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Sample records for rod reactivity measurements

  1. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; Santos, Adimir dos

    2014-11-11

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  2. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John V.; Carlson, William R.; Yarbrough, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  3. Image analysis for measuring rod network properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjae; Choi, Jungkyu; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, metallic nanowires have been attracting significant attention as next-generation flexible transparent conductive films. The performance of films depends on the network structure created by nanowires. Gaining an understanding of their structure, such as connectivity, coverage, and alignment of nanowires, requires the knowledge of individual nanowires inside the microscopic images taken from the film. Although nanowires are flexible up to a certain extent, they are usually depicted as rigid rods in many analysis and computational studies. Herein, we propose a simple and straightforward algorithm based on the filtering in the frequency domain for detecting the rod-shape objects inside binary images. The proposed algorithm uses a specially designed filter in the frequency domain to detect image segments, namely, the connected components aligned in a certain direction. Those components are post-processed to be combined under a given merging rule in a single rod object. In this study, the microscopic properties of the rod networks relevant to the analysis of nanowire networks were measured for investigating the opto-electric performance of transparent conductive films and their alignment distribution, length distribution, and area fraction. To verify and find the optimum parameters for the proposed algorithm, numerical experiments were performed on synthetic images with predefined properties. By selecting proper parameters, the algorithm was used to investigate silver nanowire transparent conductive films fabricated by the dip coating method.

  4. Evaluation of differential shim rod worth measurements in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Reasonable agreement between calculated and measured differential shim rod worths in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) has been achieved by taking into account the combined effects of negative reactivity contributions from changing fuel-moderator temperatures and of delayed photoneutrons. A method has been developed for extracting the asymptotic period from the shape of the initial portion of the measured time-dependent neutron flux profile following a positive reactivity insertion. In this region of the curve temperature-related reactivity feedback effects are negligibly small. Results obtained by applying this technique to differential shim rod worth measurements made in a wide variety of ORR cores are presented.

  5. Reactivity measurements on an experimental assembly of 4. 31 wt % sup 235 U enriched UO sub 2 fuel rods arranged in a shipping cask geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1989-10-01

    A research program was initiated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratory Transportation Systems Development Department in 1982 to provide benchmark type experimental criticality data in support of the design and safe operations of nuclear fuel transportation systems. The overall objective of the program is to identify and provide the experimental data needed to form a consistent, firm, and complete data base for verifying calculational models used in the criticality analyses of nuclear transport and related systems. A report, PNL-6205, issued in June 1988 (Bierman 1988) covered measurement results obtained from a series of experimental assemblies (TIC-1, 2, 3 and 4) involving neutron flux traps. The results obtained on a fifth experimental assembly (TIC-5), modeled after a calculational problem of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Working Group, are covered in this report. 10 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. A survey of control rod measurements in ZPPR and their analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The accurate prediction of control rod worths has been of great concern in the United States. Optimum control configurations need to balance several often conflicting requirements of control through the operating cycle, while maintaining acceptable power shapes, safety considerations of overriding importance, together with seeking economy by minimizing the number of rods, reducing boron enrichment and lengthening replacement intervals. After control and shutdown requirements have been met, the most important safety concern is the transient overpower condition (TOP) which may be initiated by uncontrolled run-out of a primary rod. Stringent criteria for the primary and secondary systems may be that they are independently capable of shutting down the reactor even with one rod stuck. The TOP initiator may be greatly enhanced by control rod interaction effects. Control rod effects may have a strong impact on core design. For example, work on the integral fast reactor with metallic fuel at ANL has studied core designs which minimize the TOP reactivity by maintaining a minimum primary control bank insertion through tailoring the internal breeding gain. The predicted control rod worths are very sensitive to the calculation methods used and to the accuracy of the basic nuclear data files. Required accuracies have been achieved only through the use of critical experiments on the ZPR and ZPPR facilities. Experiments on ZPR-3 and ZPR-9 produced satisfactory control predictions for the SEFOR, EBR-II and FFTF reactors. This document provides a survey of control rod measurements and compares calculated and experimental results. 16 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR IS FUELED AS AN ETR MOCK-UP. LIGHTS DANGLE BELOW WATER LEVEL. CONTROL RODS AND OTHER APPARATUS DESCEND FROM ABOVE WATER LEVEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-900. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Transmission efficiency measurement at the FNAL 4-rod RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J. P.; Garcia, F. G.; Ostiguy, J. F.; Saini, A.; Zwaska, R.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of the beam transmission performed on the 4-rod RFQ currently under operation at Fermilab. The beam current has been measured at the RFQ exit as a function of the magnetic field strength in the two LEBT solenoids. This measurement is compared with scans performed on the FermiGrid with the beam dynamics code TRACK. A particular attention is given to the impact, on the RFQ beam transmission, of the space-charge neutralization in the LEBT.

  9. Wave-front aberration measurements on GRIN-rod lenses.

    PubMed

    Cline, T W; Jander, R B

    1982-03-15

    A survey of the optical quality of commercial and experimental Selfoc GRIN-rod lenses was made using a digital Twyman-Green wave-front interferometer. The technique provides an accurate and reproducible method for predicting lens performance in microoptic devices. Wave-front aberrations are reported for (1/4) pitch lenses measured in a double-pass configuration. It was found that spherical aberration is dominant in commercial lenses. SLW (1/4) pitch lenses have lower aberrations than SLS lenses and are quite suitable for microoptic devices based on fiber-to-fiber coupling. Measured multimode coupling efficiency under steady-state modal propagation is compared to measured spherical aberration for a number of lenses. The slope of the coupling dependence on spherical aberration was found to be -0.1 dB/wave. Effects due to mechanical alignment and the modal distribution in the fibers had a greater influence on the measured coupling efficiency than the contribution due the intrinsic lens aberrations, especially for the SLW lenses. Comparison of this empirical dependence with theoretical predictions for a uniform distribution, which suggests a stronger dependence, is discussed. This work suggests that commercially available GRIN-rod lenses are suitable for use in microoptic components.

  10. Direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Lorenz, Martin

    2015-11-01

    We report on the first realization of direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. Typically, along the fiber processing chain more or less technology steps are able to introduce additional losses to the starting material. After the final processing, the fibers are commonly characterized regarding losses using the so-called cut-back technique in combination with spectrometers. This, however, only serves for a total loss determination. For optimization of the fiber processing, it would be of great interest to not only distinguish between different loss mechanisms but also have a better understanding of possible causes. For measuring the absorption losses along the fiber processing, a particular concept for the LID technique is introduced and requirements, calibration procedure as well as first results are presented. It allows to measure thin rods, e.g. during preform manufacturing, as well as optical fibers. In addition, the results show the prospects to also apply the new concept to topics like characterizing unwanted absorption after fiber splicing or Bragg grating inscription.

  11. Measurements of lightning rod responses to nearby strikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. B.; Aulich, G. D.; Rison, W.

    2000-05-01

    Following Benjamin Franklin's invention of the lightning rod, based on his discovery that electrified objects could be discharged by approaching them with a metal needle in hand, conventional lightning rods in the U.S. have had sharp tips. In recent years, the role of the sharp tip in causing a lightning rod to act as a strike receptor has been questioned leading to experiments in which pairs of various sharp-tipped and blunt rods have been exposed beneath thunderclouds to determine the better strike receptor. After seven years of tests, none of the sharp Franklin rods or of the so-called “early streamer emitters” has been struck, but 12 blunt rods with tip diameters ranging from 12.7 mm to 25.4 mm have taken strikes. Our field experiments and our analyses indicate that the strike-reception probabilities of Franklin's rods are greatly increased when their tips are made moderately blunt.

  12. Measuring order in the isotropic packing of elastic rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Deboeuf, S.; Corson, F.; Boudaoud, A.; Adda-Bedia, M.

    2011-08-01

    The packing of elastic bodies has emerged as a paradigm for the study of macroscopic disordered systems. However, progress is hampered by the lack of controlled experiments. Here we consider a model experiment for the isotropic two-dimensional confinement of a rod by a central force. We seek to measure how ordered is a folded configuration and we identify two key quantities. A geometrical characterization is given by the number of superposed layers in the configuration. Using temporal modulations of the confining force, we probe the mechanical properties of the configuration and we define and measure its effective susceptibility. These two quantities may be used to build a statistical framework for packed elastic systems.

  13. Evidence of fast non-linear feedback in EBR-II rod-drop measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-06-01

    Feedback reactivities determine the time dependence of a reactor during and after a transient initiating event. Recent analysis of control-rod drops in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Reactor has indicated that some relatively fast feedback may exist which cannot be accounted for by the linear feedback mechanisms. The linear and deduced non-linear feedback reactivities from a control-rod drop in EBR-II run 93A using detailed temperature coefficients of reactivity in the EROS kinetics code have been reported. The transient analyses have now been examined in more detail for times close to the drop to ascertain if additional positive reactivity is being built-in early in the drop which could be gradually released later in the drop.

  14. A Statistical Approach to Predict the Failure Enthalpy and Reliability of Irradiated PWR Fuel Rods During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Cheol; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2001-11-15

    During the last decade, the failure behavior of high-burnup fuel rods under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) condition has been a serious concern since fuel rod failures at low enthalpy have been observed. This has resulted in the reassessment of existing licensing criteria and failure-mode study. To address the issue, a statistics-based methodology is suggested to predict failure probability of irradiated fuel rods under an RIA. Based on RIA simulation results in the literature, a failure enthalpy correlation for an irradiated fuel rod is constructed as a function of oxide thickness, fuel burnup, and pulse width. Using the failure enthalpy correlation, a new concept of ''equivalent enthalpy'' is introduced to reflect the effects of the three primary factors as well as peak fuel enthalpy into a single damage parameter. Moreover, the failure distribution function with equivalent enthalpy is derived, applying a two-parameter Weibull statistical model. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the effects of burnup, corrosion, peak fuel enthalpy, pulse width, and cladding materials used.

  15. Evidence of fast nonlinear feedback in EBR-II rod-drop measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-01-01

    Feedback reactivities determine the time dependence of a reactor during and after a transient initiating event. Recent analysis of control-rod drops in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has indicated that some relatively fast feedback may exist that cannot be accounted for by the linear feedback mechanisms. The magnitude of the positive insertion appears dependent on the amount of inserted reactivity and the run configuration. This phenomenon may be caused by a small, but rapid, change in core dimensions.

  16. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  17. Validation of a Brief Measure of Opioid Dependence: The Rapid Opioid Dependence Screen (RODS)

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Azar, Marwan M.; Cannon, Christopher M.; Altice, Frederick L.; Springer, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Opioid Dependence Screen (RODS) is an 8-item measure of opioid dependence designed for quick, targeted screening in clinical and research settings. Based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition, criteria, the RODS has an average administration of less than 2 minutes and can easily be administered as a stand-alone instrument or as part of a comprehensive interview. This study reports on the initial validation of the RODS among a sample of 97 newly incarcerated, HIV-positive individuals. Using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview as the primary measure of opioid dependence, the RODS showed good-to-strong sensitivity (.97), specificity (.76), positive predictive value (.69), and negative predictive value (.98), while concordance analysis revealed moderate diagnostic agreement (κ = .67). Psychometric properties revealed strong internal consistency (α = .92) and inter-item correlations (.66 to .87). PMID:25559628

  18. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  19. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  20. Measurement of reactive species for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine has been intensively studied over the last decade. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are responsible for the therapeutic effects in plasma medicine. To examine the therapeutic effects of reactive species, the densities of OH, O, and NO were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (10 kV, 10 kHz of 40 μs pulses) and a nanosecond streamer discharge (24 kV, 8 ns, 30 Hz) were utilized to treat mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium. Correlation between the dose of reactive species and deactivation rate of melanoma cells was measured with the aid of LIF. The results showed that the rate of cell death correlates with OH density, but not with O and NO densities. Next, a method to supply a specific reactive species to living organisms was developed. It utilizes photolysis of helium-buffered H2O and O2 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to produce reactive species. The VUV method was utilized to sterilize Bacillus atrophaeus on agar plate. With the VUV method, it was succeeded to show sterilization only by OH radicals. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals caused visible sterilization.

  1. Measurements of losses and lasing efficiency in GSGG:CR,Nd and YAG:Nd laser rods

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Smith, L.K.; Wilder, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    Laser rods procured from four different vendors were examined to assess the state of the art in GSGG:Cr,Nd crystal growth. Measurement techniques included spectrophotometry (for absorption loss), interferometry (for distortion), polarimetry (for birefringence), and laser resonator insertion. Free running laser efficiency measurements were also performed. The level of losses characteristic of currently available GSGG:Cr,Nd laser rods was generally found to be much higher than that of commercially grown YAG:Nd. The intrinsic lasing efficiency of the co-doped GSGG rods, however, was typically found to exceed that of the YAG:Nd rods by more than a factor of 2.

  2. Measurement of rod seal lubrication for Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic behavior of sliding elastomeric seals for the Stirling engine, was analyzed using an experimental apparatus to determine the instantaneous oil film thickness throughout the cyclic reciprocating motion. Tests were conducted on two commercial elastomeric seals: a "T" seal (76 mm O.D. and 3.8 mm between backing rings) and an "O" ring (76 mm O.D. and 5.3 mm diameter). Testing conditions included seal durometers of 70 and 90, sliding velocities of 0.8, 2.0, and 3.6 m/s, and no pressure gradient across the seal. Both acrylic and aluminum cylinders were used. Measured oil film thickness profiles were compared to results of the elastohydrodynamic analysis. The comparison shows an overall qualitative agreement. Friction and oil leakage measurements were also made at these sliding speeds. The fluid used was a typical synthetic base automotive lubricant. It is concluded that this first time experimental analytical comparison for oil film thickness indicates the need for some improvements in the analytical model and in the experimental technique.

  3. A rod-type creepmeter for measurement of displacement in active fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-C.; Jeng, F.-S.; Chu, H.-T.; Angelier, J.; Hu, J.-C.

    2000-05-01

    A creepmeter has been developed to monitor gradual displacements of near-surface movement in an active fault zone. This rod-type creepmeter is a robust, low-cost instrument that is simple to construct and install. This creepmeter consists of two 3-m invar rods attached to anchored steel piers at each end, straddling the surface traces of active fault. The invar rods are supported by a pair of U-shaped solid steel girders. A mechanical dial-gauge sensor in the middle of the creepmeter is adopted to record the displacement of fault creep, and has a precision of 0.01 mm. Because the creepmeter is installed on the surface, the temperature effect is important. To calibrate and correct for the temperature effect, we carried out hourly measurements over a period of 30 hours to calculate the thermal expansion coefficients for each creepmeter. Thermal corrections could thus be made when readings were taken. Five of these creepmeters have been installed in the Chihshang active fault zone of eastern Taiwan, in the present collision suture zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate. Readings taken over one year have shown that this rod-type creepmeter is effective in providing a near-continuous record of active fault creep with a good precision.

  4. Reactivity measurement using a programmable logic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.M.; Miraglia, P.Q.

    1995-12-31

    The application of digital systems for measuring reactor dynamics has been used at experimental and research reactors for almost 30 yr. At the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) nuclear reactor facility (NRF), a recent modernization effort included the installation of a programmable logic controller (PLC) and an operator interface terminal (OIT). The PLC systems are increasingly being used to replace relay-based monitoring and control systems at nuclear power plants. At WPI, the PLC and OIT provide a digital reactor monitoring system that is remote from the reactor`s analog control instrumentation. The NRF staff has programmed the monitoring system for several reactor-related applications, including reactivity measurement.

  5. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    The case-hardening process modifies the near-surface permeability and conductivity of steel, as can be observed through changes in alternating current potential drop (ACPD) along a rod. In order to evaluate case depth of case hardened steel rods, analytical expressions are derived for the alternating current potential drop on the surface of a homogeneous rod, a two-layered and a three-layered rod. The case-hardened rod is first modeled by a two-layer rod that has a homogeneous substrate with a single, uniformly thick, homogeneous surface layer, in which the conductivity and permeability values differ from those in the substrate. By fitting model results to multi-frequency ACPD experimental data, estimates of conductivity, permeability and case depth are found. Although the estimated case depth by the two-layer model is in reasonable agreement with the effective case depth from the hardness profile, it is consistently higher than the effective case depth. This led to the development of the three-layer model. It is anticipated that the new three-layered model will improve the results and thus makes the ACPD method a novel technique in nondestructive measurement of case depth. Another way to evaluate case depth of a case hardened steel rod is to use induction coils. Integral form solutions for an infinite rod encircled by a coaxial coil are well known, but for a finite length conductor, additional boundary conditions must be satisfied at the ends. In this work, calculations of eddy currents are performed for a two-layer conducting rod of finite length excited by a coaxial circular coil carrying an alternating current. The solution is found using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion (TREE) method. By truncating the solution region to a finite length in the axial direction, the magnetic vector potential can be expressed as a series expansion of orthogonal eigenfunctions instead of as a Fourier integral. Closed-form expressions are derived for the electromagnetic

  6. Interferometric chromatic dispersion measurements of long, gradient-index rod lenses in the visible and the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, T H; Moore, D T

    1999-09-01

    A new procedure is presented for testing long, radial-gradient-index rod lenses in a phase-stepping Twyman-Green interferometer. In addition, a method for converting the measured optical phase data to the rod's index of refraction profile is reviewed. This procedure was used to measure refractive-index profile dispersions over the wavelength range of 441 to 1064 nm. These measurements provide the first data for refractive-index profiles of rod lenses in the infrared and show the existence of positive dispersion, negative dispersion, and near-infrared dispersion reversal in some samples. The dispersion results suggest the need for modifications to the current glass model.

  7. Measurements of /sup 10/B(n,He) reaction rates in a mockup control rod in ZPPR

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Oliver, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the first direct measurement of /sup 10/B capture rate in a mockup control rod in a critical assembly. The experiment used the helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) technique. 13 refs.

  8. Analysis of MERCI decay heat measurement for PWR UO{sub 2} fuel rod

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboulay, J.C.; Bourganel, S.

    2012-01-15

    Decay heat measurements, called the MERCI experiment, were conducted at Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA)/Saclay to characterize accurately residual power at short cooling time and verify its prediction by decay code and nuclear data. The MOSAIC calorimeter, developed and patented by CEA/Grenoble (DTN/SE2T), enables measurement of the decay heat released by a pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod sample between 200 and 4 W within a precision of 1%. The MERCI experiment included three phases. At first, a UO{sub 2} fuel rod sample was irradiated in the CEA/Saclay experimental reactor OSIRIS. The burnup achieved at the end of irradiation was similar to 3.5 GWd/tonne. The second phase was the transfer of the fuel rod sample from its irradiation location to a hot cell, to be inserted inside the MOSAIC calorimeter. It took 26 min to carry out the transfer. Finally, decay heat released by the PWR sample was measured from 27 min to 42 days after shutdown. Post irradiation examinations were performed to measure concentrations of some heavy nuclei (U, Pu) and fission products (Cs, Nd). The decay heat was predicted using a calculation scheme based on the PEPIN2 depletion code, the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code, and the JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file. The MERCI experiment analysis shows that the discrepancy between the calculated and the experimental decay heat values is included between -10% at 27 min and +6% at 12 h, 30 min otter shutdown. From 4 up to 42 days of cooling time, the difference between calculation and measurement is about ± 1%, i.e., experimental uncertainty. The MERCI experiment represents a significant contribution for code validation; the time range above 10{sup 5} s has not been validated previously. (authors)

  9. High-precision measurements of wetland sediment elevation. II The rod surface elevation table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Perez, B.C.; Segura, B.; Holland, R.D.; Stelly, C.; Stephenson, G.; Hensel, P.

    2002-01-01

    A new high-precision device for measuring sediment elevation in emergent and shallow water wetland systems is described. The rod surface-elevation table (RSET) is a balanced, lightweight mechanical leveling device that attaches to both shallow ( 1 m in order to be stable. The pipe is driven to refusal but typically to a depth shallower than the rod bench mark because of greater surface resistance of the pipe. Thus, the RSET makes it possible to partition change in sediment elevation over shallower (e.g., the root zone) and deeper depths of the sediment profile than is possible with the SET. The confidence intervals for the height of an individual pin measured by two different operators with the RSET under laboratory conditions were A? 1.0 and A? 1.5 mm. Under field conditions, confidence intervals for the measured height of an individual pin ranged from A? 1.3 mm in a mangrove forest up to A? 4.3 mm in a salt marsh.

  10. Extending calibration-free force measurements to optically-trapped rod-shaped samples.

    PubMed

    Català, Frederic; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario; Farré, Arnau; Martín-Badosa, Estela

    2017-02-21

    Optical trapping has become an optimal choice for biological research at the microscale due to its non-invasive performance and accessibility for quantitative studies, especially on the forces involved in biological processes. However, reliable force measurements depend on the calibration of the optical traps, which is different for each experiment and hence requires high control of the local variables, especially of the trapped object geometry. Many biological samples have an elongated, rod-like shape, such as chromosomes, intracellular organelles (e.g., peroxisomes), membrane tubules, certain microalgae, and a wide variety of bacteria and parasites. This type of samples often requires several optical traps to stabilize and orient them in the correct spatial direction, making it more difficult to determine the total force applied. Here, we manipulate glass microcylinders with holographic optical tweezers and show the accurate measurement of drag forces by calibration-free direct detection of beam momentum. The agreement between our results and slender-body hydrodynamic theoretical calculations indicates potential for this force-sensing method in studying protracted, rod-shaped specimens.

  11. Extending calibration-free force measurements to optically-trapped rod-shaped samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Català, Frederic; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario; Farré, Arnau; Martín-Badosa, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Optical trapping has become an optimal choice for biological research at the microscale due to its non-invasive performance and accessibility for quantitative studies, especially on the forces involved in biological processes. However, reliable force measurements depend on the calibration of the optical traps, which is different for each experiment and hence requires high control of the local variables, especially of the trapped object geometry. Many biological samples have an elongated, rod-like shape, such as chromosomes, intracellular organelles (e.g., peroxisomes), membrane tubules, certain microalgae, and a wide variety of bacteria and parasites. This type of samples often requires several optical traps to stabilize and orient them in the correct spatial direction, making it more difficult to determine the total force applied. Here, we manipulate glass microcylinders with holographic optical tweezers and show the accurate measurement of drag forces by calibration-free direct detection of beam momentum. The agreement between our results and slender-body hydrodynamic theoretical calculations indicates potential for this force-sensing method in studying protracted, rod-shaped specimens.

  12. Extending calibration-free force measurements to optically-trapped rod-shaped samples

    PubMed Central

    Català, Frederic; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario; Farré, Arnau; Martín-Badosa, Estela

    2017-01-01

    Optical trapping has become an optimal choice for biological research at the microscale due to its non-invasive performance and accessibility for quantitative studies, especially on the forces involved in biological processes. However, reliable force measurements depend on the calibration of the optical traps, which is different for each experiment and hence requires high control of the local variables, especially of the trapped object geometry. Many biological samples have an elongated, rod-like shape, such as chromosomes, intracellular organelles (e.g., peroxisomes), membrane tubules, certain microalgae, and a wide variety of bacteria and parasites. This type of samples often requires several optical traps to stabilize and orient them in the correct spatial direction, making it more difficult to determine the total force applied. Here, we manipulate glass microcylinders with holographic optical tweezers and show the accurate measurement of drag forces by calibration-free direct detection of beam momentum. The agreement between our results and slender-body hydrodynamic theoretical calculations indicates potential for this force-sensing method in studying protracted, rod-shaped specimens. PMID:28220855

  13. Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.

    1998-07-01

    A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

  14. Structure Model Index Does Not Measure Rods and Plates in Trabecular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil L.; Ohlsson, Claes; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Doube, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Structure model index (SMI) is widely used to measure rods and plates in trabecular bone. It exploits the change in surface curvature that occurs as a structure varies from spherical (SMI = 4), to cylindrical (SMI = 3) to planar (SMI = 0). The most important assumption underlying SMI is that the entire bone surface is convex and that the curvature differential is positive at all points on the surface. The intricate connections within the trabecular continuum suggest that a high proportion of the surface could be concave, violating the assumption of convexity and producing regions of negative differential. We implemented SMI in the BoneJ plugin and included the ability to measure the amounts of surface that increased or decreased in area after surface mesh dilation, and the ability to visualize concave and convex regions. We measured SMI and its positive (SMI+) and negative (SMI−) components, bone volume fraction (BV/TV), the fraction of the surface that is concave (CF), and mean ellipsoid factor (EF) in trabecular bone using 38 X-ray microtomography (XMT) images from a rat ovariectomy model of sex steroid rescue of bone loss, and 169 XMT images from a broad selection of 87 species’ femora (mammals, birds, and a crocodile). We simulated bone resorption by eroding an image of elephant trabeculae and recording SMI and BV/TV at each erosion step. Up to 70%, and rarely <20%, of the trabecular surface is concave (CF 0.155–0.700). SMI is unavoidably influenced by aberrations induced by SMI−, which is strongly correlated with BV/TV and CF. The plate-to-rod transition in bone loss is an erroneous observation resulting from the close and artifactual relationship between SMI and BV/TV. SMI cannot discern between the distinctive trabecular geometries typical of mammalian and avian bone, whereas EF clearly detects birds’ more plate-like trabeculae. EF is free from confounding relationships with BV/TV and CF. SMI results reported in the literature should be

  15. Reliability and reactivity of three new functional assessment measures.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Leonard N; Rogers, Lisa C; Kaskutas, Victoria; Dakos, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This study of the reliability of three new tests of work performance considered the effect of test reactivity on measured performance. The tests are components of an employment screening battery designed for placement of applicants in automotive assembly jobs. Statistical measures of reliability were compared with a simple measure of test reactivity in a sample of 51 healthy adults. The effect of test reactivity on employment selection decisions using various cut scores was studied. Test reactivity is found to be a significant threat to reliability that must be considered when skill-based performance tests are used on a serial basis. When intended for use on a serial basis, such tests should be studied for both reliability and reactivity. In addition to reporting traditional statistical indices of reliability, an index of the reactivity should be reported.

  16. Seebeck Coefficient Measurements on Micron-Size Single-Crystal Zinc Germanium Nitride Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, J. S.; Colvin, J. R.; Quayle, P. C.; Peshek, T. J.; Kash, K.

    2016-06-01

    II-IV-nitride compounds are tetrahedrally bonded, heterovalent ternary semiconductors that have recently garnered attention for their potential technological applications. These materials are derived from the parent III-nitride compounds; ZnGeN2 is the II-IV-nitride analogue to the III-nitride GaN. Very little is known about the transport properties of ZnGeN2. In this work, we present Seebeck coefficient ( S) data on 3-micron-diameter, 70-micron-long, single-crystal ZnGeN2 rods, employing a novel measurement approach. The measurements of S show that the majority free carriers are electrons, and imply that the carrier gas is degenerate. Within a single-band model for the conduction band, a carrier concentration of order 1019 cm-3 was estimated for a measured S = -90 μV/K. Together with electrical transport measurements, a lower limit for the electron mobility is estimated to be ˜20 cm2/V-s. A discussion of this material as a thermoelectric is presented. The background level of free electrons in this unintentionally doped ZnGeN2 is very near the predicted optimum value for maximum thermoelectric performance.

  17. Fluorometer with a quartz-rod waveguide-integrating sphere configuration to measure evanescent-field luminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorometer was designed to measure evanescent-field luminescence. A quartz-rod waveguide (d = 2 mm) was installed coaxally inside a cylindrical flow-through cell (id = 2.3 mm, od = 6.3 mm, l = 116 mm). An excitation beam from a UV LED or a miniature xenon flashlamp was focused by a ball lens and ...

  18. Modeling smog chamber measurements of vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Nance, B.I.; Kelly, N.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities, measured at GM`s smog chamber facility, have been modeled using the SAPRC93 photochemical mechanism. The vehicle exhaust mixtures were generated by a single vehicle run over a portion of the Federal Test Procedure using three Auto/Oil reformulated test gasolines. For each run, up to 156 individual VOC species were identified. Initial HONO concentrations are needed to simulate reactivity measurement runs. (HONO is expected to be generated in a Tedlar bag holding the exhaust sample prior to its transfer to the smog chambers.) Measured and simulated relative incremental reactivities for the three exhaust mixtures are highly consistent. However, measured relative incremental reactivities are more sensitive to fuel effects than simulated ones. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR)-based relative incremental reactivities, derived from individual species concentrations and MIR factors, are very close to simulated ones. A number of sensitivity simulation runs have been carried out to investigate the impact of HONO and other variables. Results show that relative reactivities of actual vehicle exhaust emissions can be measured by chamber runs in spite of the HONO effect.

  19. Measuring the efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly using a model of RKI-1 reactimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitarev, V. E.; Lebedev, G. V.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    The efficiency of control rods of the RBMK critical assembly is measured in a series of experiments. The aim of measurements is to determine the characteristics of the model of an RKI-1 reactimeter. The RKI-1 reactimeter is intended for measuring the efficiency of control rods when, according to conditions of operation, the metrological certification of results of an experiment is required. Complications with the metrological certification of reactimeters arise owing to the fact that usually calculated corrections to the results of measurements are required. When the RKI-1 reactimeter is used, there is no need to introduce calculated corrections; the result of measurements is given with the indication of substantiated errors. In connection with this, the metrological certification of the results of measurements using the RKI-1 reactimeter is simplified.

  20. Distance measurements near the myosin head-rod junction using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kekic, M; Huang, W; Moens, P D; Hambly, B D; dos Remedios, C G

    1996-07-01

    We reacted a fluorescent probe, N-methyl-2-anilino-6-naphthalenesulfonyl chloride (MNS-Ci), with a specific lysine residue of porcine cardiac myosin located in the S-2 region of myosin. We performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy measurements between this site and three loci (Cys109, Cys125, and Cys154) located within different myosin light-chain 2s (LC2) bound to the myosin "head". We used LC2s from rabbit skeletal muscle myosin (Cys125), chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (Cys109), or a genetically engineered mutant of chicken skeletal muscle myosin (Cys154). The atomic coordinates of these LC2 loci can be closely approximated, and the FRET measurements were used to determine the position of the MNS-labeled lysine with respect to the myosin head. The C-terminus of myosin subfragment-1 determined by Rayment et al. ends abruptly after a sharp turn of its predominantly alpha-helical structure. We have constructed a model based on our FRET distance data combined with the known structure of chicken skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1. This model suggests that the loci that bracket the head-rod junction will be useful for evaluating dynamic changes in this region.

  1. Distance measurements near the myosin head-rod junction using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kekic, M; Huang, W; Moens, P D; Hambly, B D; dos Remedios, C G

    1996-01-01

    We reacted a fluorescent probe, N-methyl-2-anilino-6-naphthalenesulfonyl chloride (MNS-Ci), with a specific lysine residue of porcine cardiac myosin located in the S-2 region of myosin. We performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy measurements between this site and three loci (Cys109, Cys125, and Cys154) located within different myosin light-chain 2s (LC2) bound to the myosin "head". We used LC2s from rabbit skeletal muscle myosin (Cys125), chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (Cys109), or a genetically engineered mutant of chicken skeletal muscle myosin (Cys154). The atomic coordinates of these LC2 loci can be closely approximated, and the FRET measurements were used to determine the position of the MNS-labeled lysine with respect to the myosin head. The C-terminus of myosin subfragment-1 determined by Rayment et al. ends abruptly after a sharp turn of its predominantly alpha-helical structure. We have constructed a model based on our FRET distance data combined with the known structure of chicken skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1. This model suggests that the loci that bracket the head-rod junction will be useful for evaluating dynamic changes in this region. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8804587

  2. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H.; Suzuki, T.; Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S.

    2012-07-01

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  3. The Comparative Reactivity Method - a new tool to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Crowley, J. N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals play a vital role in maintaining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. To understand variations in OH radicals both source and sink terms must be understood. Currently the overall sink term, or the total atmospheric reactivity to OH, is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new on-line method to directly measure the total OH reactivity (i.e.~total loss rate of OH radicals) in a sampled air mass. In this method, a reactive molecule (X), not normally present in air, is passed through a glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced in the glass reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing VOCs and other OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the ambient air allows the air reactivity to be determined. In our existing set up, X is pyrrole and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. The present dynamic range for ambient air reactivity is about 6 to 300 s-1. The system has been tested and calibrated with different single and mixed hydrocarbon standards showing excellent linearity and accountability with the reactivity of the standards. Field tests in the tropical rainforest of Suriname (~53 s-1) and the urban atmosphere of Mainz (~10 s-1) Germany, show the promise of the new method and indicate that a significant fraction of OH reactive species in the tropical forests is likely missed by current measurements. Suggestions for improvements to the technique and future applications are discussed.

  4. Kinetic Approaches to Measuring Peroxiredoxin Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Winterbourn, Christine C.; Peskin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thiol proteins that catalyse the breakdown of peroxides and regulate redox activity in the cell. Kinetic analysis of their reactions is required in order to identify substrate preferences, to understand how molecular structure affects activity and to establish their physiological functions. Various approaches can be taken, including the measurement of rates of individual steps in the reaction pathway by stopped flow or competitive kinetics, classical enzymatic analysis and measurement of peroxidase activity. Each methodology has its strengths and they can often give complementary information. However, it is important to understand the experimental conditions of the assay so as to interpret correctly what parameter is being measured. This brief review discusses different kinetic approaches and the information that can be obtained from them. PMID:26813658

  5. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  6. A Fast and in-Situ Measuring Method Using Laser Triangulation Sensors for the Parameters of the Connecting Rod

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Qiang; Wang, Zhong; Fu, Lu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The connecting rod is a critical part inside the marine engine. The inspection of its important parameters is directly related to the assembly and quality of the marine engine. A coordinate measuring machine (CMM) is a conventional choice to measure the parameters of a connecting rod. However, CMM requires significant resources in time and cost, which leads researchers into in-situ measurement. This article presents a fast and in-situ measuring method by using a laser-based measuring head. Two measuring strategies are adopted in the inspection process. For positional measurements (such as the hole–center distance), whose accuracy requirement is generally low, the coordinate system of the numerical control (NC) machine is combined with the measuring head to acquire the positional parameters. For dimensional measurements (such as inner diameters), whose accuracy requirement is rather high, the NC machine is used just as transportation. Note that the measuring head has the ability to perform the dimension inspection independently. The accuracy of the measuring head is high enough to meet the dimensional accuracy requirements. Experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The measuring error of the inner diameters is from 5 μm to 7 μm. The measuring error of hole–center distance is within 15 μm. The measurement of all these parameters can be done within 1 min. PMID:27754323

  7. A Fast and in-Situ Measuring Method Using Laser Triangulation Sensors for the Parameters of the Connecting Rod.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Qiang; Wang, Zhong; Fu, Lu-Hua

    2016-10-12

    The connecting rod is a critical part inside the marine engine. The inspection of its important parameters is directly related to the assembly and quality of the marine engine. A coordinate measuring machine (CMM) is a conventional choice to measure the parameters of a connecting rod. However, CMM requires significant resources in time and cost, which leads researchers into in-situ measurement. This article presents a fast and in-situ measuring method by using a laser-based measuring head. Two measuring strategies are adopted in the inspection process. For positional measurements (such as the hole-center distance), whose accuracy requirement is generally low, the coordinate system of the numerical control (NC) machine is combined with the measuring head to acquire the positional parameters. For dimensional measurements (such as inner diameters), whose accuracy requirement is rather high, the NC machine is used just as transportation. Note that the measuring head has the ability to perform the dimension inspection independently. The accuracy of the measuring head is high enough to meet the dimensional accuracy requirements. Experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The measuring error of the inner diameters is from 5 μm to 7 μm. The measuring error of hole-center distance is within 15 μm. The measurement of all these parameters can be done within 1 min.

  8. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  9. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  10. Transient release kinetics of rod bipolar cells revealed by capacitance measurement of exocytosis from axon terminals in rat retinal slices

    PubMed Central

    Oltedal, Leif; Hartveit, Espen

    2010-01-01

    Presynaptic transmitter release has mostly been studied through measurements of postsynaptic responses, but a few synapses offer direct access to the presynaptic terminal, thereby allowing capacitance measurements of exocytosis. For mammalian rod bipolar cells, synaptic transmission has been investigated in great detail by recording postsynaptic currents in AII amacrine cells. Presynaptic measurements of the dynamics of vesicular cycling have so far been limited to isolated rod bipolar cells in dissociated preparations. Here, we first used computer simulations of compartmental models of morphologically reconstructed rod bipolar cells to adapt the ‘Sine + DC’ technique for capacitance measurements of exocytosis at axon terminals of intact rod bipolar cells in retinal slices. In subsequent physiological recordings, voltage pulses that triggered presynaptic Ca2+ influx evoked capacitance increases that were proportional to the pulse duration. With pulse durations ≤100 ms, the increase saturated at ∼10 fF, corresponding to the size of a readily releasable pool of vesicles. Pulse durations ≥400 ms evoked additional capacitance increases, probably reflecting recruitment from additional pools of vesicles. By using Ca2+ tail current stimuli, we separated Ca2+ influx from Ca2+ channel activation kinetics, allowing us to estimate the intrinsic release kinetics of the readily releasable pool, yielding a time constant of ∼1.1 ms and a maximum release rate of 2–3 vesicles (release site)−1 ms−1. Following exocytosis, we observed endocytosis with time constants ranging from 0.7 to 17 s. Under physiological conditions, it is likely that release will be transient, with the kinetics limited by the activation kinetics of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. PMID:20211976

  11. Total OH Reactivity Measurements in the Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praplan, A. P.; Hellén, H.; Hakola, H.; Hatakka, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Atmospheric total OH reactivity (Rtotal) can be measured (Kovacs and Brune, 2001; Sinha et al., 2008) or it can be calculated according to Rtotal = ∑i kOH+X_i [Xi] where kOH+X_i corresponds to the reaction rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with a given compound Xi and [Xi] its concentration. Studies suggest that in some environments a large fraction of missing reactivity, comparing calculated Rtotal with ambient total OH reactivity measurements (Di Carlo et al., 2004; Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). In this study Rtotal has been measured using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008). Levels of the reference compound (pyrrole, C4H5N) are monitored by gas chromatography every 2 minutes and Rtotal is derived from the difference of reactivity between zero and ambient air. RESULTS Around 36 hours of preliminary total OH reactivity data (30 May until 2 June 2015) are presented in Fig. 1. Its range matches previous studies for this site (Nölscher et al., 2012; Sinha et al., 2010) and is similar to values in another pine forest (Nakashima et al., 2014). The setup used during the period presented here has been updated and more recent data will be presented, as well as a comparison with calculated OH reactivity from measured individual species. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship No. 275608). The authors acknowledge Juuso Raine for technical support. REFERENCES Di Carlo et al. (2004). Science 304, 722-725.Hofzumahaus et al. (2009). Science 324, 1702-1704.Kovacs and Brune (2001). J. Atmos. Chem. 39, 105-122.Nakashima et al. (2014). Atmos. Env. 85, 1-8.Nölscher et al. (2012). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 8257-8270.Sinha et al. (2008). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2213-2227.Sinha et al. (2010). Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 6614-6620.

  12. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  14. The Comparative Reactivity Method - a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Crowley, J. N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals play a vital role in maintaining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. To understand variations in OH radicals both source and sink terms must be understood. Currently the overall sink term, or the total atmospheric reactivity to OH, is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new on-line method to directly measure the total OH reactivity (i.e.~total loss rate of OH radicals) in a sampled air mass. In this method, a reactive molecule (X), not normally present in air, is passed through a glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced in the glass reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing VOCs and other OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the ambient air allows the air reactivity to be determined. In our existing set up, X is pyrrole and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. The present dynamic range for ambient air reactivity is about 6 to 300 s-1, with an overall maximum uncertainty of 25% above 8 s-1 and up to 50% between 6-8 s-1. The system has been tested and calibrated with different single and mixed hydrocarbon standards showing excellent linearity and accountability with the reactivity of the standards. Potential interferences such as high NO in ambient air, varying relative humidity and photolysis of pyrrole within the setup have also been investigated. While interferences due changing humidity and photolysis of pyrrole are easily overcome by ensuring that humidity in the set up does not change drastically and the photolytic loss of pyrrole is measured and taken into account, respectively, NO>10 ppb in ambient air remains a significant interference for the current configuration of the instrument. Field tests in the tropical rainforest of Suriname (~53 s

  15. Measurement of Fresh Fuel Rods to Demonstrate Compliance with Criticality Safety Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Miko, David K.; Desimone, David J.

    2015-11-03

    In order to operate TA-66 as a radiological facility with the quantity of nuclear material required to fulfil its mission, a criticality safety evaluation was required. This evaluation defined the control parameters for operations at the facility. The resulting evaluation for TA-66 placed limits on the amount of SNM, as well as other materials such as beryllium. In addition, there is a limit on the number of uranium fuel rods allowed subject to enrichment, outer diameter, and overall length restrictions. The enrichments for the rods to be shipped to TA-66 were documented in LA-UR-13-23581, but the outer diameter and length were not documented. This report provides this information.

  16. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT OF MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. WOOD PLANKS REST ON CANAL WALL OBSERVABLE IN FOREGROUND. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11745. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.; Lindquist, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  18. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  19. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  20. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd2O3) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×104 s-1. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to 32

  1. Measurements and models of reactive transport in geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Dror, Ishai; Hansen, Scott K.; Scher, Harvey

    2016-12-01

    Reactive chemical transport plays a key role in geological media across scales, from pore scale to aquifer scale. Systems can be altered by changes in solution chemistry and a wide variety of chemical transformations, including precipitation/dissolution reactions that cause feedbacks that directly affect the flow and transport regime. The combination of these processes with advective-dispersive-diffusive transport in heterogeneous media leads to a rich spectrum of complex dynamics. The principal challenge in modeling reactive transport is to account for the subtle effects of fluctuations in the flow field and species concentrations; spatial or temporal averaging generally suppresses these effects. Moreover, it is critical to ground model conceptualizations and test model outputs against laboratory experiments and field measurements. This review emphasizes the integration of these aspects, considering carefully designed and controlled experiments at both laboratory and field scales, in the context of development and solution of reactive transport models based on continuum-scale and particle tracking approaches. We first discuss laboratory experiments and field measurements that define the scope of the phenomena and provide data for model comparison. We continue by surveying models involving advection-dispersion-reaction equation and continuous time random walk formulations. The integration of measurements and models is then examined, considering a series of case studies in different frameworks. We delineate the underlying assumptions, and strengths and weaknesses, of these analyses, and the role of probabilistic effects. We also show the key importance of quantifying the spreading and mixing of reactive species, recognizing the role of small-scale physical and chemical fluctuations that control the initiation of reactions.

  2. Issues in Three-Dimensional Depletion Analysis of Measured Data Near the End of a Fuel Rod

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Gauld, Ian C; Suyama, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    scarcity of experimental measurements for fuel taken from the end regions of a fuel rod. A number of 3-D depletion approaches based on Monte Carlo methods have been introduced in the past decade including, but not limited to, those listed in Refs. 5-7. A full listing would be quite extensive. Recent fuel-sample measurements from two discharged assemblies of the Takahama Unit 3 PWR provide data for fuel samples taken very close to the top of the active region of the fuel rod. This paper discusses results of TRITON-based 3-D depletion calculations completed in the analysis of the Takahama fuel samples.

  3. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  4. Reactivity-adjusted VOC measurements by airtrack: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Hurley, M.D.; Nance, B.; Japar, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of concentrations of ozone precursors, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}), are essential to better understand ozone-precursor relationships in urban and regional areas. In the last two decades, major advances on measuring VOC and NO{sub x} have been made. Reliable techniques for measuring NO{sub x} are available currently, although it is difficult to measure NO{sub 2} without interferences of other species at routine monitoring sites. For VOC, reliable techniques are available for lighter nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and current techniques for measuring heavier NMHC and partially oxidized NMHC including carbonyl compounds are somewhat uncertain and are under further development. Currently available measurement techniques for VOC are time-consuming and expensive. Consequently, a simple measurement technique for reactivity-adjusted, total VOC would be valuable for evaluating ozone-precursor relationships. Recently, an integrated air quality assessment instrument, AIRTRAK, has been introduced. The uniqueness of the AIRTRAK is the possible, continuous measurements of ambient VOC. Measurements of smog formation coefficients and derivation of VOC concentrations are based on the integrated empirical rate (IER) model. However, the IER model does not appear to hold rigorously. Consequently, the capability of VOC measurements by AIRTRAK has not been demonstrated adequately. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the VOC measurement capability of AIRTRAK after substantial experiences in flow-mode experiments using AIRTRAK at our laboratory. First, model simulations are performed to derive relationships between measured smog concentrations (by AIRTRAK) and ambient VOC concentrations. Using these relationships, numerical simulations are performed to simulate ambient VOC measurements. Further, preliminary investigations of implementing the present methodology to AIRTRAK are performed.

  5. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

    1963-04-30

    This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

  6. Reactivity measurements using the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    The zero count probability method (also called Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method, after its inventors) is a method for measuring the reactivity in nuclear reactors, being a competitor of the [more well-known in the West] Feynman-alpha Method and the Rossi-alpha Method. The modus operandi of this method is using the detector channels where there was no counting at all in order to calculate reactor parameters. In deep subcriticality few models have been tested and this work tries out the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method in one of such scenarios: measurements will be made in environments below -3,5 k pcm in the zero-potency water-moderated reactor IPEN/MB-01 which is fuelled by UO{sub 2} enriched by 4.3%. These extremely low reactivity environments are required because the chance of no counts on the detector must be significant: otherwise, the method would demand a large time of acquisition of data. Besides that, the method is very simple and straightforward. One of the advantages of this method is that it needs very little data reduction, since the essential data is directly given by the measuring apparatus. The detection will be in charge of modern BF{sub 3} detectors. It will be assumed that, in these deep subcritical systems, the function K{sub eff} = f(N-Nkp) has a linear portion in its first part, resulting of the decomposition of it in a Taylor series. The value of alpha is related to the reactivity ρ with linear dependency. The results will be compared with recent studies of the two main methods described above. Presented for the first time in the 60's, this tool has seen little use in the west hemisphere. This work shows its use in the measurements of the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01, as well as the code developed for its employment. It will be the first time this method is used in the south hemisphere. (authors)

  7. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  8. Direct measurement of 235U in spent fuel rods with Gamma-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruz, J.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Alameda, J. B.; Decker, T. A.; Descalle, M. A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hill, R. M.; Kisner, R. A.; Melin, A. M.; Patton, B. W.; Soufli, R.; Ziock, K.; Pivovaroff, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    Direct measurement of plutonium and uranium X-rays and gamma-rays is a highly desirable non-destructive analysis method for the use in reprocessing fuel environments. The high background and intense radiation from spent fuel make direct measurements difficult to implement since the relatively low activity of uranium and plutonium is masked by the high activity from fission products. To overcome this problem, we make use of a grazing incidence optic to selectively reflect Kα and Kβ fluorescence of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) into a high-purity position-sensitive germanium detector and obtain their relative ratios.

  9. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  10. Surface Strength of Silicon Nitride in Relation to Rolling Contact Performance Measured on Ball-on-Rod and Modified Four-Ball Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Hadfield, M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been used in various rolling contact applications in turbomachinery, automotive and power industry. It is favoured to replace conventional steel due to its low density, low friction, corrosion resistance and good performance under extreme condition. However, a major limitation of its wider application is its high material and machining cost, especially the cost associated with the finishing process. In the present study, a low cost sintered and reaction bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) is used to study the surface machining effects on its rolling contact performance. Attempt has been made to link the surface strengths of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} derived from half-rod and C-sphere flexure strength specimens to the rolling contact lifetimes of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} rod and ball specimens. The rolling contact fatigue tests are carried out on ball-on-rod and modified four ball machines. Three types of surfaces with coarse, fine and conventional finishing conditions are examined. Flexure strength tests on half-rod and C-sphere show an increasing surface strength from specimens with coarse, fine to conventionally machined conditions. During rolling contact fatigue test of as-machined specimens, there are no failures observed on both ball-on-rod and four ball tests after 100 million stress cycles. However, there is a trend of decreasing wear volumes measured on the contact path of rods and balls with coarse, fine and conventional conditions. In four ball test, spall failures are observed on pre-crack specimens. There is a trend of increasing rolling contact fatigue lifetime from pre-cracked specimens with coarse, fine to conventional machining conditions.

  11. Poly-Use Multi-Level Sampling Rod to Measure Soil-Gas Exchange in Glacier Forefield Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauer, P. A.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The forefields of receding glaciers provide unique opportunities to investigate initial microbial processes in the vadose zone and their role in soil formation. Various studies revealed a surprising diversity of microbes and of their strategies to cope with the extreme conditions in this C- and N-limited environment. In the forefield of receding glaciers as well as in developed soils microorganisms are the driving force for the exchange of greenhouse gases between soil and atmosphere. However, in young and developing soils, little is known about soil-gas exchange and the activities of the involved microorganisms. Knowledge of soil-gas composition and gas diffusion at various depths in a soil profile allows for the precise calculation of gas fluxes among different depths within the vadose zone and at the soil-atmosphere boundary. The acquisition of undisturbed soil-gas samples at a high depth-resolution is difficult, and the estimation of soil-gas diffusion coefficients requires knowledge of volumetric water content at the exact location of gas sampling. By using conventional techniques, e.g. the burial of permanent probes, these tasks are virtually impossible to accomplish in a remote glacier forefield dominated by rocks and boulders. We developed a novel poly-use multi-level sampling rod (PULSAR) primarily consisting of two devices: a newly-designed multi-level sampler (MLS) for soil-gas sampling, and a commercially available profile probe (PR2) for non-invasive multi-level water content measurements. These devices fit into the same access tubes (ATs) of 1.1m length, which need to be pre-installed into the soil with the help of a steel rod. We modified the ATs to feature eight 1mm diameter holes each at 20 sampling depths in intervals of 5cm. Our MLS can be inserted into the ATs and allows for the selective extraction of soil-gas from each sampling depth. The interspaces between the sampling depths are sealed by inflatable rubber membranes for the time of sampling

  12. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives’ allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking. PMID:26612505

  13. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  14. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  15. Non-reactive and reactive trace gas fluxes: Simultaneous measurements with ground based and vertically integrating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, J.-C.; Rummel, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Foken, T.; Meixner, F. X.

    2009-04-01

    The footprint area, i.e. the source region of a flux measured at a certain location, increases with increasing height above ground of the flux measurements. For non-reactive trace gases and horizontally homogeneous terrain (particularly with respect to deposition and emission processes), an increase in height should not alter the actual measured flux (constant flux layer assumption). For reactive trace gases, with chemical life times of about 30 s - 300 s, chemical production and loss processes within the measuring layer lead to vertical flux divergence. The magnitude of the flux divergence can be determined directly by comparing fluxes of reactive trace gases being affected by chemistry with fluxes of the same species being not altered by chemistry. In August 2006, the field experiment LIBRETTO (LIndenBerg REacTive Trace gas prOfiles) was carried out in cooperation with the German Meteorological Service (DWD) at the field site of the Richard Aßmann Observatory in Lindenberg. At a 99 m mast, profiles of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were measured. The mast is equipped with an elevator, where sensors for trace gases (CO2, H2O, O3), air temperature and relative humidity have been installed. During the experiment, the elevator system was run continuously, providing scanned profiles of trace gas concentrations from 2 m to 99 m a.g.l. of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) approx. every 10 minutes. Between 0.15 m and 2.0 m, concentration differences of the trace gases CO2, H2O, O3, NO and NO2 were measured. Applying the modified Bowen ration (MBR) method to the measured concentration differences and directly measured sensible heat flux (eddy covariance data from DWD) yields surface fluxes of the trace gases. Integral fluxes of CO2, O3 and sensible heat were computed simultaneously by applying the nocturnal boundary layer budget method to the scanned elevator profiles. A direct comparison showed little deviations between the two methods

  16. Specimen size and geometry effects on fracture toughness of Al2O3 measured with short rod and short bar chevron-notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Munz, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Plane strain fracture toughness measurements were made on Al2O3 using short rod and short bar chevron notch specimens previously calibrated by the authors for their dimensionless stress intensity factor coefficients. The measured toughness varied systematically with variations in specimen size, proportions, and chevron notch angle apparently due to their influence on the amount of crack extension to maximum load (the measurement point). The toughness variations are explained in terms of a suspected rising R curve for the material tested, along with a discussion of an unavoidable imprecision in the calculation of K sub Ic for materials with rising R curves when tested with chevron notch specimens.

  17. OH radical reactivity in an Indiana Forest: Measurements and model comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigler, P. S. R.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Sklaveniti, S.; Dusanter, S.; Kundu, S.; Wood, E. C. D.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radicals plays an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. OH radical reactions initiate the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. In addition, reactions of OH radicals controls the lifetime of methane and other greenhouse gases that affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Previous measurements of total hydroxyl radical reactivity in forest environments have found discrepancies between measured values and those calculated from collocated measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) concentrations. Additional measurements of total OH reactivity together with measurements of BVOCs are needed to understand the source of this missing reactivity and to further constrain atmospheric chemistry models. Total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity was measured using a turbulent flow reactor were made during summer 2015 as part of the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC). This campaign took place in a forested area at the Indiana Research and Teaching Preserve (IURTP) near the Bloomington campus characterized by high mixing ratios of isoprene and low mixing ratios of NOx. Measurements of a suite of VOCs and oxygenated VOCs was also conducted at the site, allowing a comparison of the observed reactivity with the expected OH reactivity from these measurements.

  18. Further validation of a measure of proactive and reactive aggression within a clinical child population.

    PubMed

    Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Gaertner, Alden E

    2009-09-01

    The current study provided further validity for the use of a measure of proactive and reactive aggression that was first developed by Little and his colleagues. Confirmatory factor analyses performed with a high-risk clinical population (N = 107) revealed that the model was a good fit to the data. Structural equation models revealed significant associations in the expected direction between the Little et al. measure and another measure of proactive and reactive aggression developed by Dodge and Coie. Further analyses revealed that the proactive aggression subscales of the Little et al. and Dodge and Coie measures were significantly related to conduct problems. However, the reactive aggression subscale of the Little et al. measure was not related to social problems while both the proactive and reactive aggression subscales of the Dodge and Coie measure were.

  19. Total OH reactivity measurement in a BVOC dominated temperate forest during a summer campaign, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Ida, Akira; Jones, Charlotte; Kato, Shungo; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Iori; Kawasaki, Shio; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro; Kagami, Sara; Deng, Yange; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-01

    A total OH reactivity measurement was conducted in coniferous forest located in Wakayama prefecture, Japan, during the summer of 2014. The average total OH reactivity, measured using a laser-induced pump and probe technique was 7.1 s-1. The measured OH reactivity was comparable with other coniferous and temperate forest measurements and much lower than that of tropical forests. OH reactivity varied diurnally and showed moderate linear correlation with temperature (r2 = 0.66) and light (r2 = 0.53). Monoterpene emitters, Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obutsa, are the dominant tree species in this forest. Although clean air from the sea was predominant, the beginning of the campaign was influenced by transported anthropogenic pollutants and consequently a higher average OH reactivity of 9.8 s-1 with high missing sinks of 37.3% was determined. Cleaner conditions, along with cooler day-time temperatures during in the second half of the campaign resulted in a lower average OH reactivity of 6.0 s-1 with a lower missing OH reactivity of 21.5%. Monoterpenes, isoprene, acetaldehyde were the dominant contributors to the total OH reactivity, accounting for 23.7%, 17.0% and 14.5%, respectively.

  20. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  1. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  2. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  3. Measuring and filtering reactive inhibition is essential for assessing serial decision making and learning.

    PubMed

    Török, Balázs; Janacsek, Karolina; Nagy, Dávid G; Orbán, Gergő; Nemeth, Dezso

    2017-04-01

    Learning complex structures from stimuli requires extended exposure and often repeated observation of the same stimuli. Learning induces stimulus-dependent changes in specific performance measures. The same performance measures, however, can also be affected by processes that arise because of extended training (e.g., fatigue) but are otherwise independent from learning. Thus, a thorough assessment of the properties of learning can only be achieved by identifying and accounting for the effects of such processes. Reactive inhibition is a process that modulates behavioral performance measures on a wide range of time scales and often has opposite effects than learning. Here we develop a tool to disentangle the effects of reactive inhibition from learning in the context of an implicit learning task, the alternating serial reaction time (ASRT) task. Our method highlights that the magnitude of the effect of reactive inhibition on measured performance is larger than that of the acquisition of statistical structure from stimuli. We show that the effect of reactive inhibition can be identified not only in population measures but also at the level of performance of individuals, revealing varying degrees of contribution of reactive inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that a higher proportion of behavioral variance can be explained by learning once the effects of reactive inhibition are eliminated. These results demonstrate that reactive inhibition has a fundamental effect on the behavioral performance that can be identified in individual participants and can be separated from other cognitive processes like learning. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  5. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  6. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  7. Laser doppler and radar interferometer for contactless measurements on unaccessible tie-rods on monumental buildings: Santa Maria della Consolazione Temple in Todi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioffré, M.; Cavalagli, N.; Pepi, C.; Trequattrini, M.

    2017-01-01

    Non-contact measurements can be effectively used in civil engineering to assess the variation of structural performance with time. In the last decades this approach has received considerable interests from researchers working in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Indeed, non-contact measurements are very attractive because it is possible to perform non intrusive and non destructive investigations even being at a significant distance from the targets. Within this context, contactless measurements of the tie-rod vibrations in the Santa Maria della Consolazione Temple in Todi (Italy) are presented in this paper. In particular, laser vibrometer and radar interferometer measurements are used to estimate natural frequencies and mode shapes. This information is crucial to obtain the tensile axial force in the tie-rods, which can be used as an indicator of structural integrity or possible failure. Furthermore, a novel approach is proposed where drones (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) can be successfully used to improve the effectiveness and the accuracy of the experimental activities.

  8. Connexin 36 and Rod Bipolar Cell Independent Rod Pathways Drive Retinal Ganglion Cells and Optokinetic Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cameron S.; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M.; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E.; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L.; Wu, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα−/− mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36−/− and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα−/− mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36−/− mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  9. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-09-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes' P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key pointsReactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement templateThe reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive dutiesThe handball specific "true-game" reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance.

  10. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  11. Measurement of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds over the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1996-01-01

    This report covers the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurement Group's (TTGAMG) participation in the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Pacific Exploratory Mission: Tropics A (PEM-TA) field measurement program. With other university and NASA centers, the Georgia Institute of Technology Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE) was deployed on the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft for the measurement of NO and NO2 One of the PEM-TA objectives was to collect the data and interpret the fast photo-chemical processes taking place in the remote and relatively pristine environment over Hawaii, Tahiti, Easter Island, New Zealand, and Fiji.

  12. X-ray tomography to measure size of fragments from penetration of high-velocity tungsten rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Bless, Stephan; Tolman, John; McDonald, Jason; Levinson, Scott; Hanna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particle board. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN and EPIC calculations. Fragments were steel or tungsten generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models.

  13. X-Ray Tomography to Measure Size of Fragments from Penetration of High-Velocity Tungsten Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Hanna, Romy; Bless, Stephan; Levinson, Scott; InstituteAdvanced Technology Collaboration; Department of Geological Sciences-UT Austin Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particleboard. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN SPH calculations to provide the exit velocity and the strain rate at the time of particle formation. There were four types of fragments: steel or tungsten, and generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models, e.g., Grady Kipp.

  14. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  15. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  16. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  17. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  18. Sucker rod construction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Goodman, J.L.; Tickle, J.D.; Liskey, A.K.

    1987-03-31

    A sucker rod construction is described comprising: a connector member being formed to define a rod receptacle having a closed axially inner end and an open axially outer end, the rod receptacle having axially spaced, tapered annular surfaces, a cylindrical fiberglass rod having an end having an outer surface being received within the rod receptacle through the outer end and cooperating therewith to define an annular chamber between the outer surface of the end of the rod and the tapered annular surfaces, and a bonding means positioned in the annular chamber for bonding to the outer surface of the end of the rod to confront the tapered annular surfaces, each annular surface having an angle of taper with respect to the outer surface of the fiberglass rod, and each angle of taper being progressively and uniformly less toward the open end by an amount between one and one-half degrees and two degrees, inclusive, and a collet connected to the connector member adjacent the open axially outer end of the rod receptacle and having an axial bore therethrough retaining the end of the rod in coaxial position within the rod receptacle.

  19. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  20. OH reactivity measurements from Boreal tree species in a plant chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, Anke; Custer, Thomas; Sinha, Vinayak; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kleist, Einhard; Tillmann, Ralf; Wildt, Jürgen; Williams, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forest covers a large area (ca. 15 million km2) comparable in size to the Tropical rain forest (ca. 17 million km2). The vegetation in Boreal regions is typically conifer forest which is known to emit significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS), such as monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, methanol and acetone. Many of these organic chemicals react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals to produce aerosols or secondary pollutants such as ozone. The total effect of the emitted species on the OH radical can be determined by measuring the total OH reactivity directly. Therefore a new measurement method was recently devised (Sinha et al., 2008). The Jülich plant atmosphere chamber (JPAC) at the Forschungszentrum-Jülich was used to investigate the overall reactivity of emissions from several Boreal tree species under controlled conditions in October 2009. Vegetation, temperature and light intensities typical of the Hyytiälä measurement station in Finland were used in these experiments and the levels of CO2, humidity and NOx were controlled. In addition to the reactivity measurement, a gas chromatograph (GC), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS) and a time-of-flight PTRMS (TOF-PTRMS) were used to quantify individual organic chemicals emitted by the plants for comparison with the overall reactivity. Experiments were performed under three different conditions. 1) Lower temperatures (T=20° C) resulted in low plant emissions with no diurnal variation. The total measured OH reactivity ranged from below detection limit (3 sec-1) to 7 sec-1 during the day and overnight rose to 8-13 sec-1. 2) Higher temperatures (T=35° C) produced higher emissions of volatile organic compounds and a clear diurnal trend. Reactivity data matched well with these results rising to 30-50 sec-1 by day and during the night sinking again to 8-13 sec-1. 3) Finally a control experiment was performed without trees in the plant chamber. In this experiment

  1. Measurements of fuel pin/water hole worths and power peaking, void coefficients, and temperature coefficients for 4. 81 wt% enriched UO[sub 2] fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.R.; Rohr, R.R.; Angelo, P.L.; Patrou, N.T.; Buckwheat, K.W.; Hayes, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute reactor critical facility is currently the only facility in North America providing critical measurement data in support of the light water reactor electric power industry. The reactor is fueled by 4.81 wt% [sup 235]U enriched UO[sub 2] high-density pellets in stainless steel clad fuel rods at the present time, although experiments with other fuels are being analyzed. The fuel pins are supported by inexpensive stainless steel lattice plates in a large open water tank. Three sets of lattice plates have been fabricated for fuel pins in square array with pitches 0.585, 0.613, and 0.640 in. (1.486, 0.613, and 1.656 cm, respectively) to provide a relevant range of water-to-fuel volume ratios. The measurements reported here are for the first of these, a relatively tight lattice of considerable interest for reactor physics methods for advanced fuels and reactors.

  2. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Biomass Combustion - Emission Ratios, OH Reactivities and SOA Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, W. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldan, P. D.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Veres, P. R.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple instruments including a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), a proton ion trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS), a negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (NI-PT-CIMS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) acquired data from 77 burns of various biomass fuels conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Sciences Laboratory (FSL) in Missoula, MT in February 2009. We compare VOC measurements of oxygenates, aromatics and biogenics from the various instruments as well as from the various fuel types collected in southeastern and southwestern regions of the United States. The relative contribution of the combustion species to the total reactivity with the OH radical is calculated and compared to ambient air reactivity in various locations. Total reactivity for measured species in these fires occasionally exceeded 1000 sec-1 with the majority of this reactivity due to alkenes. In addition, we investigate the relative contribution of the combustion species to the potential for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Measurements of several compounds not previously reported in various urban ambient air measurement campaigns such as pyrazole (C3H4N2), pyrrole (C4H5N), benzofuran (C8H6O) and 2-furanaldehyde (C5H4O2), which are highly reactive with OH, will be presented.

  3. Longitudinal Impact of Rods: A Continuing Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, W. G. B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment of research potential. The experiment cconsists of measuring the time of contact of a metal rod bouncing on a steel base as a function of the velocity of impact, length, diameter, and material of the rod. (GA)

  4. IASI measurements of reactive trace species in biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coheur, P.-F.; Clarisse, L.; Turquety, S.; Hurtmans, D.; Clerbaux, C.

    2009-08-01

    This work presents observations of a series of short-lived species in biomass burning plumes from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), launched onboard the MetOp-A platform in October 2006. The strong fires that have occurred in the Mediterranean Basin - and particularly Greece - in August 2007, and those in Southern Siberia and Eastern Mongolia in the early spring of 2008 are selected to support the analyses. We show that the IASI infrared spectra in these fire plumes contain distinctive signatures of ammonia (NH3), ethene (C2H4), methanol (CH3OH) and formic acid (HCOOH) in the atmospheric window between 800 and 1200 cm-1, with some noticeable differences between the plumes. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3COOONO2, abbreviated as PAN) was also observed with good confidence in some plumes and a tentative assignment of a broadband absorption spectral feature to acetic acid (CH3COOH) is made. For several of these species these are the first reported measurements made from space in nadir geometry. The IASI measurements are analyzed for plume height and concentration distributions of NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. The Greek fires are studied in greater detail for the days associated with the largest emissions. In addition to providing information on the spatial extent of the plume, the IASI retrievals allow an estimate of the total mass emissions for NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. Enhancement ratios are calculated for the latter relative to carbon monoxide (CO), giving insight in the chemical processes occurring during the transport, the first day after the emission.

  5. Measurement and Analysis of Void Fraction in a Multiple-Channel Simplifying Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Michio Sadatomi; Akimaro Kawahara; Hiroyuki Kudo; Hiroshi Shirai

    2006-07-01

    In order to know the effects of reduced surface tension on void fraction, adiabatic experiments were conducted for both air-water and air-water with surfactant systems at room temperature and pressure. Void fraction data were obtained for bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows in a vertical channel with two subchannels simplifying a triangle tight lattice rod bundle. The void fraction was found to be lower in air-water system than air-water with surfactant one. In addition, the void fractions for both systems were found to be lower than those calculated by various correlations in literatures for circular pipe flow. In order to study the cause of the above data trend, for annular flows as a first step, the void fraction has been calculated by a subchannel analysis using wall and interfacial friction correlations in literatures as constitutive equations, and by assuming the liquid film to be uniform over the wall perimeter. The best agreement between the calculation and the experiment has been obtained when NASCA correlation for wall friction force and modified RELAP5/MOD2 correlation incorporating reduced surface tension effects for interfacial friction force were used. (authors)

  6. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  7. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  8. Total OH reactivity measurements at Manitou Experimental Forest in summer season during BEACHON-ROCS field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Ida, A.; Kajii, Y. J.; Greenberg, J.; Karl, T.; Kim, S.; Turnipseed, A.; Guenther, A. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Henry, S. B.; Keutsch, F. N.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Kaser, L.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is well known to play a central role in initiating the oxidation of a number of atmospheric species. We have developed an OH reactivity measurement system using a laser pump probe technique and have deployed this instrument in urban and suburban areas of Tokyo. During these measurements of OH reactivity, we confirmed the existence of unknown reactive species. However, there are only few examples for measurements of OH reactivity in rural areas where the effect of anthropogenic emissions is thought to be small. Therefore measurements of OH reactivity in rural areas are essential to confirm whether our knowledge of trace species in these areas is valid. We participated in the BEACHON-ROCS field campaign and measured the total OH reactivity at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) during August 8th-23rd, 2010. MEF is located in the southern part of the Rocky Mountains and about 80 km south from Denver. MEF is dominated by ponderosa pine; observations indicate that the effect of anthropogenic emissions is small. The OH reactivity was about 5-20 s-1, lower than that measured in urban or suburban areas of Tokyo. Diurnal variation of OH reactivity was observed for all measurement days and OH reactivity for daytime was lower than that for nighttime. In addition to the measurement of OH reactivity, trace species such as CO, NOx, O3, SO2, aldehydes and VOCs, including biogenic VOCs, were analyzed. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of the observed trace species, about 15-30% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic VOCs, which were dominated by a monoterpene and 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO). A comparison of the observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is up to 60% less than the observed value.

  9. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  10. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  11. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  12. ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA-660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL WORK PLATFORM ABOVE. THE REACTOR WAS IN A SMALL WATER-FILLED POOL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 66-6373. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1966 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Summer 2015 measurements of total OH reactivity at a UK coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, R.; Cryer, D. R.; Whalley, L. K.; Ingham, T.; Crilley, L.; Kramer, L. J.; Reeves, C.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; Bandy, B.; Reed, C.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, W.; Heard, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays a central role in the day time oxidative removal of pollutants and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is essential that all production and loss pathways of OH are understood and included in computer models in order to accurately predict OH concentrations for a range of environments, and in turn the rate of production of secondary products, for example ozone and organic aerosol. Direct measurement of total OH reactivity, the pseudo first order rate coefficient for OH loss by reaction with its sinks, is a very useful tool to test how complete our knowledge is of OH loss pathways. Comparison with values of total OH reactivity calculated by computer models using concentrations of simultaneously measured OH 'sinks' and unmeasured intermediates enables environments to be identified where there are unidentified 'missing' OH sinks. Total OH reactivity was measured using the laser flash photolysis combined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique during the ICOZA (Integrated Chemistry of OZone in the Atmosphere) campaign in July 2015 at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO), Norfolk, UK. Air masses sampled ranged from polluted air from the UK or Europe containing processed urban emissions to very clean air of marine origin. Data for measured and calculated OH reactivity will be presented in addition to a discussion of the magnitude of the 'missing' OH sink determined for each type of air mass.

  14. Measurement Reactivity and Fatigue Effects in Daily Diary Research with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Bridget M.; Robles, Theodore F.; Repetti, Rena L.

    2016-01-01

    Methodological challenges associated with measurement reactivity and fatigue were addressed using diary data collected from mothers (n = 47), fathers (n = 39), and children (n = 47; 8-13 years) across 56 consecutive days. Demonstrating the feasibility of extended diary studies with families, on-time compliance rates were upward of 90% for all…

  15. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-05-01

    The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

  16. Rod Has High Tensile Strength And Low Thermal Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Everton, R. L.; Howe, E.; O'Malley, M.

    1996-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten extension rod fabricated to replace stainless-steel extension rod attached to linear variable-differential transformer in gap-measuring gauge. Threads formed on end of rod by machining with special fixtures and carefully chosen combination of speeds and feeds.

  17. Effects of Beijing Olympics control measures on reducing reactive hydrocarbon species.

    PubMed

    Min, Shao; Bin, Wang; Sihua, Lu; Bin, Yuan; Ming, Wang

    2011-01-15

    Stringent air-quality control measures were implemented for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. This large-scale manmade experiment provided an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of measures to reduce the reactivity of hydrocarbons (HCs) from emission sources, which is important for ground-level ozone abatement. Photochemical initial concentrations (PICs), i.e., the levels of HCs from sources before undergoing chemical reactions, were calculated from ambient measurements. PICs obtained using the ratio method for HCs and the sequential reaction model for alkyl nitrates were in good agreement. Propene, 1-butene, iso-butene, trans-2-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-pentene, and m,p-xylene were identified as key reactive species in terms of their photochemical consumptions and correspondent ozone formation potentials (OFPs). During the Olympics and Paralympics, the PICs of these seven species were reduced by 27-66%, contributing 20% to the reduction in total PICs and 60% to the reduction in total OFP compared with June levels. Source apportionments from the chemical mass balance model indicated that gasoline vehicle exhaust was the predominant contributor to the key reactive species (45-78%). Reductions of gasoline vehicle exhaust during the Olympics and Paralympics explained 53-77% and 59-68% of the reductions in PICs of the key reactive HCs and total OFP, respectively.

  18. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  19. Measuring reactive hyperemia in the lower limb using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingham, Thomas B.; Southern, William M.; McCully, Kevin K.

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to measure reactive hyperemia following a vascular occlusion. However, the procedures and methods of analysis used have varied. The purpose of the present study is to identify reproducible methods for measuring reactive hyperemia using HbO2 NIRS signals in the calf and foot. Healthy participants (10 male, 10 female) aged 19 to 28 years performed one of two tests: reproducibility trials or elevation protocol (30 and 60 cm limb elevation above the heart). The time to 50% reperfusion (T) and the second (R2q) quartile rates of reperfusion were found to be the most reproducible parameters (coefficient of variation=7.12 to 14.1%). The time to 95% reperfusion (T95) was 12.7% more reproducible on average than the previously reported parameter of time to peak hyperemia. Measures of reperfusion time and rate slowed with increasing limb elevation. Correlations were identified between the calf and foot in the measurements of R2q (R2=0.713, p=0.021), T (R2=0.673, p=0.033), and T95 (R2=0.792, p=0.006). Half and 95% recovery times and second and third quartile rates expressed good reproducibility and sensitivity to change with reduced perfusion pressure. NIRS measures of reactive hyperemia have the potential to evaluate microvascular perfusion in clinical populations.

  20. An overview of reactive chlorine measurements during the WINTER C-130 aircraft campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Jaegle, L.; Haskins, J.; Shah, V.; Brown, S. S.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Veres, P. R.; Dibb, J. E.; Sparks, T.; Ebben, C. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Sullivan, A.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, T. L.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity (WINTER) campaign, the University of Washington Iodide-adduct high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) was deployed aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. Calibrated measurements of ClNO2, Cl2, HCl, N2O5, HNO3, HONO, among several other compounds, were made at 2Hz on all 13 research flights. ClNO2 and HCl were often the dominant forms of reactive gas-phase chlorine compounds, with ClNO2 routinely reaching >1.5 ppb in the polluted outflow of the eastern U.S. urban corridor. ClNO2 often becomes a substantial fraction (~30%) of NOz (NOz = NOy - NOx) in these plumes at night. Preliminary analyses suggests that ClNO2 production is most efficient in the polluted marine boundary layer, with yields approaching unity and the evolution of nighttime ClNO2 highly correlated with that of HNO3 and particulate nitrate. However, ClNO2 production was observed throughout the region and a significant source of reactive chlorine from coal-fired power plants was directly confirmed with measurements of HCl strongly correlated with SO2. In addition, there is some evidence that biomass or biofuel combustion is a source of reactive chlorine that can lead to ClNO2 production. Examples of the nocturnal and diel evolution of reactive chlorine species are given, and we show to our knowledge the first measurements of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) in the polluted mid-latitude marine boundary layer.

  1. Total OH reactivity measurements within a suburban Tokyo forest in late summer 2012 during the AQUAS-TAMA campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Jones, C. E.; Yamasaki, S.; Kato, S.; Minejima, C.; Yoshino, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Matsuda, K.; Kajii, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is known to play a central role in initiating the oxidation of a number of atmospheric species. We have developed an OH reactivity measurement system using a laser pump probe technique and have previously deployed this instrument at urban and suburban sites across Tokyo, as well as within a remote forest in Colorado, US. Based upon these measurements of OH reactivity, we confirmed the existence of unknown reactive species at each location. To investigate the interaction between urban / suburban emissions and forest air, the AQUAS-TAMA (Air QUAlity Study in TAMA hills) field campaign was carried out at Field Museum of Tama hills (FM-Tama) during September 20th - October 4th, 2012 and total OH reactivity was measured continuously throughout this period. The FM-Tama experimental forest site is operated by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, and is located within a suburban forest ~30 km west of the center of Tokyo. Since FM-Tama is surrounded by residential areas and several major roads, the site is subjected to considerable anthropogenic emissions. The total OH reactivity was about 3-30 s-1, comparable with the OH reactivity measured in suburban areas of Tokyo. Diurnal variation of OH reactivity was observed, with OH reactivity higher during the daytime. In addition to the measurement of OH reactivity, trace species such as CO, NOx, O3, SO2, and VOCs, including biogenic VOCs, were analyzed. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of the observed trace species, about 31% of measured OH reactivity may be attributed to anthropogenic VOCs, and 14% from isoprene. However, about 26% of the measured OH reactivity was the result of missing OH sinks.

  2. Assessing Reactive Strength Measures in Jumping and Hopping Using the Optojump™ System

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Ian C.; Harrison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of the Optojump™ system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy) versus a force platform in the estimation of temporal and reactive strength measures. In two separate investigations, twenty physically active males performed double-leg and single-leg drop jumps from a box height of 0.3 m and a 10 s vertical bilateral hopping test. Contact time, flight time and total time (the sum of contact and flight time) were concurrently assessed during single and double-leg drop jumps and during hopping. Jump height, the reactive strength index and the reactive strength ratio were also calculated from contact time and flight time. Despite intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for all variables being close to 1 (ICC > 0.975), a significant overestimation was found in contact time (0.005 ± 0.002 s) and underestimations in flight time (0.005 ± 0.003 s), the reactive strength index (0.04 ± 0.02 m·s-1) and the reactive strength ratio (0.07 ± 0.04). Overestimations in contact time and underestimations in flight time were attributed to the physical design of the Optojump™ system as the transmitter and receiver units were positioned 0.003 m above the floor level. The Optojump™ demonstrated excellent overall temporal validity with no differences found between systems for total time. Coaches are advised to be consistent with the instrumentation used to assess athletes, however, in the case of comparison between reactive strength values collected with the Optojump™ and values collected with a force platform, regression equations are provided. PMID:28031754

  3. Control rod housing alignment and repair method

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a method for underwater welding of a control rod drive housing inserted through a stub tube to maintain requisite alignment and elevation of the top of the control rod drive housing to an overlying and corresponding aperture in a core plate as measured by an alignment device which determines the relative elevation and angularity with respect to the aperture. It comprises providing a welding cylinder dependent from the alignment device such that the elevation of the top of the welding cylinder is in a fixed relationship to the alignment device and is gas-proof; pressurizing the welding cylinder with inert welding gas sufficient to maintain the interior of the welding cylinder dry; lowering the welding cylinder through the aperture in the core plate by depending the cylinder with respect to the alignment device, the lowering including lowering through and adjusting the elevation relationship of the welding cylinder to the alignment device such that when the alignment device is in position to measure the elevation and angularity of the new control rod drive housing, the lower distal end of the welding cylinder extends below the upper periphery of the stub where welding is to occur; inserting a new control rod drive housing through the stub tube and positioning the control rod drive housing to a predetermined relationship to the anticipated final position of the control rod drive housing; providing welding implements transversely rotatably mounted interior of the welding cylinder relative to the alignment device such that the welding implements may be accurately positioned for dispensing weldment around the periphery of the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing; measuring the elevation and angularity of the control rod drive housing; and dispensing weldment along the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing.

  4. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  5. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  6. Measurements of NO and total reactive odd-nitrogen, NOy, in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Murphy, D. M.; Eubank, C. S.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. Roland; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of NO and total reactive N, NOy, were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment conducted in Punta Arenas, Chile during Aug. and Sept. 1987. The total reactive N reservoir includes the species NO, NO2, NO3, N2 O5, HNO3, and ClONO2. The instrument was located on board the NASA ER2 aircraft which conducted 12 flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 deg S latitude. The NOy technique utilized the conversion of component NOy species to NO on a gold catalyst and the subsequent detection of NO by the chemiluminescence reaction of NO with ozone. Since the inlet sample line is heated and the catalyst operates at 300 C, NOy incorporated in aerosols evaporates and is converted to NO. NO was measured on two separate flights by removing the catalyst from the sample inlet line.

  7. Reactivity in Rapidly Collected Hygiene and Toilet Spot Check Measurements: A Cautionary Note for Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Benjamin F.; Khush, Ranjiv S.; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford Jr., John M.

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. PMID:25385856

  8. Direct Measurement of U235 and Pu239 in Spent Fuel Rods with Gamma-Ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Alameda, J. B.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Decker, T. A.; Descalle, M. A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hill, R. M.; Kisner, R. A.; Melin, A. M.; Patton, B. W.; Ruz, J.; Soufli, R.

    2013-09-30

    The amounts of fissile Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel are of primary concern to the safeguards community. In particular, there are issues when safeguards transitions from an item accountancy basis (such as fuel bundles) to a fissile material mass basis as occurs when spent fuel enters a reprocessing plant. Discrepancies occur because item accountancy requires estimating the content of fissile material using indirect techniques such as the fuel burn-up and item-level measurements of radiation emissions from fission by-products. Direct measurement of the fissile content by monitoring line emissions from fissile species themselves is impossible because the lines are much weaker than those emitted by shorter-lived isotopes in the fuel. The goal of this project is to develop a technique to directly measure these weaker lines despite the presence of overwhelming radiation from other isotopes. This is achieved by using gamma-ray mirrors as a narrow band-pass filter. The mirrors reflect only energies of interest toward a HPGe detector that is shielded from direct view of the spent fuel and its fierce emissions. This can significantly improve the reliability with which the mass of fissile material is tracked.

  9. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  10. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    by means of either its relative position with respect to the constraint axis (contact-free segments) or its angular position on the constraint surface (continuous contacts.) This formulation circumvents both drawbacks that afflict the conventional Lagrangian approach associated with the segmentation strategy. As the a priori unknown domain, viz. the rod length, is substituted for the known constraint axis, the free boundary problem and the associated isoperimetric constraints are converted into a classical two-point boundary value problem. Additionally, the description of the rod deflection by means of its eccentricity with respect to the constraint axis trivializes the assessment of the unilateral contact condition. Along continuous contacts, this formulation expresses the strain variables, measuring the rod change of shape, in terms of the geometric invariants of the constraint surface, and emphasizes the influence of the constraint local geometry on the reaction pressure. Formalizing the segmentation strategy, a computational model that exploits the Eulerian formulation of the rod governing equations is devised. To solve the quasi-static deflection of elastic rods constrained inside or around a tube-like surface, this computational model identifies the number of contacts, their nature (either discrete or continuous), and the rod configuration at the connections that satisfies the unilateral contact condition and preserves the rod integrity along the sequence of elementary problems.

  11. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry

  13. High-speed tomographic PIV and OH PLIF measurements in turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriton, Bruno; Steinberg, Adam M.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2014-06-01

    High-speed tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) is demonstrated in turbulent reactive flows at acquisition rates ranging from 10 to 16 kHz. The 10-kHz TPIV measurements are combined with planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of OH to mark the high-temperature reaction zone of the flame. Simultaneous TPIV/OH PLIF measurements are applied to the stabilization region of a weakly turbulent lifted dimethyl ether (DME)/air jet flame ( Re D = 7,600) and the mixing layer of a turbulent partially premixed DME/air jet flame ( Re D = 29,300). In the lifted jet flame, vortical structures exhibit time-dependent morphological changes and eventually dissipate as they approach the flame. In the near field of the turbulent jet flame, dynamics of localized extinction are captured as coherent structures with high compressive strain rates interact with the reaction zone and subsequently break apart. The principal axis of compressive strain has a strong preferential orientation at 45° with respect to the jet axis. The three-dimensional velocity field measurements are used to evaluate biases in two-dimensional (2D) measurements of compressive strain rates in a turbulent jet flame. The biases in the 2D measurements primarily stem from out-of-plane orientation of the principal axis of compressive strain. Comparisons with a constant density turbulent non-reactive jet ( Re D = 22,600) show that the jet flame has larger coherent structures that are confined near the reaction zone. Data from the non-reactive jet are also used to evaluate effects of noise, bias, and spatial averaging on measurements of the velocity and velocity gradients.

  14. GUINEVERE experiment: Kinetic analysis of some reactivity measurement methods by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, G.; Burgio, N.; Carta, M.; Peluso, V.; Fabrizio, V.; Ricci, L.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE experiment (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) is an experimental program in support of the ADS technology presently carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol (Belgium). In the experiment a modified lay-out of the original thermal VENUS critical facility is coupled to an accelerator, built by the French body CNRS in Grenoble, working in both continuous and pulsed mode and delivering 14 MeV neutrons by bombardment of deuterons on a tritium-target. The modified lay-out of the facility consists of a fast subcritical core made of 30% U-235 enriched metallic Uranium in a lead matrix. Several off-line and on-line reactivity measurement techniques will be investigated during the experimental campaign. This report is focused on the simulation by deterministic (ERANOS French code) and Monte Carlo (MCNPX US code) calculations of three reactivity measurement techniques, Slope ({alpha}-fitting), Area-ratio and Source-jerk, applied to a GUINEVERE subcritical configuration (namely SC1). The inferred reactivity, in dollar units, by the Area-ratio method shows an overall agreement between the two deterministic and Monte Carlo computational approaches, whereas the MCNPX Source-jerk results are affected by large uncertainties and allow only partial conclusions about the comparison. Finally, no particular spatial dependence of the results is observed in the case of the GUINEVERE SC1 subcritical configuration. (authors)

  15. Reactivation of slow-moving landslides by earthquakes, kinematics measurements and mechanical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Pascal; Perfettini, Hugo; Berthier, Etienne; Taipe, Edu; Guillier, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Major earthquakes in mountainous areas often trigger landslides. The impact of earthquakes on slow-moving landslides is however not well constrained due to few co-seismic measurements of landslide motion. We document the first time-series of a landslide reactivation by an earthquake (Mw6.0, distance 20 km), using continuous GPS measurements over the Maca landslide (Peru). Our survey shows a coseismic response of the landslide of about 2 cm, followed by a relaxation period of 5 weeks during which postseismic slip is three times greater than the coseismic displacement itself. Our results confirm the coseismic activation of landslides and provide the first observation of a post seismic displacement. Finally, a multi-temporal survey using images from the very high resolution Pléiades optical satellite, allowed us to detect 9 active slow-moving landslides over the whole valley. Their pattern of motion show they have been reactivated by the same earthquake. We analyze this small but comprehensive database of landslides reactivated by the earthquake. We find that the landslide motion due to the earthquake is function of the shaking intensity, suggesting a friction at the basal interface dependent on the earthquake solicitation. These various observations are consistent with a mechanical model where slip on the landslide basal interface is governed by rate and state friction, analogous to the mechanics of creeping tectonic faults.

  16. Reactive Strength Index Modified Is a Valid Measure of Explosiveness in Collegiate Female Volleyball Players.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Kiely, Michael T; Geiser, Christopher F

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of the reactive strength index modified (RSImod) as a measure of lower body explosiveness. Fifteen female, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I volleyball players performed vertical countermovement jumps (CMJs) while standing on a force plate. Each player performed 3 CMJs. The vertical ground reaction forces collected during each jump were used to calculate jump height, time to take-off, time to peak force, peak force, peak rate of force development, and peak power; the latter 3 variables were all normalized to body mass. Reactive strength index modified was calculated as the ratio between jump height and time to take-off. All variables, except for jump height, were then entered a factor analysis, which reduced the input data into 2 factors: a force factor and a speed factor. Although RSImod loaded more strongly onto the force factor, further analysis showed that RSImod loaded positively onto both force and speed factors. Visual analysis of the Cartesian coordinates also showed that RSImod loaded into the quadrant of greater force and speed abilities. These results indicate that the construct of RSImod, as derived from CMJ force-time data, captures a combination of speed-force factors that can be interpreted as lower body explosiveness during the CMJ. Reactive strength index modified therefore seems to be a valid measure to study lower body explosiveness.

  17. Self-reported trait mindfulness and affective reactivity: a motivational approach using multiple psychophysiological measures.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Danielle; Wiens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51) passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels) electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses during picture

  18. Self-Reported Trait Mindfulness and Affective Reactivity: A Motivational Approach Using Multiple Psychophysiological Measures

    PubMed Central

    Cosme, Danielle; Wiens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51) passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels) electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses during picture

  19. Reproducibility of parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Rosas, Ernesto E.; Billings, Stephen A.; Chico, Timothy; Coca, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess microvascular function has shown promising results. An important limitation when using a single source-detector pair, however, is the lack of depth sensitivity. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) overcomes this limitation using an array of sources and detectors that allow the reconstruction of volumetric hemodynamic changes. This study compares the key parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured in the forearm using standard NIRS and DOT. We show that while the mean parameter values are similar for the two techniques, DOT achieves much better reproducibility, as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We show that DOT achieves high reproducibility for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.99), time to maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.94), maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.99), and time to maximal HbT (ICC: 0.99). Absolute reproducibility as measured by the standard error of measurement is consistently smaller and close to zero (ideal value) across all parameters measured by DOT compared to NIRS. We conclude that DOT provides a more robust characterization of the reactive hyperemic response and show how the availability of volumetric hemodynamic changes allows the identification of areas of temporal consistency, which could help characterize more precisely the microvasculature.

  20. Measuring Sensory Reactivity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Application and Simplification of a Clinician-Administered Sensory Observation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavassoli, Teresa; Bellesheim, Katherine; Siper, Paige M.; Wang, A. Ting; Halpern, Danielle; Gorenstein, Michelle; Grodberg, David; Kolevzon, Alexander; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory reactivity is a new DSM-5 criterion for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study aims to validate a clinician-administered sensory observation in ASD, the Sensory Processing Scale Assessment (SPS). The SPS and the Short Sensory Profile (SSP) parent-report were used to measure sensory reactivity in children with ASD (n = 35) and…

  1. Microelectrophoresis of Silica Rods Using Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility and the zeta potential (ζ) of fluorescently labeled colloidal silica rods, with an aspect ratio of 3.8 and 6.1, were determined with microelectrophoresis measurements using confocal microscopy. In the case where the colloidal particles all move at the same speed parallel to the direction of the electric field, we record a xyz-stack over the whole depth of the capillary. This method is faster and more robust compared to taking xyt-series at different depths inside the capillary to obtain the parabolic flow profile, as was done in previous work from our group. In some cases, rodlike particles do not move all at the same speed in the electric field, but exhibit a velocity that depends on the angle between the long axis of the rod and the electric field. We measured the orientation-dependent velocity of individual silica rods during electrophoresis as a function of κa, where κ–1 is the double layer thickness and a is the radius of the rod associated with the diameter. Thus, we determined the anisotropic electrophoretic mobility of the silica rods with different sized double layers. The size of the double layer was tuned by suspending silica rods in different solvents at different electrolyte concentrations. We compared these results with theoretical predictions. We show that even at already relatively high κa when the Smoluchowski limiting law is assumed to be valid (κa > 10), an orientation dependent velocity was measured. Furthermore, we observed that at decreasing values of κa the anisotropy in the electrophoretic mobility of the rods increases. However, in low polar solvents with κa < 1, this trend was reversed: the anisotropy in the electrophoretic mobility of the rods decreased. We argue that this decrease is due to end effects, which was already predicted theoretically. When end effects are not taken into account, this will lead to strong underestimation of the experimentally determined zeta potential. PMID:28045541

  2. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  3. Measurements of reactive halogen species as oxidants of mercury over the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Terschure, A. F.; Edgerton, E. S.; Wu, Y.; Nair, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction of bromine and chlorine radicals with gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is a source for gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM). It has been established that oxidation by bromine is relevant at high latitudes, and can also occur in mid-latitude regions (Peleg et al. 2007), or in the free troposphere. A subject of ongoing debate concerns the role of free tropospheric bromine vs boundary layer bromine in oxidizing mercury. Here we present measurements of reactive halogen species bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) along with gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), and particulate mercury (Hgp) at a coastal location in Gulf Breeze, Fl. The University of Colorado has deployed a research grade Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure BrO, IO, as well as formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen dimers (O4). Here we present the compilation of the data collected by this instrument over the time period from May 2009 to January 2011, which include the first measurements of BrO, IO, and CHOCHO over the Gulf of Mexico. We also present several case studies for days where significant amounts of reactive halogens were measured, explore the sources and back trajectories of the air masses carrying these compounds, and relate our observations to mercury data collected at a nearby SEARCH network site.

  4. Spent fuel measurements. passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and photon signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Eigenbrodt, Julia; Menlove, Howard Olsen

    2016-03-29

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of a diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear material from peaceful activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. An important IAEA task towards meeting this objective is the ability to accurately and reliably measure spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to verify reactor operating parameters and verify that the fuel has not been removed from reactors or SNF storage facilities. This dissertation analyzes a method to improve the state-of-the-art of nuclear material safeguards measurements using two combined measurement techniques: passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and passive spectral photon measurements.

  5. Rod Contributions to Color Perception: Linear with Rod Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Pokorny, Joel; Smith, Vivianne C.; Zele, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    At mesopic light levels, an incremental change in rod activation causes changes in color appearance. In this study, we investigated how rod mediated changes in color perception varied as a function of the magnitude of the rod contrast. Rod-mediated changes in color appearance were assessed by matching them with cone-mediated color changes. A two-channel four-primary colorimeter allowed independent control of the rods and each of the L-, M- and S-cone photoreceptor types. At all light levels, rod contributions to inferred PC, KC and MC pathway mediated vision were linearly related to the rod incremental contrast. This linear relationship could be described by a model based on primate ganglion cell responses with the assumption that rod signals were conveyed via rod-cone gap junctions at mesopic light levels. PMID:18561973

  6. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    under a metre of sodium. 4 poles will have been required for this operation: - a pole for draining the rod and uncovering the bearing surface, - a borescope pole, - a pole for cleaning the bearing surface, - a pole for inspecting the bearing surface. The operation resulted in a very satisfactory bearing capacity of approx. 80 daN. This paper also examines the history of contamination of the control rod and the rod mechanism. It outlines the hypotheses for the source of this contamination and the measures taken to counteract this problem. (authors)

  7. Acoustic sensors for fission gas characterization: R and D skills devoted to innovative instrumentation in MTR, non-destructive devices in hot lab facilities and specific transducers for measurements of LWR rods in nuclear plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandis, J.Y.; Leveque, G.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Augereau, F.; Combette, P.

    2015-07-01

    First of all, we will present the main principle of the method. A piezoelectric transducer, driven by a pulse generator, generates the acoustic waves in a cavity that may be the fuel rod or a chamber connected to an instrumented rod. The composition determination consists in measuring the time of flight of the acoustic signal emitted. The pressure can be estimated by a calibration process, above the measurement of the amplitude of the signal. Two projects will then be detailed. The first project consists in the development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor. It constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. This acoustic method was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). As a first step of the development program, we performed in-pile tests on the most sensitive component, i.e., the piezoelectric transducer. For this purpose, the active part of this sensor has been qualified on gamma and neutron radiations and at high temperature. Various industrial piezo-ceramics were exposed to a high activity Cobalt source for few days. The cumulated dose was ranged from 50 kGy up to 2 MGy. Next, these devices were placed inside a Material Test Reactor to investigate their reliability towards neutron fluence. The final fluence after 150 days of irradiation was up to 1.6.10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2} (for thermal neutron). Irreversible variations have been measured. Next, a specific sensor has been implemented on an instrumented fuel rod and tested in the frame of a REMORA 3 Irradiation test. It was the first experiment under high mixed, temperature neutron and gamma flux. A first irradiation phase took place in March 2010 in the OSIRIS reactor and in November 2010 for the second step of the

  8. Strain measurement in concrete structure using distributed fiber optic sensing based on Brillouin scattering with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforcing vinyl ester rod and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhoa, Cia Y.; Bao, Xiaoyi; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2001-08-01

    The strain distribution in a 1.65m long reinforced concrete beam was measured using the distributed fiber optic sensing system developed by Dr. Bao's Fiber Optic Group at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) with center point and two point loading pattern. A spatial resolution of 0.5m was used. Past experience has shown that the bare optical fiber is too fragile to act as a sensor in a reinforced concrete structure. Therefore, in this experiment, two methods of protecting the fibers were incorporated into the concrete beam to increase the fibers' resistance to mechanical damages and prevent chemical reaction from occurring between the fibers and the concrete. The fibers were either embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester (GFRP) rods or bonded to the steel reinforcing bars with an epoxy adhesive. The strain at midspan of the beam as measured by the distributed sensing system was compared with the readings of electrical resistance strain (ERS) and mechanical strain (MS) gauges. The experimental results showed that the pultruded GFRP rods effectively protected the fibers, but the strain readings from the GFRP rods did not agree with the strain measurement of the ERS on the steel reinforcing bars due to the possible slippage of the rods in the concrete. However, the fiber bonded to steel reinforcing bars produced more accurate results and confirmed the potential of this technology to accurately measure strain in a reinforced concrete structure. As expected, the fiber with direct contact to the concrete and steel reinforcing bar, can effectively measured the strain under center point or two point loading.

  9. Observation of skin thermal inertia distribution during reactive hyperaemia using a single-hood measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Togawa, T

    2001-02-01

    An attempt was made to image the thermal inertia (defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) of the skin to observe the distribution of blood in the skin during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in normal healthy volunteers. The method was based on the ability to calculate thermal inertia by successive thermographic measurements of the skin after stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature surrounding the skin area. The stepwise change was achieved within 0.1 s through a single hood. Experimentation on the undisturbed volar forearm of normal subjects at the same site showed that the measurements thus achieved were reproducible. The thermal inertia values of forearm skin in normal subjects were scattered throughout the range 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.7 x 10(3) W s(1/2) m(-2) K(-1). Experiments on forearm skin subjected to arterial cuff occlusion indicated that thermal inertia can be detected at a low level of blood perfusion. A linear relationship was observed between thermal inertia and blood perfusion measured by laser Doppler imager before and during blood flow occlusion. During reactive hyperaemia, the thermal inertia image exhibited a non-uniform island-shaped pattern of distribution over the forearm, suggesting that, after release from occlusion, recovery of blood flow is non-uniform.

  10. Intramedullary rodding in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, K; Joseph, B

    2000-01-01

    The results of intramedullary rodding of long bones of 16 children with osteogenesis imperfecta, over a 10-year period, were analyzed. Sheffield elongating rods or non-elongating rods were used. The frequency of fractures was dramatically reduced after implantation of either type of rod, and the ambulatory status improved in all instances. The results were significantly better after Sheffield rodding with regard to the frequency of complications requiring reoperations and the longevity of the rods. Migration of the rods, encountered frequently, appears to be related to improper placement of the rods in the bone. It seems likely that if care is taken to ensure precise placement of a rod of appropriate size, several of these complications may be avoided.

  11. Intraoperative pulmonary embolism of Harrington rod during spinal surgery: the potential dangers of rod cutting.

    PubMed

    Aylott, Caspar E W; Hassan, Kamran; McNally, Donal; Webb, John K

    2006-12-01

    This is a case report and laboratory-based biomechanics study. The objective is to report the first case of Titanium rod embolisation during scoliosis surgery into the Pulmonary artery. To investigate the potential of an unconstrained cut Titanium rod fragment to cause wounding with reference to recognised weapons. Embolisation of a foreign body to the heart is rare. Bullet embolisation to the heart and lungs is infrequently reported in the last 80 years. Iatrogenic cases of foreign body embolisation are very rare. Fifty 1-2 cm segments of Titanium rod were cut in an unconstrained manner and a novel method was used to calculate velocity. A high-speed camera (6,000 frames/s) was used to further measure velocity and study projectile motion. The wounding potential was investigated using lambs liver, high-speed photography and local dissection. Rod velocities were measured in excess of 23 m s(-1). Rods were seen to tumble end-over-end with a maximum speed of 560 revolutions/s. The maximum kinetic energy was 0.61 J which is approximately 2% that of a crossbow. This is sufficient to cause significant liver damage. The degree of surface damage and internal disruption was influenced by the orientation of the rod fragment at impact. An unconstrained cut segment of a Titanium rod has a significant potential to wound. Precautions should be taken to avoid this potentially disastrous but preventable complication.

  12. Monolayers of hard rods on planar substrates. I. Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Oettel, M; Klopotek, M; Dixit, M; Empting, E; Schilling, T; Hansen-Goos, H

    2016-08-21

    The equilibrium properties of hard rod monolayers are investigated in a lattice model (where position and orientation of a rod are restricted to discrete values) as well as in an off-lattice model featuring spherocylinders with continuous positional and orientational degrees of freedom. Both models are treated using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Upon increasing the density of rods in the monolayer, there is a continuous ordering of the rods along the monolayer normal ("standing up" transition). The continuous transition also persists in the case of an external potential which favors flat-lying rods in the monolayer. This behavior is found in both the lattice and the continuum models. For the lattice model, we find very good agreement between the results from the specific DFT used (lattice fundamental measure theory) and simulations. The properties of lattice fundamental measure theory are further illustrated by the phase diagrams of bulk hard rods in two and three dimensions.

  13. Monolayers of hard rods on planar substrates. I. Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettel, M.; Klopotek, M.; Dixit, M.; Empting, E.; Schilling, T.; Hansen-Goos, H.

    2016-08-01

    The equilibrium properties of hard rod monolayers are investigated in a lattice model (where position and orientation of a rod are restricted to discrete values) as well as in an off-lattice model featuring spherocylinders with continuous positional and orientational degrees of freedom. Both models are treated using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Upon increasing the density of rods in the monolayer, there is a continuous ordering of the rods along the monolayer normal ("standing up" transition). The continuous transition also persists in the case of an external potential which favors flat-lying rods in the monolayer. This behavior is found in both the lattice and the continuum models. For the lattice model, we find very good agreement between the results from the specific DFT used (lattice fundamental measure theory) and simulations. The properties of lattice fundamental measure theory are further illustrated by the phase diagrams of bulk hard rods in two and three dimensions.

  14. Analysis of High Temperature Reactor Control Rod Worth for the Initial and Full Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktajianto, Hammam; Setiawati, Evi; Anam, Khoirul; Sugito, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Control rod is one important component in a nuclear reactor. In nuclear reactor operations the control rod functions to shut down the reactor. This research analyses ten control rods worth of HTR (High Temperature Reactor) at initial and full core. The HTR in this research adopts HTR-10 China and HTR- of pebble bed. Core calculations are performed by using MCNPX code after modelling the entire parts of core in condition of ten control rods fully withdrawn, all control rods in with 20 cm ranges of depth and the use of one control rod. Pebble bed and moderator balls are distributed in the core zone using a Body Centred Cubic (BCC) lattice by ratio of 57:43. The research results are obtained that the use of one control rod will decrease the reactor criticality of 2.04±0.12 %Δk/k at initial core and 1.57±0.10 %Δk/k at full core. The deeper control rods are in, the lesser criticality of reactor is with reactivity of ten control rods of 16.41±0.11 %Δk/k at initial core and 15.43±0.11 %Δk/k at full core. The results show that the use of ten control rods at full core will keep achieving subcritical condition even though the reactivity is smaller than reactivity at initial core.

  15. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  16. Measurements of total reactive nitrogen during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Anderson, L. C.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    Composite distributions of measured total reactive nitrogen NO(y), from the NASA ER-2 during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition are presented. The observed features of these distributions are discussed in terms of the controlling dynamical, chemical and microphysical processes. In the latitudinal profile from 58 deg N to within about 4 deg poleward of the polar vortex boundary, NO(y) conforms closely to predictions of NO(y) based on N2O measurements. Poleward of 5 deg of latitude within the boundary, the average NO(y) decreases sharply and is significantly lower than that predicted from N2O. This feature is consistent with loss of NO(y) through sedimentation of particles containing NO(y) in polar stratospheric clouds.

  17. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  18. Long Term Suboxone™ Emotional Reactivity As Measured by Automatic Detection in Speech

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Edward; Han, David; Dumouchel, Pierre; Dehak, Najim; Quatieri, Thomas; Moehs, Charles; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Giordano, John; Simpatico, Thomas; Blum, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation’s most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX) as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states (“true ground emotionality”) in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of “true” emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP) and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate “true ground” emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™). We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01), and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction. PMID:23874860

  19. Differentiating Challenge Reactivity from Psychomotor Activity in Studies of Children's Psychophysiology: Considerations for Theory and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nicole R.; Alkon, Abbey; Obradovic, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338).…

  20. The Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale: Measurement Invariance, Stability, and Validity in Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlotz, Wolff; Yim, Ilona S.; Zoccola, Peggy M.; Jansen, Lars; Schulz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. We here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a…

  1. Reference measurement procedure development for C-reactive protein in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Eric L; Bunk, David M

    2009-10-15

    This paper describes the development of a reference measurement procedure to quantify human C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum using affinity techniques prior to tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the certification of reference materials in clinically relevant ranges. The absence of a suitable internal standard for the CRP measurement, necessary to eliminate potential measurement bias in both the affinity purification and trypsin digestion steps, was addressed using the method of standard addition. The standard addition quantification approach was combined with affinity purification, using an anti-CRP monoclonal antibody conjugated to polystyrene beads, trypsin digestion of the purified protein, and LC-MS/MS analysis of CRP tryptic peptides. The effectiveness of intact protein affinity purification was evaluated through the measurement of CRP in several serum-based CRP control materials, yielding levels that were comparable to their expected mean concentration values. Quantitative results were confirmed with an external calibration approach. This study demonstrates the feasibility of affinity purification with LC-MS/MS for the reference measurement procedure development of low abundance serum protein analytes.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  3. Learning with Rods: One Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Donald Esha

    This paper discusses one English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher's attempts to use cuisenaire rods as a language learning tool. Cuisenaire rods (sometimes called algebricks) vary in size from 1 x 1 x 10 centimeter sticks to 1 x 1 x 1 centimeter cubes, with each of the 10 sizes a different color. Although such rods have been used to teach…

  4. Closed form expressions for crack mouth displacements and stress intensity factors for chevron notched short bar and short rod specimens based on experimental compliance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubsey, R. T.; Orange, T. W.; Pierce, W. S.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A set of equations are presented describing certain fracture mechanics parameters for chevron notch bar and rod specimens. They are developed by fitting compliance calibration data reported earlier. The equations present the various parameters in their most useful forms. The data encompass the entire range of the specimen geometries most commonly used. Their use will facilitate the testing and analysis of brittle metals, ceramics, and glasses.

  5. Dynamic, multiaxial impact response of confined and unconfined ceramic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Grady, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    A new configuration for impact testing was implemented which yielded time-resolved measurements of the dynamic response of materials undergoing multiaxial strain. With this`-Method, one end of an initially stationary rod (ie., right circular cylinder) of test material was subjected to planar impact with a flat-faced projectile. The test rod was either free (unconfined) or mounted within a close-fitting sleeve which provided lateral confinement. Velocity interferometer diagnostics monitored the axial (longitudinal) velocity of the rod free end, and the transverse (radial) velocity for one or more points on the periphery of the rod or confinement sleeve. Analysis of the resultant velocity records allowed assessment of material properties, such as wave speeds and compressive yield strength, without the requirement of intact recovery of the rod. Data were obtained for alumina (Coors AD-99.5) rods in a series of tests involving variations in confinement and peak impact stress.

  6. In situ simple method for measuring size and density of nanoparticles in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kita, Makoto; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yukio

    2006-04-15

    A laser-light-scattering (LLS) method for measuring the size and density of nanoparticles generated in reactive plasmas has been developed. The size and density of the nanoparticles are determined from their thermal coagulation that takes place after turning off the discharge. The measurable size and density range of the LLS method is n{sub p} x 10{sup 13} (m{sup -3/2})xd{sub p}{sup -5/2}L{sup -2}n{sub g}{sup -1}, where n{sub p}, d{sub p}, L, and n{sub g} are the density, size, and diffusion length of the nanoparticles, and the density of a background gas, respectively. The method has been demonstrated by measurement of the size and density of nanoparticles formed by the radio-frequency discharge of dimethyldimethoxysilane Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2} diluted with Ar. Using a simple optical setup for the LLS measurement, nanoparticles are detected down to {approx_equal}1 nm in size when they are generated at a density of {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The developed method is widely applicable to other systems in which thermal coagulation takes place.

  7. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  8. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  9. Trunnion Rod Microcrack Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    optimization, which can involve specification of frequency, propagation mode, transmitter, receiver, and post processing . More detail is presented...structures such as plates, rods, pipes and even more arbitrary shaped extrusions like railroad tracks, greatly affect the propagation characteristics of...waves exist only in solids and are not carried in fluids. Some greases do have limited capacity in carrying shear waves. Because the viscosity of some

  10. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  11. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  12. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  13. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.; Gregurech, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  14. Accelerating flow propagator measurements for the investigation of reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourne, A. A.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.

    2016-11-01

    NMR propagator measurements are widely used for identifying the distribution of molecular displacements over a given observation time, characterising a flowing system. However, where high q-space resolution is required, the experiments are time consuming and therefore unsuited to the study of dynamic systems. Here, it is shown that with an appropriately sampled subset of the q-space points in a high-resolution flow propagator measurement, one can quickly and robustly reconstruct the fully sampled propagator through interpolation of the acquired raw data. It was found that exponentially sampling ∼4% of the original data-points allowed a reconstruction with the deviation from the fully sampled propagator below the noise level, in this case reducing the required experimental time from ∼2.8 h to <7 min. As a demonstration, this approach is applied to observe the temporal evolution of the reactive flow of acid through an Estaillades rock core plug. It is shown that 'wormhole' formation in the rock core plug provides a channel for liquid flow such that the remaining pore space is by-passed, thereby causing the flow velocity of the liquid in the remaining part of the plug to become stagnant. The propagator measurements are supported by both 1D profiles and 2D imaging data. Such insights are of importance in understanding well acidisation and CO2 sequestration processes.

  15. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  16. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dionigi, F.; Hansen, O.; Nielsen, M. G.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K.; Pedersen, T.

    2013-10-15

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ∼0.4 and ∼4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  17. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, F; Nielsen, M G; Pedersen, T; Hansen, O; Chorkendorff, I; Vesborg, P C K

    2013-10-01

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ~0.4 and ~4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  18. Passive electrical properties of rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gertrude; Fatt, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Measurements on a packed suspension of randomly oriented, dark-adapted frog rods at frequencies of 15 c/s-0·5 Mc/s indicate a behaviour similar to that of other biological materials. 2. Results are analysed on the assumption that the low-frequency limiting resistance is determined by current flowing in the suspending medium and that, of the rods, two thirds are oriented perpendicular to the applied field and one third parallel to it. Those parallel to the field are treated as non-conductors. 3. From the high-frequency limiting resistance the conductivity of the rod interior is calculated to vary linearly with the conductivity of the medium. The slope of the relation of internal to external conductivity is 0·50 with a limiting internal conductivity (at zero external) of 280 μmho/cm. 4. On the assumption that the suspension can be represented as a single-capacitance network, the characteristic frequency of impedance is used to calculate a capacitance for the rod surface of 1·54 μF/cm2. On the assumption of a distribution in properties of the suspension according to the theory of Bruggeman, the capacitance is calculated to have a value of about one half this. 5. At frequencies below 5 kc/s the impedance locus deviates from the curve describing the behaviour at higher frequencies. It is suggested that this may involve conduction in a thin layer extending along the surface of the rod. PMID:5685292

  19. Wetting of a partially immersed compliant rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2016-11-01

    The force on a solid rod partially immersed in a liquid is commonly used to determine the liquid-vapor surface tension by equating the measured force required to remove the rod from the liquid to the vertical component of the liquid-vapor surface tension. Here, we study how this process is affected when the rod is compliant. For equilibrium, we enforce force and configurational energy balance, including contributions from elastic energy. We show that, in general, the contact angle does not equal that given by Young's equation. If surface stresses are tensile, the strain in the immersed part of the rod is found to be compressive and to depend only on the solid-liquid surface stress. The strain in the dry part of the rod can be either tensile or compressive, depending on a combination of parameters that we identify. We also provide results for compliant plates partially immersed in a liquid under plane strain and plane stress. Our results can be used to extract solid surface stresses from such experiments.

  20. Chemical Dosimeter Tube With Coaxial Sensing Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved length-of-stain (LOS) chemical dosimeter indicates total dose of chemical vapor in air. Made with rods and tubes of various diameters to obtain various sensitivities and dynamic ranges. Sensitivity larger and dose range smaller when more room for diffusion in gap between tube and rod. Offers greater resistance to changing of color of exposed dye back to color of unexposed condition, greater sensitivity, and higher degree of repeatability. Developed to measure doses of gaseous HCI, dosimeter modified by use of other dyes to indicate doses of other chemical vapors.

  1. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  2. Relationship between measures of HIV reactivation and the decline of latent reservoir under latency-reversing agents.

    PubMed

    Petravic, Janka; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Lewin, Sharon R; Kent, Stephen J; Davenport, Miles P

    2017-02-15

    Antiretroviral-free HIV remission requires substantial reduction of the number of latently infected cells and enhanced immune control of viremia. Latency-reversing agents (LRA) aim to eliminate latently infected cells by increasing the rate of reactivation of HIV transcription, which exposes these cells to killing by the immune system. As LRA are explored in clinical trials, it becomes increasingly important to assess the effect of increased HIV reactivation rate on the decline of latently infected cells, and estimate LRA efficacy in increasing virus reactivation. However, whether the extent of HIV reactivation is a good predictor of the rate of decline of the number of latently infected cells is dependent on a number of factors. Our modeling shows that mechanisms of maintenance and clearance of the reservoir, lifespan of cells with reactivated HIV and other factors may significantly impact the relationship between measures of HIV reactivation and the decline of the number of latently infected cells.The usual measures of HIV reactivation are the increase in cell-associated HIV RNA (CA RNA) and/or plasma HIV RNA soon after administration. We analyze two recent studies where CA RNA was used to estimate the impact of two novel LRAs, panobinostat and romidepsin. Both drugs increased the CA RNA level 3-4 fold in clinical trials. However, cells with panobinostat-reactivated HIV appeared long-lived (half-life > month), suggesting that HIV reactivation rate increased approximately by 8%. With romidepsin, the lifespan of cells that reactivated HIV was short (2 days), suggesting that HIV reactivation rate may have doubled under treatment.Importance Long-lived latently infected cells that persist on antiretroviral treatment (ART) are thought to be the source of viral rebound soon after ART interruption. The elimination of latently infected cells is an important step to achieving antiretroviral-free HIV remission. Latency-reversing agents (LRA) aim to activate HIV expression

  3. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  4. Direct measurements of conformer-dependent reactivity of the Criegee intermediate CH3CHOO.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Scheer, Adam M; Shallcross, Dudley E; Rotavera, Brandon; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Mok, Daniel K W; Osborn, David L; Percival, Carl J

    2013-04-12

    Although carbonyl oxides, "Criegee intermediates," have long been implicated in tropospheric oxidation, there have been few direct measurements of their kinetics, and only for the simplest compound in the class, CH2OO. Here, we report production and reaction kinetics of the next larger Criegee intermediate, CH3CHOO. Moreover, we independently probed the two distinct CH3CHOO conformers, syn- and anti-, both of which react readily with SO2 and with NO2. We demonstrate that anti-CH3CHOO is substantially more reactive toward water and SO2 than is syn-CH3CHOO. Reaction with water may dominate tropospheric removal of Criegee intermediates and determine their atmospheric concentration. An upper limit is obtained for the reaction of syn-CH3CHOO with water, and the rate constant for reaction of anti-CH3CHOO with water is measured as 1.0 × 10(-14) ± 0.4 × 10(-14) centimeter(3) second(-1).

  5. Measurements of nitric oxide and total reactive nitrogen in the Antarctic stratosphere - Observations and chemical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Murphy, D. M.; Proffitt, M. H.; Eubank, C. S.; Ko, M. K. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements of NO and the sum of reactive nitrogen species, NO(y), which include NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, and ClONO2 (in addition to ClO, O3, H2O, and N2O measurements), obtained aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft flying over the Antarctica between the latitudes of 53 and 72 deg S during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The boundary of the chemically perturbed region (CPR), as indicated by a sharp increase in the level of ClO, occurred near 66 deg S; outside or equatorward of the CPR, the NO(y) mixing ratios ranged between 6 and 12 ppbv, with values decreasing poleward and reaching total NO(y) levels of 4 ppbv or less within 5-deg poleward of the boundary. Data presented in this paper clearly associate the Antarctic ozone decrease with perturbed conditions of ClO, NO(y), and H2O, which are in turn associated with processes defined as nonstandard heterogeneous chemistry, denitrification, and dehydration, respectively.

  6. New Indices of Endothelial Function Measured by Digital Thermal Monitoring of Vascular Reactivity: Data from 6084 Patients Registry.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Morteza; Yen, Albert A; Lin, Alex W H; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Kleis, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is viewed as a barometer of cardiovascular health and plays a central role in vascular reactivity. Several studies showed digital thermal monitoring (DTM) as a simple noninvasive method to measure vascular reactivity that is correlated with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary artery disease. Objectives. To further evaluate the relations between patient characteristics and DTM indices in a large patient registry. Methods. DTM measures were correlated with age, sex, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 6084 patients from 18 clinics. Results. DTM vascular reactivity index (VRI) was normally distributed and inversely correlated with age (r = -0.21, p < 0.0001). Thirteen percent of VRI tests were categorized as poor vascular reactivity (VRI < 1.0), 70 percent as intermediate (1.0 ≤ VRI < 2.0), and 17 percent as good (VRI ≥ 2.0). Poor VRI (<1.0) was noted in 6% of <50 y, 10% of 50-70 y, and 18% of ≥70 y. In multiple linear regression analyses, age, sex, and diastolic blood pressure were significant but weak predictors of VRI. Conclusions. As the largest database of finger-based vascular reactivity measurement, this report adds to prior findings that VRI is a meaningful physiological marker and reflects a high level of residual risk found in patients currently under care.

  7. New Indices of Endothelial Function Measured by Digital Thermal Monitoring of Vascular Reactivity: Data from 6084 Patients Registry

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Albert A.; Lin, Alex W. H.; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Kleis, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is viewed as a barometer of cardiovascular health and plays a central role in vascular reactivity. Several studies showed digital thermal monitoring (DTM) as a simple noninvasive method to measure vascular reactivity that is correlated with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary artery disease. Objectives. To further evaluate the relations between patient characteristics and DTM indices in a large patient registry. Methods. DTM measures were correlated with age, sex, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 6084 patients from 18 clinics. Results. DTM vascular reactivity index (VRI) was normally distributed and inversely correlated with age (r = −0.21, p < 0.0001). Thirteen percent of VRI tests were categorized as poor vascular reactivity (VRI < 1.0), 70 percent as intermediate (1.0 ≤ VRI < 2.0), and 17 percent as good (VRI ≥ 2.0). Poor VRI (<1.0) was noted in 6% of <50 y, 10% of 50–70 y, and 18% of ≥70 y. In multiple linear regression analyses, age, sex, and diastolic blood pressure were significant but weak predictors of VRI. Conclusions. As the largest database of finger-based vascular reactivity measurement, this report adds to prior findings that VRI is a meaningful physiological marker and reflects a high level of residual risk found in patients currently under care. PMID:27830091

  8. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  9. New Directions in Measuring Reactive and Proactive Aggression: Validation of a Teacher Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Thomaes, Sander; van Aken, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The well-known distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is theoretically important but empirically controversial. Recently, aggression researchers have argued that we should separate the form and function of aggression to make a clearer distinction between reactive and proactive aggression. This article describes the validation of a…

  10. AN EXAMINATION OF METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENTS OF REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive gaseous Hg (RGHg), usually assumed to be HgCl2, may
    dominate the total Hg depositional flux due to its higher surface reactivity and
    water solubility. Three methods are currently used for RGHg sampling:
    multi-stage filter packs, refluxing mist c...

  11. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  12. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  13. Comparison of Reactive Mercury Concentrations Measured Simultaneously Using KCl-coated Denuders, Nylon Membranes, and Cation Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    There is much debate about the chemistry of reactive gaseous and particle bound mercury (Hg) in the atmosphere, and the processes associated with formation. In addition, there are concerns regarding the interferences and calibration of the widely used Tekran® 2537/1130/1135 Hg measurement system. To investigate these we developed simple laboratory and field sampling systems designed to collect and analyze reactive Hg (Hg (II), Hg (I) and/or particle bound). A manifold system was applied in the laboratory, and in the field, in-series and -parallel membranes, flow controllers and pumps were utilized. Both systems actively collected reactive Hg using nylon membranes and cation exchange membranes alongside measurements made using the Tekran® system. The analytical system consisted of step wise 2.5 minute thermo-desorption and Hg quantification by cold vapor atomic fluorescence. In the laboratory, we compared the efficiency of these surfaces for collection of HgO, HgCl2, and HgBr2 when permeated into Hg and oxidant free air, and ambient filtered air. Other tests are ongoing. Thus far, results show concentrations measured by the cation exchange membrane were two-to-three fold greater than that measured by the nylon membranes, and three-to -four fold greater than that measured by the KCl-coated annual denuder. Thermo-desorption profiles obtained using nylon membranes show slightly different patterns associated with the reactive Hg compounds as permeated and tested. Field measurements were made at two locations in Reno, Nevada (a high traffic site and an agricultural area) and at Elkhorn Slough, California (marine site). Desorption profiles from nylon membrane differed by site and by time of year. Although the influence of aerosol on this measurement has not been explored, field results suggest different forms of reactive Hg were present in the atmosphere as a function of season and location.

  14. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  15. Making Highly Pure Glass Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

  16. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2002-08-01

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon (mum/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and plus-or-minus5 mu][epsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are plus-or-minus7 and plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is plus-or-minus20 mu][epsilon for the two-point loading case.

  17. Active Brownian rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruani, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria, chemically-driven rods, and motility assays are examples of active (i.e. self-propelled) Brownian rods (ABR). The physics of ABR, despite their ubiquity in experimental systems, remains still poorly understood. Here, we review the large-scale properties of collections of ABR moving in a dissipative medium. We address the problem by presenting three different models, of decreasing complexity, which we refer to as model I, II, and III, respectively. Comparing model I, II, and III, we disentangle the role of activity and interactions. In particular, we learn that in two dimensions by ignoring steric or volume exclusion effects, large-scale nematic order seems to be possible, while steric interactions prevent the formation of orientational order at large scales. The macroscopic behavior of ABR results from the interplay between active stresses and local alignment. ABR exhibit, depending on where we locate ourselves in parameter space, a zoology of macroscopic patterns that ranges from polar and nematic bands to dynamic aggregates.

  18. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  19. Screening symptoms of reactive attachment disorder: evidence for measurement invariance and convergent validity.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Eleonora; De Schipper, J Clasien; Bosmans, Guy; Verschueren, Karine

    2013-09-01

    The Relationship Problems Questionnaire (RPQ) was developed to screen symptoms of the inhibited and disinhibited subtype of reactive attachment disorder (RAD). This study further examines the psychometric properties of the RPQ in children with severe emotional and behavioural problems by testing its measurement invariance across informants and its convergent validity. Parents and teachers of 152 children [mean age (Mage) = 7.92] from 20 schools for special education filled out the RPQ and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). During a home visit in a subsample of 77 children the Disturbances of Attachment Interview (DAI) was administered to the caregiver and the child was observed using an observational schedule for RAD. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed the expected two-factor structure for both parent and teacher RPQ. Configural and metric invariance, but no scalar invariance, were obtained across informants. Both RPQ-subscales had acceptable to good internal consistencies and correlated as expected with similar DAI-subscales. Furthermore, the disinhibited RPQ-scale related with observations of the child's approach to a stranger. Finally, significant associations were found between the RPQ and the SDQ. Overall, the RPQ has good psychometric qualities as a multi-informant instrument for RAD-symptoms in children with severe emotional and behavioural problems.

  20. A paper-based device for measurement of reactive phosphate in water.

    PubMed

    Jayawardane, B Manori; McKelvie, Ian D; Kolev, Spas D

    2012-10-15

    The preparation and evaluation of a simple paper-based device for the determination of reactive phosphate in natural and soil waters based on the formation of phosphomolybdenum blue is reported. Hydrophilic reagent zones were defined by printing filter paper with a hydrophobic paper-sizing agent using an inkjet printer. The molybdate/potassium antimony(III)-tartrate reagent and ascorbic acid reductant merged together from adjacent hydrophilic zones after spotting the liquid sample onto the paper. The colour intensity of the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex produced was measured using a flat bed scanner. Under optimal conditions, the paper-based device is characterised by a working range of 0.2-10 mg L(-1) P, limits of detection and quantitation of 0.05 and 0.16 mg L(-1) P, respectively, and repeatability of less than 2% RSD at 1 and 5 mg L(-1) P (n=10 and 8). There was no significant difference between the results obtained using the paper-based device and reference methods (t=0.0135, P (T≤t) two-tail=0.9892, df=38). In its optimum form, the paper-based device was stable for up to 15 day under ambient conditions, and up to 122 day when stored at ≤-20 °C. The small dimensions, minimal reagent consumption, low cost (a few cents), ease of operation and favourable analytical performance make the proposed paper-based device attractive for on-site environmental monitoring and analysis.

  1. Measuring cerebrovascular reactivity: the dynamic response to a step hypercapnic stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Poublanc, Julien; Crawley, Adrian P; Sobczyk, Olivia; Montandon, Gaspard; Sam, Kevin; Mandell, Daniel M; Dufort, Paul; Venkatraghavan, Lashmikumar; Duffin, James; Mikulis, David J; Fisher, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    We define cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) as the ratio of the change in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal (S) to an increase in blood partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2): % Δ S/Δ PCO2 mm Hg. Our aim was to further characterize CVR into dynamic and static components and then study 46 healthy subjects collated into a reference atlas and 20 patients with unilateral carotid artery stenosis. We applied an abrupt boxcar change in PCO2 and monitored S. We convolved the PCO2 with a set of first-order exponential functions whose time constant τ was increased in 2-second intervals between 2 and 100 seconds. The τ corresponding to the best fit between S and the convolved PCO2 was used to score the speed of response. Additionally, the slope of the regression between S and the convolved PCO2 represents the steady-state CVR (ssCVR). We found that both prolongations of τ and reductions in ssCVR (compared with the reference atlas) were associated with the reductions in CVR on the side of the lesion. τ and ssCVR are respectively the dynamic and static components of measured CVR. PMID:26126862

  2. Control rod heterogeneity effects in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors: Method developments and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Granget, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Soule, R.

    1988-11-01

    The control rod worth assessment in a large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is strongly dependent on the actual arrangement of the absorber pins inside the control rod subassemblies. The so-called heterogeneity effects (i.e., the effects on the rod reactivity of the actual rod internal geometry versus homogenization of the absorber atoms over all the subassembly volume) have been evaluated, using explicit and variational methods to derive appropriate cross sections. An experimental program performed at the MASURCA facility has been used to validate these methods.

  3. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1984-01-01

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  4. Micrometeorological measurements of ammonia and total reactive nitrogen exchange over semi-natural peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Schrader, Frederik; Kutsch, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Intensive agriculture generates a substantial atmospheric burden for nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as peatlands when the latter are located in close vicinity to arable sites and animal houses. The exchange of reactive nitrogen compounds between these bog ecosystems and the atmosphere is still not very well understood due to the lack of suitable measurement techniques. With recent advancements in laser spectrometry, we used a quantum cascade laser spectrometer as well as a custom-built total reactive atmospheric nitrogen (ΣNr) converter (TRANC) coupled to a fast-response chemiluminescence detector to measure NH3 and ΣNr concentrations, respectively. The analyzers' high temporal resolution allowed for determination of the respective nitrogen exchange within eddy covariance-based setups. Field campaigns were conducted at a northwestern German peatland site that is surrounded by an area of highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). The field site is part of a natural park with a very small remaining protected zone of less than 2 km x 2 km. Ammonia and ΣNr concentrations were highly variable between 2 to 110 ppb and 10 to 120 ppb, respectively. Peak values coincided with main fertilization periods on the neighboring agricultural land in early spring and fall. The trend in weekly averaged ΣNr concentrations from TRANC measurements was in good agreement with results from KAPS denuder filter systems when the latter were combined with the missing and apparently highly variable NOx contribution. Wind direction and land use in the closer vicinity clearly regulated whether ΣNr concentrations were NH3 or NOx-dominated. Ammonia uptake rates between 40 ng N m-2 s-1 and near-neutral exchange were observed. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~700 g N ha-1 resulting in a dry net deposition of ~4 kg N ha-1 when extrapolated to an entire year, whereas KAPS denuder measurements in combination with dry

  5. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as

  6. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-15

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1 mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2 mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  7. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-01

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1 mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2 mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  8. Methodological considerations for the use of heart rate variability as a measure of pain reactivity in vulnerable infants.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Tim; Saul, J Philip

    2002-09-01

    Measures of HR and HRV offer multiple indices of reactivity to painful events. These measures are particularly helpful in preterm and ill infants where distress signals are often nonspecific and ambiguous. HR is easy to acquire, and a variety of widely used techniques are available for processing it. In general, the neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic bases for pain perception are in place even in the most preterm infant and produce patterns of HR and HRV responses that are similar across multiple settings. Developmental and experiential factors related to preterm birth, however, may affect these HR responses. Furthermore, evaluation of ill infants in an NICU setting adds multiple contextual factors that potentially influence HR and HRV and alter their specificity as measures of pain. In some cases, it may appear that pain reactivity is reduced when, in fact, HR reactivity is only an expression of the biologic capacity to produce a response, not the presence of a response itself. The nature of the setting and the infant's health, developmental stage, and behavioral state all contribute to potentially altering HR responses to painful events in this setting. Thus, the methodology used and its application must be flexible. A variety of HRV analysis techniques may be needed to identify a variety of response patterns and mechanisms that influence pain reactivity. Furthermore, careful selection of HR epochs for stationarity, an understanding of the potential discordance between biologic and behavioral measures, the effects of medication, and an accounting for developmental differences that occur during a typical NICU course are all critical factors for investigators to be aware of. Understanding cardiovascular reactivity as a measure of response to painful events in vulnerable infants requires ongoing work.

  9. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design.

  10. Simplified modeling of the EBR-II control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, P.L.

    1995-06-25

    Simplified models of EBR-II control and safety rods have been developed for core modeling under various operational and shutdown conditions. A parametric study was performed on normal worth, high worth, and safety rod type control rods. A summary of worth changes due to individual modeling approximations is tabulated. Worth effects due to structural modeling simplification are negligible. Fuel region homogenization and burnup compression contributes more than any other factor. Reference case C/E values (ratio of calculated worth from detailed model to measured worth) of 1.072 and 1.142 for safety and normal worth rods indicate acceptable errors when the approximations are used. Fuel burnup effect illustrates rod worth sensitivity to the modeling approximation. Aggregate effects are calculated under a reduced mesh.

  11. A Characterization of the Radiation from a Rod-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Allen, R. J.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Schumer, J. W.; Young, F. C.

    2001-10-01

    The rod pinch diode is being developed as an intense, x-ray source for high-resolution flash radiography. Recent experiments on the Asterix pulsed-power generator at the CEG in France have demonstrated rod-pinch operation with 2-4 MV endpoint voltages and have demonstrated doses of = 5-23 rads-Si at 1 meter with a 1-mm diameter spot size. A series of = simulations with the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) electron/photon transport code = were performed to characterize the radiation from a rod-pinch. The electron-energy and incident-angle distributions on the tungsten rod = were input to ITS from MAGIC PIC predictions. These simulations give = information about the angular dependence of the radiation from the rod-pinch and the axial extent of the radiation source. The results from these simulations will be compared with radiation measurements from Asterix.

  12. Switch isotropic/anisotropic wettability via dual-scale rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Jiang, Chengyu; Wang, Shengkun; Ma, Zhibo; Yuan, Weizheng

    2014-10-01

    It is the first time to demonstrate the comparison of isotropic/anisotropic wettability between dual-scale micro-nano-rods and single-scale micro-rods. Inspired by the natural structures of rice leaf, a series of micro-nano-rods and micro-rods with different geometric parameters were fabricated using micro-fabrication technology. Experimental measured apparent contact angles and advancing and receding contact angles from orthogonal orientations were characterized. The difference of contact angles from orthogonal orientation on dual-scale rods was much smaller than those on single-scale rods in both static and dynamic situation. It indicated that the dual-scale micro-nano-rods showed isotropic wettability, while single-scale micro-rods showed anisotropic wettability. The switch of isotropic/anisotropic wettability could be illustrated by different wetting state and contact line moving. It offers a facial way to switch isotropic/anisotropic wettability of the surface via dual-scale or single-scale structure.

  13. Sucker rod pump

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a subsurface well pump, it comprises: a working barrel; a plunger which reciprocates along the vertical axis within the working barrel between an upper and lower position; a rod connected to the plunger and extending to a means for providing reciprocating force; a well string extending from the top of the working barrel to the surface; an outlet check valve which permits flow to exit the working barrel into the well string and does not permit flow to exit the well string into the working barrel; and an inlet check valve which permits flow into the working barrel from outside of the subsurface pump, the inlet check valve being above the top position of the plunger, the inlet check valve having a cross sectional flow area about equal to or greater than the horizontal cross sectional area of the working barrel, and the inlet check valve being a hinged flapper valve.

  14. Cuisenaire Rods Go to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Phyllis; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents examples of questions and answers arising from a hands-on and exploratory approach to discrete mathematics using cuisenaire rods. Combinatorial questions about trains formed of cuisenaire rods provide the setting for discovering numerical patterns by experimentation and organizing the results using induction and successive differences.…

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Part 2. Assessment of airtrak as a reactivity analyzer. Final report for the second year, March 1, 1994-February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Hurley, M.D.; Japar, S.M.; Chang, T.

    1996-06-13

    During the second year of the GM smog chamber study of incremental reactivity the authors performed smog chamber experiments to measure three important properties of incremental reactivity. First, they challenged the linear relationship between the Carter factors and the chamber-measured reactivities found during the first-year smog chamber study. Second, they compared the predicted and measured smog formation in simple and complex mixtures. Third, they measured the incremental reactivities of three hydrocarbons (n-butane, propene, and p-xylene) as well as the urban-surrogate mixture at three different temperatures, 22 deg C, 32 deg C (the default), and 42 deg C, to determine how temperature affects both the absolute and the relative reactivity. Finally, they conducted experiments in which the incremental reactivity of NO2 was measured in order to test the Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model.

  16. Behaviour of the rod network in the tiger salamander retina mediated by membrane properties of individual rods

    PubMed Central

    Attwell, David; Wilson, Martin

    1980-01-01

    1. The spread of electrical signals between rods in the salamander retina was examined by passing current into one rod and recording the voltage responses in nearby rods. Rod network behaviour, measured in this way, was simulated from data on rod membrane properties gathered in voltage-clamp experiments on single isolated rods. 2. The network voltage responses to square current pulses became smaller, more transient, and had a longer time-to-peak, for rods further away from the site of current injection. Depolarizing currents produced smaller responses than hyperpolarizing currents of the same magnitude. 3. Neighbouring rods and cones were coupled less strongly than neighbouring rods. 4. The response of the rod network to current injection was unaffected by 2 mm-aspartate-, which eliminates transmission from receptors to horizontal cells. 5. The input resistance of single isolated rods, measured at the resting potential, varied between 100 and 680 MΩ. The lower values were probably due to damage by the micro-electrodes. Electrical coupling was found to be very strong between the rod inner and outer segments. 6. A strong `instantaneous' outward rectification seen in isolated rods at potentials positive to -35 mV was reduced, but not abolished, by 15 mm-TEA. 7. In normal solution, isolated rods exhibited a voltage- and time-dependent current, IA, whose kinetics were approximated by a single first-order gating variable, and whose activation curve spanned the range between -40 and -80 mV. The time constant for the current varied with voltage and was 60-200 msec between -140 and -40 mV. 8. A reversal potential for IA could not be found between -140 and -40 mV in normal solution, and the fully activated current, ĪA, was approximately voltage-independent, with a magnitude of ∼ 0.1 nA over this potential range. 9. By several criteria, IA behaved as a single inward current activated by hyperpolarization. Pharmacological studies suggest, however, that it is the sum of at

  17. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  18. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  19. Actin dynamics and cofilin-actin rods in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bamburg, James R.; Bernstein, Barbara W.

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities and synaptic loss, typical of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), are induced by diverse stresses such as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and energetic stress, each of which may be initiated or enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines or amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Extracellular Aβ-containing plaques and intracellular phospho-tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles are postmortem pathologies required to confirm AD and have been the focus of most studies. However, AD brain, but not normal brain, also have increased levels of cytoplasmic rod-shaped bundles of filaments composed of ADF/cofilin-actin in a 1:1 complex (rods). Cofilin, the major ADF/cofilin isoform in mammalian neurons, severs actin filaments at low cofilin/actin ratios and stabilizes filaments at high cofilin/actin ratios. It binds cooperatively to ADP-actin subunits in F-actin. Cofilin is activated by dephosphorylation and may be oxidized in stressed neurons to form disulfide-linked dimers, required for bundling cofilin-actin filaments into stable rods. Rods form within neurites causing synaptic dysfunction by sequestering cofilin, disrupting normal actin dynamics, blocking transport, and exacerbating mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Aβ and proinflammatory cytokines induce rods through a cellular prion protein-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase and production of reactive oxygen species. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of cofilin biochemistry, rod formation, and the development of cognitive deficits. We will then discuss rod formation as a molecular pathway for synapse loss that may be common between all three prominent current AD hypotheses, thus making rods an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26873625

  20. Topological mixing with ghost rods.

    PubMed

    Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Finn, Matthew D

    2006-03-01

    Topological chaos relies on the periodic motion of obstacles in a two-dimensional flow in order to form nontrivial braids. This motion generates exponential stretching of material lines, and hence efficient mixing. Boyland, Aref, and Stremler [J. Fluid Mech. 403, 277 (2000)] have studied a specific periodic motion of rods that exhibits topological chaos in a viscous fluid. We show that it is possible to extend their work to cases where the motion of the stirring rods is topologically trivial by considering the dynamics of special periodic points that we call "ghost rods", because they play a similar role to stirring rods. The ghost rods framework provides a new technique for quantifying chaos and gives insight into the mechanisms that produce chaos and mixing. Numerical simulations for Stokes flow support our results.

  1. Experiments with a falling rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Vitor

    2016-02-01

    We study the motion of a uniform thin rod released from rest, with the bottom end initially in contact with a horizontal surface. Our focus here is the motion of the bottom end as the rod falls. For small angles of release with respect to the horizontal, the rod falls without the bottom end slipping. For larger angles, the slipping direction depends on the static friction coefficient between the rod and the horizontal surface. Small friction coefficients cause the end to slip initially in one direction and then in the other, while for high coefficients, the end slips in one direction only. For intermediate values, depending on the angle of release, both situations can occur. We find the initial slipping direction to depend on a relation between the angle at which the rod slips, and a critical angle at which the frictional force vanishes. Comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations shows good agreement.

  2. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  3. Correlated and uncorrelated invisible temporal white noise alters mesopic rod signaling.

    PubMed

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Kremers, Jan; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    We determined how rod signaling at mesopic light levels is altered by extrinsic temporal white noise that is correlated or uncorrelated with the activity of one (magnocellular, parvocellular, or koniocellular) postreceptoral pathway. Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. Psychometric (Weibull) functions were measured for incremental rod pulses (50 to 250 ms) in the presence (or absence; control) of perceptually invisible subthreshold extrinsic noise. Uncorrelated (rod) noise facilitates rod detection. Correlated postreceptoral pathway noise produces differential changes in rod detection thresholds and decreases the slope of the psychometric functions. We demonstrate that invisible extrinsic noise changes rod-signaling characteristics within the three retinogeniculate pathways at mesopic illumination depending on the temporal profile of the rod stimulus and the extrinsic noise type.

  4. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12 to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  5. New directions in measuring reactive and proactive aggression: validation of a teacher questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Thomaes, Sander; van Aken, Marcel

    2009-02-01

    The well-known distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is theoretically important but empirically controversial. Recently, aggression researchers have argued that we should separate the form and function of aggression to make a clearer distinction between reactive and proactive aggression. This article describes the validation of a new teacher-report Instrument for Reactive and Proactive Aggression (IRPA) that assesses the form separate from the function of aggression. We demonstrated good discriminant, convergent, and construct validity of the IRPA in a sample of 427 children aged 10 to 13. Reactive and proactive functions of aggression were independent constructs (r = 0.03) which indicates excellent discriminant validity. Convergent validity was satisfactory; scores from the IRPA were moderately to highly related to scores from the widely used Teacher Rating Instrument, TRI (Dodge and Coie in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 53:1146-1158, 1987). Additionally, reactive and proactive aggression showed unique correlations with most a priori hypothesized theoretically relevant variables, which indicates construct validity. (150 words).

  6. Dynamics of entangled rod-coil block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muzhou; Timachova, Ksenia; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Likhtman, Alexei E.; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2014-03-01

    Polymer science is exploring advanced materials which combine functional domains such as proteins and semiconducting polymers with traditional flexible polymers onto the same molecule. While many studies have focused on equilibrium structure-property relationships, little is known about how the conformational restrictions of rigid domains affect dynamical phenomena such as mechanical properties, processing pathways, and self-assembly kinetics. We have recently introduced a reptation theory for entangled rod-coil block copolymers as a model for this wider class of functional polymeric materials. The theory hypothesizes that the motion of rod-coils is slowed relative to rod and coil homopolymers because of a mismatch between the curvature of the rod and coil entanglement tubes. This effect leads to activated reptation and arm retraction as two relaxation mechanisms that govern the short and long rod regimes, respectively. These results were verified by tracer diffusion measurements using molecular dynamics simulation and forced Rayleigh scattering in both the rod-coil diblock and coil-rod-coil triblock configurations. The tracer diffusion results were then compared to experimental self-diffusion measurements which require a consideration of the motion of the surrounding chains.

  7. Inertial Range Scaling in Rotations of Long Rods in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Parsa, Shima

    2013-11-01

    We measure the rotational statistics of neutrally buoyant rods with lengths 2 . 8 < l / η < 72 . 9 in turbulence. For particles with length in the inertial range, we derive a scaling relationship for the mean square rotation rate, <ṗiṗi > ~l - 4 / 3 and show that measurements approach this scaling. Deviations from the proposed scaling are explained as the effect of dissipation range scales. The correlation time of the Lagrangian autocorrelation of rod rotation rate scales as the turn over time of eddies of the size of the rod. Measuring rotational dynamics of single long rods provides a new way to access the dynamics of turbulence at fixed spatial scale in a frame advected with the flow. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1208990.

  8. Organic compounds in office environments - sensory irritation, odor, measurements and the role of reactive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K; Clausen, P A; Nielsen, G D

    2006-02-01

    Abstract Sensory irritation and odor effects of organic compounds in indoor environments are reviewed. It is proposed to subdivide volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four categories: (i) chemically non-reactive, (ii) chemically 'reactive', (iii) biologically reactive (i.e. form chemical bonds to receptor sites in mucous membranes) and (iv) toxic compounds. Chemically non-reactive VOCs are considered non-irritants at typical indoor air levels. However, compounds with low odor thresholds contribute to the overall perception of the indoor air quality. Reported sensory irritation may be the result of odor annoyance. It appears that odor thresholds for many VOCs probably are considerably lower than previously reported. This explains why many building materials persistently are perceived as odorous, although the concentrations of the detected organic compounds are close to or below their reported odor thresholds. Ozone reacts with certain alkenes to form a gas and aerosol phase of oxidation products, some of which are sensory irritants. However, all of the sensory irritating species have not yet been identified and whether the secondary aerosols (ultrafine and fine particles) contribute to sensory irritation requires investigation. Low relative humidity may exacerbate the sensory irritation impact. Practical Implications Certain odors, in addition to odor annoyance, may result in psychological effects and distraction from work. Some building materials continually cause perceivable odors, because the odor thresholds of the emitted compounds are low. Some oxidation products of alkenes (e.g. terpenes) may contribute to eye and airway symptoms under certain conditions and low relative humidity.

  9. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  10. Lateral suppression of mesopic rod and cone flicker detection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Lu, Yolanda H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms of flicker detection suppression by measuring mesopic rod and cone critical flicker frequencies (CFFs) at different center and surround illuminance levels. Stimuli were generated with a four-primary photostimulator that provided independent control of rod and cone excitations. The results showed that dim surrounds ≤0.2 Td suppressed cone-mediated CFFs at ≥20 Td but not rod-mediated CFFs. These results can be understood in terms of peak amplitudes of photoreceptor impulse response functions under different stimulation conditions. PMID:22330377

  11. In vivo imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Doble, Nathan; Choi, Stacey S.; Codona, Johanan L.; Christou, Julian; Enoch, Jay M.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Although single cone receptors have been imaged in the living human eye, there has been no observation of rods in vivo. Using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope and post processing, evidence of rod mosaic was observed at 5° and 10° eccentricities in the horizontal, temporal retina. For 4 normal human subjects, small structures were observed in between the larger cones, and were observed repeatedly at the same locations on different days and with varying wavelengths. Image analysis gave spacings that agree well with rod measurements from histological data. PMID:21209677

  12. BWR fuel rod performance evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The joint EPRI/GE fuel performance program, RP510-1, involved thorough preirradiation characterization of fuel used in lead test assemblies, detailed surveillance of their operation, and interim site examinations of the assemblies during reactor outages. The program originally included four GE-5 lead test assemblies operating in the Peach Bottom-2 reactor. The program was later modified to include the pressurized fuel rod test assembly in the Peach Bottom-3 reactor (RP510-2). The program modification also included extending the operation of the Peach Bottom-2 and Peach Bottom-3 lead test assembly fuel beyond normal discharge exposures. Interim site examination results following the first four cycles of operation of the Peach Bottom-2 lead test assemblies up to 35 GWd/MT and the examination of the Peach Bottom-3 pressurized test assembly at 32 GWd/MT are presented in this report. Elements of the examinations included visual examination of the fuel bundles; individual fuel rod visual examinations, rod length measurements, ultrasonic and eddy current nondestructive testing, Zircaloy cladding oxide thickness measurements and fission gas measurements. Channel measurements were made on the PB-2 Lead Test Assemblies after each of the first three operating cycles. All of the bundles were found to be in good condition. Since the pressurized test assembly contained pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods in symmetric positions, it was possible to make direct comparisons of the fission gas release from pairs of pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods with identical power histories. With one exception, the release was less from the pressurized fuel rod of each pair. Fuel rod power histories were calculated using new physics methods for all of the fuel rods that were punctured for fission gas release measurements. 28 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Topological mixing with ghost rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Finn, Matthew D.

    2006-03-01

    Topological chaos relies on the periodic motion of obstacles in a two-dimensional flow in order to form nontrivial braids. This motion generates exponential stretching of material lines, and hence efficient mixing. Boyland, Aref, and Stremler [J. Fluid Mech. 403, 277 (2000)] have studied a specific periodic motion of rods that exhibits topological chaos in a viscous fluid. We show that it is possible to extend their work to cases where the motion of the stirring rods is topologically trivial by considering the dynamics of special periodic points that we call “ghost rods”, because they play a similar role to stirring rods. The ghost rods framework provides a new technique for quantifying chaos and gives insight into the mechanisms that produce chaos and mixing. Numerical simulations for Stokes flow support our results.

  14. Diffusion of spheres in crowded suspensions of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok; Gapinski, J.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.; Ratajczyk, M.; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Patkowski, A.

    2005-01-01

    Translational tracer diffusion of spherical macromolecules in crowded suspensions of rodlike colloids is investigated. Experiments are done using several kinds of spherical tracers in fd-virus suspensions. A wide range of size ratios L/2a of the length L of the rods and the diameter 2a of the tracer sphere is covered by combining several experimental methods: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for small tracer spheres, dynamic light scattering for intermediate sized spheres, and video microscopy for large spheres. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is shown to measure long-time diffusion only for relatively small tracer spheres. Scaling of diffusion coefficients with a/ξ, predicted for static networks, is not found for our dynamical network of rods (with ξ the mesh size of the network). Self-diffusion of tracer spheres in the dynamical network of freely suspended rods is thus fundamentally different as compared to cross-linked networks. A theory is developed for the rod-concentration dependence of the translational diffusion coefficient at low rod concentrations for freely suspended rods. The proposed theory is based on a variational solution of the appropriate Smoluchowski equation without hydrodynamic interactions. The theory can, in principle, be further developed to describe diffusion through dynamical networks at higher rod concentrations with the inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions. Quantitative agreement with the experiments is found for large tracer spheres, and qualitative agreement for smaller spheres. This is probably due to the increasing importance of hydrodynamic interactions as compared to direct interactions as the size of the tracer sphere decreases.

  15. Design study for MOX fuel rod scanner for ATR fuel fabrication. Phase I: Design of active neutron scanner. Phase II: Design of passive neutron scanner. Phase III: Design of passive gamma-ray scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1997-09-01

    An active neutron fuel-rod scanner has been designed for the assay of fissile materials in mixed oxide fuel rods. A {sup 252}Cf source is located at the center of the scanner very near the through-hole for the fuel rods. Spontaneous fission neutrons from the californium are moderated and induce fissions within the passing fuel rod. The rod continues past a combined gamma-ray and neutron shield where delayed gamma rays above 1 MeV are detected. The authors used the Monte Carlo neutron-photon (MCNP) code to design the scanner and review optimum materials and geometries. Applications of the rod scanner include accountability of fissile material for safeguards applications, quality control of the fissile content in a fuel rod, and the verification of reactivity potential for mixed oxide fuels. A passive neutron fuel-rod scanner has been designed for the assay of the plutonium in mixed oxide fuel rods. The {sup 240}Pu-effective is measured by counting the spontaneous fission neutrons using a high-efficiency thermal-neutron detector. This passive neutron detector would be combined with a high-resolution gamma-ray system (HRGS) measurement to obtain the total plutonium from the plutonium isotopic ratios. A passive gamma-ray scanner has been designed for the measurement of the {sup 241}Am and plutonium uniformity in mixed oxide fuel rods. The passive gamma-ray emissions from {sup 241}Am (60 keV) and plutonium (150-400 keV) are used to verify the unformity of the fuel enrichment zones and to check for any pellets that are out of specification. The fuel rod is moved through the interior of an NaI(Tl) or a bismuth germanate detector to measure the passive gamma-ray emissions. A tungsten sleeve collimator is used in the through-hole to improve the pellet-to-pellet spatial resolution. The same detector is used to verify the plutonium uniformity in the pellets with a 13-mm tungsten collimator. The low-resolution passive gamma system would be used in the unattended mode.

  16. Total OH reactivity measurements in ambient air in a southern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine forest during BEACHON-SRM08 summer campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Greenberg, Jim; Harley, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Turnipseed, A.; Apel, Eric; Guenther, Alex B.; Smith, Jim; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2014-03-01

    Total OH reactivity was measured during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08) held at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado USA during the summer season in August, 2008. The averaged total OH reactivity was 6.8 s-1, smaller than that measured in urban or suburban areas, while sporadically high OH reactivity was also observed during some evenings. The total OH reactivity measurements were accompanied by observations of traces species such as CO, NO, NOy, O3 and SO2 and VOCs. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of these trace species, 35.3-46.3% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic species that are dominated by 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes. MBO was the most prominent contribution to OH reactivity of any other trace species. A comparison of observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is 29.5-34.8% less than the observed value, implying the existence of missing OH sink. One of the candidates of missing OH was thought to be the oxidation products of biogenic species.

  17. Total OH reactivity measurements in ambient air in a southern Rocky mountain ponderosa pine forest during BEACHON-SRM08 summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Greenberg, Jim; Harley, Peter; Karl, Thomas; Turnipseed, Andrew; Apel, Eric; Guenther, Alex; Smith, Jim; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2014-03-01

    Total OH reactivity was measured during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08) held at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado USA in August, 2008. The averaged total OH reactivity was 6.7 s-1, smaller than that measured in urban (33.4 s-1, Yoshino et al., 2012) and suburban (27.7 s-1, Yoshino et al., 2006) areas in Tokyo in the same season, while sporadically high OH reactivity was also observed during some evenings. The total OH reactivity measurements were accompanied by observations of traces species such as CO, NO, NOy, O3 and SO2 and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of these trace species, 46.3% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic species that are dominated by 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes. MBO was the most prominent contribution to OH reactivity of all trace species. A comparison of observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is 29.5% less than the observed value, implying the existence of missing OH sinks. One of the candidates of missing OH is thought to be the oxidation products of biogenic species.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) rods were synthesized from dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CaHPO 4, DCPA) and calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) by the hydrothermal method from 120 to 180 °C. Both cuttlebone (aragonite polymorph of CaCO 3) and CaCO 3 chemical (calcite polymorph of CaCO 3) were used as CaCO 3 sources. The nucleation and growth of HAP rods mainly occurred on DCPA particles, while some HAP rods also grew from aragonite particles. The nucleation and growth of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) particles on the surface of calcite particles were observed at the beginning of the reaction of DCPA and calcite, and some HAP rods were also found to grow out of β-TCP particles. After the hydrothermal reaction at 140 °C for 24 h, most products are HAP with a small amount of β-TCP synthesized as a byproduct. The HAP rods synthesized were ˜200 nm in width and several microns in length. The reaction mechanism and growth process of HAP rods are discussed.

  19. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  20. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  1. Measurements of friction coefficients and cohesion for faulting and fault reactivation in laboratory models using sand and sand mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Robert W.

    1991-03-01

    Simple laboratory tests have been made on dry quartz sand and on mixtures of sand and clay and sand and cement. Tests were made on both low- and high-density specimens of each mixture, as determined by physical handling techniques. The tests included measurements of density, estimates of the coefficient of internal friction based on fault orientation, and estimates of the friction coefficients and cohesion values for fault initiation and reactivation in a shear frame apparatus, which was also used to test artificial fault zones made from pure clay, glass microspheres, and wheat flour. The results suggest that density is determined more by handling technique than by composition, and that friction coefficients and perhaps cohesion both increase with increasing density. The shear testing revealed a consistent drop in cohesion for fault reactivation in all densely packed mixtures tested. Although small, this drop may be significant for some types of laboratory models.

  2. Instabilities of a rotating helical rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yunyoung; Ko, William; Kim, Yongsam; Lim, Sookkyung

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus have helical flagellar filament. By rotating a motor, which is located at the bottom end of the flagellar filament embedded in the cell body, CCW or CW, they swim forward or backward. We model a left-handed helix by the Kirchhoff rod theory and use regularized Stokes formulation to study an interaction between the surrounding fluid and the flagellar filament. We perform numerical studies focusing on relations between physical parameters and critical angular frequency of the motor, which separates overwhiring from twirling. We are also interested in the buckling instability of the hook, which is very flexible elastic rod. By measuring buckling angle, which is an angle between rotational axis and helical axis, we observe the effects of physical parameters on buckling of the hook.

  3. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  4. Investigation of Swirling Flow in Rod Bundle Subchannels Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.; Conner, Michael E.

    2006-07-01

    The fluid dynamics for turbulent flow through rod bundles representative of those used in pressurized water reactors is examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The rod bundles of the pressurized water reactor examined in this study consist of a square array of parallel rods that are held on a constant pitch by support grids spaced axially along the rod bundle. Split-vane pair support grids are often used to create swirling flow in the rod bundle in an effort to improve the heat transfer characteristics for the rod bundle during both normal operating conditions and in accident condition scenarios. Computational fluid dynamics simulations for a two subchannel portion of the rod bundle were used to model the flow downstream of a split-vane pair support grid. A high quality computational mesh was used to investigate the choice of turbulence model appropriate for the complex swirling flow in the rod bundle subchannels. Results document a central swirling flow structure in each of the subchannels downstream of the split-vane pairs. Strong lateral flows along the surface of the rods, as well as impingement regions of lateral flow on the rods are documented. In addition, regions of lateral flow separation and low axial velocity are documented next to the rods. Results of the CFD are compared to experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements documenting the lateral flow structures downstream of the split-vane pairs. Good agreement is found between the computational simulation and experimental measurements for locations close to the support grid. (authors)

  5. Taylor impact of glass rods

    SciTech Connect

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below {approx}2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above {approx}3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at {approx}4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7{+-}0.5 and 4.6{+-}0.5 mm {mu}s{sup -1} for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  6. Role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measurements in HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Arun; Quaiser, Saif; Khan, Ruhi

    2016-01-01

    As we herald into the 21st century, the quality of life and the repertoire of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have considerably improved. However, considerable work is still needed to educate the population about primary and secondary prevention modalities. Moreover, regular monitoring of immune response with patients on HAART with conventional biomarkers is still a problem in low resource settings which needs to be addressed. We aim to review high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a potential biomarker in this regard. PMID:27890944

  7. Behavior of Segmented Rods during Penetration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    full-scale penetrators which had been swaged 24%. The density of this tungsten alloy was 17.2 Mg/m 3. Gold-alloy penetrators were composed of 92Au-4.9Ag...of behavior. Segmented rods of tungsten alloy always penetrated less than the equivalent unitary rod. Successive rod segments were found to...gold-alloy penetrators because unitary rods of this material surpassed the perform- ance of unitary tungsten -alloy rods, while leaving almost no

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  9. Clustering-Induced Attraction in Granular Mixtures of Rods and Spheres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Depletion-induced aggregation of rods enhanced by clustering is observed to produce a novel model of attractive pairs of rods separated by a line of spheres in a quasi-2D, vertically-shaken, granular gas of rods and spheres. We show that the stability of these peculiar granular aggregates increases as a function of shaking intensity. Velocity distributions of spheres inside and outside of a pair of rods trapping a line of spheres show a clear suppression of the momentum acquired by the trapped spheres. The condensed phase formed between the rods is caused by a clustering instability of the trapped spheres, enhanced by a vertical guidance produced by the confining rods. The liberated area corresponding to direct excluded-volume pairs and indirect depletion-aggregated pairs is measured as a function of time. The stability of rod pairs mediated by spheres reveals an attraction comparable in strength to the one purely induced by depletion forces. PMID:27218804

  10. Process-based tolerance assessment of connecting rod machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Surendra Babu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Process tolerancing based on the process capability studies is the optimistic and pragmatic approach of determining the manufacturing process tolerances. On adopting the define-measure-analyze-improve-control approach, the process potential capability index ( C p) and the process performance capability index ( C pk) values of identified process characteristics of connecting rod machining process are achieved to be greater than the industry benchmark of 1.33, i.e., four sigma level. The tolerance chain diagram methodology is applied to the connecting rod in order to verify the manufacturing process tolerances at various operations of the connecting rod manufacturing process. This paper bridges the gap between the existing dimensional tolerances obtained via tolerance charting and process capability studies of the connecting rod component. Finally, the process tolerancing comparison has been done by adopting a tolerance capability expert software.

  11. Loading effect of Ag/AgO on the photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuddin, Aida Fitri; Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini Abd; Pung, Swee-Yong

    2017-01-01

    The photocatalytic performance of ZnO rods in degradation of Rhodamine B dye under UV light was improved by 7.3% via deposition of Ag/AgO using 1.0 × 10-3 g mL-1 of silver nitrate solution. However, its photodegradation efficiency decreased with the increase in silver nitrate concentration which was used to prepare the Ag/AgO-ZnO rods. This result suggests that the loading of Ag/AgO on the surface of ZnO rods affected the photocatalytic performance differently. The scavenger study indicates that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of Rhodamine B dye by Ag-/AgO-deposited ZnO rods were holes, followed by superoxide anion free radicals, hydroxyl free radicals and electrons. Based on these findings, a refined photodegradation mechanism of Rhodamine B by Ag/AgO-ZnO rods is proposed.

  12. Reactivity and recovery from different types of work measured by catecholamines and cortisol: a systematic literature overview

    PubMed Central

    Sluiter, J.; Frings-Dresen, M.; Meijman, T.; van der Beek, A. J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To review occupational health, laboratory, and sports literature on neuroendocrine reactivity and recovery from mental, combined mental and physical, or physical tasks.
METHODS—A systematic literature search was performed in eight databases. Studies with catecholamines or cortisol as effect variables measured in blood, urine, or saliva were included.
RESULTS—After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 77 studies from the initial 559 identified were taken into account. In occupational settings it was found that relatively few studies were conclusive about recovery, which formed a contrast with sports research. For reactivity and recovery up to 1 hour after performing the task, half of the studies considered physical tasks and more than two thirds showed incomplete recovery compared with baseline excretion of catecholamines and cortisol. Recovery extending to 3 days after the task was performed was often incomplete for cortisol after combined mentally and physically demanding tasks, and less often after solely mental or physical tasks. This type of recovery was more often incomplete for adrenaline (epinephrine) than for noradrenaline (norepinephrine), which was the case after mental as well as combined mental and physical tasks.
CONCLUSIONS—The results from laboratory and sports research may be transferable to some occupations, but more research is needed on the course of recovery relative to health effects in occupational settings.


Keywords: neuroendocrine reactivity; neuroendocrine recovery; occupational task PMID:10769296

  13. Measurement of reactive oxygen metabolites produced by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to mineral dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, P.; Klockars, M.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop an in-vitro model for studying mineral dust-induced production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human macrophages. Monocytes isolated from human buffy coats were cultured in vitro for 1-6 days. Quartz particles induced both luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) by the adherent cells. However, the luminol response decreased form day to day, obviously due to a decrease in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the cells, whereas the lucigenin response showed no such MPO dependence. The luminol response was inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and the MPO-inhibitor azide, while the lucigenin response was inhibited by SOD and catalase but stimulated by azide. There was a positive correlation between the lucigenin responses and the results obtained with the established cytochrome c assay for superoxide, when opsonized zymosan was used as a stimulant. The effects of quartz, titanium dioxide, chrysotile asbestos, and wollastonite particles were investigated with the lucigenin assay. Quartz and chrysotile caused prominent light emission by 6-day-old macrophages, whereas titanium dioxide and wollastonite caused weak responses. We conclude that mineral dusts induce production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human monocyte-derived macrophages, and that the quantitative responses depend on both physical and physicochemical dust properties, the nature of which are still to be defined. PMID:2169299

  14. Hydraulic testing of accelerator-production-of-tritium rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, T.L.; Siebe, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydraulic tests have been performed on small pitch-to-diameter-ratio rod bundles using light water (1.7 < P/D < 1.17, and d = 3.175 mm). Flows cover the range from greater-than-nominal Reynolds numbers (fully turbulent) to low-speed laminar flows. Differential pressure measurements were made across the support plates holding the rod bundles, across the rod bundles, and across the entire assembly. Flow rates, temperatures, and gauge pressures also were measured. The data from these hydraulic tests have been compared to correlating literature for tightly pitched rod bundles. The prototypic geometry of these tests did not compare directly to any geometry found in the literature because of the variety of subchannels along the outer wall of the rod bundle. Under that constraint, there was excellent comparison of the rod-bundle friction factor with those factors given in the literature. The results show a large range of the Reynolds number over which the flow is in transition from laminar to turbulent (e.g., 580 < Re{sub Tr} < 13,000). Also presented is the comparison of the overall rung pressure drop to a solution based on hydraulic-resistance handbook calculations.

  15. Experimental and computational studies of rod-deployment mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalbe, L.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stofleth, J.H.; Greene, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    We describe experimental measurements and hydrocode simulations of two tests in which long (L/D=12), steel rods were accelerated laterally with charges of Detasheet-C high explosive (HE). In each test configuration, 84 rods were initially aligned parallel to one another in an array of four concentric rings. The first test had a central core of HE that dispersed the rods isotropically. The second test had a narrow, 180 degree strip of HE on one side of the assembly that focused the rods directionally. Using radiographic data taken at several milliseconds after HE initiation, we measured the dynamic distributions of the rods, and their translational velocities and tumble rates. To compare with the data, we also modeled the experiments with our smooth particle hydrocode SPHINX. Within the context of our numerical model, the hydrocode results agree satisfactorily with the test data. We include in our discussion many of the inferences and insights that our results provide to the phenomenology and performance of multimode, rod-deployment mechanisms.

  16. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30∗α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90–1.10∗α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40–0.55∗α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00∗α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30–2.30∗α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex. PMID:27588002

  17. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30(∗)α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90-1.10(∗)α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40-0.55(∗)α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00(∗)α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30-2.30(∗)α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex.

  18. Method of targeted delivery of laser beam to isolated retinal rods by fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Sim, Nigel; Bessarab, Dmitri; Jones, C Michael; Krivitsky, Leonid

    2011-11-01

    A method of controllable light delivery to retinal rod cells using an optical fiber is described. Photo-induced current of the living rod cells was measured with the suction electrode technique. The approach was tested with measurements relating the spatial distribution of the light intensity to photo-induced current. In addition, the ion current responses of rod cells to polarized light at two different orientation geometries of the cells were studied.

  19. The evolution of rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Morshedian, Ala; Fain, Gordon L

    2017-04-05

    Photoreceptors in animals are generally of two kinds: the ciliary or c-type and the rhabdomeric or r-type. Although ciliary photoreceptors are found in many phyla, vertebrates seem to be unique in having two distinct kinds which together span the entire range of vision, from single photons to bright light. We ask why the principal photoreceptors of vertebrates are ciliary and not rhabdomeric, and how rods evolved from less sensitive cone-like photoreceptors to produce our duplex retina. We suggest that the principal advantage of vertebrate ciliary receptors is that they use less ATP than rhabdomeric photoreceptors. This difference may have provided sufficient selection pressure for the development of a completely ciliary eye. Although many of the details of rod evolution are still uncertain, present evidence indicates that (i) rods evolved very early before the split between the jawed and jawless vertebrates, (ii) outer-segment discs make no contribution to rod sensitivity but may have evolved to increase the efficiency of protein renewal, and (iii) evolution of the rod was incremental and multifaceted, produced by the formation of several novel protein isoforms and by changes in protein expression, with no one alteration having more than a few-fold effect on transduction activation or inactivation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  20. Improved instrumentation for near-real-time measurement of reactive hydrocarbons, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Drayton, P. J.; Blazer, C. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    1999-10-06

    The measurement of reactive hydrocarbons and associated nitrogen oxides, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) is of key importance to unraveling the complex chemistries involved in daytime photochemical oxidant formation and nighttime chemistry driven by the nitrate radical. Recent work has demonstrated that chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with hydrocarbons (and the temperature dependence of the reactions) can be used as a means of detecting a wide variety of organic compounds in the gas phase with sensitivity comparable to or better than that of the conventional flame ionization detection method (Marley and Gaffney, 1998). We have implemented a new design and built a new instrument to evaluate this approach for the monitoring of alkenes. This instrument makes use of a computer-controlled photon-counting system with a reaction chamber operated at room temperature. Signals are compared to those for an ethene standard to estimate relative reactivity. The instrument is described in detail here, along with a new version of a luminol-based chemiluminescence detection system with fast gas chromatography for measurement of NO{sub 2} and PANs. The photon-counting system, the reaction chamber, and the luminol detection system have been combined on one instrument rack for field use on both ground-based and aircraft platforms. Data presented show the response times of the instruments and indicate applications for examining reactive hydrocarbon emissions from both vegetation and anthropogenic sources. In addition, the luminol chemiluminescence instrument was field tested, and the data obtained are compared with data from a commercial NO{sub x} analyzer. Preliminary results demonstrating the potential use of this instrumentation for rapid measurement of key tropospheric trace species are presented and discussed.

  1. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Culture Media Using Acridan Lumigen PS-3 Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Benedict; McGlashan, Susan R.; Shaikh, Shamim B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated continuously during aerobic metabolism. ROS are highly reactive molecules and in excessive amounts, can lead to protein and DNA oxidation, protein cross-linking, and cell death. Cell-culture models provide a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms that lead to cell death. Accumulation of ROS within cells and/or their release into the culture media are highly cell type-specific. The ability to estimate ROS levels in the culture media is an important step in understanding the mechanisms contributing to disease processes. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a simple method to estimate ROS levels in the culture media using the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 reagent provided in the Amersham ECL Plus kit (GE Healthcare, UK). We have shown that the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay generates ROS-specific chemiluminescence in fresh as well as media stored at −20°C, in as little as 10–20 μl of samples. The method was able to detect the dose (of stimulants)- and time (acute and chronic)-dependent changes in ROS levels in media collected from various cell types. Our results suggest that the kit reagents, PBS buffer, and various media did not contribute significantly to the overall chemiluminescence generated in the assay; however, we suggest that the unused medium specific for each cell type should be used as blanks and final readings of test samples normalized against these readings. As this method uses commonly available laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents, we believe this assay is convenient, economical, and specific in estimating ROS released extracellularly into the culture media. PMID:21966257

  2. Measurement of reactive oxygen species in the culture media using Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay.

    PubMed

    Uy, Benedict; McGlashan, Susan R; Shaikh, Shamim B

    2011-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated continuously during aerobic metabolism. ROS are highly reactive molecules and in excessive amounts, can lead to protein and DNA oxidation, protein cross-linking, and cell death. Cell-culture models provide a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms that lead to cell death. Accumulation of ROS within cells and/or their release into the culture media are highly cell type-specific. The ability to estimate ROS levels in the culture media is an important step in understanding the mechanisms contributing to disease processes. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a simple method to estimate ROS levels in the culture media using the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 reagent provided in the Amersham ECL Plus kit (GE Healthcare, UK). We have shown that the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay generates ROS-specific chemiluminescence in fresh as well as media stored at -20°C, in as little as 10-20 μl of samples. The method was able to detect the dose (of stimulants)- and time (acute and chronic)-dependent changes in ROS levels in media collected from various cell types. Our results suggest that the kit reagents, PBS buffer, and various media did not contribute significantly to the overall chemiluminescence generated in the assay; however, we suggest that the unused medium specific for each cell type should be used as blanks and final readings of test samples normalized against these readings. As this method uses commonly available laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents, we believe this assay is convenient, economical, and specific in estimating ROS released extracellularly into the culture media.

  3. Diurnal and Reactivity Measures of Cortisol in Response to Intensive Resilience and Tactical Training Among Special Forces Police.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Judith P; Dorai, Mala; Papazoglou, Konstantinos; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2016-07-01

    Special Forces Police are called to the most dangerous situations that require skills and equipment beyond the training available to a patrol officer. We recruited a platoon of special forces (n = 18) and examined their basal and reactivity levels of cortisol in relation to occupational duties. Moreover, we measured the impact of a multiday program of intensive resilience and tactical training in improving cortisol responses to stressful situations. Participants were significantly more likely to exhibit basal cortisol levels higher than the civilian norms across all of the 5 days of intensive training. However, anticipatory cortisol, measured directly before exposure to critical incident scenarios, was significantly lower in Day 5 than in Day 1 of the training period. This study demonstrates that measuring cortisol is an objective method of examining training effects and possible long-term occupational health outcomes.

  4. Topological Optimization of Rod Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Matthew D.; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2006-11-01

    Stirring of fluid with moving rods is necessary in many practical applications to achieve homogeneity. These rods are topological obstacles that force stretching of fluid elements. The resulting stretching and folding is commonly observed as filaments and striations, and is a precursor to mixing. In a space-time diagram, the trajectories of the rods form a braid [1], and the properties of this braid impose a minimal complexity in the flow. We discuss how optimal mixing protocols can be obtained by a judicious choice of braid, and how these protocols can be implemented using simple gearing [2].[12pt] [1] P. L. Boyland, H. Aref, and M. A. Stremler, JFM 403, 277 (2000).[8pt] [2] J.-L. Thiffeault and M. D. Finn, http://arxiv.org/nlin/0603003

  5. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Affect Intensity and Reactivity Measure Adapted for Youth (AIR-Y)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rachel E.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Reardon, Laura E.; Hawks, Erin

    2009-01-01

    A valid and reliable instrument for measuring affect intensity does not exist for adolescents; such a measure may help to refine understanding of emotion among youths. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and clinical relevance of a measure of affect intensity adapted for youths. Two hundred five community…

  7. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O₂ Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch and 7-Tube Clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Murphy, Michael F.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  8. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  9. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  10. Reactive transport modelling of a remediation measure at a former gasworks site in Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, T.; Herold, M.; Greskowiak, J.; Prommer, H.

    2009-12-01

    The aquifer beneath a former manufactured gas plant site is contaminated with polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that form large plumes and are only slowly degraded under natural conditions. This leaves active remediation as the only viable option to eliminate the risks of toxic substances to reach potential receptors. The aims of the study presented here were to verify the proposed conceptual model of interacting physical and biogeochemical processes and to assess the effectiveness of a proposed in-situ remediation approach with the help of multi-component reactive transport modelling, focusing on the situations (i) prior to the implementation of the in-situ remediation scheme and (ii) following the operation of a circulation well with O2 and H2O2 injection to aid aerobic microbial degradation of the contaminants in the otherwise anoxic surroundings. The model incorporates microbially mediated redox reactions, mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions as well as subsequent changes in the chemical composition of the aquifer. The degradation pathways proposed in the conceptual model could be verified. The model was then used (i) to explore two possible remediation scenarios where the results highlighted the importance of source remediation and (ii) to study the uncertainty regarding the presence of another electron donor in the form of pyrite.

  11. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  12. A combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering detector for measurements on reactive systems.

    PubMed

    Vallenhag, Linda; Canton, Sophie E; Sondhauss, Peter; Haase, Dörthe; Ossler, Frederik

    2011-08-01

    A detector with high dynamic range designed for combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments has been developed. It allows measurements on single events and reactive systems, such as particle formation in flames and evaporation of levitating drops. The detector consists of 26 channels covering a region from 0.5° to 60° and it provides continuous monitoring of the sampled signal without readout dead time. The time resolution for fast single events is about 40 μs and for substances undergoing slower dynamics, the time resolution is set to 0.1 or 1 s with hours of continuous sampling. The detector has been used to measure soot particle formation in a flame, burning magnesium and evaporation of a toluene drop in a levitator. The results show that the detector can be used for many different applications with good outcomes and large potential.

  13. Backward-in-time Modeling to Identify Sources of Reactive Solutes in Groundwater Using Probabilities Conditioned on Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupauer, R. M.; Lin, R.

    2003-12-01

    When contamination is observed in an aquifer, the source of contamination is often unknown. We present an approach that can be used to identify sources of contamination based on the observed distribution (spatial, temporal, or both) of the contaminant plume. Using backward-in-time advection dispersion theory, we first obtain a backward location probability distribution that describes the possible prior positions of the contamination. This distribution is independent of the measured concentrations of the contaminant. Next, we condition the probability distribution on the measured concentrations, resulting in an improvement in the accuracy and a reduction in the variance of the backward location probability distribution. We illustrate the approach for a reactive solute (first-order decay), and demonstrate its applicability for identifying possible source locations of a trichloroethylene plume at the Massachusetts Military Reservation.

  14. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  15. VISUAL ADAPTATION AND CHEMISTRY OF THE RODS

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George; Clark, Anna-Betty

    1937-01-01

    1. The reality of a chemical cycle proposed to describe the rhodopsin system is tested with dark adaptation measurements. 2. The first few minutes of rod dark adaptation are rapid following short, slower following long irradiation. As dark adaptation proceeds, the slow process grows more prominent, and occupies completely the final stages of adaptation. 3. Light adaptation displays similar duality. As the exposure to light of constant intensity lengthens, the visual threshold rises, and independently the speed of dark adaptation decreases. 4. These results conform with predictions from the chemical equations. PMID:19873041

  16. The use of enriched 6Li and 7Li Lif:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescent dosemeters for linear accelerator out-of-field radiation dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Liu, G; Marcu, L

    2012-06-01

    (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were used for measurements of out-of-field photon and neutron doses produced by Varian iX linear accelerator. Both TLDs were calibrated using 18-MV X-ray beam to investigate their dose-response sensitivity and linearity. CR-39 etch-track detectors (Luxel+, Landauer) were employed to provide neutron dose data to calibrate (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs at various distances from the isocentre. With cadmium filters employed, slow neutrons (<0.5 eV) were distinguished from fast neutrons. The average in-air photon dose equivalents per monitor unit (MU) ranged from 1.5±0.4 to 215.5±94.6 μSv at 100 and 15 cm from the isocentre, respectively. Based on the cross-calibration factors obtained with CR-39 etch-track detectors, the average in-air fast neutron dose equivalents per MU range from 10.6±3.8 to 59.1±49.9 μSv at 100 and 15 cm from the isocentre, respectively. Contribution of thermal neutrons to total neutron dose equivalent was small: 3.1±7.2 μSv per MU at 15 cm from the isocentre.

  17. Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NO/y/) within and above a tropical forest canopy in the wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Fan, Song-Miao

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ambient concentrations of reactive nitrogen oxides were made in the Amazon rain forest, near Manaus, Brazil, continuously at 39 m (above the canopy), and on several days and nights at 19 m (within the canopy). Concentrations were very low, typically 100-700 pptv, except for brief periods when up to 5000 pptv of NO(y) was observed, indicating polluted air from the urban area of Manaus. The forest was a net sink for NO(y) with the NO(y) flux = -7.6 + or - 5.0) x 10 to the 9th molecules/sq cm per sec in unpolluted periods, even though soils emitted NO at a significant rate (8.9 + or - 1.5 x 10 to the 9th molecules/sq cm per sec). The deposition rate for NO(y) appeared to be much larger during the daytime than at night, suggesting that uptake was controlled either by plant processes (stomatal opening) or by supply of reactive components of NO(y) (e.g., HNO3) during the daytime. Implications for regional and global atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  18. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  19. Combined measurement of perfusion, venous oxygen saturation, and skeletal muscle T2* during reactive hyperemia in the leg

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The function of the peripheral microvascular may be interrogated by measuring perfusion, tissue oxygen concentration, or venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) recovery dynamics following induced ischemia. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a magnetic resonance (MR) technique for simultaneous measurement of perfusion, SvO2, and skeletal muscle T2*. Methods Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT) is comprised of interleaved pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) and multi-echo gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences. During the PASL post-labeling delay, images are acquired with a multi-echo GRE to quantify SvO2 and T2* at a downstream slice location. Thus time-courses of perfusion, SvO2, and T2* are quantified simultaneously within a single scan. The new sequence was compared to separately measured PASL or multi-echo GRE data during reactive hyperemia in five young healthy subjects. To explore the impairment present in peripheral artery disease patients, five patients were evaluated with PIVOT. Results Comparison of PIVOT-derived data to the standard techniques shows that there was no significant bias in any of the time-course-derived metrics. Preliminary data show that PAD patients exhibited alterations in perfusion, SvO2, and T2* time-courses compared to young healthy subjects. Conclusion Simultaneous quantification of perfusion, SvO2, and T2* is possible with PIVOT. Kinetics of perfusion, SvO2, and T2* during reactive hyperemia may help to provide insight into the function of the peripheral microvasculature in patients with PAD. PMID:23958293

  20. Chromatic discrimination in the presence of incremental and decremental rod pedestals.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J; Pokorny, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Signals from rods can alter chromatic discrimination. Here, chromatic discrimination ellipses were determined in the presence of rod incremental and decremental pedestals at mesopic light levels. The data were represented in a relative cone Troland space, normalized by discrimination thresholds measured along the cardinal axes without a rod pedestal. In the quadrant of cone space where L-cone relative to M-cone excitation increased, and S-cone excitation decreased, rod incremental pedestals degraded chromatic discrimination, and rod decremental pedestals improved chromatic discrimination. Discrimination in the other three quadrants of cone space was unaffected by the incremental or decremental rod pedestals. A second experiment measured chromatic discrimination under conditions where cone pedestals were matched to the appearances of the incremental and decremental rod pedestals. Based on the matching pedestal data, discrimination then could be measured independently along the cardinal axes using either chromatic [L/(L + M); S/(L + M)] or luminance (L + M) pedestal components. The discrimination data altered by the rod pedestals were similar to chromatic cone pedestals for L/M increment discrimination, but similar to luminance cone pedestals for S decrement discrimination. The results indicated that the rod and cone signals combined differently in determining chromatic discrimination for different post-receptoral pathways.

  1. Combination of rod and cone inputs in parasol ganglion cells of the magnocellular pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Lee, Barry B.; Sun, Hao

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how rod and cone inputs are combined in the magnocellular (MC) pathway in the mesopic luminance range, when both rods and cones are active. Responses of parafoveal MC ganglion cells from macaque retina were measured as a function of temporal frequency (0.62–20 Hz) or contrast (0.05–0.55) at mesopic light levels (0.2, 2, 20, and 200 td). Stimuli were of three modulation types: (1) isolated rod stimuli (only rod signals were modulated), (2) isolated cone stimuli (only cone luminance signals from long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones were modulated), and (3) combined rod and cone stimuli (both rod and cone luminance signals were modulated in phase, as with conventional stimuli). The results showed that under mesopic conditions, the relative rod and cone inputs to the MC cells varied with light level and they are combined linearly prior to saturation. Further, rod contrast gain is relatively stable over the mesopic range while cone contrast gain increased with light level. Finally, the measured rod and cone inputs are consistent with the measured human temporal contrast sensitivity functions under comparable stimulation conditions. PMID:20884499

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Final report for the first year, January 1-December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Japar, S.M.; Hurley, M.D.; Wallington, T.J.

    1994-06-30

    A set of multiple indoor smog chambers were used to measure the increase in smog formation (smog = NO oxidation + O3 formation) from a series of individual test volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), as well as carbon monoxide (CO), when they were added to a standard urban mixture and irradiated for 10-12 hours with a solar simulator. The chambers and the mixtures were designed to simulate the Carter incremental reactivity concept that is being used in California. The test compounds covered a wide range of mechanistic uncertainties and predicted reactivities (reactivity is the increase in smog divided by the amount of test compound added). Also, the chambers were used to test the recently developed Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) Model which predicts that the smog formation of a mixture is constant and independent of NOx in the so-called light-limited regime.

  3. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  4. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out...

  5. Hydraulic Actuator for Ganged Control Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. C.; Robey, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic actuator moves several nuclear-reactor control rods in unison. Electromagnetic pump pushes liquid lithium against ends of control rods, forcing them out of or into nuclear reactor. Color arrows show lithium flow for reactor startup and operation. Flow reversed for shutdown. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, actuator principle applied to terrestrial hydraulic machinery involving motion of ganged rods.

  6. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    “Predecisional information distortion” occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed “stepwise evolution of preference” (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option (“proleader” distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option (“antitrailer” distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture (“reactivity”). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs (“cues”) in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its

  7. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  8. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel wasmore » in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.« less

  9. A large OH sink in summertime surface air of the northern Indo-Gangetic plain revealed through in-situ total OH Reactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Garg, S.; Chandra, P.; Sinha, V.

    2013-12-01

    The summertime surface air in the Northern Indo-Gangetic plain is characterized by high temperatures (up to 47 oC) and strong solar radiation (up to 765 Watt/m2), which together with large urban and agricultural emissions in the densely populated region, lead to intense photochemistry. The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the primary atmospheric oxidant responsible for oxidizing gaseous emissions and hence direct measurements of the total OH reactivity are necessary for understanding reactive emission budgets and constraining instantaneous ozone production regimes. Here, we present the first dataset of direct OH reactivity measurements from a regional surface site in the northern India-Gangetic plain (30.667°N, 76.729°E; 310 m above mean sea level). The measurements were performed in April-May 2013 using the comparative reactivity method [1]. A single PTRMS was used for sequential measurements of the total OH reactivity and circa 20 ambient VOCs. Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2), sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone and meteorological parameters were measured concomitantly using the IISER Mohali atmospheric chemistry facility. Air masses impacting the site arrived from rural and agricultural regions at high wind speeds of up to 24 m/s. A large variability was observed in the diel hourly averaged OH reactivity spanning an interquartile range of 36 s-1 - 120 s-1. The daily average and median total OH reactivity was 76 s-1 and 73 s-1, respectively corresponding to average and median OH chemical lifetimes of 13.1 milliseconds and 13.6 milliseconds, respectively. The five highest individual OH sinks measured were: acetaldehyde > isoprene+furan > NO2 > trimethyl benzene > CO. The measured OH reactivity did not show a pronounced diel cycle but remarkably the highest missing OH reactivity fraction (> 50 %) was observed during afternoon hours (12-16 local time) on very sunny days with low RH. This suggests that a significant fraction of secondary oxidation products formed due to

  10. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    PubMed

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  11. Noise Radiation from Single and Multiple Rod Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were performed on single and multiple rod configurations to study the effect of Reynolds number, surface roughness, freestream turbulence, proximity and wake interference on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.8 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 5). Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the different model configurations tested. The dependence of the peak Sound Pressure Level on velocity was also examined. Several concepts for the reduction of the noise radiating from cylindrical rods were tested. It was shown that wire wraps and collar distributions could be used to significantly reduce the noise radiating from rods in tandem configurations.

  12. Test and evaluation of the one-meter, fuel rod calorimeter at Mol, Belgium, 1-12 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; Keddar, A.

    1982-10-29

    In order to test the performance of the l-m fuel rod calorimeter, measurements were made of fuel rods with three different plutonium isotopic compositions containing from 3.6 to 28.5 g of plutonium. Measurement times were nominally 2 h: 1 h for a fuel rod measurement and 1 h for a base-line measurement. From these measurements, the precision (1 S.D.) of the calorimeter power measurement is 1 mW over the range of 10 to 135 mW. For rods with powers greater than 50 mW, apparent biases of up to 3% were within measured and assumed experimental errors. It is not possible from these data to identify the source of biases of -5.8% and -7% found for two rods. A problem encountered with the electric rod calibration requires further study. 1 figure, 7 tables.

  13. Axial power monitor rod issues and resolution for K-14.1

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, T.C.; Fields, C.C.; Hightower, N.T. III; Wooten, L.A.; Andre, S.K.; Apperson, C.E.; Bailey, M.H.; Bell, D.L.; Clare, G.H.; Collins, S.L.; Croft, W.D.; Edwards, T.B.; Geiger, G.T.; Harris, S.P.; Lietzow, J.L.; McCulloch, R.W.; McFarlane, A.F.; Randolph, H.W.; Reed, R.L.; Reeve, C.P.; Revolinski, S.M.; Sessions, H.T.; Shine, E.P.; Smith, T.A.; Sossman, C.L.; Taylor, J.J.; Weber, J.H.

    1992-05-01

    A recent concern arose over the treatment of uncertainty associated with the K-Reactor axial power monitors (APMs). There are nine axial power monitor rods located at various positions in the K-Reactor core. By comparing the output of one sensor near the top of the rod to the output of another sensor near the bottom of the rod, the relative ratio of the neutron flux from the top to the bottom of the core can be determined. This ratio is called the roof-top-ratio (RTR) and is the output of a top sensor (Sensor 2) divided by the output of a bottom sensor (Sensor 6). The RTR is important to the safety analyses because when the RTR is maintained within certain ranges, the severity of reactivity transients is limited. There are uncertainties associated with the equipment`s ability to measure the true roof top ratio. It was determined recently that sufficient uncertainty was not accounted for either in reactor operation or in the safety analyses. The concern about uncertainty was addressed for three separate issues. One issue dear with the linear response of the sensors for power ranges planned for K-Reactor operation. The second issue dear with overall uncertainty in the RTR channel. The third issue dear with apparent large ranges in confidence bands for the RTR at low reactor powers as represented by original vendor data. Plots of sparse vendor data indicated unacceptably large uncertainties in RTR would have to be accounted for at the power ranges planned for K-Reactor operation. These concerns were brought to management`s attention through the existing procedures for notification, irrespective of their potential impact on the restart schedule. Analyses have been completed to resolve the APM issues described above, and work is progressing to take the needed steps to change operational procedures.

  14. Evaluation of a catalytic reduction technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Eubank, C. S.; Hubler, C. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of a technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy-containing species in the atmosphere has been examined. In the technique, an NOy component species, which may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and particulate nitrate, are catalytically reduced by CO to form NO molecules on the surface of a metal converter tube, and the NO product is detected by chemiluminescence produced in reaction with O3. Among the catalysts tested in the temperature range of 25-500 C, Au was the preferred catalyst. The results of laboratory tests investigating the effects of pressure, O3, and H2O on NOy conversion, and the possible sources of interference, have shown that the technique is suitable for atmospheric analyses. The results of a test in ambient air at a remote ground-based field site are included.

  15. Comparison of CO2 in air versus carbogen for the measurement of cerebrovascular reactivity with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hare, Hannah V; Germuska, Michael; Kelly, Michael E; Bulte, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can give valuable information about existing pathology and the risk of adverse events, such as stroke. A common method of obtaining regional CVR values is by measuring the blood flow response to carbon dioxide (CO2)-enriched air using arterial spin labeling (ASL) or blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Recently, several studies have used carbogen gas (containing only CO2 and oxygen) as an alternative stimulus. A direct comparison was performed between CVR values acquired by ASL and BOLD imaging using stimuli of (1) 5% CO2 in air and (2) 5% CO2 in oxygen (carbogen-5). Although BOLD and ASL CVR values are shown to be correlated for CO2 in air (mean response 0.11±0.03% BOLD, 4.46±1.80% ASL, n=16 hemispheres), this correlation disappears during a carbogen stimulus (0.36±0.06% BOLD, 4.97±1.30% ASL). It is concluded that BOLD imaging should generally not be used in conjunction with a carbogen stimulus when measuring CVR, and that care must be taken when interpreting CVR as measured by ASL, as values obtained from different stimuli (CO2 in air versus carbogen) are not directly comparable.

  16. Blocks and residual stresses in sapphire rods of different crystallographic orientations grown by the Stepanov method

    SciTech Connect

    Krymov, V. M. Nosov, Yu. G.; Bakholdin, S. I.; Maslov, V. N.; Shul’pina, I. L.

    2015-05-15

    The formation of blocks in shaped sapphire rods of two crystallographic orientations has been investigated. It is shown that, when growth occurs in the direction of the optical c axis, blocks are formed with a higher probability than in the case of growth in the a direction. A model of formation of blocks in rods of different orientations is proposed. The distribution of residual stresses over sapphire rod cross sections is measured by conoscopy. It is found that stresses increase from the middle of a rod to its periphery and reach 20 MPa.

  17. Telephone self-monitoring among alcohol use disorder patients in early recovery: a randomized study of feasibility and measurement reactivity.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Tracy L; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Bush, Kristen R; McFall, Miles E

    2005-08-01

    Frequent symptom self-monitoring protocols have become popular tools in the addiction field. Interactive Voice Response (IVR) is a telephone monitoring system that has been shown to be feasible for collecting frequent self-reports from a variety of research populations. Little is known, however, about the feasibility of using IVR monitoring in clinical samples, and few controlled trials exist assessing the impact of any type of frequent self-report monitoring on the behaviors monitored. This pilot study with patients in early recovery from an alcohol use disorder (n=98) evaluated compliance with two IVR monitoring protocols, subjective experiences with monitoring, and change in symptoms associated with monitoring (i.e., measurement reactivity). Participants were randomly assigned to call an IVR system daily for 28 days, once per week for 4 weeks, or only to complete 28-day follow-up assessment including retrospective drinking reports. Monitoring calls assessed alcohol craving, substance use, emotional well-being, and PTSD symptoms. Most monitoring participants completed calls on at least 75% of scheduled days (72.2% and 59.2% for daily and weekly, respectively). Including reconstructed data from follow-up of missed calls yielded 77.8% and 74.1% of maximum data points, respectively. Most monitoring participants indicated the protocol was manageable and reported positive or no effects of monitoring on urges to use alcohol, actual drinking, and PTSD symptoms. Analyses of measurement reactivity based on assessment one month after randomization found no significant group differences on drinking, craving for alcohol, or PTSD-related symptoms. Results suggest that IVR technology is feasible and appropriate for telephone symptom monitoring in similar clinical samples.

  18. In situ measurements of IO and reactive iodine aboard the RV Sonne during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne; Walker, Hannah; Ingham, Trevor; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wittrock, Folker

    2013-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combined ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo. In this paper we present measurements of IO radicals in coastal and open ocean regions made onboard the German research vessel RV Sonne in November 2011 between Singapore and Manila, via the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo (South China Sea) and the Sulu Sea. In situ measurements of IO were made on 12 days by the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument, with a detection limit of 0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging period. The cruise average IO concentration was found to be 1.2 pptv, with a maximum concentration of 2.4 pptv in the middle of the Sulu Sea, an area known for high biological activity. Only a weak diurnal profile was observed, with IO detected above the detection limit on 10 out of the 11 nights when the LIF instrument was operational. Measurements of IO at night in the open ocean have not previously been reported and indicate the presence of gas phase or heterogeneous mechanisms that recycle iodine species without requiring light. There was reasonable agreement for IO concentrations measured by the University of Leeds LIF and the University of Bremen MAX-DOAS instruments, for which a comparison will be presented. I2, ICl and HOI were measured by the University of Mainz using a coupled diffusion denuder system followed by analysis using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectroscopy, with a detection of 0.17 pptv for 30 mins (I2). The cruise average I2 concentration was found to be 2.0 pptv, with a maximum concentration observed during one night of 12.7 pptv on the northern coast

  19. Development of Airborne Eddy-Correlation Flux Measurement Capabilities for Reactive Oxides of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurement Group (TTGAMG) endeavors to continue to push the evolution of the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE) into a sensor capable of making airborne eddy correlation measurements of nitrogen oxides. It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as well as its participation in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and the deliverables can not be achieved as proposed in the original funding of this grant. Most of these changes have been driven by the passing away of John Bradshaw, the original principal investigator.

  20. Measurements of admittances and characteristic combustion times of reactive gaseous propellant coaxial injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation that was concerned with the quantitative determination of the capabilities of combustion processes associated with coaxial injectors to amplify and sustain combustor oscillations was described. The driving provided by the combustion process was determined by employing the modified standing-wave method utilizing coaxial injectors and air-acetylene mixtures. Analyses of the measured data indicate that the investigated injectors are capable of initiating and amplifying combustion instabilities under favorable conditions of injector-combustion coupling and over certain frequency ranges. These frequency ranges and the frequency at which an injector's driving capacity is maximum are observed to depend upon the equivalence ratio, the pressure drop across the injector orifices and the number of injector elements. The characteristic combustion times of coaxial injectors were determined from steady state temperature measurements.

  1. Measurement of tumour reactive antibody and antibody conjugate by competition, quantitated by flow cytofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Robins, R A; Laxton, R R; Garnett, M; Price, M R; Baldwin, R W

    1986-06-24

    Binding of unlabelled monoclonal antibody preparations has been assessed by competition at saturation with fluorochrome labelled homologous antibody for binding to antigen bearing target cells. The extent of competition was measured by quantitative flow cytofluorimetry, and simple mathematical procedures have been developed to allow the interpretation of competition data in terms of antibody binding activity. In the system studied, non-specific (non-competitive) fluorescence was minimal, but an iterative method to calculate its contribution to the measured signal is given. This approach has the advantage that the antibody preparation to be tested does not need to be labelled or modified; this is particularly important when evaluating the binding activity of therapeutic antibody conjugates. Comparison with a well characterized standard antibody preparation provides a rapid, sensitive and accurate quality control procedure. This test is also simple to perform, requiring only the mixing of labelled and unlabelled antibodies with target cells, a single incubation, followed by analysis without washing of the target cells.

  2. Laser-Based Optical System for Reactive Radical Concentration Measurements in Plasmas and Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    activity are also those that have the shortest living time, which means that this flow of "decaying" plasma (sometimes called an " afterglow " or "plasma jet...about the electron component of plasma will be obtained using the method of Langmuir probes that has been successfully applied to obtain reliable...H20 2) and HCN. Measurements in Gliding Arc, Dielectric Barrier Discharge and Pulsed Corona Plasma systems and in flame and flow reactor systems are

  3. ADS reactivity measurements from MUSE to TRADE (and where do we go from here?)

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.; Mellier, F.; Jammes, C.; Philibert, H.; Granget, G.; Gonzalez, E.; Villamarin, D.; Rosa, R.; Carta, M.; Monti, S.; Baeten, P.; Billebaud, A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a link between the MUSE (Multiplication avec Source Externe) program performed at CEA-Cadarache in France, and the TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) program performed at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. In both programs, extensive measurements were made to determine the best methods for sub-criticality measurements in an accelerator-driven system. A very serious attempt was made to quantify the uncertainties associated with such measurements. While both MUSE and TRADE studied the methods of sub-criticality determination, in fact the two systems are very different. MUSE was a fast system with MOX fuel (generation time around 0.5 {mu}s), and TRADE was performed in a TRIGA reactor (generation time around 50 {mu}s). This paper will summarize the important results of these two experiments, with the main purpose being to tie them together to attempt to draw generic conclusions that can be applied in the future to a real ADS. In addition, this paper will briefly discuss the next series of experiments that will continue this work in the U.S. (RACE, Reactor Accelerator Coupled Experiments), Belarus (YALINA), Belgium (GUINEVERE), and Russia (SAD, Sub-critical Assembly Dubna). MUSE and TRADE have contributed greatly to our understanding of the uncertainties associated with sub-critical measurements, but there are still some gaps that must be covered. This paper will describe the gaps that exist, and demonstrate how the above future programs will fill in the missing information needed for the design of an actual ADS system in the future. (authors)

  4. Viscoelasticity measurement of gel formed at the liquid-liquid reactive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Tomohiro

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally studied a reacting liquid flow with gel formation by using viscous fingering (VF) as a flow field. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, xthantan gum (XG) solution and the ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. We showed that influence of gel formation on VF were qualitatively different in these two systems. We consider that the difference in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. In the present study, viscoelasticity measurement was performed by two methods. One is the method which uses Double Wall Ring sensor (TA instrument) and another is the method using parallel plate. In both viscoelasticity measurements, the behavior of the formed gel was qualitatively consistent. We have found that the gel in the SPA system shows viscoelastic fluid like behavior. Moreover, we have found that the gel in the XG system shows solid like behavior.

  5. Stabilization of reactive nitroxides using invasomes to allow prolonged electron paramagnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Haag, S F; Taskoparan, B; Bittl, R; Teutloff, C; Wenzel, R; Fahr, A; Chen, M; Lademann, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Meinke, M C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of the antioxidative capacity of the skin is of great practical relevance since free radicals are involved in many skin damaging processes, including aging and inflammation. The nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for measuring the antioxidative capacity since its reaction with reducing agents is considerably fast. Yet, in order to achieve longer measurement times, e.g. in inflammatory skin diseases, the stabilizing effect of an invasome (ultraflexible vesicle/liposome) suspension with TEMPO was investigated ex vivo on porcine skin and in vivo on human skin. Invasomes increased the measurement time ex vivo 2-fold and the reduction was significantly slowed down in vivo, which is due to membrane-associated and therefore protected TEMPO. Furthermore, TEMPO accumulation in the membrane phase as well as the decreasing polarity of the ultimate surroundings of TEMPO during skin penetration explains the stabilizing effect. Thus, an invasome suspension with TEMPO exhibits stabilizing effects ex vivo and in vivo.

  6. Visual transduction in human rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Kraft, T W; Schneeweis, D M; Schnapf, J L

    1993-05-01

    1. Photocurrents were recorded with suction electrodes from rod photoreceptors of seven humans. 2. Brief flashes of light evoked transient outward currents of up to 20 pA. With increasing light intensity the peak response amplitude increased along an exponential saturation function. A half-saturating peak response was evoked by approximately sixty-five photoisomerizations. 3. Responses to brief dim flashes rose to a peak in about 200 ms. The waveform was roughly like the impulse response of a series of four to five low-pass filters. 4. The rising phases of the responses to flashes of increasing strength were found to fit with a biochemical model of phototransduction with an 'effective delay time' and 'characteristic time' of about 2 and 800 ms, respectively. 5. Spectral sensitivities were obtained over a wavelength range from 380 to 760 nm. The action spectrum, which peaked at 495 nm, followed the template described for photoreceptors in the macaque retina. Variation between rods in the position of the spectrum on the wavelength axis was small. 6. The scotopic luminosity function derived from human psychophysical experiments was found to agree well with the measured rod action spectrum after adjustments were made for lens absorption and photopigment self-screening in the intact eye. 7. Responses to steps of light rose monotonically to a maintained level, showing little or no relaxation. Nevertheless, the relationship between light intensity and steady-state response amplitude was shallower than that expected from simple response saturation. This is consistent with an adaptation mechanism acting on a rapid time scale. 8. Flash sensitivity fell with increasing intensities of background light according to Weber's law. Sensitivity was reduced twofold by lights evoking about 120 photoisomerizations per second. Background lights decreased the time to peak and the integration time of the flash response by up to 20%.

  7. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  8. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  9. On-road Emissions of Reactive Nitrogen through In-situ, Mobile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Existing atmospheric measurements suggest that urban traffic may provide significant amount of NH3. NH3 emissions in urban areas may cause greater impact on air quality and human health, because other aerosol tracers, like NO and NO2, are emitted by similar on-road sources. However, the on-road NH3 emission inventories are subject to significant uncertainties. A mobile platform is developed by mounting multiple portable (total power ~ 100 W, weight ~ 25 kg), high-resolution (10 Hz), open-path sensors on top of a passenger car. On-road NH3 emissions are quantified in the real-world driving conditions by synchronized NH3, CO, and CO2 measurements. The mobile platform has covered over 16,000 km in the US and China since 2013. The total on-road sampling time is over 300 hours. Major US metropolitan areas that have been sampled include LA, SF, Houston, Philadelphia, and Denver. Three Chinese megacities (Beijing, Baoding, and Shijiazhuang) were sampled in both 2013 and 2014. The average emission factors (grams of NH3 emitted per kilogram of fuel) range from 0.3 to 0.5 g/kg. Different methodologies were compared, including on-road emission ratios, tunnel measurements, and city-scale gradient measurements. These methodologies yielded the same emission factor for Houston (0.4±0.05 g/kg) within the sampling uncertainties and showed that multiple approaches are consistent with one another. The observed NH3 emission ratios indicate that National Emisison Inventory (NEI) underestimates on-road NH3 emissions by up to 50% in some major urban areas. On-road NH3 emission factors show higher values in both stop-and-go driving conditions and freeway speeds with a minimum near 70 km/h. This is consistent with another observation that the emission factors in urban traffic are generally larger than suburban traffic. Road gradient

  10. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  11. Chip electrophoresis as a novel approach to measure the polyphenols reactivity toward human saliva.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Iturmendi, Néréa; Gambuti, Angelita; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Moio, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Saliva is a biological fluid with a multifunctional role that makes it interesting in terms of research and diagnostic possibilities. In food research, human saliva represented a useful tool by which we measure the tactile sensation elicited by polyphenol-rich beverages called astringency. A method based on SDS-PAGE analysis of saliva before and after the binding reaction with wine polyphenols has been successfully used in previous studies for measuring wine astringency by means of the saliva precipitation index. In this work, chip electrophoresis was used alternatively to SDS-PAGE and results were compared. Chip electrophoresis provides a very good reproducibility for wine and grape astringency. Moreover, this approach is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method requiring several hours for an analysis. Another advantage over traditional gel is lower sample and reagent volume requirements, as well as the lower and less toxic wastes, contributing benefits to health and environment. The application of this novel method allowed, using the principal component analysis, to distinguish grapes and wines according to the saliva precipitation index and structural characteristics determined by the phoroglucinolysis analysis.

  12. Use of the double-loop reactivation test to measure sensitization in aged and welded pH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, W.R.; Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.

    1987-01-08

    Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) testing provides quantitative detection of small degrees of sensitization. We have used double-loop (DL-EPR) testing, a method which has been characterized for use on austenitic stainless steels, to measure sensitization resulting from aging or from welding of PH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel. Aging at either 500/sup 0/C or 620/sup 0/C results in an increase of the reactivation current density. The 500/sup 0/C treatment promotes preferential susceptibility to corrosion along prior austenite grain boundaries, and the 620/sup 0/C treatment promotes preferential susceptibility along martensite interlath boundaries. A narrow band in the heat-affected zone of autogenous weldments also undergoes localized corrosion during the reactivation scan. Increased reactivation current density is likely caused by classic Cr-depletion resulting from carbide precipitation.

  13. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  14. ATMOS/ATLAS-3 Measurements of Stratospheric Chlorine and Reactive Nitrogen Partitioning Inside and Outside the November 1994 Antarctic Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Michelsen, H. A.; Zander, R.; Newchurch, M. J.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Chang, A. Y.; Irion, F. W.; Goldman, A.; Mahieu, E.

    1996-01-01

    Partitioning between HCl and ClONO2 and among the main components of the reactive nitrogen family (NO, NO2, HNO3, ClONO2, N2O5, and HO2NO2) has been studied inside and outside the Antarctic stratospheric vortex based on ATMOS profiles measured at sunrise during the 3-12 November 1994 ATLAS-3 Shuttle mission. Elevated mixing ratios of HCl in the lower stratosphere with a peak of approximately 2.9 ppbv (10(exp -9) parts per volume) were measured inside the vortex near 500 K potential temperature (approximately 19 km). Maximum ClONO2 mixing ratios of approximately 1.2, approximately 1.4, and approximately 0.9 ppbv near 700 K (approximately 25 km) were measured inside, at the edge, and outside the vortex, respectively. Model calculations reproduce the higher levels of HCl and NO(x) (NO + NO2) inside the lower stratospheric vortex both driven by photochemical processes initiated by low O3. The high HCl at low O3 results from chemical production of HC1 via the reaction of enhanced Cl with CH4, limited production of ClONO2, and the descent of inorganic chlorine from higher altitudes.

  15. Measurements of reactive nitrogen produced by tropical thunderstorms during BIBLE-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Takegawa, N.; Nishi, N.; Kashihara, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kudoh, S.; Blake, D.; Shirai, T.; Liley, B.; Ko, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ogawa, T.

    2007-09-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase C (BIBLE-C) aircraft mission was carried out near Darwin, Australia (12°S, 131°E) in December 2000. This was the first aircraft experiment designed to estimate lightning NO production rates in the tropics, where production is considered to be most intense. During the two flights (flights 10 and 13 made on December 9 and 11-12, respectively) enhancements of NOx (NO + NO2) up to 1000 and 1600 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, 10-s data) were observed at altitudes between 11.5 and 14 km. The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) cloud (brightness temperature) data and ground-based lightning measurements by the Global Positioning and Tracking System (GPATS) indicate that there were intensive lightning events over the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria, which took place upstream from our measurement area 10 to 14 h prior to the measurements. For these two flights, air in which NOx exceeded 100 pptv extended over 620 × 140 and 400 × 170 km2 (wind direction × perpendicular direction), respectively, suggesting a significant impact of lightning NO production on NOx levels in the tropics. We estimate the amount of NOx observed between 11.5 and 14 km produced by the thunderstorms to be 3.3 and 1.8 × 1029 NO molecules for flights 10 and 13, respectively. By using the GPATS lightning flash count data, column NO production rates are estimated to be 1.9-4.4 and 21-49 × 1025 NO molecules per single flash for these two flight data sets. In these estimations, it is assumed that the column NO production between 0 and 16 km is greater than the observed values between 11.5 and 14 km by a factor of 3.2, which is derived using results reported by Pickering et al. (1998). There are however large uncertainties in the GPATS lightning data in this study and care must be made when the production rates are referred. Uncertainties in these estimates are discussed. The impact on the ozone production rate is also described.

  16. Adolescent daily and general maladjustment: is there reactivity to daily repeated measures methodologies?

    PubMed

    Nishina, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined whether repeated exposure to daily surveys about negative social experiences predicts changes in adolescents' daily and general maladjustment, and whether question content moderates these changes. Across a 2-week period, 6th-grade students (N = 215; mode age = 11) completed 5 daily reports tapping experienced or experienced and witnessed negative events, or they completed no daily reports. General maladjustment was measured in 2-week intervals before, at the end of, and 2 weeks after the daily report study. Daily maladjustment either decreased or did not change across the 5 daily report exposures. General maladjustment decreased across the three 2-week intervals. Combined, results indicate that short-term daily report studies do not place youth at risk for increased maladjustment.

  17. Rushton's paradox: rod dark adaptation after flash photolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, E N

    1975-01-01

    1. Rod dark adaptations after a photoregenerating flash and quantum-equivalent 30 sec bleach are found to be in exact agreement, while the measured rhodopsin regenerations are grossly different. This finding confirms and clarifies "Rushton's paradox', the failure of the Dowling-Rushton equation (linking log sensitivity linearly with unregenerated rhodopsin) to account for human rod dark adaptation after flash photolysis. 2. The hypothesis that the agreement between rod dark adaptation curves after a photoregenerating flash and after a quantum-equivalent 30 sec bleach is coincidental is rejected on the basic of two classes of experiments. 3. Rod "bleaching' adaptation is demonstrated to be entirely determined by the number of rhodopsin molecules which absorb at least one quantum in a temporal period T, whose range includes the time interval 600 musec less than or equal T less than or equal 30 sec. This generalization obtains over the entire scotopic energy range (congruent to 3 log units) where rod dark adaptations has been studied. 4. Thus, the state of "bleaching' adaptation is determined by some by-product of the normal chain of events in scotopic excitation. About this by-product three important deductions are made: (i) its production is a monotonic function of the initial effective quantum absorptions; (ii) its production occurs before the metarhodopsin I leads to to metarhodopsin II dark reaction; (iii) it cannot be any photoproduct of the rhodopsin cycle. PMID:1151791

  18. Nano-rods of zinc oxide in nano-graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Pedro; Chavira, Elizabeth; Monroy, Marel; Elizalde, José; Santiago, Patricia; Sato, Roberto; Tejeda, Adriana; González, Guillermina; Novelo, Omar; Flores, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    It's of great interest to study the devices based on nano-ZnO and graphene, for their electromagnetic and optical properties to increase the efficiency of solar cells. The graphene multilayers synthesis was done by mechanosynthesis, grinding in a mechanical agate mortar. The zinc oxide nano-rods were synthesized from zinc acetate dihydrate, Ace, (Sigma Aldrich) and ethylene diamine, En, (Sigma Aldrich) with a 1:2 ratio of reagents En/Ace. The ZnO nano-rods in nano-tubes graphene were obtained by mechanosynthesis. The X-ray powder diffraction, shows the shift of C with PDF 12-0212 and ZnO, Zincite PDF 36-1451, both with hexagonal unit cell. The grain size and morphology of graphene (multilayers and nano-tubes), ZnO nano-rods and ZnO-graphene mixture (multilayers, nano-tubes) were observed by scanning electron microscope. Transmission electron microscope, corroborates shown in SEM. Raman spectroscopy, shows the shift of multilayer graphene and the ZnO nano-rods. In photoluminescence measurements, observe the change in intensity in the band defects. Magnetic properties characterization was carried out by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. We conclude that graphite multilayers dislocated by cutting efforts, forming graphene nano-tubes and encapsulated ZnO nano-rods within graphene.

  19. Failure kinetics in borosilicate glass during rod impact

    SciTech Connect

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Anderson, Charles E. Jr.; Behner, Thilo; Hohler, Volker; Wickert, Matthias; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2007-12-12

    Failure front (FF) and penetration velocity have been measured for long gold rods impacting and penetrating borosilicate (BS) glass. Data are obtained by visualizing simultaneously FF propagation with a high speed camera and rod penetration with flash X-rays. Results for BS glass are qualitatively similar to those of DEDF (PbO) glass. FF velocity rapidly decreases from an initial value to a lower, approximately constant value. FF velocity increases with impact velocity, v{sub p}. The FF velocity remains significantly lower than the shear velocity, even at the highest impact velocity tested, about 2.5 km/s. The ratio of the FF velocity to the rod penetration velocity, v{sub F}/u, decreases with increasing v{sub p} and appears to be approaching v{sub F}/u = 1 asymptotically, as observed previously for DEDF glass. The separation of the FF and the tip of the rod decreases with increasing impact velocity. Importantly, since v{sub F}/u{>=}1, the gold rod is always penetrating glass behind the FF.

  20. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p < 0.0005) and dPRU = -54.4 × dFg - 21.8 (r = -0.764, p < 0.0005). Thus, the results of our experiments suggest that: (i) blood fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy.

  1. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  2. Investigation of atmospheric particle-bound reactive oxidative species (ROS): Their sources, characterization, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachari, Prasanna

    The relationships between the observed ROS concentrations in the New York City PMTACS study and various other atmospheric indicator species such as O3, HOx radicals, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC), as well as the statistical significance of any observable correlations were explored. A statistically significant moderate positive correlation between the O3 and the ROS concentrations, that indicated the local intensity of photochemistry was a moderate factor affecting the formation of particulate ROS in the daytime atmosphere, was observed. The results of the comparison between ROS and HO x concentrations indicated the existence of, at best, a weak positive correlation. The lack of a more positive correlation of the particle-bound ROS, both with ozone as well as other gas phase oxidants, showed the decoupling of the particulate matter ROS from the gas phase oxidants. The comparison of ROS concentrations with OC, EC, and SOC concentrations revealed a statistically significant relationship (P-value < 0.05) only in the case of ROS and SOC. EC and OC, in general exhibited weak, negative correlations with the observed ROS concentrations. The consistency of the positive relationships between ROS and SOC for all the periods suggested that the measured ROS was photochemically driven. The absence of any statistical relevance of primary EC and OC concentrations on the ROS concentrations suggested that primary emissions, especially from motor vehicles, were not a major source of the measured particle-bound ROS. An important objective of this work was to develop a system that could provide a stable throughput of particle-bound ROS, and characterize it in terms of particle size distribution, concentrations, and formed products, such that the results obtained could be viewed in the perspective of atmospheric processes and measurements. A ROS-bearing particle generator was developed, that could deliver known exposures of ROS. It was

  3. Noise reduction in a Mach 5 wind tunnel with a rectangular rod-wall sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Keyes, J. W.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rod wall sound shield was tested over a range of Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x 10 to the 7th power to 8.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter. The model consisted of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Suitable measurement techniques were used to determine properties of the flow and acoustic disturbance in the shield and transition in the rod boundary layers. Measurements indicated that for a Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power the noise in the shielded region was significantly reduced, but only when the flow is mostly laminar on the rods. Actual nozzle input noise measured on the nozzle centerline before reflection at the shield walls was attenuated only slightly even when the rod boundary layer were laminar. At a lower Reynolds number, nozzle input noise at noise levels in the shield were still too high for application to a quiet tunnel. At Reynolds numbers above 2.0 x 10 the the 7th power per meter, measured noise levels were generally higher than nozzle input levels, probably due to transition in the rod boundary layers. The small attenuation of nozzle input noise at intermediate Reynolds numbers for laminar rod layers at the acoustic origins is apparently due to high frequencies of noise.

  4. Evidence for rod-shaped DNA-stabilized silver nanocluster emitters.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Danielle; Gardner, Kira; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S R; Markešević, Nemanja; Olsson, Kevin; Debord, Mark; Bouwmeester, Dirk; Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2013-05-28

    Fluorescent DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters contain both cationic and neutral silver atoms. The absorbance spectra of compositionally pure solutions follow the trend expected for rod-shaped silver clusters, consistent with the polarized emission measured from individual nanoclusters. The data suggest a rod-like assembly of silver atoms, with silver cations mediating attachment to the bases.

  5. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Anderson, B.; Beyersdorf, A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G.; Eichler, P.; Fried, A.; Keutsch, F. N.; Mikoviny, T.; Thornhill, K. L.; Walega, J. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Yokelson, R.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-11-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin for deriving emission factors and followed ~ 13.6 km downwind for observing chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution (10 m/0.1 s). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3 and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butandione and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 ppbV ppmV-1 CO emitted. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a near-explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into PAN and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the plume. Formaldehyde, acetone

  6. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Eichler, Philipp; Fried, Alan; Keutsch, Frank N.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Walega, James G.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert J.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-03-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed ˜ 13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV-1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the

  7. Direct Evidence for Daily Plasticity of Electrical Coupling between Rod Photoreceptors in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors are electrically coupled through gap junctions. Coupling is a key determinant of their light response properties, but whether rod electrical coupling is dynamically regulated remains elusive and controversial. Here, we have obtained direct measurements of the conductance between adjacent rods in mouse retina and present evidence that rod electrical coupling strength is dependent on the time of day, the lighting conditions, and the mouse strain. Specifically, we show in CBA/Ca mice that under circadian conditions, the rod junctional conductance has a median value of 98 pS during the subjective day and of 493 pS during the subjective night. In C57BL/6 mice, the median junctional conductance between dark-adapted rods is ∼140 pS, regardless of the time in the circadian cycle. Adaptation to bright light decreases the rod junctional conductance to ∼0 pS, regardless of the time of day or the mouse strain. Together, these results establish the high degree of plasticity of rod electrical coupling over the course of the day. Estimates of the rod coupling strength will provide a foundation for further investigations of rod interactions and the role of rod coupling in the ability of the visual system to anticipate, assimilate, and respond to the daily changes in ambient light intensity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many cells in the CNS communicate via gap junctions, or electrical synapses, the regulation of which remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the strength of electrical coupling between rod photoreceptors of the retina is regulated by the time of day and the lighting conditions. This mechanism may help us understand some key aspects of day and night vision as well as some visual malfunctions. PMID:26740659

  8. Tensile Characterization of FRP Rods for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelli, F.; Nanni, A.

    2003-07-01

    The application of FRP rods as an internal or external reinforcement in new or damaged concrete structures is based on the development of design equations that take into account the mechanical properties of FRP material systems.The measurement of mechanical characteristics of FRP requires a special anchoring and protocol, since it is well known that these characteristics depend on the direction and content of fibers. In this study, an effective tensile test method is described for the mechanical characterization of FRP rods. Twelve types of glass and carbon FRP specimens with different sizes and surface characteristics were tested to validate the procedure proposed. In all, 79 tensile tests were performed, and the results obtained are discussed in this paper. Recommendations are given for specimen preparation and test setup in order to facilitate the further investigation and standardization of the FRP rods used in civil engineering.

  9. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  10. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the troposphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently the atmospheric sinks of OH are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink term of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. The first direct measurements of total OH reactivity were performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) [1], [2]. Recently a new method for determining OH reactivity was developed called the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [3]. The measurement principle is based on a competitive reaction between a reactive molecule not normally present in air with OH, and atmospheric OH reactive molecules with OH. The reactive molecule (X), is passed through a Teflon coated glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced into the reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the competing ambient air molecules directly provides the atmospheric total OH reactivity. In the first version of this set up, molecule X is pyrrole (C5H4N) and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In comparison to the original LIF based system, the PTR-MS has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and commercially available. However, using the PTR-MS for total OH reactivity measurements prevents it from probing the broad variety of volatile organic compounds in ambient air. Moreover, even smaller, less expensive and more portable detectors are available. This work examines the potential for a GC-PID in order to make the total OH reactivity measurement accessible to more practitioners. This study presents measurements of total OH reactivity with a custom built GC-PID (VOC-Analyzer from IUT-Berlin, now ENIT (Environics-IUT GmbH))[4]. The GC-PID is small (260

  11. Development and characterization of an annular denuder methodology for the measurement of divalent inorganic reactive gaseous mercury in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Landis, Matthew S; Stevens, Robert K; Schaedlich, Frank; Prestbo, Eric M

    2002-07-01

    Atmospheric mercury is predominantly present in the gaseous elemental form (Hg0). However, anthropogenic emissions (e.g., incineration, fossil fuel combustion) emit and natural processes create particulate-phase mercury(Hg(p)) and divalent reactive gas-phase mercury (RGM). RGM species (e.g., HgCl2, HgBr2) are water-soluble and have much shorter residence times in the atmosphere than Hg0 due to their higher removal rates through wet and dry deposition mechanisms. Manual and automated annular denuder methodologies, to provide high-resolution (1-2 h) ambient RGM measurements, were developed and evaluated. Following collection of RGM onto KCl-coated quartz annular denuders, RGM was thermally decomposed and quantified as Hg0. Laboratory and field evaluations of the denuders found the RGM collection efficiency to be >94% and mean collocated precision to be <15%. Method detection limits for sampling durations ranging from 1 to 12 h were 6.2-0.5 pg m(-3), respectively. As part of this research, the authors observed that methods to measure Hg(p) had a significant positive artifact when RGM coexists with Hg(p). This artifact was eliminated if a KCl-coated annular denuder preceded the filter. This new atmospheric mercury speciation methodology has dramatically enhanced our ability to investigate the mechanisms of transformation and deposition of mercury in the atmosphere.

  12. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  13. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Final report, 1 September 1990--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.; Lu, W.; Lilly, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed what we believe to be the very first, a priori, correlation/prediction technique for the gasification reactivity of coal char. With this method the gasification reactivity of a coal char as a function of temperature can be correlated using the data from a temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiment following gasification under conditions where the reactivity is controlled by the thermal desorption of oxygen surface complexes formed during gasification. The current project was directed at extending and developing related techniques for the characterization and prediction/correlation of the reactivity of the ``young`` chars to CO{sub 2} and steam. Of particular interest was mapping of the reactivity behavior of the resultant chars, as revealed by the energetic heterogeneity of the complexes with char preparation conditions.

  14. The effect of fuel rod oxidation on PCMI-induced fuel failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2011-11-01

    It was found in a one of the PWRs operating in Korea that a few three cycle-burned Zry-4 fuel assemblies which were loaded in a core center region at control bank positions were leaking. The leaking cycle has experienced a few reactor trips and some fuel rods started to leak at about a month after a power ramp following the second reactor trip. To investigate a root cause of such fuel failure as well as to examine intact and leak rod oxidation behaviors, one intact and one leaking fuel rods were selected from one intact and one failed three cycle-burned fuel assemblies, respectively, and in parallel one intact fuel rod was selected from a two cycle-burned fuel assembly to examine the effect of burnup on fuel rod oxidation and cladding stress during the power ramp. The maximum oxide thicknesses for the intact two cycle-burned and three cycle-burned fuel rods were measured to be about 70 and 140 μm, respectively, whereas that for the leaking three cycle-burned fuel rod to be about 200 μm. The leaking fuel rods generated a very sharp increase in oxide thickness in the fuel rod upper region having a relatively high axial power, resulting in through-wall axial cracks. The root cause of the fuel rod leaks was evaluated to be the pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI)-induced failure combined with excessive Zry-4 oxidation and cladding stress, based on the evaluations of pellet-clad friction coefficient-dependent cladding hoop stresses after the power ramp following the second trip, measured oxide thicknesses and axial cracks on the cladding surface, a fuel leak initiation time and failed fuel rod locations at the control bank positions.

  15. Chemotaxis of Nonbiological Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yiying; Blackman, Nicole M. K.; Kopp, Nathaniel D.; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell

    2007-10-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of organisms toward or away from a chemical attractant or toxin by a biased random walk process. Here we describe the first experimental example of chemotaxis outside biological systems. Platinum-gold rods 2.0μm long exhibit directed movement toward higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations through “active diffusion.” Brownian dynamics simulations reveal that no “temporal sensing” algorithm, commonly attributed to bacteria, is necessary; rather, the observed chemotaxis can be explained by random walk physics in a gradient of the active diffusion coefficient.

  16. Lateral Flow Field Behavior Downstream of Mixing Vanes In a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2004-07-01

    To assess the fuel assembly performance of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies, average subchannel flow values are used in design analyses. However, for this highly complex flow, it is known that local conditions around fuel rods vary dependent upon the location of the fuel rod in the fuel assembly and upon the support grid design that maintains the fuel rod pitch. To investigate the local flow in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle, a testing technique has been employed to measure the lateral flow field in a 5 x 5 rod bundle. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the lateral flow field downstream of a support grid with mixing vanes for four unique subchannels in the 5 x 5 bundle. The dominant lateral flow structures for each subchannel are compared in this paper including the decay of these flow structures. (authors)

  17. Combining Ambient Measurements of OH Radicals and OH Reactivity in a Tropical Rainforest during the OP-3 Project: Resolving the Magnitude of the Missing OH Sources and Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P.; Furneaux, K. L.; Goddard, A.; George, I. J.; Evans, M. J.; Heard, D. E.; Team Op-3

    2010-12-01

    The self cleansing capacity of the troposphere and the lifetime of key greenhouse gases are controlled to a large extent by the OH radical. In environments where biogenic VOC emissions are high and NOx concentrations are low, for example in tropical rainforests, the current understanding of tropospheric chemistry suggests that OH radical concentrations should be suppressed. OH measurements made in such regions, however, have highlighted higher than expected OH radical concentrations that cannot be replicated by chemical models constrained with the currently known OH formation pathways [1]. Here we report OH and OH reactivity measurements made during the OP-3 project that took place in the Borneo rainforest in 2008. Concentrations of OH displayed a clear diurnal cycle, peaking at solar noon, with significant concentrations observed: up to 8.7×106 molecule cm-3 (60 min average). Although j(O1D) levels and humidity were high, low O3 concentrations limited the rate of primary OH production from ozone photolysis. OH reactivity measurements were made using a sliding injector flow-tube reactor technique, with OH detection by LIF. Mean OH reactivities of 15.5 s-1 were observed with daily maximum OH reactivity of 24.7 ± 11.1 s-1 shortly after local solar noon, coinciding with peak isoprene concentrations. Minimum values of 7.2 ± 2.2 s-1 were observed just before sun rise. Using the measured OH and OH reactivity in a constrained box model containing detailed MCM chemistry we are able to fully resolve the magnitude of the missing OH source. We find that significant OH sources must be present - in addition to primary production - in order to maintain the elevated levels of OH levels recorded. Inclusion of an additional OH source formed as a recycled product of isoprene oxidation [2] improves the modelled OH agreement but reduces the modelled to measured HO2 agreement. To replicate both OH and HO2, a process that recycles HO2 to OH is required; equivalent to the OH recycling

  18. Measurements of volatile organic compounds during the 2006 TexAQS/GoMACCS campaign: Industrial influences, regional characteristics, and diurnal dependencies of the OH reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Kuster, William C.; Goldan, Paul D.; Herndon, Scott C.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Tucker, Sara C.; Brewer, W. Alan; Lerner, Brian M.; Williams, Eric J.; Harley, Robert A.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2009-04-01

    An extensive set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gas phase species were measured in situ aboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown as the ship sailed in the Gulf of Mexico and the Houston and Galveston Bay (HGB) area as part of the Texas Air Quality (TexAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) conducted from July-September 2006. The magnitudes of the reactivities of CH4, CO, VOCs, and NO2 with the hydroxyl radical, OH, were determined in order to quantify the contributions of these compounds to potential ozone formation. The average total OH reactivity (ROH,TOTAL) increased from 1.01 s-1 in the central gulf to 10.1 s-1 in the HGB area as a result of the substantial increase in the contribution from VOCs and NO2. The increase in the measured concentrations of reactive VOCs in the HGB area compared to the central gulf was explained by the impact of industrial emissions, the regional distribution of VOCs, and the effects of local meteorology. By compensating for the effects of boundary layer mixing, the diurnal profiles of the OH reactivity were used to characterize the source signatures and relative magnitudes of biogenic, anthropogenic (urban + industrial), and oxygenated VOCs as a function of the time of day. The source of reactive oxygenated VOCs (e.g., formaldehyde) was determined to be almost entirely from secondary production. The secondary formation of oxygenated VOCs, in addition to the continued emissions of reactive anthropogenic VOCs, served to sustain elevated levels of OH reactivity throughout the time of peak ozone production.

  19. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  20. Fuel rod retention device for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, Charles L.

    1984-01-01

    A device is described for supporting a nuclear fuel rod in a fuel rod assembly which allows the rod to be removed without disturbing other rods in the assembly. A fuel rod cap connects the rod to a bolt which is supported in the assembly end fitting by means of a locking assembly. The device is designed so that the bolt is held securely during normal reactor operation yet may be easily disengaged and the fuel rod removed when desired.

  1. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  2. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  3. Experimental measurements and techniques in turbulent reactive and non-reactive flows; Proceedings of the Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, December 9-14, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    So, R.M.C.; Whitlaw, J.H.; Lapp, M.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-based diagnostics for flowfield measurements are discussed along with considerations for the application of CARS to turbulent reacting flows, Raman measurements of surface deposition from combustion flows, laser light scattering methods for simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements, and the characterization of sprays. Attention is given to concentration distributions in cylindrical combustors, scalar and momentum turbulent transport experiments with swirling and nonswirling flows, velocity and concentration measurements in a model diesel engine, an LDV system for turbulence length scale measurements, and laser measurement techniques applied to turbulent combustion in piston engines. Other topics explored are related to the role of vortex shedding in a bluff-body combustor, the structure and dynamics of reacting two stream plane mixing layers, conditional sampling of velocity and scalars in turbulent flames using simultaneous LDV-Raman scattering, and an investigation of temperature and velocity correlations in turbulent flames.

  4. Measurements of OH and HO2 Radicals and OH Reactivity at Tropical Locations Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furneaux, K. L.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P.; Goddard, A.; Ingham, T.; Evans, M. J.; Heard, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    included, indicating a missing HOx source. Both OH and HO2 were observed at night. Measurements of HOx at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (16.9N, 24.9W) were made from May - June 2007 as part of the RHaMBLe (Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer) programme. The site is located adjacent to the ocean with an absence of macro algae, providing conditions analogous to open ocean, clean marine air. However, background tropical conditions were not dictated by simple chemistry. Peak OH and HO2 concentrations were 9 × 106 molecule cm-3 and 6 ×108 molecule cm-3, respectively. HO2 was observed at night between 5 - 20 × 106 molecule cm-3. Modelling studies determined oxygenated-VOCs and halogen chemistry to play an important role in HOx chemistry. A comparison of HOx measurements at tropical open ocean and tropical rainforest locations shows that HOx chemistry varies greatly throughout the tropics. Higher HOx sinks in tropical rainforest environments result in a decrease of HOx compared to the tropical open ocean. 1. Lelieveld, J., T. M. Butler, et al. (2008). Atmospheric oxidation capacity sustained by a tropical forest, Nature, 452(7188): 737-740. 2. Martinez, M., Harder, H., et al. (2008). Hydroxyl radicals in the tropical troposphere over the Suriname rainforest: airborne measurements, ACPD, 8, 15491-15536.

  5. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  6. Importance of measurement of platelet reactivity to ADP in patients with coronary artery disease: an historical account.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Udaya S; Mahla, Elisabeth; Gesheff, Martin G; Gurbel, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    The pivotal roles of platelets in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis at the site of plaque rupture are well established. The latter roles provide the fundamental basis for the most widely implemented pharmacologic management of coronary artery disease--dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin to inhibit platelet thromboxane A2 generation, and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor to prevent adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet activation. Although suboptimal pharmacodynamic efficacy, also described as high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP, has been associated with greater risk for post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, enhanced responsiveness is associated with higher risk for bleeding in selected patients. In this review article, we aim to provide an historical account of the one and a half century long journey starting with the first description of platelets through the first report of ex vivo measurement of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the first demonstration of an association between ADP-induced platelet aggregation and post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, and finally to the most recent description of a 'therapeutic window' concept for P2Y12 receptor inhibitor therapy.

  7. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  8. Radial pressure sensor of sucker rod based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyu; Yan, Hu; Li, Qiang

    2013-10-01

    The eccentric wear, fracture and other phenomena often occur to the sucker rod in major oil fields. It turns out that the radial pressure of sucker rod suffered is the main reason for its eccentric wear. It is necessary to analyze the eccentric wear and fracture of sucker rod in the pumping process. It is also important to measure the radial pressure for the downhole sucker rod accurately. The radial pressure could be analyzed when sucker rod is extruded, collided or sustained friction based on the material mechanics and the fluid dynamics. The mechanical structure is designed for measuring the radial pressure. The data processing system for radial pressure of down-hole sucker rod based on LabVIEW is developed in this paper. The functions are real-time data acquisition and processing for sucker rod radial pressure. The communication of LabVIEW and Access database had been realized. The database management system for radial pressure of sucker rod is built, which could be used to achieve the data storage, historical data retrieval analysis, data organization and calculation. The computer simulation is carried out to verify the reasonability of the theoretical analysis and structure design.

  9. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed.

  10. Equations determine reasonable rod pump submergence depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yongquan; Cai Wizhong

    1997-03-24

    A reasonable rod pump submergence depth can be calculated by combining fluid level changes with piston travel. Submergence depth is affected by the pump fill factor, reservoir fluid viscosity, rod pump type, and pumping parameters such as pump diameter, polished-rod stroke length, and pumping speed. Fluid level velocity can be obtained with an energy balance, and piston travel rate is based on the polished-rod travel. The paper describes the pump fill factor, piston travel velocity, fluid level rise, flow coefficient, reasonable submergence depth, and results from equations.

  11. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  12. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  13. An explanation for the anomalous wave profiles obtained in composition B-3 impacted by flat nosed steel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. R.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    In previous work involving firing flat nosed steel rods into the 60/40 RDX/TNT explosive Composition B-3, we found an apparently anomalous "hump" in particle velocity wave profiles. The "hump" occurred on the center-line established by the rod, and at relatively late times, > 1 µs, after detonation onset. Several explanations, including that of a late time reaction, were postulated. This report will present evidence that the anomalous late time "hump" is due to the arrival of rarefaction waves from the rod's periphery. Simple analytic calculations and reactive-burn hydro-code calculations will be presented supporting this hypothesis.

  14. Effects of rod worth and drop speed on the BWR off-center rod drop accident

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.M.; Carew, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    BWR off-center RDA calculations have been performed for selected rod worths and drop speeds. While in all cases the peak fuel enthalpy was well below the 280 cal/g fuel criterion, a substantial sensitivity to control rod worth and rod drop speed was observed.

  15. Morphology-dependent nanocatalysts: rod-shaped oxides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Shen, Wenjie

    2014-03-07

    Nanocatalysts are characterised by the unique nanoscale properties that originate from their highly reduced dimensions. Extensive studies over the past few decades have demonstrated that the size and shape of a catalyst particle on the nanometre scale profoundly affect its reaction performance. In particular, controlling the catalyst particle morphology allows a selective exposure of a larger fraction of the reactive facets on which the active sites can be enriched and tuned. This desirable surface coordination of catalytically active atoms or domains substantially improves catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability. This phenomenon is called morphology-dependent nanocatalysts: catalyst particles with anisotropic morphologies on the nanometre scale greatly affect the reaction performance by selectively exposing the desired facets. In this review, we highlight important progress in morphology-dependent nanocatalysts based on the use of rod-shaped metal oxides with characteristic redox and acid-base features. The correlation between the catalytic properties and the exposed facets verifies the chemical nature of the morphology effect. Moreover, we provide an overview of the interactions between the rod-shaped oxides and the metal nanoparticles in metal-oxide catalyst systems, involving crystal-facet-selective deposition of metal particles onto different crystal facets in the oxide supports. A fundamental understanding of active sites in morphologically tuneable oxides enclosed by the desired reactive facets is expected to direct the development of highly efficient nanocatalysts.

  16. Rapid kinetics of endocytosis at rod photoreceptor synapses depends upon endocytic load and calcium.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-05-01

    Release from rods is triggered by the opening of L-type Ca2+ channels that lie beneath synaptic ribbons. After exocytosis, vesicles are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis. Previous work showed that endocytosis is dynamin-dependent in rods but dynamin-independent in cones. We hypothesized that fast endocytosis in rods may also differ from cones in its dependence upon the amount of Ca2+ influx and/or endocytic load. We measured exocytosis and endocytosis from membrane capacitance (C m) changes evoked by depolarizing steps in voltage clamped rods from tiger salamander retinal slices. Similar to cones, the time constant for endocytosis in rods was quite fast, averaging <200 ms. We manipulated Ca2+ influx and the amount of vesicle release by altering the duration and voltage of depolarizing steps. Unlike cones, endocytosis kinetics in rods slowed after increasing Ca2+ channel activation with longer step durations or more strongly depolarized voltage steps. Endocytosis kinetics also slowed as Ca2+ buffering was decreased by replacing BAPTA (10 or 1 mM) with the slower Ca2+ buffer EGTA (5 or 0.5 mM) in the pipette solution. These data provide further evidence that endocytosis mechanisms differ in rods and cones and suggest that endocytosis in rods is regulated by both endocytic load and local Ca2+ levels.

  17. Rapid kinetics of endocytosis at rod photoreceptor synapses depends upon endocytic load and calcium

    PubMed Central

    CORK, KARLENE M.; THORESON, WALLACE B.

    2015-01-01

    Release from rods is triggered by the opening of L-type Ca2+ channels that lie beneath synaptic ribbons. After exocytosis, vesicles are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis. Previous work showed that endocytosis is dynamin-dependent in rods but dynamin-independent in cones. We hypothesized that fast endocytosis in rods may also differ from cones in its dependence upon the amount of Ca2+ influx and/or endocytic load. We measured exocytosis and endocytosis from membrane capacitance (Cm) changes evoked by depolarizing steps in voltage clamped rods from tiger salamander retinal slices. Similar to cones, the time constant for endocytosis in rods was quite fast, averaging <200 ms. We manipulated Ca2+ influx and the amount of vesicle release by altering the duration and voltage of depolarizing steps. Unlike cones, endocytosis kinetics in rods slowed after increasing Ca2+ channel activation with longer step durations or more strongly depolarized voltage steps. Endocytosis kinetics also slowed as Ca2+ buffering was decreased by replacing BAPTA (10 or 1 mM) with the slower Ca2+ buffer EGTA (5 or 0.5 mM) in the pipette solution. These data provide further evidence that endocytosis mechanisms differ in rods and cones and suggest that endocytosis in rods is regulated by both endocytic load and local Ca2+ levels. PMID:24735554

  18. Fretting corrosion behavior of nitinol spinal rods in conjunction with titanium pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Elena; Kollerov, Mikhail; Meswania, Jay; Khon, Alla; Panin, Pavel; Blunn, Gordon W

    2017-03-01

    Untypical corrosion damage including erosions combined with the build-up of titanium oxide as a corrosion product on the surface of explanted Nitinol spinal rods in the areas where it was in contact with titanium pedicle screw head is reported. It was suggested that Nitinol rods might have inferior fretting corrosion resistance compared with that made of titanium or CoCr. Fretting corrosion of Nitinol spinal rods with titanium (Ti6Al4V) pedicle screws were tested in-vitro by conducting a series of potentiostatic measurements of the peak-to-peak values of fretting corrosion current under bending in a 10% solution of calf serum in PBS. The test included Nitinol rods locked in titanium pedicle screws of different designs. Performance of commercially available titanium (Ti6Al4V) and CoCr spinal rods was also investigated for a comparison. Corrosion damage observed after the in-vitro tests was studied using SEM and EDAX analysis and was compared with patterns on Nitinol rods retrieved 12months after initial surgery. Metal ions level was measured in the test media after in-vitro experiments and in the blood and tissues of the patients who had the rods explanted. The results of this study revealed that Nitinol spinal rods locked in Ti pedicle screws are susceptible to fretting corrosion demonstrating higher fretting corrosion current compared with commercially used Ti6Al4V and CoCr rods. On the surface of Nitinol rods after in-vitro tests and on those retrieved from the patients similar corrosion patterns were observed. Improved resistance to fretting corrosion was observed with Nitinol rods in the in-vitro tests where pedicle screws were used with a stiffer locking mechanism. Since the development of the localized corrosion damage might increase the risk of premature fatigue failure of the rods and result in leaching of Ni ions, it is concluded that Nitinol rods should not be used in conjunction with Ti pedicle screws without special protection especially where the

  19. Reproducibility of hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity measurements using BOLD fMRI in combination with a paced deep breathing task.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Vilela, P; Figueiredo, P

    2014-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that hypocapnic cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) can be assessed by measuring the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response to paced deep breathing (PDB) tasks inducing mild hypocapnia and vasoconstriction. In this work, we aim to assess the test-retest reproducibility and inter-subject variability of BOLD CVR measurements obtained using a PDB task and different methods to analyse the associated BOLD signal. The respiratory protocol consisted of alternating 40s of PDB with normal free breathing; expired CO2 pressure levels (PETCO2) were continuously monitored. CVR was quantified using either a timecourse curve analysis (TCA) approach, where the magnitude of response peaks is emphasized, or general linear modelling (GLM) including optimisation of the BOLD response latencies. The GLM fit was carried out using two types of response regressors: one that was computed as the convolution of PETCO2 traces with a gamma function and another that consisted of the convolution of PDB paradigm blocks with a physiological model of the respiratory response. Haemodynamic response latencies were optimised either on a voxel basis or for the whole imaging region. We found that the GLM method based on PDB task or PETCO2 traces and voxelwise optimisation of response latencies provided the most reproducible measures of CVR. For the average grey matter CVR, the inter-subject coefficient of variation (CVinter) / intra-subject coefficient of variation (CVintra) / intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were 20%/8%/0.8 and 27%/8%/0.9, using the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. In terms of the spatial reproducibility, the group mean (±standard deviation) of the spatial ICC (ICCspatial) was 1.04±0.23 and 1.02±0.26, for the task and PETCO2 timecourses, respectively. These results indicate generally good reproducibility of the hypocapnic CVR maps obtained using the proposed PDB task and analysis methodology. This suggests that such protocol

  20. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  1. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  2. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  3. Porous tantalum rods for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z H; Guo, W S; Li, Z R; Cheng, L M; Zhang, Q D; Yue, D B; Shi, Z C; Wang, B L; Sun, W; Zhang, N F

    2014-10-20

    This study evaluated the outcomes of using porous tantalum rods for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We performed core decompression and inserted porous tantalum implants in 149 patients (168 consecutive hips) with ONFH. Hips had large (65), medium (64), or small (39) lesions; 63 lesions were lateral, 68 were central, and 35 were medial. Conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) was the end point of this survey. A total of 130 cases (138 hips) were followed. The mean follow-up time was 38.46 ± 5.76 months; 43 hips (31%) were converted to or needed THA. Of the 43 hips requiring THA, 33 had large lesions, including 1 medial, 3 central, and 29 lateral lesions; 9 had medium, lateral lesions, and 1 hip had a small, lateral lesion. Bone grafting was used in 59 hips, with 3 hips failing; 40 of 79 hips without bone grafts failed. The sum distances between the tops of the rods and the lateral lesion boundaries (SDTL, mm) were measured in anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In the failure and spared groups, the average SDTLs were 7.65 ± 2.759 and 0.83 ± 2.286 mm, respectively. The survival of porous tantalum rods used for treating early-stage ONFH was affected by the size and location of the lesion, whether or not a bone graft was used, as well as the distance between top of the rod and the lateral boundary of the lesion.

  4. Safety rod/thimble melt failure characterization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Hawkes, G.L.

    1992-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) requested that he INEL perform experiments to study the thermal failure characteristics of a simulated Savannah River Site nuclear reactor safety rod and its surrounding thimble assembly. An electrically heated stainless steel rod simulated a reactor safety rod located eccentrically or concentrically within a perforated aluminum guide tube or thimble. A total of 37 experiments were conducted for a range of power levels and safety rod/thimble relative orientations. Video tapes were made of the four failure tests that were conducted to the melting point of the thimble. Although the primary emphasis of the experiments were to characterize the melting of the thimble qualitatively, experimental transient measurements included heater voltage and current, heater surface temperatures, aluminum thimble temperatures, and ambient temperature. Numerical studies were also performed in support of the experiments and data interpretation. Two finite element models were created to model the heat conduction-radiation between the stainless steel heater and thimble. The predicted temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Combining moving inlets for measuring gradients of reactive trace gases and thoron measurements for the determination of near surface fluxes -first results from the Amazon rain forest-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Artaxo, Paulo; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto; Trebs, Ivonne; Vega, Oscar; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many compounds of interest no fast response sensors for the determination of eddy covariance fluxes are available. Therefore, flux-gradient relationships are used. The most common are the aerodynamic gradient method and the modified Bowen ratio method. For those approaches some assumptions have to be made which restrict their use. An alternative approach to calculate these fluxes might be given by the "thoron clock" method. The radon isotope Thoron (220Rn) is exhaled from the soil and has a half life time of 56 seconds. Therefore, it exists in measureable amounts only close to the ground and is hardly advected. Its only source is the radioactive decay of Thorium in soil. As it is a noble gas Thoron is not influenced by biochemical processes in air. Consequently, its concentration profile only depends on vertical mixing and the radioactive decay which is a physical constant. According to Lehmann et al. (1999) and Plake and Trebs (2013) a transport-time can be directly calculated from two heights thoron concentration/activity for the layer in-between without further assumptions. From this transport time the transfer velocity is derived which is then applied to calculate the fluxes of other (reactive) trace gases. A major advantage of the method is that the transport-time is known and using the measured concentration profile the chemical loss of a compound can be directly calculated and corrected for. We have applied this method for a first time in the Amazon rainforest during a field campaign at the ATTO site 150 km North East of Manaus in the dry season of 2014. We measured gradients of NO, NO2, O3, HONO and VOCs by using a movable inlet on a lift system close to the forest floor (0.19 m, 0.52 m and 1.59 m). A Thoron profile was measure in parallel at the lower two heights. First results of the gradients, the transport times and some preliminary flux values will be presented. References: Lehmann, B.E., Lehmann, M., Neftel, A .: 220 Radon calibration of near

  6. Self-Assembled Formation of Well-Aligned Cu-Te Nano-Rods on Heavily Cu-Doped ZnTe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Cheng, Man Kit; Lai, Ying Hoi; Wei, Guanglu; Yang, Sean Derman; Wang, Gan; Ho, Sut Kam; Tam, Kam Weng; Sou, Iam Keong

    2016-11-01

    Cu doping of ZnTe, which is an important semiconductor for various optoelectronic applications, has been successfully achieved previously by several techniques. However, besides its electrical transport characteristics, other physical and chemical properties of heavily Cu-doped ZnTe have not been reported. We found an interesting self-assembled formation of crystalline well-aligned Cu-Te nano-rods near the surface of heavily Cu-doped ZnTe thin films grown via the molecular beam epitaxy technique. A phenomenological growth model is presented based on the observed crystallographic morphology and measured chemical composition of the nano-rods using various imaging and chemical analysis techniques. When substitutional doping reaches its limit, the extra Cu atoms favor an up-migration toward the surface, leading to a one-dimensional surface modulation and formation of Cu-Te nano-rods, which explain unusual observations on the reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns and apparent resistivity of these thin films. This study provides an insight into some unexpected chemical reactions involved in the heavily Cu-doped ZnTe thin films, which may be applied to other material systems that contain a dopant having strong reactivity with the host matrix.

  7. Looking South at North End of Rod Loading Line Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking South at North End of Rod Loading Line Including Welding Area Within Rod Loading building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Rod Loading Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  8. Measuring the reactivity of commercially available zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for environmental remediation with iopromide.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Doris; Micić, Vesna; Laumann, Susanne; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-10-01

    The high specific surface area and high reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have led to much research on their application to environmental remediation. The reactivity of nZVI is affected by both the water chemistry and the properties of the particular type of nZVI particle used. We have investigated the reactivity of three types of commercially available Nanofer particles (from Nanoiron, s.r.o., Czech Republic) that are currently either used in, or proposed for use in full scale environmental remediation projects. The performance of one of these, the air-stable and thus easy-to-handle Nanofer Star particle, has not previously been reported. Experiments were carried out first in batch shaking reactors in order to derive maximum reactivity rates and provide a rapid estimate of the Nanofer particle's reactivity. The experiments were performed under near-natural environmental conditions with respect to the pH value of water and solute concentrations, and results were compared with those obtained using synthetic water. Thereafter, the polyelectrolyte-coated Nanofer 25S particles (having the highest potential for transport within porous media) were chosen for the experiments in column reactors, in order to elucidate nanoparticle reactivity under a more field-site realistic setting. Iopromide was rapidly dehalogenated by the investigated nZVI particles, following pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics that was independent of the experimental conditions. The specific surface area normalized reaction rate constant (kSA) value in the batch reactors ranged between 0.12 and 0.53Lm(-2)h(-1); it was highest for the uncoated Nanofer 25 particles, followed by the polyacrylic acid-coated Nanofer 25S and air-stable Nanofer Star particles. In the batch reactors all particles were less reactive in natural water than in synthetic water. The kSA values derived from the column reactor experiments were about 1000 times lower than those from the batch reactors, ranging

  9. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  10. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  11. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  12. Nondestructive post-irradiation examination of Loop-1, S1 and B1 rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    As a part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Tritium Target Development Program, eleven tritium target rods were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory during 1991. Both nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination on all eleven rods was planned under the Tritium Target Development Program. Funding for the program was reduced in 1991 resulting in the early removal of the program experiments before reaching their irradiation goals. Post-irradiation examination was only performed on one of the irradiated rods at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory before the program was terminated in 1992. On December 6, 1995, the Secretary of Energy announced the pursuit of the Commercial Light-Water Reactor option for producing tritium establishing the Tritium Target Qualification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This program decided to pursue nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination of the ten remaining rods from the previous program. The ten rods comprise three experiments. The Loop-1 experiment irradiated eight target rods in a loop configuration for 217 irradiation days. The other two rods were irradiated in two separate irradiation experiments, designated as S1 and B1 for 143 effective full-power days, but at different power levels. After the ten rods were transferred from the ATR Canal to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility, the following examinations were performed: (1) visual examination and photography; (2) neutron radiography; (3) axial gamma scanning; (4) contact profilometry measurement; (5) bow and length measurements; (6) rod puncture and plenum gas analysis/measurement of plenum gas quantity; (7) void volume determination; and (8) internal pressure determination. This report presents the data collected during these examinations.

  13. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  14. Morphoelastic rods Part II: Growing birods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessinnes, Thomas; Moulton, Derek E.; Goriely, Alain

    2017-03-01

    The general problem of determining the shape and response of two attached growing elastic Kirchhoff rods is considered. A description of the kinematics of the individual interacting rods is introduced. Each rod has a given intrinsic shape and constitutive laws, and a map associating points on the two rods is defined. The resulting filamentary structure, a growing birod, can be seen as a new filamentary structure. This kinematic description is used to derive the general equilibrium equations for the shape of the rods under loads, or equivalently, for the new birod. It is shown that, in general, the birod is not simply a Kirchhoff rod but rather, due to the internal constraints, new effects can appear. The two-dimensional restriction is then considered explicitly and the limit for small deformation is shown to be equivalent to the classic Timsohenko bi-metallic strip problem. A number of examples and applications are presented. In particular, the problem of two attached rods with intrinsic helical shape and uniform growth is computed in detail and a host of new interesting solutions and bifurcations are observed.

  15. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  16. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ANNULAR DENUDER METHODOLOGY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF DIVALENT INORGANIC REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric mercury is predominantly present in the gaseous elemental form (Hg0). However, anthropogenic emissions (e.g. incineration, fossil fuel combustion) emit and natural processes create particulate-phase mercury (Hg(p)) and divalent reactive gas-phase mercury (RGM). RG...

  18. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  19. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae. PMID:27651858

  20. Airborne Measurements of Nitric Oxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Ozone, and Total Reactive Nitrogen During the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Fabrication of the University of Michigan Multichannel Chemiluminescence Instrument (UMMCI) was completed in early 1996 and the instrument participated in test flights on the NASA P3B at Wallops Island prior to integration and deployment for the PEM- Tropics A Mission. The UMMCI consists of 4 channels for simultaneous measurements of ozone and NO with the option for measurements of NO2 and NOy (total reactive nitrogen) when converters are placed upstream of the NO channels. Each NO channel consists of a zeroing volume and reaction vessel, while the ozone channel consists of an ozone catalyst (or scrubber) trap that is not in line with the reaction vessel. The detectors in all for channels are Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes, which are followed by pulse amplifier discriminators on the NO channels and an electrometer on the ozone channel. Schematics of the Detector Module and NOx/03 Probe Insert and Diagrams of the Control and Data System, the Power and Ground System, the Gas Flow System, and the Calibration System Flow are attached. Intercomparisons were conducted with G. Gregory, NASA/Langley, during the test flights (following prior calibration of the ozone generator/calibrators at the Wallops Long-Path Absorption facility). Initial test results appeared to be reasonable, and instrument characterization studies proceeded for the ozone channel and the 3 NO channels until deployment for integration for the PEM-Tropics Mission. Ozone data was obtained for Flights #4, and 6-2 1, and finalized data was submitted to the PEM-Tropics Data Archive and to the Science Team during the April 1997 Data Workshop. Although it initially appeared that the instrument sensitivity varied, subsequent tests showed that this was the fault of a leak in the ozone calibrator. In fact; the instrument sensitivity has not been observed to vary in a large number of tests over the years since the PEM-Tropics mission. We have, therefore, a very high degree of confidence in the O3 data that we

  1. VARIABLE AREA CONTROL ROD FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Huston, N.E.

    1960-05-01

    A control rod is described which permits continual variation of its absorbing strength uniformly along the length of the rod. The rod is fail safe and is fully inserted into the core but changes in its absorbing strength do not produce axial flux distortion. The control device comprises a sheet containing a material having a high thermal-neutron absorption cross section. A pair of shafts engage the sheet along the longitudinal axis of the shafts and gears associated with the shafts permit winding and unwinding of the sheet around the shafts.

  2. Self-sensing CF-GFRP rods as mechanical reinforcement and sensors of concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, F.; Auricchio, F.; Sarchi, F.; Forte, G.; Gusmano, G.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper testing carried out on concrete beams reinforced with self-sensing composite rods is presented. Such concrete beams, whose peculiarity is to be reinforced by self-sensing materials able to generate an alarm signal when fixed loads are reached, were designed, manufactured and tested. The reinforcing rods were manufactured by pultrusion and consisted of self-sensing hybrid composites containing both glass and carbon fibres in an epoxy resin. The experimentation was carried out by performing simultaneously mechanical tests on the reinforced beams and electrical measurements on the composite rods. The results showed that the developed system reached the target proposed, giving an alarm signal.

  3. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  4. The DBA Analysis of One Control Rod Withdrawal Out of the HTR-10GT Core

    SciTech Connect

    Mingang Lang; Yujie Dong

    2006-07-01

    The 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Test Reactor (HTR-10) has been built in Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) and has been operating successfully since the beginning of 2003. The core outlet temperature of HTR-10 is 700 deg. C. To verify the technology of gas-turbine direct cycle, INET has planned to increase its core outlet temperature to 750 deg. C and use a helium gas turbine instead of the steam generator (then the reactor is called HTR-10GT). Though HTR-10 has good intrinsic safety, the design basic accidents and beyond design basic accidents of HTR10-GT must be analyzed according to China's nuclear regulations due to changed operation parameters. THERMIX code system is used to study the accident on one control rod withdrawal out of the core by a mistake. After a control rod in the side reflector was withdrawn out at a speed of 1 cm/s by a mistake, a positive reactivity was inserted and the reactor power increased and the temperature of the core increased. When the neutron flux of power measuring range exceeded 123% and the core outlet temperature was lager than 800 deg. C, the reactor was scrammed. During the accident sequence the maximum fuel temperature was 1200.9 deg. C. It was lower than the fuel temperature limitation of 1230 deg. C. The paper compares the analysis result of HTR10-GT to those of HTR-10. The results shows that the HTR-10GT is still safe during the accident though its operating temperature is higher than HTR-10 when the fuel safety limits are the same. (authors)

  5. Laser-assisted growth of molybdenum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björklund, K. L.; Heszler, P.; Boman, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report for the first time the laser-assisted growth of molybdenum rods via the H 2 reduction of MoF 6 with a focused Ar + laser beam as the heat source. By varying the gas composition, total pressure, and laser power rods with different morphologies were deposited on a tungsten wire. At low H 2/MoF 6 molar ratios crystal-like rods were obtained and at higher molar ratios the rods became dendrite-like. The activation energy for the process was determined to be 77±7 kJ mol -1 in the temperature range 705-840 K. The reaction order showed to be nearly 3 with respect to the hydrogen partial pressure and zero order with respect to the molybdenum hexafluoride partial pressure. Compositional and morphological characterisation were performed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersed X-ray spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  6. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  7. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system.

  8. Use of a plane jet for flow-induced noise reduction of tandem rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Zhao; Xi-xiang, Yang; Patrick, N. Okolo; Wei-hua, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady wake from upstream components of landing gear impinging on downstream components could be a strong noise source. The use of a plane jet is proposed to reduce this flow-induced noise. Tandem rods with different gap widths were utilized as the test body. Both acoustic and aerodynamic tests were conducted in order to validate this technique. Acoustic test results proved that overall noise emission from tandem rods could be lowered and tonal noise could be removed with use of the plane jet. However, when the plane jet was turned on, in some frequency range it could be the subsequent main contributor instead of tandem rods to total noise emission whilst in some frequency range rods could still be the main contributor. Moreover, aerodynamic tests fundamentally studied explanations for the noise reduction. Specifically, not only impinging speed to rods but speed and turbulence level to the top edge of the rear rod could be diminished by the upstream plane jet. Consequently, the vortex shedding induced by the rear rod was reduced, which was confirmed by the speed, Reynolds stress as well as the velocity fluctuation spectral measured in its wake. This study confirmed the potential use of a plane jet towards landing gear noise reduction. Project partially supported by the European Union FP7 CleanSky Joint Technology Initiative “ALLEGRA” (Grant No. 308225).

  9. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 8 AND 9 CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wilson

    2001-02-08

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 8 and 9 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  10. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, 3, AND 1X OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-09-03

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, 3, and 1X of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A rodded assembly is one that contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) for some period of time during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H calculated isotopic compositions of depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison for each fuel assembly to be used in subsequent CRC reactivity calculations containing the fuel assemblies.

  11. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 4 AND 5 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-30

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 4 and 5 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  12. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, AND 3 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-29

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, and 3 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  13. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  14. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  15. Uncertainty analysis of spent nuclear fuel isotopics and rod internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Ryan N.

    The bias and uncertainty in fuel isotopic calculations for a well-defined radio- chemical assay benchmark are investigated with Sampler, the new sampling-based uncertainty quantification tool in the SCALE code system. Isotopic predictions are compared to measurements of fuel rod MKP109 of assembly D047 from the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 core at three axial locations, representing a range of discharged fuel burnups. A methodology is developed which quantifies the significance of input parameter uncertainties and modeling decisions on isotopic prediction by compar- ing to isotopic measurement uncertainties. The SCALE Sampler model of the D047 assembly incorporates input parameter uncertainties for key input data such as multigroup cross sections, decay constants, fission product yields, the cladding thickness, and the power history for fuel rod MKP109. The effects of each set of input parameter uncertainty on the uncertainty of isotopic predictions have been quantified. In this work, isotopic prediction biases are identified and an investiga- tion into their sources is proposed; namely, biases have been identified for certain plutonium, europium, and gadolinium isotopes for all three axial locations. More- over, isotopic prediction uncertainty resulting from only nuclear data is found to be greatest for Eu-154, Gd-154, and Gd-160. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle as- sembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each considered WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burn- able absorber (IFBA) layers is

  16. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I. Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-15

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  17. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  18. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  19. Rigid rod anchored to infinite membrane.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kunkun; Qiu, Feng; Zhang, Hongdong; Yang, Yuliang

    2005-08-15

    We investigate the shape deformation of an infinite membrane anchored by a rigid rod. The density profile of the rod is calculated by the self-consistent-field theory and the shape of the membrane is predicted by the Helfrich membrane elasticity theory [W. Helfrich, Z. Naturforsch. 28c, 693 (1973)]. It is found that the membrane bends away from the rigid rod when the interaction between the rod and the membrane is repulsive or weakly attractive (adsorption). However, the pulled height of the membrane at first increases and then decreases with the increase of the adsorption strength. Compared to a Gaussian chain with the same length, the rigid rod covers much larger area of the membrane, whereas exerts less local entropic pressure on the membrane. An evident gap is found between the membrane and the rigid rod because the membrane's curvature has to be continuous. These behaviors are compared with that of the flexible-polymer-anchored membranes studied by previous Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical analysis. It is straightforward to extend this method to more complicated and real biological systems, such as infinite membrane/multiple chains, protein inclusion, or systems with phase separation.

  20. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  1. Ideal illuminants for rod/L-cone color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Humans see multicolor complex images with illuminants that have very low amounts of 400 to 580nm light when there is enough long-wave light greater than 590nm. Interactions between rods and long-wave (L) cones generate these colors. They are observed when there is insufficient light for a threshold response from M- and S-cones. This paper measures the spectral emission of a wood fire and a wax candle and it compares these low-color temperature spectral radiant exitances with the sensitivities of rods and long-wave cones. The paper reviews some of the literature on the evolution of human cone pigments and the early use of fire by hominids.

  2. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  3. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-01-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough

  4. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions

    DOE PAGES

    Murphy, Ryan P.; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J.

    2016-07-28

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing non-spherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346–2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating themore » calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. We find the adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions.« less

  5. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan P.; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J.

    2016-07-28

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing non-spherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346–2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. We find the adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions.

  6. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  7. Analytical Solution to the Pneumatic Transient Rod System at ACRR

    SciTech Connect

    Fehr, Brandon Michael

    2016-01-08

    The ACRR pulse is pneumatically driven by nitrogen in a system of pipes, valves and hoses up to the connection of the pneumatic system and mechanical linkages of the transient rod (TR). The main components of the TR pneumatic system are the regulator, accumulator, solenoid valve and piston-cylinder assembly. The purpose of this analysis is to analyze the flow of nitrogen through the TR pneumatic system in order to develop a motion profile of the piston during the pulse and be able to predict the pressure distributions inside both the cylinder and accumulators. The predicted pressure distributions will be validated against pressure transducer data, while the motion profile will be compared to proximity switch data. By predicting the motion of the piston, pulse timing will be determined and provided to the engineers/operators for verification. The motion profile will provide an acceleration distribution to be used in Razorback to more accurately predict reactivity insertion into the system.

  8. Rolling contact fatigue of surface modified 440C using a 'Ge-Polymet' type disc rod test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Through hardened 440 C martensitic stainless steel test specimens were surface modified and tested for changes in rolling contact fatigue using a disc on rod test rig. The surface modifications consisted of nitrogen, boron, titanium, chromium, tantalum, carbon, or molybdenum ion implantation at various ion fluences and energies. Tests were also performed on specimens reactively sputtered with titanium nitride.

  9. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  10. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  11. Carbon dioxide reactivity of tumor blood flow as measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: a new treatment protocol for laser thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Sherar, Michael D.; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the current study is to measure the carbon dioxide reactivity of blood flow in VX2 tumor in the rabbit thigh. The carbon dioxide reactivity of the functional parameters was investigated in eight rabbits by changing the ventilation rate in order to manipulate the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). In each experiment, functional maps were generated at four PaCO2 levels: normocapnia (PaCO2 equals 40.7 +/- 1.4 mm Hg), hypocapnia (27.1 +/- 2.5 and 33.7 +/- 2.2) and hypercapnia (53.8 +/- 5.2). The carbon dioxide reactivity of tumor blood flow showed significant differences between normocapnia and the two levels of hypocapnia, but not between normocapnia and hypercapnia. The average fractional change of blood flow from normocapnia for the two hypocapnic level was -0.41 +/- 0.06 and -0.29 +/- 0.08, respectively. The ability to reduce blood flow through hypocapnia has significant implications in thermal therapy, as heat dissipation represents a major obstacle which limits the effectiveness of treatment.

  12. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    PubMed

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R(2 )= 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  13. Rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge; Chuang, Alice Z; Masson, Philippe J; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-01-01

    Key points Rod photoreceptors play a key role in vision in dim light; in the mammalian retina, although rods are anatomically connected or coupled by gap junctions, a type of electrical synapse, the functional importance and regulation of rod coupling has remained elusive. We have developed a new technique in the mouse: perforated patch-clamp recording of rod inner segments in isolated intact retinae maintained by superfusion. We find that rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine, and is weak during the day and stronger at night. The results also indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio for a dim light response is increased at night because of coupling. Our observations will provide a framework for understanding the daily variations in human vision as well as the basis of specific retinal malfunctions. Abstract Rod single-photon responses are critical for vision in dim light. Electrical coupling via gap junction channels shapes the light response properties of vertebrate photoreceptors, but the regulation of rod coupling and its impact on the single-photon response have remained unclear. To directly address these questions, we developed a perforated patch-clamp recording technique and recorded from single rod inner segments in isolated intact neural mouse retinae, maintained by superfusion. Experiments were conducted at different times of the day or under constant environmental conditions, at different times across the circadian cycle. We show that rod electrical coupling is regulated by a circadian clock and dopamine, so that coupling is weak during the day and strong at night. Altogether, patch-clamp recordings of single-photon responses in mouse rods, tracer coupling, receptive field measurements and pharmacological manipulations of gap junction and dopamine receptor activity provide compelling evidence that rod coupling is modulated in a circadian manner. These data are consistent with computer modelling. At night, single

  14. Failure and penetration response of borosilicate glass during short-rod impact

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C. E. Jr.; Orphal, D. L.; Behner, Th.; Hohler, V.; Wickert, M.; Templeton, D. W.

    2007-12-12

    The failure characterization of brittle materials like glass is of fundamental importance in describing the penetration resistance against projectiles. A critical question is whether this failure front remains 'steady' after the driving stress is removed. A test series with short gold rods (D = 1 mm, L/D{approx_equal}5-11) impacting borosilicate glass at {approx}1 to 2 km/s was carried out to investigate this question. The reverse ballistic method was used for the experiments, and the impact and penetration process was observed simultaneously with five flash X-rays and a 16-frame high-speed optical camera. Very high measurement accuracy was established to ensure reliable results. Results show that the failure front induced by rod impact and penetration does arrest (ceases to propagate) after the rod is totally eroded inside the glass. The impact of a second rod after a short time delay reinitiates the failure front at about the same speed.

  15. Measurement of reactive species generated by dielectric barrier discharge in direct contact with water in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević, Vesna V.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of hydroxyl radical and long-living chemical species (H2O2, O3, \\text{NO}3- and \\text{NO}2- ) generated in the liquid phase of a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge in dependence on the gas atmosphere (air, nitrogen, oxygen, argon and helium) was studied. The chemical molecular probe dimethyl sulfoxide was employed for quantification of ˙OH, and the influence of hydroxyl radical scavenging on formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species was investigated. In addition to liquid analysis, plasma diagnostics was applied to indicate possible reaction pathways of plasma–liquid interaction. The highest ˙OH production rate of 1.19  ×  10‑5 mol l‑1 s‑1 was found when water was treated in oxygen, with a yield of 2.75  ×  10‑2 molecules of ˙OH per 100 eV. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in air, nitrogen and argon discharges is determined by recombination reaction of hydroxyl radicals, reaching the highest yield of about 0.7 g kWh‑1 when distilled water was treated in argon discharge. Ozone formation was dominant in oxygen and air discharges. Strong acidification along with formation of reactive nitrogen species was detected in water treated in air and nitrogen discharges.

  16. Effects of rod worth and drop speed on the BWR off-center rod drop accident

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.M.; Carew, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of increasing the control rod worth and the rod drop speed on the off-center RDA. An increase in either of these parameters results in an increase in peak core power and fuel enthalpy, and the objective of this study is to determine the margin to the fuel damage threshold.

  17. Harmonic Resonances in Metal Rods - Easy Experimentation with a Smartphone and Tablet PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Michael; Gröber, Sebastian; Kuhn, Jochen; Müller, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    A variety of experiments with smartphones and tablet PCs allow a precise analysis of acoustic phenomena. For example, we recently described an experiment in which a noise signal simultaneously triggered harmonic acoustic resonances in the air column of a tube open at both ends and a tube closed at one end. The measured resonant frequencies were used to determine the speed of sound in air with an error less than 4%. The present article describes experiments for harmonic resonances in another type of one-dimensional wave carrier, viz. clamped metal rods. Resonances are generated by hitting one end face of the rod; the resonant frequencies can then be measured by an app on a smartphone or tablet PC. The experiments can be used to explore how the excitement of particular resonant frequencies depend on boundary conditions like the length of the rod, the number and specific positions of fixed points of the rod, and the rod's material. In addition the rod's longitudinal (the so-called extensional) speed of sound can be determined.

  18. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations on self-assembly of rod-coil-rod triblock copolymers in a rod-selective solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian-Hua; Fan, Zhong-Xiang; Ma, Ze-Xin

    2013-08-01

    Self-assembly of rod-coil-rod ABA triblock copolymers in a rod-selective solvent is investigated by using dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The morphologies of the self-assembled aggregates are dependent on the number of copolymers in the aggregate and the rod length of the copolymer. We observe vesicles at short rod block and bowl-like aggregates at slightly longer rod block. In the vesicle region near the phase boundary, metastable bowl-like aggregates can be observed and be transformed into vesicles by annealing process. A transition from the bowl-like structure to the vesicle is observed by increasing the solvophobicity of the mid-coil block. In this study, the difference between the self-assembly of fully flexible ABA triblock copolymer and that of rod-coil-rod triblock copolymer is also discussed.

  19. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  20. Particle-rod hybrids: growth of arachidic acid molecular rods from capped cadmium selenide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongzhong; Wang, Ruomiao; Arachchige, Indika; Mao, Guangzhao; Brock, Stephanie L

    2004-12-22

    This communication describes a spin-coating method to nucleate organic molecular rods of uniform size from an inorganic nanoparticle at a solid surface. The particle-rod hybrid structure spontaneously forms when a film is spin coated from a mixed 2-propanol solution of arachidic acid (AA) and nanoparticles of cadmium selenide capped by mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA-CdSe) on graphite. AFM images show that MUA-CdSe nanoparticles nucleate single crystalline rods of AA with a cross section of a single unit cell of the C-form. The solution-based process potentially allows the precise tuning of the wetting profile of the solution on the surface-attached nanoparticle, which provides the reservoir for the growth of the single crystalline rods. The results suggest that nanoparticles can be regarded as nanoseeds for the nucleation of guest crystals. It should be possible to further functionalize the AA rods by electrostatic complexation with metal or organic ions.

  1. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  2. Real-time measurement of reactive gases (NO, NO2, O3, CO) at ERSA, Cape Corsica, a long term Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, Jean-Marc; Colomb, Aurelie; Gheusi, Francois; Sauvage, Stephane; Pont, Veronique; Tison, Emmanuel; Bordier, Florent; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli, Jean-Luc; Dulac, Francois; Sciare, Jean; Nicolas, Jose; Bourrianne, Thierry; Bouvier, Laetitia

    2013-04-01

    Important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly airmasses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The ERSA observatory is a french initiative within the framework of CHARMEX (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) and CORSICA (Centre d'Observation Régional pour la Surveillance du Climat et de l'environnement Atmosphérique et océanographique en Méditerranée occidentale (http://www2.obs-mip.fr/corsica) . The measurements of the station include real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges), a broad spectrum of aerosol properties (chemical composition, ground optical properties, integrated and space-resolved optical properties , size distribution properties, mass, hygroscopicity as well as dry/wet depositions). Among all the parameters, reactive gases are recognized as precursors of ozone and aerosol. The primarily emitted nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) have a substantial impact on radical chemistry, ozone (O3) formation and aerosol by their atmospheric oxidation to aerosol nitrate. Carbon monoxide (CO) is mostly primarily emitted from combustion processes, but it is also formed in substantial amounts from the oxidation of methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to its high global turn-over rates CO is a major O3 precursor, and it has a strong impact on the oxidizing capacity and thus indirectly on the concentration of the climate gas CH4. O3 is a climate gas itself, however, also strongly involved in NO/NO2 partitioning and oxidizing capacity, thus coupling back on several photochemical processes. Accordingly, impacts on climate are multiple and rather complex. The understanding requires high quality, long-term observations of these reactive species. We

  3. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  4. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Note: A laser-flash photolysis and laser-induced fluorescence detection technique for measuring total HO2 reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Schoemaecker, C.; Fittschen, C.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-07-01

    A novel instrument for measuring total HO2 reactivity in the troposphere was successfully developed using a laser-flash photolysis and laser-induced fluorescence detection technique. Validation and testing were conducted through kinetic measurements of the reaction of HO2 radicals with NO2, and the results were found to be in good agreement with recent recommended values. The limit of detection (LOD) for HO2 loss rate measurement is achieved to be 0.024 s-1 (3σ) with 60 times decay integrations. An observation of ambient air was carried out in a suburb of Tokyo to test the practical use of the developed instrument and un-expected rapid HO2 loss rate has been observed.

  6. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  7. Torque requirement of rotating rods in airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.; Crossman, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the torque required for rotating a rotor disk fitted with a number of radially arranged rods placed into a ducted airflow. An array of stationary rods, also radially arranged, was placed upstream close to the rotor with a small gap between the rods to cause wake interference. The results show that torque generally increased with airflow and the rate of increase varied considerably. At lower values of airflow, the rate of increase was larger than at higher airflow, and definite torque peaks occurred at certain airflow rates, where the torque attained a maximum within the test airflow range. During the test, a maximum blade passage frequency of 2037 Hz was attained. The results also show that the torque peaks occurred at the same Strouhal number for all speeds.

  8. Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bokan, S.L.

    1987-02-19

    Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

  9. Self-Contact for Rods on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, G. H. M.; Peletier, M. A.; Planqué, R.

    2006-11-01

    We study self-contact phenomena in elastic rods that are constrained to lie on a cylinder. By choosing a particular set of variables to describe the rod centerline the variational setting is made particularly simple: the strain energy is a second-order functional of a single scalar variable, and the self-contact constraint is written as an integral inequality. Using techniques from ordinary differential equation theory (comparison principles) and variational calculus (cut-and-paste arguments) we fully characterize the structure of constrained minimizers. An important auxiliary result states that the set of self-contact points is continuous, a result that contrasts with known examples from contact problems in free rods.

  10. Concentration-dependent sedimentation of colloidal rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogic, Z.; Philipse, A. P.; Fraden, S.; Dhont, J. K. G.

    2000-11-01

    In this paper we first develop an approximate theory for the leading order concentration dependence of the sedimentation coefficient for rodlike colloids/polymers/macromolecules. To first order in volume fraction φ of rods, the sedimentation coefficient is written as 1+αφ. For large aspect ratios L/D (L is the rod length, D its thickness) α is found to vary like ∝(L/D)2/ln(L/D). This theoretical prediction is compared to experimental results. Then, experiments on fd virus are described, both in the isotropic and nematic phase. First-order in concentration results for this very long and thin (semiflexible) rod are in agreement with the above-mentioned theoretical prediction. Sedimentation profiles for the nematic phase show two sedimentation fronts. This result indicates that the nematic phase becomes unstable with the respect to isotropic phase during sedimentation.

  11. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  14. Optical contact approach to laser rod support.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurski, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The successful application of an optical contact is described between a ruby laser rod that has no mechanical support and a sapphire rod. The contact is found to be durable in the environmental conditions associated with a high-power pulsed ruby laser. The described contact technique makes it possible to construct a laser oscillator using an ellipsoidal pump mirror that does not employ dielectric coatings in the cavity. Another advantage consists in that the ruby laser is not shaded from the pump light by mounting jigs at its ends.

  15. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  16. Improving fuel-rod performance. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ocken, H.; Knott, S.

    1981-03-01

    To reduce the risk of fuel-rod failures, utilities operate their nuclear reactors within conservative limits on power increases proposed by nuclear-fuel vendors. Of particular concern to US utilities is that adopting these limits results in an industrywide average plant capacity loss of 3% in BWR designs and 0.3% in PWR designs. To replace lost BWR capacity by other generating means currently costs the utilities $150 million annually, and losses for PWRs are about $20 million. Efforts are therefore being made to identify the factors responsible for Zircaloy degradation under PCI condition and to improve nuclear-fuel-rod design and reactor operation.

  17. Rod Photoreceptor Temporal Properties in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yuquan; Locke, Kirsten G.; Hood, Donald C.; Birch, David G.

    2011-01-01

    One of the characteristic signs of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the progressive loss of night vision. We have previously shown that the gain of rod photoreceptor activation is moderately reduced in some patients with RP, but this decrease in activation kinetics is not sufficient to account for the night blindness. Recently, single rod recording from animal models of RP showed rods under degeneration remain saturated for shorter periods than normal rods; i.e. are less able to sustain the rod photoresponse. Using paired-flash ERG, here we determine whether rod phototransduction inactivation parameters might also be abnormal in patients with RP. Inactivation parameters were derived from 13 subjects with normal vision, 16 patients with adRP, and 16 patients with autosomal recessive/isolate (rec/iso) RP. The adRP cases included 9 patients with rhodopsin mutations and 7 patients with peripherin/RDS mutations. The inactivation phase was derived using a double-flash paradigm, with a test flash of 2.7 log scot td-sec followed at varying intervals by a 4.2 log scot td-sec probe flash. Derived rod photoresponses to this just-saturating test flash in normal subjects exhibit a critical time to the initiation of recovery (Tsat) of 525±90 (SD) msec. The values of Tsat were 336±104 (SD) msec in patients with adRP (P<0.001) and 271±45 (SD) msec (P<0.001) in patients with rec/iso RP. When Tsat values were categorized by mutations, the values were 294±91 (SD) msec (P<0.001) for rhodopsin mutations, and 389±100 (SD) msec (p=0.01) for peripherin/RDS mutations. Overall, Tsat in patients with RP was significantly correlated with the amplitude of ISCEV standard rod response (r = 0.56; P < 0.001) and the gain of the activation phase of phototransduction (r=0.6, P<0.001). Tsat may be a useful marker for therapeutic efficacy in future clinical trials in RP. PMID:21219898

  18. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  19. Underwater characterization of control rods for waste disposal using SMOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Gallozzi-Ulmann, A.; Couturier, P.; Amgarou, K.; Rothan, D.; Menaa, N.; Chard, P.

    2015-07-01

    Storage of spent fuel assemblies in cooling ponds requires careful control of the geometry and proximity of adjacent assemblies. Measurement of the fuel burnup makes it possible to optimise the storage arrangement of assemblies taking into account the effect of the burnup on the criticality safety margins ('burnup credit'). Canberra has developed a measurement system for underwater measurement of spent fuel assemblies. This system, known as 'SMOPY', performs burnup measurements based on gamma spectroscopy (collimated CZT detector) and neutron counting (fission chamber). The SMOPY system offers a robust and waterproof detection system as well as the needed capability of performing radiometric measurements in the harsh high dose - rate environments of the cooling ponds. The gamma spectroscopy functionality allows powerful characterization measurements to be performed, in addition to burnup measurement. Canberra has recently performed waste characterisation measurements at a Nuclear Power Plant. Waste activity assessment is important to control costs and risks of shipment and storage, to ensure that the activity level remains in the range allowed by the facility, and to declare activity data to authorities. This paper describes the methodology used for the SMOPY measurements and some preliminary results of a radiological characterisation of AIC control rods. After describing the features and normal operation of the SMOPY system, we describe the approach used for establishing an optimum control rod geometric scanning approach (optimum count time and speed) and the method of the gamma spectrometry measurements as well as neutron check measurements used to verify the absence of neutron sources in the waste. We discuss the results obtained including {sup 60}Co, {sup 110m}Ag and {sup 108m}Ag activity profiles (along the length of the control rods) and neutron results including Total Measurement Uncertainty evaluations. Full self-consistency checks were performed and these

  20. High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Cook, Alan M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A. Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; Marsh, Roark A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG) structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E) was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz), achieving a gradient of 128MV/m at a breakdown probability of 3.6×10-3 per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 150 ns. The tested standing-wave structure was a single high-gradient cell with an inner row of elliptical rods and an outer row of round rods; the elliptical rods reduce the peak surface magnetic field by 20% and reduce the temperature rise of the rods during the pulse by several tens of degrees, while maintaining good damping and suppression of high order modes. When compared with a single-cell standing-wave undamped disk-loaded waveguide structure with the same iris geometry under test at the same conditions, the PBG-E structure yielded the same breakdown rate within measurement error. The PBG-E structure showed a greatly reduced breakdown rate compared with earlier tests of a PBG structure with round rods, presumably due to the reduced magnetic fields at the elliptical rods vs the fields at the round rods, as well as use of an improved testing methodology. A post-testing autopsy of the PBG-E structure showed some damage on the surfaces exposed to the highest surface magnetic and electric fields. Despite these changes in surface appearance, no significant change in the breakdown rate was observed in testing. These results demonstrate that PBG structures, when designed with reduced surface magnetic fields and operated to avoid extremely high pulsed heating, can operate at breakdown probabilities comparable to undamped disk-loaded waveguide structures and are thus viable for high-gradient accelerator applications.

  1. Nonlocal Entropic Repulsion Effects on Rod Polymer Induced Depletion Attraction between Spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeng-Long; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2002-03-01

    The polymer liquid state integral equation approach for treating depletion phenomena in rigid rod-colloid suspensions is generalized to account for spatially nonlocal entropic repulsions which modify rod orientation near an impenetrable particle. A thermodynamically consistent theory for the rod segment-particle direct correlation function is formulated under athermal conditions for thin rods and all ratios of the rod length, L, to sphere diameter, D. Results for the polymer density profile near a colloid, the cross second virial coefficient, and the sphere-sphere depletion potential under dilute polymer conditions have been obtained. Relative to simpler approaches based on the (local) Percus-Yevick closure approximation, the new theory represents a qualitative improvement for the shape of the polymer density profile at small separations, and a major quantitative improvement for the depletion attraction strength at colloidal contact when D>L. Detailed comparisons reveal very good agreement of the theory with both exact simulation results for all size asymmetry ratios, and recent direct experimental measurements of the fd-virus(rod) induced depletion potential between silica colloids where L ~ D.

  2. Method and means of packaging nuclear fuel rods for handling

    DOEpatents

    Adam, Milton F.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rods, especially spent nuclear fuel rods that may show physical distortion, are encased within a metallic enclosing structure by forming a tube about the fuel rod. The tube has previously been rolled to form an overlapping tubular structure and then unrolled and coiled about an axis perpendicular to the tube. The fuel rod is inserted into the tube as the rolled tube is removed from a coiled strip and allowed to reassume its tubular shape about the fuel rod. Rollers support the coiled strip in an open position as the coiled strip is uncoiled and allowed to roll about the fuel rod.

  3. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  4. Comparing the Performance of Hyperbolic and Circular Rod Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers with Applied Higher Order Auxiliary Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, D.J.; Block, B.P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    This work applies higher order auxiliary excitation techniques to two types of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs): commercial systems and spaceborne instruments. The operational settings of a circular rod geometry commercial system and an engineering test-bed for a hyperbolic rod geometry spaceborne instrument were matched, with the relative performance of each sensor characterized with and without applied excitation using isotopic measurements of Kr+. Each instrument was operated at the limit of the test electronics to determine the effect of auxiliary excitation on extending instrument capabilities. For the circular rod sensor, with applied excitation, a doubling of the mass resolution at 1% of peak transmission resulted from the elimination of the low-mass side peak tail typical of such rod geometries. The mass peak stability and ion rejection efficiency were also increased by factors of 2 and 10, respectively, with voltage scan lines passing through the center of stability islands formed from auxiliary excitation. Auxiliary excitation also resulted in factors of 6 and 2 in peak stability and ion rejection efficiency, respectively, for the hyperbolic rod sensor. These results not only have significant implications for the use of circular rod quadrupoles with applied excitation as a suitable replacement for traditional hyperbolic rod sensors, but also for extending the capabilities of existing hyperbolic rod QMSs for the next generation of spaceborne instruments and low-mass commercial systems.

  5. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  6. A multiple metrics approach to prioritizing strategies for measuring and managing reactive nitrogen in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Ariel I.; Moomaw, William R.; Liptzin, Daniel; Gramig, Benjamin M.; Reeling, Carson; Meyer, Johanna; Hurley, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle exceeds the safe planetary boundary for the use of reactive nitrogen (Nr). We complement global analysis by analyzing regional mass flows and the relative consequences of multiple chemical forms of Nr as they ‘cascade’ through multiple environmental media. The goals of this paper are (1) to identify the amounts of Nr that flow through a specific nitrogen rich region, (2) develop multiple metrics to characterize and compare multiple forms of Nr and the different damages that they cause, and (3) to use these metrics to assess the most societally acceptable and cost effective means for addressing the many dimensions of Nr damage. This paper uses a multiple metrics approach that in addition to mass flows considers economic damage, health and mitigation costs and qualitative damages to evaluate options for mitigating Nr flows in California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Most analysis focuses attention on agricultural Nr because it is the largest flow in terms of mass. In contrast, the multiple metrics approach identifies mobile source Nr emissions as creating the most economic and health damage in the SJV. Emissions of Nr from mobile sources are smaller than those from crop agriculture and dairy in the SJV, but the benefits of abatement are greater because of reduced health impacts from air pollution, and abatement costs are lower. Our findings illustrate the benefit of a comprehensive multiple metrics approach to Nr management.

  7. Measuring reactive species and oxidative damage in vivo and in cell culture: how should you do it and what do the results mean?

    PubMed Central

    Halliwell, Barry; Whiteman, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Free radicals and other reactive species (RS) are thought to play an important role in many human diseases. Establishing their precise role requires the ability to measure them and the oxidative damage that they cause. This article first reviews what is meant by the terms free radical, RS, antioxidant, oxidative damage and oxidative stress. It then critically examines methods used to trap RS, including spin trapping and aromatic hydroxylation, with a particular emphasis on those methods applicable to human studies. Methods used to measure oxidative damage to DNA, lipids and proteins and methods used to detect RS in cell culture, especially the various fluorescent ‘probes' of RS, are also critically reviewed. The emphasis throughout is on the caution that is needed in applying these methods in view of possible errors and artifacts in interpreting the results. PMID:15155533

  8. Observation of cone and rod photoreceptors in normal subjects and patients using a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Duncan, Jacque L.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) to resolve cones and rods in normal subjects, and confirm our findings by comparing cone and rod spacing with published histology measurements. Cone and rod spacing measurements are also performed on AOSLO images from two different diseased eyes, one affected by achromatopsia and the other by acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). The potential of AOSLO technology in the study of these and other retinal diseases is illustrated. PMID:21833357

  9. On-line monitoring of control rod integrity in BWRs using a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, I.; Loner, H.; Ammon, K.; Sihver, L.; Ledergerber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of fuel and control rod integrity in the core of a boiling water reactor is essential for maintaining a safe and reliable operation. Control rods of a boiling water reactor are mainly filled with boron carbide as a neutron absorber. Due to the irradiation of boron with neutrons, a continuous production of lithium and helium will occur inside a control rod. Most of the created helium will be retained in the boron carbide lattice; however a small part will escape into the void volume of the control blade. Therefore the integrity of control rods during operation can efficiently be followed by on-line measurements of helium concentration in the reactor off-gas system using a mass spectrometer. Since helium is a fill gas in fuel rods, the same method is a useful early warning system for primary fuel failures. In this paper, we introduce an on-line helium detector system which is installed at the nuclear power plant in Leibstadt. Furthermore the measuring experiences of control rod failure detection at the plant are presented. Different causes of increased helium levels in the off-gas system have been distinguished. There are spontaneous helium releases as well as helium releases caused by changed conditions in the reactor (power reduction, control rod movement, etc.). Helium peaks can also be characterized according to the released amount of helium, the peak shape and the duration of the release, which leads to different interpretations of the release mechanisms. In addition, the measured amount of released helium from a 50 days period (280 l) is also compared to the calculated amount of produced helium from the washed out boron during the same time period (190 l).

  10. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    SciTech Connect

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-30

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  11. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi; Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-01

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  12. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  13. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  14. Confinement stabilises single crystal vaterite rods.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Anna S; Albarracin, Eduardo J; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Ihli, Johannes; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-05-11

    Single-crystals of vaterite, the least-stable anhydrous polymorph of CaCO3, are rare in biogenic and synthetic systems. We here describe the synthesis of high aspect ratio single crystal vaterite rods under additive-free conditions by precipitating CaCO3 within the cylindrical pores of track-etch membranes.

  15. Using the Rods for Structural Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Patrick

    The innovative use of a visual cueing device, or rods, in a second language class to represent the parts of speech and the grammatical structure of a sentence is explained and illustrated. The advantages found in it are that individual structures are not learned as isolated elements but rather as parts of a larger system, and that there is more…

  16. Genetics Home Reference: intranuclear rod myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibers and are important for muscle contraction. Attachment (binding) and release of the overlapping thick and thin filaments allows them to move relative to each other so that the muscles can contract. ACTA1 gene mutations that cause intranuclear rod myopathy ...

  17. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  18. Adjustable solitary waves in electroactive rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, H.-H.; Chen, W. Q.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an asymptotic analysis of solitary waves propagating in an incompressible isotropic electroactive circular rod subjected to a biasing longitudinal electric displacement. Several asymptotic expansions are introduced to simplify the rod governing equations. The boundary conditions on the lateral surface of the rod are satisfied from the asymptotic point of view. In the limit of finite-small amplitude and long wavelength, a set of ten simplified one-dimensional nonlinear governing equations is established. To validate our approach and the derivation, we compare the linear dispersion relation with the one directly derived from the three-dimensional linear theory in the limit of long wavelength. Then, by the reductive perturbation method, we deduce the far-field equation (i.e. the KdV equation). Finally, the leading order of the electroelastic solitary wave solution is presented. Numerical examples are provided to show the influences of the biasing electric displacement and material constants on the solitary waves. It is found that the biasing electric displacement can modulate the velocity of solitary waves with a prescribed amplitude in the electroactive rod, a very interesting result which may promote the particular application of solitary waves in solids with multi-field coupling.

  19. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse position....

  20. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse position....

  1. Monodisperse hard rods in external potentials.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Benaoumeur; Karbach, Michael; Maass, Philipp; Müller, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We consider linear arrays of cells of volume V(c) populated by monodisperse rods of size σV(c),σ=1,2,..., subject to hardcore exclusion interaction. Each rod experiences a position-dependent external potential. In one application we also examine effects of contact forces between rods. We employ two distinct methods of exact analysis with complementary strengths and different limits of spatial resolution to calculate profiles of pressure and density on mesoscopic and microscopic length scales at thermal equilibrium. One method uses density functionals and the other statistically interacting vacancy particles. The applications worked out include gravity, power-law traps, and hard walls. We identify oscillations in the profiles on a microscopic length scale and show how they are systematically averaged out on a well-defined mesoscopic length scale to establish full consistency between the two approaches. The continuum limit, realized as V(c)→0,σ→∞ at nonzero and finite σV(c), connects our highest-resolution results with known exact results for monodisperse rods in a continuum. We also compare the pressure profiles obtained from density functionals with the average microscopic pressure profiles derived from the pair distribution function.

  2. Determination of the rod-wise fission gas release fraction in a complete fuel assembly using non-destructive gamma emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcombe, Scott; Andersson, Peter; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson; Hallstadius, Lars

    2016-11-01

    A gamma tomography instrument has been developed at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in cooperation between the Institute for Energy Technology, Westinghouse (Sweden) and Uppsala University. The instrument is used to record the gamma radiation field surrounding complete fuel assemblies and consists of a shielded enclosure with fixtures to accurately position the fuel and detector relative to each other. A High Purity Germanium detector is used for acquiring high-resolution spectroscopic data, allowing for analysis of multiple gamma-ray peaks. Using the data extracted from the selected peaks, tomographic reconstruction algorithms are used to reproduce the corresponding spatial gamma-ray source distributions within the fuel assembly. With this method, rod-wise data can be can be deduced without the need to dismantle the fuel. In this work, the tomographic device has been experimentally benchmarked for non-destructive rod-wise determination of the Fission Gas Release (FGR) fraction. Measurements were performed on the fuel-stack and gas-plenum regions of a complete fuel assembly, and quantitative tomographic reconstructions of the measurement data were performed in order to determine the rod-wise ratio of 85Kr in the gas plenum to 137Cs in the fuel stack. The rod-wise ratio of 85Kr/137Cs was, in turn, used to calculate the rod-wise FGR fraction. In connection to the tomographic measurements, the fuel rods were also measured individually using gamma scanning in order to provide an experimental benchmark for the tomographic method. Fuel rods from two donor driver fuel assemblies were placed into a nine-rod HBWR driver fuel assembly configuration. In order to provide a challenging measurement object and thus an appropriate benchmark for the tomographic method, five rods were taken from an assembly with a burnup of 51 MWd/kgUO2, and four rods were from an assembly with a burnup of 26 MWd/kgUO2. At the time of the measurements, the nine rods had cooled for

  3. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  4. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  5. How to Obtain the Lorentz Space Contraction Formula for a Moving Rod from Knowledge of the Positions of its Ends at Different Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guasti, M. Fernandez; Zagoya, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz length contraction for a rod in uniform motion is derived performing two measurements at arbitrary times. Provided that the velocity of the rod is known, this derivation does not require the simultaneous measurement of two events. It thus avoids uncomfortable superluminal relationships. Furthermore, since the observer's simultaneous…

  6. VIEW EAST, EAST ELEVATION OF ECCENTRIC HOUSE, NOTE ROD LINES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW EAST, EAST ELEVATION OF ECCENTRIC HOUSE, NOTE ROD LINES EXITING THE BUILDING AND ROD LINES WITH SUPPORTS IN FOREGROUND LEFT. - South Penn Oil Company, G. M. Mead Lot 492 Lease, Morrison Run Field, Clarendon, Warren County, PA

  7. Looking Northwest Along South End of Rod Loading Building Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northwest Along South End of Rod Loading Building Including Mezzanine and Gad Loading Area - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Rod Loading Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  8. 5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, EAST VIEW. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Grinding Rod Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  9. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  14. 11. Detail showing stay rods and westerly Samson post; view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail showing stay rods and westerly Samson post; view to west. Note slackness of stay rods while draw-span is closed. - Summer Street Bridge, Spanning Reserved Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. Stimulus-evoked outer segment changes in rod photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Thapa, Damber; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Gai, Shaoyan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-06-01

    Rod-dominated transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been recently observed in freshly isolated mouse and frog retinas. Comparative confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography revealed that the TRP was predominantly elicited from the rod outer segment (OS). However, the biophysical mechanism of rod OS dynamics is still unknown. Mouse and frog retinal slices, which displayed a cross-section of retinal photoreceptors and other functional layers, were used to test the effect of light stimulation on rod OSs. Time-lapse microscopy revealed stimulus-evoked conformational changes of rod OSs. In the center of the stimulated region, the length of the rod OS shrunk, while in the peripheral region, the rod OS swung toward the center region. Our experimental observation and theoretical analysis suggest that the TRP may reflect unbalanced rod disc-shape changes due to localized visible light stimulation.

  16. Is structured observation a valid technique to measure handwashing behavior? Use of acceleration sensors embedded in soap to assess reactivity to structured observation.

    PubMed

    Ram, Pavani K; Halder, Amal K; Granger, Stewart P; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3-10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0-18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior.

  17. Measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in water with polyquaternary ammonium salt as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhang, Meng-Han; Gu, Jia-Li; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-12-17

    Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) sampler with a polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) aqueous solution as a binding phase and a dialysis membrane as a diffusive phase (PQAS DGT) was developed for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in water. The performance of PQAS DGT was not dependent upon pH 3-10 and ionic strength from 1 × 10(-4) to 1 mol L(-1). The effective binding capacity of PQAS DGT containing 2.0 mL of 0.050 mol L(-1) PQAS solution was estimated as 9.9 μg cm(-2). The measurement of DRP in a synthetic solution by PQAS DGT over a 48 h deployment period demonstrated high consistency with the concentration of DRP in the synthetic solution measured directly by the ammonium molybdate spectrophotometric method. Field deployments of PQAS DGT samplers allowed for accurate measurement of the DRP concentration in situ. The advantages of PQAS DGT include no requirement of the elution steps and direct concentration measurements of the binding phase.

  18. 13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ROD STORAGE RACKS ALONG EAST WALL OF FACTORY INTERIOR. AT THIS BENCH WORKERS RIVETED THREADED WROUGHT IRON CONNECTORS TO THE ENDS OF 20' LONG WOODEN SUCKER RODS (THE RODS WHICH EXTEND DOWNWARD IN THE WELL FROM THE GROUND SURFACE TO PISTON DISPLACEMENT PUMPS WHICH ACTUALLY ELEVATE WATER TO THE SURFACE). ROZNOR HEATER AT THE FAR RIGHT WAS ADDED CIRCA 1960. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  19. Rod Bundle Heat Transfer: Steady-State Steam Cooling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, J.P.; McLaughlin, D.M.

    2006-07-01

    Through the joint efforts of the Pennsylvania State University and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, an experimental rod bundle heat transfer (RBHT) facility was designed and built. The rod bundle consists of a 7 x 7 square pitch array with spacer grids and geometry similar to that found in a modern pressurized water reactor. From this facility, a series of steady-state steam cooling experiments were performed. The bundle inlet Reynolds number was varied from 1 400 to 30 000 over a pressure range from 1.36 to 4 bars (20 to 60 psia). The bundle inlet steam temperature was controlled to be at saturation for the specified pressure and the fluid exit temperature exceeded 550 deg. C in the highest power tests. One important quantity of interest is the local convective heat transfer coefficient defined in terms of the local bulk mean temperature of the flow, local wall temperature, and heat flux. Steam temperatures were measured at the center of selected subchannels along the length of the bundle by traversing miniaturized thermocouples. Using an analogy between momentum and energy transport, a method was developed for relating the local subchannel centerline temperature measurement to the local bulk mean temperature. Wall temperatures were measured using internal thermocouples strategically placed along the length of each rod and the local wall heat flux was obtained from an inverse conduction program. The local heat transfer coefficient was calculated from the data at each rod thermocouple location. The local heat transfer coefficients calculated for locations where the flow was fully developed were compared against several published correlations. The Weisman and El-Genk correlations were found to agree best with the RBHT steam cooling data, especially over the range of turbulent Reynolds numbers. The effect of spacer grids on the heat transfer enhancement was also determined from instrumentation placed downstream of the spacer grid locations. The local

  20. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  1. Vibration Feedback Latency Affects Material Perception during Rod Tapping Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, Taku; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-15

    We investigated the effect of vibration feedback latency on material perception during a tapping interaction using a rod device. When a user taps a surface, the perception of the material can be modulated by providing a decaying sinusoidal vibration at the moment of contact. To achieve this haptic material augmentation on a touchscreen, a system that can measure the approach velocity and provide vibration with low latency is required. To this end, we developed a touchscreen system that is capable of measuring the approach velocity and providing vibration feedback via a rod device with latency of 0.1 ms. Using this system, we experimentally measured the human detection threshold of the vibration feedback latency adopting a psychophysical approach. We further investigated the effect of latency on the perception of the material using a subjective questionnaire. Results show that the threshold was around 5.5 ms and the latency made the user feel that the surface is soft. In addition, users reported bouncing and denting sensations induced by the latency.

  2. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo.

  3. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods

    PubMed Central

    Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Berry, Justin D.; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Cornwall, M. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1−/−), Arr1-deficient (Arr1−/−), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1ox) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1−/− rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1ox rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1−/− rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  4. A new MCNP option: KCORR -- The use of the correlated sampling method to study reactivity effects due to changes of a reactor arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.

    1995-06-01

    The planned advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor has a compact core surrounded by a large pool of heavy water containing a complex arrangement of reflector experimental components. Mocking up the reactor system without the reflector components results in an azimuthally symmetric geometry for which the eigenvalue k{sub eff} can be calculated accurately with diffusion or discrete ordinates methods by using two-dimensional geometry. Here, a new option KCORR for calculating the eigenvalue k{sub eff} of fission reactor arrangements has been implemented in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This option is based on a matrix method and has the additional feature of applying correlated sampling methods to investigate small reactivity effects that are very likely lost in the statistical uncertainties of two independent program runs with the old option KCODE. For verification of the new program option, calculations of the reactivity worths of the control rod and the safety rod of the FOEHN reactor and the reactivity effects of various components in the reflector pool of the FOEHN reactor were performed with both KCODE and KCORR and compared with measured data. The efficient of MCNP in calculating reactivity changes by using KCORR is improved not only by means of lower statistical uncertainties but also by reducing of computing time.

  5. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  6. CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

    1963-05-14

    A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

  7. The Galveston technique using Luque or Cotrel-Dubousset rods.

    PubMed

    Lonstein, J E

    1994-04-01

    The Galveston technique for pelvic fixation in long fusions to the sacrum in neuromuscular and adult scoliosis is an effective technique to help obtain a solid fusion. With careful technique and accurate rod bending, rod insertion, rod contouring, and wire tightening, excellent fixation is obtained that maximizes the fusion rate.

  8. Detection of Microcracks in Trunnion Rods Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    compress the surrounding concrete and prevent it from experiencing excessive destructive tensile forces. These rods are now experiencing ongoing failures...5 Figure 4. Full-scale 4-rod test bed during construction and concrete ...diameter grease-embedded trunnion anchor rod with concrete termination. ...................... 14 Figure 11. Variation in load and the resulting

  9. ROD INTERNAL PRESSURE QUANTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS USING FRAPCON

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Kostadin; Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    2016-01-01

    The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified forWatts BarNuclearUnit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, intercycle assembly movements, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layers is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rod-specific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel blankets. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) are prepared from the distribution of RIP predictions for all standard and IFBA rods. The provided CDFs allow for the determination of the portion of WBN1 fuel rods that exceed a specified RIP limit. Lastly, improvements to the computational methodology of FRAPCON are proposed.

  10. Vibrational spraying of liquid by a thin rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. A.

    2008-02-01

    The phenomenon of liquid spraying by a thin rod bent at a right angle and excited with a piezoelectric transducer at one end is observed when the rod touches the open liquid surface at the bending site. The spraying may be accompanied by the formation of a liquid jet, which is emitted from the free end of the bent rod.

  11. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod From India would be likely to lead to continuation or... contained in USITC Publication 4300 (January 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod From...

  12. On-line detection of key radionuclides for fuel-rod failure in a pressurized water reactor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guoxiu; Chen, Xilin; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ni, Ning

    2016-08-01

    For early on-line detection of fuel rod failure, the key radionuclides useful in monitoring must leak easily from failing rods. Yield, half-life, and mass share of fission products that enter the primary coolant also need to be considered in on-line analyses. From all the nuclides that enter the primary coolant during fuel-rod failure, (135)Xe and (88)Kr were ultimately chosen as crucial for on-line monitoring of fuel-rod failure. A monitoring system for fuel-rod failure detection for pressurized water reactor (PWR) based on the LaBr3(Ce) detector was assembled and tested. The samples of coolant from the PWR were measured using the system as well as a HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. A comparison showed the method was feasible. Finally, the γ-ray spectra of primary coolant were measured under normal operations and during fuel-rod failure. The two peaks of (135)Xe (249.8keV) and (88)Kr (2392.1keV) were visible, confirming that the method is capable of monitoring fuel-rod failure on-line.

  13. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  14. The 1997 El Niño impact on clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases in the troposphere, as measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, D.; Valks, P.; Ruppert, T.; Richter, A.; Wagner, T.; Thomas, W.; van der A, R.; Meisner, R.

    2006-03-01

    The El Niño event of 1997/1998 caused dry conditions over the Indonesian area that were followed by large scale forest and savannah fires over Kalimantan, Sumatra, Java, and parts of Irian Jaya. Biomass burning was most intense between August and October 1997, and large amounts of ozone precursors, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were emitted into the atmosphere. In this work, we use satellite measurements from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) sensor to study the teleconnections between the El Niño event of 1997 and the Indonesian fires, clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases (nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and ozone) in the troposphere.

  15. Evaluation of scavenging rate constants of DOPA and tyrosine enantiomers against multiple reactive oxygen species and methyl radical as measured with ESR trapping method.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Takemoto, Tsubasa

    2015-04-15

    The scavenging rates of DOPA (dl- and l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine) and Tyr (tyrosine (dl- and l-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)alanine)) against five reactive oxygen species (ROS) and methyl radical were measured with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method and the scavenging rate constants of DOPA and Tyr were determined. The scavenging rate constants for multiple active species increased in the order of O2(-)

  16. Transduction heats in retinal rods: tests of the role of cGMP by pyroelectric calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, W A; Ross, P D; Tate, R L; Yoshikami, S

    1989-01-01

    The sensory dark current of vertebrate retinal rods is believed to be controlled by light activation of a chain of coupled biochemical cycles that finally regulate the cationic conductance of the plasma membrane by hydrolytically reducing the level of cGMP in rod outer segment cytoplasm. The scheme has been tested by measuring heat production by live frog retinas when stimulated with sequences of light flashes of progressively increasing energy. Using pyroelectric poly(vinylidene 1,1-difluoride) detectors that simultaneously measure transretinal voltage and retinal temperature change, four heat effects assignable to known biochemical cycles in rods have been found. As the dark current shuts down after a flash causing 180-1800 rhodopsin photoisomerizations per rod, a heat burst, q1, raises the retinal temperature 1-2 microK. q1 is closely regulated in size and slightly precedes dark current shutdown. Isobutylmethylxanthine slows and enlarges q1, delaying the dark-current response. Increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ stops the dark current without affecting q1. Although rod heat production is consistent with splitting of 1-3 microM of free cytoplasmic cGMP during transduction, the kinetics of the two processes do not match the predictions of current cGMP control models. PMID:2537492

  17. ATMOS Measurements of H2O + 2CH4 and Total Reactive Nitrogen in the November 1994 Antarctic Stratosphere: Dehydration and Denitrification in the Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Newchurch, M. J.; Zander, R.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous stratospheric volume mixing ratios (VMR's) measured inside and outside the Antarctic vortex by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument in November 1994 reveal previously unobserved features in the distributions of total reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) and total hydrogen (H2O + 2CH4). Maximum removal of NO(y) due to sedimentation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) inside the vortex occurred at a potential temperature (Theta) of 500-525 K (approximately 20 km), where values were 5 times smaller than measurements outside. Maximum loss of H2O + 2CH4 due to PSC's occurred in the vortex at 425-450 K, approximately 3 km lower than the peak NO(y) loss. At that level, H2O + 2CH4 VMR's inside the vortex were approximately 70% of corresponding values outside. The Antarctic and April 1993 Arctic measurements by ATMOS show no significant differences in H2O + 2CH4 VMR's outside the vortices in the two hemispheres. Elevated NO(y) VMRs were measured inside the vortex near 700 K. Recent model calculations indicate that this feature results from downward transport of elevated NO(y) produced in the thermosphere and mesosphere.

  18. Experimental studies and performance analyses on polyurethane and nitrile rubber rod seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, M.; Temiz, V.; Kamburoǧlu, E.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the friction and leakage properties of rod seals made of polyethylene and nitrile rubber with different design geometries, under various pressure and lubricating oil viscosity conditions, in order to make assumptions about their general sealing characteristics and their pros and cons under certain working conditions that involve a range of fluid pressures. The test specimens consist of commercial rod seals of various designs and materials and were mounted on a hard chrome coated shaft subject to reciprocating motion. The test rig is capable of measuring friction force by means of strain measurements on a load cell transmitting the linear motion of a screw shaft to the test shaft. The test results of the reciprocating rod seal samples were evaluated according to leakage amount and friction resistance as a function of materials, design geometries and fluid pressures as well as the lubricating oil viscosity.

  19. Comparison of measured reactive trace gas profiles with a multi-layer canopy chemical exchange model in an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Stefan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Pöhlker, Christopher; de Abreu Sá, Leonardo Deane; Ocimar Manzi, Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, an 80 m high walk up tower for atmospheric research was erected at the ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W) in the remote Amazonian rainforest. The nearly pristine environment allows biosphere-atmosphere studies within an ecosystem far away from large anthropogenic emission sources. Since April 2012 vertical mixing ratio profiles of H2O, CO2 and O3 were measured at 8 different heights between 0.05 m and 79.3 m. During five intensive campaigns (Oct-Dec 2012, Oct-Nov 2013, Mar 2014, Aug-Sep 2014, Oct-Dec 2015) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also measured. We applied the Multi-layer Canopy Chemical Exchange Model - MLC-CHEM to support the analysis of the observed profiles of NOx and O3. This includes inferring bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes as well as the role of the canopy interactions between the emissions, dry deposition, chemistry and turbulent transport of trace gases. During our investigation of diurnal and seasonal differences between model and measurements, we conducted a set of sensitivity studies to analyse the effects of changes in NOx-soil emissions, in-canopy turbulence and resistances for O3 and NO2 uptake on wet surfaces. These analyses suggest some modification in the representation of some of the poorly constrained canopy processes resulting in a significantly better comparison between the simulated and measured exchange fluxes and concentrations.

  20. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; ...

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore » out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less