Science.gov

Sample records for rod reactivity measurements

  1. Control rod reactivity measurement by rod-drop method at a fast critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Yin, Y.; Lian, X.; Zheng, C.

    2012-07-01

    Rod-drop experiments were carried out to estimate the reactivity of the control rod of a fast critical assembly operated by CAEP. Two power monitor systems were used to obtain the power level and integration method was used to process the data. Three experiments were performed. The experimental results of the reactivity from the two power monitor systems were consistent and showed a reasonable range of reactivity compared to results from positive period method. (authors)

  2. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; Santos, Adimir dos

    2014-11-11

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  3. Control rod calibration and reactivity effects at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Gonnelli, Eduardo; dos Santos, Adimir

    2014-11-01

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. Control rods may be made of several neutron absorbing materials that are used to adjust the reactivity of the core. For the reactor operation, these experimental data are also extremely important: with them it is possible to estimate the reactivity worth by the movement of the control rod, understand the reactor response at each rod position and to operate the reactor safely. This work presents a temperature correction approach for the control rod calibration problem. It is shown the control rod calibration data of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, the integral and differential reactivity curves and a theoretical analysis, performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  4. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John V.; Carlson, William R.; Yarbrough, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  5. Induced Current Measurement of Rod Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The longitudinal normal modes of vibration of rods are similar to the modes seen in pipes open at both ends. A maximum of particle displacement exists at both ends and an integral number (n) of half wavelengths fit into the rod length. The frequencies fn of the normal modes is given by Eq. (1), where L is the rod length and V is the wave velocity: fn = nV/2L. Many methods have been used to measure the velocity of these waves. The Kundt's tube method commonly used in student labs will not be discussed here. A simpler related method has been described by Nicklin.2 Kluk3 measured velocities in a wide range of materials using a frequency counter and microphone to study sounds produced by impacts. Several earlier methods4,5 used phonograph cartridges complete with needles to detect vibrations in excited rods. A recent interesting experiment6 used wave-induced changes in magnetization produced in an iron rod by striking one end. The travel time, measured as the impulsive wave reflects back and forth, gave the wave velocity for the iron rod. In the method described here, a small magnet is attached to the rod with epoxy, and vibrations are detected using the current induced in a few loops of wire. The experiment is simple and yields very accurate velocity values.

  6. Evaluation of differential shim rod worth measurements in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Reasonable agreement between calculated and measured differential shim rod worths in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) has been achieved by taking into account the combined effects of negative reactivity contributions from changing fuel-moderator temperatures and of delayed photoneutrons. A method has been developed for extracting the asymptotic period from the shape of the initial portion of the measured time-dependent neutron flux profile following a positive reactivity insertion. In this region of the curve temperature-related reactivity feedback effects are negligibly small. Results obtained by applying this technique to differential shim rod worth measurements made in a wide variety of ORR cores are presented.

  7. Measurement of the Speed of Sound in a Metal Rod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Ng, Yee-kong; Wu, Kam-wah

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two improved methods to measure the speed of sound in a metal rod. One employs a fast timer to measure the time required for a compression pulse to travel along the rod from end to end, and a second uses a microphone to measure the frequency of the fundamental mode of a freely suspending singing rod. (Author/ASK)

  8. Pulse neutron subcritical K/sub EFF/ measurements on water flooded arrays of fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1980-07-01

    The pulsed neutron source technique has been utilized at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for some twenty years for measurement of subcritical reactivities of a variety of fuel systems. One area of application has included measurements of subcritical reactivities of water flooded arrays of fuel rods. This report summarizes these measurements. The theory behind the measurement process is reviewed and the instrumentation of the measurement system discussed. Also, four experiment programs are described in detail, illustrating system use and flexibility. Some changes are suggested for system improvements to speed up data collection and data reduction, and some possible areas of future application of the method are described.

  9. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR IS FUELED AS AN ETR MOCK-UP. LIGHTS DANGLE BELOW WATER LEVEL. CONTROL RODS AND OTHER APPARATUS DESCEND FROM ABOVE WATER LEVEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-900. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. A survey of control rod measurements in ZPPR and their analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The accurate prediction of control rod worths has been of great concern in the United States. Optimum control configurations need to balance several often conflicting requirements of control through the operating cycle, while maintaining acceptable power shapes, safety considerations of overriding importance, together with seeking economy by minimizing the number of rods, reducing boron enrichment and lengthening replacement intervals. After control and shutdown requirements have been met, the most important safety concern is the transient overpower condition (TOP) which may be initiated by uncontrolled run-out of a primary rod. Stringent criteria for the primary and secondary systems may be that they are independently capable of shutting down the reactor even with one rod stuck. The TOP initiator may be greatly enhanced by control rod interaction effects. Control rod effects may have a strong impact on core design. For example, work on the integral fast reactor with metallic fuel at ANL has studied core designs which minimize the TOP reactivity by maintaining a minimum primary control bank insertion through tailoring the internal breeding gain. The predicted control rod worths are very sensitive to the calculation methods used and to the accuracy of the basic nuclear data files. Required accuracies have been achieved only through the use of critical experiments on the ZPR and ZPPR facilities. Experiments on ZPR-3 and ZPR-9 produced satisfactory control predictions for the SEFOR, EBR-II and FFTF reactors. This document provides a survey of control rod measurements and compares calculated and experimental results. 16 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Transmission efficiency measurement at the FNAL 4-rod RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J. P.; Garcia, F. G.; Ostiguy, J. F.; Saini, A.; Zwaska, R.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of the beam transmission performed on the 4-rod RFQ currently under operation at Fermilab. The beam current has been measured at the RFQ exit as a function of the magnetic field strength in the two LEBT solenoids. This measurement is compared with scans performed on the FermiGrid with the beam dynamics code TRACK. A particular attention is given to the impact, on the RFQ beam transmission, of the space-charge neutralization in the LEBT.

  12. Stiffness Coefficients Measurement of Cylindrical Rods by Laser Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2004-02-01

    A non-contact laser-ultrasonic technique is applied to the nondestructive measurement of the stiffness properties of cylindrical rods. Acoustic waves generated in a cylinder by a laser line source under thermoelastic regime are identified by the comparison between experiment and theory. Two stiffness coefficients c11 and c12 are determined by measuring the arrival time of the reflected longitudinal wave (LL) and that of the head wave (HW). The effects of laser beamwidth and time duration on the measurement are found by numerical simulations. For such an application, a radius of 0.3 mm appears as a minimum limit for the sample size using a laser source of 0.1 mm beamwidth and 20 ns time duration. Stiffness coefficients of three aluminum rods are experimentally measured with good accuracy.

  13. Direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Lorenz, Martin

    2015-11-01

    We report on the first realization of direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. Typically, along the fiber processing chain more or less technology steps are able to introduce additional losses to the starting material. After the final processing, the fibers are commonly characterized regarding losses using the so-called cut-back technique in combination with spectrometers. This, however, only serves for a total loss determination. For optimization of the fiber processing, it would be of great interest to not only distinguish between different loss mechanisms but also have a better understanding of possible causes. For measuring the absorption losses along the fiber processing, a particular concept for the LID technique is introduced and requirements, calibration procedure as well as first results are presented. It allows to measure thin rods, e.g. during preform manufacturing, as well as optical fibers. In addition, the results show the prospects to also apply the new concept to topics like characterizing unwanted absorption after fiber splicing or Bragg grating inscription.

  14. Measurements of lightning rod responses to nearby strikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. B.; Aulich, G. D.; Rison, W.

    2000-05-01

    Following Benjamin Franklin's invention of the lightning rod, based on his discovery that electrified objects could be discharged by approaching them with a metal needle in hand, conventional lightning rods in the U.S. have had sharp tips. In recent years, the role of the sharp tip in causing a lightning rod to act as a strike receptor has been questioned leading to experiments in which pairs of various sharp-tipped and blunt rods have been exposed beneath thunderclouds to determine the better strike receptor. After seven years of tests, none of the sharp Franklin rods or of the so-called “early streamer emitters” has been struck, but 12 blunt rods with tip diameters ranging from 12.7 mm to 25.4 mm have taken strikes. Our field experiments and our analyses indicate that the strike-reception probabilities of Franklin's rods are greatly increased when their tips are made moderately blunt.

  15. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  16. A Statistical Approach to Predict the Failure Enthalpy and Reliability of Irradiated PWR Fuel Rods During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Cheol; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2001-11-15

    During the last decade, the failure behavior of high-burnup fuel rods under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) condition has been a serious concern since fuel rod failures at low enthalpy have been observed. This has resulted in the reassessment of existing licensing criteria and failure-mode study. To address the issue, a statistics-based methodology is suggested to predict failure probability of irradiated fuel rods under an RIA. Based on RIA simulation results in the literature, a failure enthalpy correlation for an irradiated fuel rod is constructed as a function of oxide thickness, fuel burnup, and pulse width. Using the failure enthalpy correlation, a new concept of ''equivalent enthalpy'' is introduced to reflect the effects of the three primary factors as well as peak fuel enthalpy into a single damage parameter. Moreover, the failure distribution function with equivalent enthalpy is derived, applying a two-parameter Weibull statistical model. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the effects of burnup, corrosion, peak fuel enthalpy, pulse width, and cladding materials used.

  17. Measurement of reactive species for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine has been intensively studied over the last decade. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are responsible for the therapeutic effects in plasma medicine. To examine the therapeutic effects of reactive species, the densities of OH, O, and NO were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (10 kV, 10 kHz of 40 μs pulses) and a nanosecond streamer discharge (24 kV, 8 ns, 30 Hz) were utilized to treat mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium. Correlation between the dose of reactive species and deactivation rate of melanoma cells was measured with the aid of LIF. The results showed that the rate of cell death correlates with OH density, but not with O and NO densities. Next, a method to supply a specific reactive species to living organisms was developed. It utilizes photolysis of helium-buffered H2O and O2 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to produce reactive species. The VUV method was utilized to sterilize Bacillus atrophaeus on agar plate. With the VUV method, it was succeeded to show sterilization only by OH radicals. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals caused visible sterilization.

  18. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  19. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  20. Bragg grating extensometer rods (BGX) for geotechnical strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia; Borm, Gunter

    1998-06-01

    We report on a new type of optical extensometer for strain measurement in geotechnical and civil engineering applications. The system key elements are fiber Bragg gratings embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rockbolts. In order to monitor rock deformations in tunnels, a prototype sensor rockbolt was designed. First measurements have been made to demonstrate the characteristics of the sensor system.

  1. Measurement of rod seal lubrication for Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic behavior of sliding elastomeric seals for the Stirling engine, was analyzed using an experimental apparatus to determine the instantaneous oil film thickness throughout the cyclic reciprocating motion. Tests were conducted on two commercial elastomeric seals: a "T" seal (76 mm O.D. and 3.8 mm between backing rings) and an "O" ring (76 mm O.D. and 5.3 mm diameter). Testing conditions included seal durometers of 70 and 90, sliding velocities of 0.8, 2.0, and 3.6 m/s, and no pressure gradient across the seal. Both acrylic and aluminum cylinders were used. Measured oil film thickness profiles were compared to results of the elastohydrodynamic analysis. The comparison shows an overall qualitative agreement. Friction and oil leakage measurements were also made at these sliding speeds. The fluid used was a typical synthetic base automotive lubricant. It is concluded that this first time experimental analytical comparison for oil film thickness indicates the need for some improvements in the analytical model and in the experimental technique.

  2. OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest: evidence for unknown reactive emissions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vinayak; Williams, J; Lelieveld, J; Ruuskanen, T M; Kajos, M K; Patokoski, J; Hellen, H; Hakola, H; Mogensen, D; Boy, M; Rinne, J; Kulmala, M

    2010-09-01

    Boreal forests emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which react with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to influence regional ozone levels and form secondary organic aerosol. Using OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest in Finland, we investigated the budget of reactive VOCs. OH reactivity was measured using the comparative reactivity method, whereas 30 individual VOCs were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, thermal-desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, in August 2008. The measured OH reactivity ranged from below detection limit (3.5 s(-1)), to approximately 60 s(-1) in a single pollution event. The average OH reactivity was approximately 9 s(-1) and no diel variation was observed in the profiles. The measured OH sinks (approximately 30 species) accounted for only 50% of the total measured OH reactivity, implying unknown reactive VOCs within the forest. The five highest measured OH sinks were: monoterpenes (1 s(-1)), CO (0.7 s(-1)), isoprene (0.5 s(-1)), propanal and acetone (0.3 s(-1)), and methane (0.3 s(-1)). We suggest that models be constrained by direct OH reactivity measurements to accurately assess the impact of boreal forest emissions on regional atmospheric chemistry and climate.

  3. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    The case-hardening process modifies the near-surface permeability and conductivity of steel, as can be observed through changes in alternating current potential drop (ACPD) along a rod. In order to evaluate case depth of case hardened steel rods, analytical expressions are derived for the alternating current potential drop on the surface of a homogeneous rod, a two-layered and a three-layered rod. The case-hardened rod is first modeled by a two-layer rod that has a homogeneous substrate with a single, uniformly thick, homogeneous surface layer, in which the conductivity and permeability values differ from those in the substrate. By fitting model results to multi-frequency ACPD experimental data, estimates of conductivity, permeability and case depth are found. Although the estimated case depth by the two-layer model is in reasonable agreement with the effective case depth from the hardness profile, it is consistently higher than the effective case depth. This led to the development of the three-layer model. It is anticipated that the new three-layered model will improve the results and thus makes the ACPD method a novel technique in nondestructive measurement of case depth. Another way to evaluate case depth of a case hardened steel rod is to use induction coils. Integral form solutions for an infinite rod encircled by a coaxial coil are well known, but for a finite length conductor, additional boundary conditions must be satisfied at the ends. In this work, calculations of eddy currents are performed for a two-layer conducting rod of finite length excited by a coaxial circular coil carrying an alternating current. The solution is found using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion (TREE) method. By truncating the solution region to a finite length in the axial direction, the magnetic vector potential can be expressed as a series expansion of orthogonal eigenfunctions instead of as a Fourier integral. Closed-form expressions are derived for the electromagnetic

  4. Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.

    1998-07-01

    A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

  5. Benchmark of CFD Simulations Using Temperatures Measured Within an Enclosed Array of Heater Rods Oriented Vertically and Horizontally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalasani, Narayana Rao

    Experiments and computational fluid dynamics/radiation heat transfer simulations of an 8x8 array of heated rods within an aluminum enclosure are performed. This configuration represents a region inside the channel of a spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly between two consecutive spacer plates. The heater rods can be oriented horizontally or vertically to represent transport or storage conditions, respectively. The measured and simulated rod-to-wall temperature differences are compared for various heater rod power levels (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500W), gases (Helium and Nitrogen), enclosure wall temperatures, pressures (1, 2 and 3 atm) and orientations (Horizontal and Vertical) to assess the accuracy of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. For analysis of spent nuclear fuel casks, it is crucial to predict the temperature of the hottest rods in an assembly to ensure that none of the fuel cladding exceeds its temperature limit. The measured temperatures are compared to those determined using CFD code to assess the adequacy of the computer code. Simulations show that temperature gradients are much steeper near the enclosure walls than they are near the center of the heater rod array. The measured maximum heater rod temperatures are above the center of heater rod array for nitrogen experiments in both horizontal and vertical orientations, whereas for helium the maximum temperatures are at the center of heater rod array irrespective of the orientation due to the high thermal conductivity of the helium gas. The measured temperatures of rods at symmetric locations are not identical, and the difference is larger for rods close to the enclosure wall than for those far from it. Small but uncontrolled deviations of the rod positions away from the design locations may cause these differences. For 2-inch insulated nitrogen experiment in vertical orientation with 1 atm pressure and a total heater rod power of 500 W, the maximum measured heater rod and enclosure

  6. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    PubMed

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation.

  7. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    PubMed

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation. PMID:25484909

  8. Analysis of MERCI decay heat measurement for PWR UO{sub 2} fuel rod

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboulay, J.C.; Bourganel, S.

    2012-01-15

    Decay heat measurements, called the MERCI experiment, were conducted at Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA)/Saclay to characterize accurately residual power at short cooling time and verify its prediction by decay code and nuclear data. The MOSAIC calorimeter, developed and patented by CEA/Grenoble (DTN/SE2T), enables measurement of the decay heat released by a pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod sample between 200 and 4 W within a precision of 1%. The MERCI experiment included three phases. At first, a UO{sub 2} fuel rod sample was irradiated in the CEA/Saclay experimental reactor OSIRIS. The burnup achieved at the end of irradiation was similar to 3.5 GWd/tonne. The second phase was the transfer of the fuel rod sample from its irradiation location to a hot cell, to be inserted inside the MOSAIC calorimeter. It took 26 min to carry out the transfer. Finally, decay heat released by the PWR sample was measured from 27 min to 42 days after shutdown. Post irradiation examinations were performed to measure concentrations of some heavy nuclei (U, Pu) and fission products (Cs, Nd). The decay heat was predicted using a calculation scheme based on the PEPIN2 depletion code, the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code, and the JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file. The MERCI experiment analysis shows that the discrepancy between the calculated and the experimental decay heat values is included between -10% at 27 min and +6% at 12 h, 30 min otter shutdown. From 4 up to 42 days of cooling time, the difference between calculation and measurement is about ± 1%, i.e., experimental uncertainty. The MERCI experiment represents a significant contribution for code validation; the time range above 10{sup 5} s has not been validated previously. (authors)

  9. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  10. High-precision measurements of wetland sediment elevation. II The rod surface elevation table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Perez, B.C.; Segura, B.; Holland, R.D.; Stelly, C.; Stephenson, G.; Hensel, P.

    2002-01-01

    A new high-precision device for measuring sediment elevation in emergent and shallow water wetland systems is described. The rod surface-elevation table (RSET) is a balanced, lightweight mechanical leveling device that attaches to both shallow ( 1 m in order to be stable. The pipe is driven to refusal but typically to a depth shallower than the rod bench mark because of greater surface resistance of the pipe. Thus, the RSET makes it possible to partition change in sediment elevation over shallower (e.g., the root zone) and deeper depths of the sediment profile than is possible with the SET. The confidence intervals for the height of an individual pin measured by two different operators with the RSET under laboratory conditions were A? 1.0 and A? 1.5 mm. Under field conditions, confidence intervals for the measured height of an individual pin ranged from A? 1.3 mm in a mangrove forest up to A? 4.3 mm in a salt marsh.

  11. Modeling smog chamber measurements of vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Nance, B.I.; Kelly, N.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities, measured at GM`s smog chamber facility, have been modeled using the SAPRC93 photochemical mechanism. The vehicle exhaust mixtures were generated by a single vehicle run over a portion of the Federal Test Procedure using three Auto/Oil reformulated test gasolines. For each run, up to 156 individual VOC species were identified. Initial HONO concentrations are needed to simulate reactivity measurement runs. (HONO is expected to be generated in a Tedlar bag holding the exhaust sample prior to its transfer to the smog chambers.) Measured and simulated relative incremental reactivities for the three exhaust mixtures are highly consistent. However, measured relative incremental reactivities are more sensitive to fuel effects than simulated ones. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR)-based relative incremental reactivities, derived from individual species concentrations and MIR factors, are very close to simulated ones. A number of sensitivity simulation runs have been carried out to investigate the impact of HONO and other variables. Results show that relative reactivities of actual vehicle exhaust emissions can be measured by chamber runs in spite of the HONO effect.

  12. Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ren, X.; Brune, W. H.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Fried, A.; Huey, L. G.; Cohen, R. C.; Heikes, B.; Singh, H. B.; Blake, D. R.; Sachse, G. W.; Diskin, G. S.; Hall, S. R.; Shetter, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of OH reactivity, the inverse of the OH lifetime, provides a powerful tool to investigate atmospheric photochemistry. A new airborne OH reactivity instrument was designed and deployed for the first time on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the second phase of Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX-B) campaign, which was focused on the Asian pollution outflow over Pacific Ocean and was based in Hawaii and Alaska. The OH reactivity was measured by adding OH, generated by photolyzing water vapor with 185 nm UV light in a moveable wand, to the flow of ambient air in a flow tube and measuring the OH signal with laser induced fluorescence. As the wand was pulled back away from the OH detector, the OH signal decay was recorded; the slope of -Δln(signal)/Δ time was the OH reactivity. The overall absolute uncertainty at the 2σ confidence levels is about 1 s-1 at low altitudes (for decay about 6 s-1), and 0.7 s-1 at high altitudes (for decay about 2 s-1). From the median vertical profile obtained in the second phase of INTEX-B, the measured OH reactivity (4.0±1.0 s-1) is higher than the OH reactivity calculated from assuming that OH was in steady state (3.3±0.8 s-1), and even higher than the OH reactivity that was calculated from the total measurements of all OH reactants (1.6±0.4 s-1). Model calculations show that the missing OH reactivity is consistent with the over-predicted OH and under-predicted HCHO in the boundary layer and lower troposphere. The over-predicted OH and under-predicted HCHO suggest that the missing OH sinks are most likely related to some highly reactive VOCs that have HCHO as an oxidation product.

  13. Structure Model Index Does Not Measure Rods and Plates in Trabecular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil L.; Ohlsson, Claes; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Doube, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Structure model index (SMI) is widely used to measure rods and plates in trabecular bone. It exploits the change in surface curvature that occurs as a structure varies from spherical (SMI = 4), to cylindrical (SMI = 3) to planar (SMI = 0). The most important assumption underlying SMI is that the entire bone surface is convex and that the curvature differential is positive at all points on the surface. The intricate connections within the trabecular continuum suggest that a high proportion of the surface could be concave, violating the assumption of convexity and producing regions of negative differential. We implemented SMI in the BoneJ plugin and included the ability to measure the amounts of surface that increased or decreased in area after surface mesh dilation, and the ability to visualize concave and convex regions. We measured SMI and its positive (SMI+) and negative (SMI−) components, bone volume fraction (BV/TV), the fraction of the surface that is concave (CF), and mean ellipsoid factor (EF) in trabecular bone using 38 X-ray microtomography (XMT) images from a rat ovariectomy model of sex steroid rescue of bone loss, and 169 XMT images from a broad selection of 87 species’ femora (mammals, birds, and a crocodile). We simulated bone resorption by eroding an image of elephant trabeculae and recording SMI and BV/TV at each erosion step. Up to 70%, and rarely <20%, of the trabecular surface is concave (CF 0.155–0.700). SMI is unavoidably influenced by aberrations induced by SMI−, which is strongly correlated with BV/TV and CF. The plate-to-rod transition in bone loss is an erroneous observation resulting from the close and artifactual relationship between SMI and BV/TV. SMI cannot discern between the distinctive trabecular geometries typical of mammalian and avian bone, whereas EF clearly detects birds’ more plate-like trabeculae. EF is free from confounding relationships with BV/TV and CF. SMI results reported in the literature should be

  14. Structure Model Index Does Not Measure Rods and Plates in Trabecular Bone.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil L; Ohlsson, Claes; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Doube, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Structure model index (SMI) is widely used to measure rods and plates in trabecular bone. It exploits the change in surface curvature that occurs as a structure varies from spherical (SMI = 4), to cylindrical (SMI = 3) to planar (SMI = 0). The most important assumption underlying SMI is that the entire bone surface is convex and that the curvature differential is positive at all points on the surface. The intricate connections within the trabecular continuum suggest that a high proportion of the surface could be concave, violating the assumption of convexity and producing regions of negative differential. We implemented SMI in the BoneJ plugin and included the ability to measure the amounts of surface that increased or decreased in area after surface mesh dilation, and the ability to visualize concave and convex regions. We measured SMI and its positive (SMI(+)) and negative (SMI(-)) components, bone volume fraction (BV/TV), the fraction of the surface that is concave (CF), and mean ellipsoid factor (EF) in trabecular bone using 38 X-ray microtomography (XMT) images from a rat ovariectomy model of sex steroid rescue of bone loss, and 169 XMT images from a broad selection of 87 species' femora (mammals, birds, and a crocodile). We simulated bone resorption by eroding an image of elephant trabecule and recording SMI and BV/TV at each erosion step. Up to 70%, and rarely <20%, of the trabecular surface is concave (CF 0.155-0.700). SMI is unavoidably influenced by aberrations induced by SMI(-), which is strongly correlated with BV/TV and CF. The plate-to-rod transition in bone loss is an erroneous observation resulting from the close and artifactual relationship between SMI and BV/TV. SMI cannot discern between the distinctive trabecular geometries typical of mammalian and avian bone, whereas EF clearly detects birds' more plate-like trabecule. EF is free from confounding relationships with BV/TV and CF. SMI results reported in the literature should be

  15. Structure Model Index Does Not Measure Rods and Plates in Trabecular Bone.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil L; Ohlsson, Claes; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Doube, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Structure model index (SMI) is widely used to measure rods and plates in trabecular bone. It exploits the change in surface curvature that occurs as a structure varies from spherical (SMI = 4), to cylindrical (SMI = 3) to planar (SMI = 0). The most important assumption underlying SMI is that the entire bone surface is convex and that the curvature differential is positive at all points on the surface. The intricate connections within the trabecular continuum suggest that a high proportion of the surface could be concave, violating the assumption of convexity and producing regions of negative differential. We implemented SMI in the BoneJ plugin and included the ability to measure the amounts of surface that increased or decreased in area after surface mesh dilation, and the ability to visualize concave and convex regions. We measured SMI and its positive (SMI(+)) and negative (SMI(-)) components, bone volume fraction (BV/TV), the fraction of the surface that is concave (CF), and mean ellipsoid factor (EF) in trabecular bone using 38 X-ray microtomography (XMT) images from a rat ovariectomy model of sex steroid rescue of bone loss, and 169 XMT images from a broad selection of 87 species' femora (mammals, birds, and a crocodile). We simulated bone resorption by eroding an image of elephant trabecule and recording SMI and BV/TV at each erosion step. Up to 70%, and rarely <20%, of the trabecular surface is concave (CF 0.155-0.700). SMI is unavoidably influenced by aberrations induced by SMI(-), which is strongly correlated with BV/TV and CF. The plate-to-rod transition in bone loss is an erroneous observation resulting from the close and artifactual relationship between SMI and BV/TV. SMI cannot discern between the distinctive trabecular geometries typical of mammalian and avian bone, whereas EF clearly detects birds' more plate-like trabecule. EF is free from confounding relationships with BV/TV and CF. SMI results reported in the literature should be

  16. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H.; Suzuki, T.; Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S.

    2012-07-01

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  17. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector admittances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the results of an experimental study of the quantitative determination of the capabilities of the combustion processes associated with coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors to drive combustor pressure oscillations. The data, obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel, describe the frequency dependence of the admittance of the combined injector-combustion process. The measured data are compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann analytical model utilizing different values for the characteristic combustion time tau sub b. The values of tau sub b which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector investigated in this study the tau sub b varies between 0.7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of 0.57 to 1.31. In addition, the experimental data indicate that the tested injector system could drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  18. Total OH Reactivity Measurements in the Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praplan, A. P.; Hellén, H.; Hakola, H.; Hatakka, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Atmospheric total OH reactivity (Rtotal) can be measured (Kovacs and Brune, 2001; Sinha et al., 2008) or it can be calculated according to Rtotal = ∑i kOH+X_i [Xi] where kOH+X_i corresponds to the reaction rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with a given compound Xi and [Xi] its concentration. Studies suggest that in some environments a large fraction of missing reactivity, comparing calculated Rtotal with ambient total OH reactivity measurements (Di Carlo et al., 2004; Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). In this study Rtotal has been measured using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008). Levels of the reference compound (pyrrole, C4H5N) are monitored by gas chromatography every 2 minutes and Rtotal is derived from the difference of reactivity between zero and ambient air. RESULTS Around 36 hours of preliminary total OH reactivity data (30 May until 2 June 2015) are presented in Fig. 1. Its range matches previous studies for this site (Nölscher et al., 2012; Sinha et al., 2010) and is similar to values in another pine forest (Nakashima et al., 2014). The setup used during the period presented here has been updated and more recent data will be presented, as well as a comparison with calculated OH reactivity from measured individual species. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship No. 275608). The authors acknowledge Juuso Raine for technical support. REFERENCES Di Carlo et al. (2004). Science 304, 722-725.Hofzumahaus et al. (2009). Science 324, 1702-1704.Kovacs and Brune (2001). J. Atmos. Chem. 39, 105-122.Nakashima et al. (2014). Atmos. Env. 85, 1-8.Nölscher et al. (2012). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 8257-8270.Sinha et al. (2008). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2213-2227.Sinha et al. (2010). Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 6614-6620.

  19. Nighttime reactive nitrogen measurements from stratospheric infrared thermal emission observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Brasunas, J. C.; Herman, J. R.; Massie, Steven T.

    1991-01-01

    IR thermal emission spectra of the earth's atmosphere in the 700-2000/cm region were obtained with a cryogenically cooled high-resolution interferometer spectrometer on a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on September 15-16, 1986. The observations exhibit spectral features of a number of stratospheric constituents, including important species of the reactive nitrogen family. An analysis of the observed data for simultaneously measured vertical distributions of O3, H2O, N2O, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, and ClONO2 is presented. These measurements permit the first direct determination of the nighttime total reactive nitrogen concentrations, and the partitioning of the important elements of the NO(x) family. Comparisons of the total reactive nitrogen budget are made with the measurements by the ATMOS experiment and with the predictions of one-dimensional and two-dimensional photochemical models.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  1. Spinal motion and intradiscal pressure measurements before and after lumbar spine instrumentation with titanium or PEEK rods.

    PubMed

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley; Kim, Sam Byeong; Grosland, Nicole; Kumar, Rajinder; Belirgen, Muhittin; Lim, Tae Hong; Torner, James; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2014-04-01

    Spinal instrumentation and fusion have been incriminated as contributing to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). It has been suggested that ASD results from increased range of motion and intradiscal pressure (IDP) adjacent to instrumentation. Posterior dynamic stabilization with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods has been proposed as potentially advantageous compared to rigid instrumentation with titanium (Ti) rods in reducing the incidence of ASD. We evaluated segmental motions in the cadaveric spine instrumented with PEEK or Ti rods from L3 to S1, as well as the adjacent segment motions and IDP at L1-2 and L2-3. Human cadaveric spines were potted at T12-L1 and S1-2. Spinal instrumentation from L3-S1 was accomplished using pedicle screws with either PEEK or Ti rods. Specimens were subjected to displacement controlled testing: 15° flexion, 15° extension, 10° lateral bending, and 5° right axial rotation using the MTS machine (MTS, Minneapolis, MN, USA). Intradiscal pressure was measured by placing pressure transducers into the intervertebral disc at L1-2 and L2-3. Spinal motion of L2 relative to L3, and L3 relative to S1 was tracked using a three dimensional motion analysis system. Instrumentation with PEEK and Ti rods was associated with a decrease in L3-S1 motion compared to the intact state that was significant in flexion (p=0.002), and extension (p=0.0075). Instrumentation with PEEK and Ti rods was associated with an increase in IDP at L1-2 that was significant in flexion (p=0.0028). Instrumentation with either PEEK or Ti rods resulted in decreased motion at the instrumented levels while increasing IDP at the adjacent level.

  2. Seebeck Coefficient Measurements on Micron-Size Single-Crystal Zinc Germanium Nitride Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, J. S.; Colvin, J. R.; Quayle, P. C.; Peshek, T. J.; Kash, K.

    2016-06-01

    II-IV-nitride compounds are tetrahedrally bonded, heterovalent ternary semiconductors that have recently garnered attention for their potential technological applications. These materials are derived from the parent III-nitride compounds; ZnGeN2 is the II-IV-nitride analogue to the III-nitride GaN. Very little is known about the transport properties of ZnGeN2. In this work, we present Seebeck coefficient ( S) data on 3-micron-diameter, 70-micron-long, single-crystal ZnGeN2 rods, employing a novel measurement approach. The measurements of S show that the majority free carriers are electrons, and imply that the carrier gas is degenerate. Within a single-band model for the conduction band, a carrier concentration of order 1019 cm-3 was estimated for a measured S = -90 μV/K. Together with electrical transport measurements, a lower limit for the electron mobility is estimated to be ˜20 cm2/V-s. A discussion of this material as a thermoelectric is presented. The background level of free electrons in this unintentionally doped ZnGeN2 is very near the predicted optimum value for maximum thermoelectric performance.

  3. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  4. Fluorometer with a quartz-rod waveguide-integrating sphere configuration to measure evanescent-field luminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorometer was designed to measure evanescent-field luminescence. A quartz-rod waveguide (d = 2 mm) was installed coaxally inside a cylindrical flow-through cell (id = 2.3 mm, od = 6.3 mm, l = 116 mm). An excitation beam from a UV LED or a miniature xenon flashlamp was focused by a ball lens and ...

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.; Lindquist, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  6. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT OF MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. WOOD PLANKS REST ON CANAL WALL OBSERVABLE IN FOREGROUND. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11745. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  8. Spectral sensitivity measurements reveal partial success in restoring missing rod function with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Caterina; Henning, G Bruce; Robbie, Scott J; Sundaram, Venki; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Moore, Anthony T; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R; Stockman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Restored rod visual function after gene therapy can be established unequivocally by demonstrating that, after dark adaptation, spectral sensitivity has the shape characteristic of rods and that this shape collapses to a cone-like shape before rods have recovered after an intense bleach. We used these tests to assess retinal function in eight young adults and children with early-onset severe retinal dystrophy from Phase II of a clinical gene-therapy trial for RPE65 deficiency that involved the subretinal delivery of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying RPE65. We found substantial improvements in rod sensitivity in two participants: dark-adapted spectral sensitivity was rod-like after treatment and was cone-like before rods had recovered after a bleach. After 40 min of dark adaptation, one participant showed up to 1,000-fold sensitivity improvements 4 months after treatment and the second up to 100-fold improvements 6 months after treatment. The dark-adapted spectral sensitivities of the other six participants remained cone-like and showed little improvement in sensitivity. PMID:26605849

  9. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  10. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  11. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  12. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  13. Measurement of Fresh Fuel Rods to Demonstrate Compliance with Criticality Safety Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Miko, David K.; Desimone, David J.

    2015-11-03

    In order to operate TA-66 as a radiological facility with the quantity of nuclear material required to fulfil its mission, a criticality safety evaluation was required. This evaluation defined the control parameters for operations at the facility. The resulting evaluation for TA-66 placed limits on the amount of SNM, as well as other materials such as beryllium. In addition, there is a limit on the number of uranium fuel rods allowed subject to enrichment, outer diameter, and overall length restrictions. The enrichments for the rods to be shipped to TA-66 were documented in LA-UR-13-23581, but the outer diameter and length were not documented. This report provides this information.

  14. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  15. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  16. Reactivity-adjusted VOC measurements by airtrack: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Hurley, M.D.; Nance, B.; Japar, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of concentrations of ozone precursors, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}), are essential to better understand ozone-precursor relationships in urban and regional areas. In the last two decades, major advances on measuring VOC and NO{sub x} have been made. Reliable techniques for measuring NO{sub x} are available currently, although it is difficult to measure NO{sub 2} without interferences of other species at routine monitoring sites. For VOC, reliable techniques are available for lighter nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and current techniques for measuring heavier NMHC and partially oxidized NMHC including carbonyl compounds are somewhat uncertain and are under further development. Currently available measurement techniques for VOC are time-consuming and expensive. Consequently, a simple measurement technique for reactivity-adjusted, total VOC would be valuable for evaluating ozone-precursor relationships. Recently, an integrated air quality assessment instrument, AIRTRAK, has been introduced. The uniqueness of the AIRTRAK is the possible, continuous measurements of ambient VOC. Measurements of smog formation coefficients and derivation of VOC concentrations are based on the integrated empirical rate (IER) model. However, the IER model does not appear to hold rigorously. Consequently, the capability of VOC measurements by AIRTRAK has not been demonstrated adequately. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the VOC measurement capability of AIRTRAK after substantial experiences in flow-mode experiments using AIRTRAK at our laboratory. First, model simulations are performed to derive relationships between measured smog concentrations (by AIRTRAK) and ambient VOC concentrations. Using these relationships, numerical simulations are performed to simulate ambient VOC measurements. Further, preliminary investigations of implementing the present methodology to AIRTRAK are performed.

  17. Dark adaptation recovery of human rod bipolar cell response kinetics estimated from scotopic b-wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A M; Miao, L; Ruseckaite, R; Pianta, M J; Lamb, T D

    2008-11-15

    We recorded ganzfeld scotopic ERGs to examine the responses of human rod bipolar cells in vivo, during dark adaptation recovery following bleaching exposures, as well as during adaptation to steady background lights. In order to be able to record responses at relatively early times in recovery, we utilized a 'criterion response amplitude' protocol in which the test flash strength was adjusted to elicit responses of nearly constant amplitude. In order to provide accurate and unbiased measures of response kinetics, we utilized a curve-fitting procedure to fit a smooth function to the measured responses in the vicinity of the peak, thereby extracting both the time-to-peak and the amplitude of the responses. Following bleaching exposures, the responses exhibited both desensitization and accelerated kinetics. During early post-bleach recovery, the flash sensitivity and time-to-peak varied according to a power-law expression (with an exponent of 6), as found in the presence of steady background light. This light-like phenomenon, however, appeared to be set against the backdrop of a second, more slowly recovering 'pure' desensitization, most clearly evident at late post-bleach times. The post-bleach 'equivalent background intensity' derived from measurements of flash sensitivity faded initially with an S2 slope of approximately 0.24 decades min(-1), and later as a gentle S3 tail. When calculated from kinetics, the results displayed only the S2 slope. While the recovery of rod bipolar cell response kinetics can be described accurately by a declining level of opsin in the rods, the sensitivity of these cells is reduced further than expected by this mechanism alone.

  18. Spatial corrections for pulsed-neutron reactivity measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Lee, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-07-01

    For pulsed-neutron experiments performed in a subcritical reactor, the reactivity obtained from the area-ratio method is sensitive to detector positions. The spatial effects are induced by the presence of both the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics in the reactor. The traditional kinetics distortion factor is only limited to correcting the spatial effects caused by the fundamental prompt-{alpha} mode. In this paper, we derive spatial correction factors fp and fd to account for spatial effects induced by the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics, respectively. Our numerical simulations with the FX2-TH time-dependent multigroup diffusion code indicate that the high-order prompt neutron harmonics lead to significant spatial effects and cannot be neglected in calculating the spatial correction factors. The prompt spatial correction factor fp can be simply determined by the ratio of the normalized detector responses corresponding to the fundamental k-mode and the prompt neutron flux integrated over the pulse period. Thus, it is convenient to calculate and provides physically intuitive explanations on the spatial dependence of reactivity measured in the MUSE-4 experiments: overestimation of the subcriticality in regions close to the external neutron source and underestimation of the subcriticality away from the source but within the fuel region.

  19. A comparative study on the CANDU-6 reactivity device model based on Wolsong-2 physics measurement data

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C. J.; Choi, H.

    2006-07-01

    A benchmark calculation of a 713 MWe Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was performed based on the physics measurement data of Wolsong-2 nuclear power plant by using WIMS-AECL, DRAGON, and RFSP codes. The benchmark calculation included sensitivity analyses on the number of energy groups, cross-section library, and the weighting spectrum of the homogenized lattice parameters. The effective multiplication factor, critical boron concentration, reactivity device worth and the flux distribution were estimated and compared with those obtained by the measurement and standard CANDU reactor physics design tools. In general, the prediction errors by WIMS-AECL, DRAGON and RFSP codes were within the acceptance limit for all the sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity calculations also showed that the calculation accuracy was improved when two energy groups were used especially for the prediction of the reactivity worth of strong absorbers such as mechanical control absorbers and shutoff rods. However, the prediction error increased when calculating the reactivity worth of the adjuster banks with two energy groups. Therefore a further study is recommended to obtain consistent results for the benchmark calculation. (authors)

  20. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd2O3) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×104 s-1. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to 32

  1. Atmospheric measurements of total OH reactivity: Intercomparison of the pump-probe technique and the comparative reactivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, Sebastien; Hansen, Robert; Leonardis, Thierry; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Blocquet, Marion; Fittschen, Christa; Hanoune, Benjamin; Sinha, Vinayak; Stevens, Philip; Locoge, Nadine

    2013-04-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) drives the oxidation of organic trace gases that can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. A complete understanding of the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to both air quality and climate change. However, recent measurements of total OH reactivity [1-2], which is the inverse of the OH lifetime, have pointed out that our understanding of OH sinks is still incomplete and important reactive trace gases have not yet been identified. These measurements of total OH reactivity are of particular interest since they provide a critical test of our understanding of the OH budget. Three techniques are available to measure the total OH reactivity, including the total OH loss rate method [3], the pump-probe method [4], and the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [5]. While the first two methods are based on direct measurements of OH decays using laser-induced fluorescence instruments, the CRM is based on a different approach in which a tracer molecule is detected instead of OH to determine the ambient OH loss rate. As these instruments were deployed in different field campaigns, intercomparison exercises would be useful to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. However, such intercomparisons have not yet been published. An informal intercomparison involving a CRM instrument from the Ecole des Mines de Douai (EMD) and a pump-probe instrument from the laboratory Physicochimie des Processus de Combustion et de l'Atmosphere (PC2A) took place in an urban environment at the university of Lille (France). The two OH reactivity instruments measured continuously side by side for a duration of two weeks. Collocated measurements of trace gases were also performed using O3, NOx and SO2 monitors, as well as two automated chromatographic instruments capable of measuring more than 50 volatile organic compounds (VOC). We will present cross calibrations of the two OH reactivity

  2. Issues in Three-Dimensional Depletion Analysis of Measured Data Near the End of a Fuel Rod

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Gauld, Ian C; Suyama, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    scarcity of experimental measurements for fuel taken from the end regions of a fuel rod. A number of 3-D depletion approaches based on Monte Carlo methods have been introduced in the past decade including, but not limited to, those listed in Refs. 5-7. A full listing would be quite extensive. Recent fuel-sample measurements from two discharged assemblies of the Takahama Unit 3 PWR provide data for fuel samples taken very close to the top of the active region of the fuel rod. This paper discusses results of TRITON-based 3-D depletion calculations completed in the analysis of the Takahama fuel samples.

  3. Airborne measurements of total reactive odd nitrogen (NO(y))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebler, G.; Fahey, D. W.; Ridley, B. A.; Gregory, G. L.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne total reactive odd nitrogen measurements were made during August and September 1986 over the continental United States and off the west coast over the Pacific Ocean during NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment/Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 2 program. Measurements were made in the marine and continental boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 6.1 km altitude. NO(y) mixing ratios between 24 pptv and more than 1 ppbv were found, with median values of 101 pptv in the marine boundary layer, 298 pptv in the marine free troposphere, and 288 pptv in the continental free troposphere, respectively. The marine troposphere exhibited layered structure which was also seen in the simultaneously measured ozone mixing ratio and dew point temperature. The averaged vertical NO(y) profile over the ocean does not show a distinct gradient. The NO(y) mixing ratio over the continent decreases with increasing altitude. The latter is consistent with our understanding that the continents are the major source region for these gases.

  4. Differentiating challenge reactivity from psychomotor activity in studies of children's psychophysiology: considerations for theory and measurement.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicole R; Alkon, Abbey; Obradović, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338). Measures of parasympathetic reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and sympathetic reactivity (preejection period [PEP]) were calculated for social, cognitive, sensory, and emotional challenge tasks. Reactivity was calculated relative to both resting and a paired comparison task that accounted for psychomotor activity effects during each challenge. Results indicated that comparison tasks themselves elicited RSA and PEP responses, and reactivity adjusted for psychomotor activity was incongruent with reactivity calculated using rest. Findings demonstrate the importance of accounting for confounding psychomotor activity effects on physiological reactivity.

  5. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R. . Energy Systems Business Unit)

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 {mu}m to 53 {mu}m, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor.

  6. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H; Siegel, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking. PMID:26612505

  7. Rod-like particles matching algorithm based on SOM neural network in dispersed two-phase flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Hoseini, Afshin; Zavareh, Zahra; Lundell, Fredrik; Anderson, Helge I.

    2014-04-01

    A matching algorithm based on self-organizing map (SOM) neural network is proposed for tracking rod-like particles in 2D optical measurements of dispersed two-phase flows. It is verified by both synthetic images of elongated particles mimicking 2D suspension flows and direct numerical simulations-based results of prolate particles dispersed in a turbulent channel flow. Furthermore, the potential benefit of this algorithm is evaluated by applying it to the experimental data of rod-like fibers tracking in wall turbulence. The study of the behavior of elongated particles suspended in turbulent flows has a practical importance and covers a wide range of applications in engineering and science. In experimental approach, particle tracking velocimetry of the dispersed phase has a key role together with particle image velocimetry of the carrier phase to obtain the velocities of both phases. The essential parts of particle tracking are to identify and match corresponding particles correctly in consecutive images. The present study is focused on the development of an algorithm for pairing non-spherical particles that have one major symmetry axis. The novel idea in the algorithm is to take the orientation of the particles into account for matching in addition to their positions. The method used is based on the SOM neural network that finds the most likely matching link in images on the basis of feature extraction and clustering. The fundamental concept is finding corresponding particles in the images with the nearest characteristics: position and orientation. The most effective aspect of this two-frame matching algorithm is that it does not require any preliminary knowledge of neither the flow field nor the particle behavior. Furthermore, using one additional characteristic of the non-spherical particles, namely their orientation, in addition to its coordinate vector, the pairing is improved both for more reliable matching at higher concentrations of dispersed particles and

  8. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  9. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.H.; Lu, W.; Lilly, W.D.

    1992-06-10

    We have developed what we believe to be the very first a priori prediction technique for the gasification reactivity of coal char. With this method the gasification reactivity of a coal char as function of temperature can be predicted from a single temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiment following mild gasification at a single temperature (Calo et al., 1989; Hall and Calo, 1990a). This approach has been demonstrated for C0{sub 2} gasification of coal chars where the gasification reactivity is controlled by the thermal desorption of oxygen surface complexes formed during gasification. This approach may be extended to other oxidant species, such as steam, and carbon-hydrogen complexes for hydrogen gasification as well. In the current report, we present a summary of the work that has been conducted to date in constructing a new TGA/TPD-MS experimental system which provides us with the capability of simultaneous monitoring of transient sample mass data, as well as gas phase composition during thermal desorption experiments. In addition, we present some steam reactivity data obtained with another TGA (Cahn 113 system) which has been modified for steam gasification experiments.

  10. Mark 22 Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-07-02

    Calculations for reactivity held in control rods have underpredicted the observed Mark 22 reactivity. Reactivity predictions by charge designers have accounted for this by including large biases which change with exposure and reactor region. The purpose of this study was to thoroughly investigate the methods and data used in the reactivity calculations. The goal was to identify errors and improvements and make necessary corrections.

  11. OH radical reactivity in an Indiana Forest: Measurements and model comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigler, P. S. R.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Sklaveniti, S.; Dusanter, S.; Kundu, S.; Wood, E. C. D.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radicals plays an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. OH radical reactions initiate the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. In addition, reactions of OH radicals controls the lifetime of methane and other greenhouse gases that affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Previous measurements of total hydroxyl radical reactivity in forest environments have found discrepancies between measured values and those calculated from collocated measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) concentrations. Additional measurements of total OH reactivity together with measurements of BVOCs are needed to understand the source of this missing reactivity and to further constrain atmospheric chemistry models. Total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity was measured using a turbulent flow reactor were made during summer 2015 as part of the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC). This campaign took place in a forested area at the Indiana Research and Teaching Preserve (IURTP) near the Bloomington campus characterized by high mixing ratios of isoprene and low mixing ratios of NOx. Measurements of a suite of VOCs and oxygenated VOCs was also conducted at the site, allowing a comparison of the observed reactivity with the expected OH reactivity from these measurements.

  12. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  13. Surface Strength of Silicon Nitride in Relation to Rolling Contact Performance Measured on Ball-on-Rod and Modified Four-Ball Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Hadfield, M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been used in various rolling contact applications in turbomachinery, automotive and power industry. It is favoured to replace conventional steel due to its low density, low friction, corrosion resistance and good performance under extreme condition. However, a major limitation of its wider application is its high material and machining cost, especially the cost associated with the finishing process. In the present study, a low cost sintered and reaction bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) is used to study the surface machining effects on its rolling contact performance. Attempt has been made to link the surface strengths of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} derived from half-rod and C-sphere flexure strength specimens to the rolling contact lifetimes of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} rod and ball specimens. The rolling contact fatigue tests are carried out on ball-on-rod and modified four ball machines. Three types of surfaces with coarse, fine and conventional finishing conditions are examined. Flexure strength tests on half-rod and C-sphere show an increasing surface strength from specimens with coarse, fine to conventionally machined conditions. During rolling contact fatigue test of as-machined specimens, there are no failures observed on both ball-on-rod and four ball tests after 100 million stress cycles. However, there is a trend of decreasing wear volumes measured on the contact path of rods and balls with coarse, fine and conventional conditions. In four ball test, spall failures are observed on pre-crack specimens. There is a trend of increasing rolling contact fatigue lifetime from pre-cracked specimens with coarse, fine to conventional machining conditions.

  14. Total OH reactivity measurement in a BVOC dominated temperate forest during a summer campaign, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Ida, Akira; Jones, Charlotte; Kato, Shungo; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Iori; Kawasaki, Shio; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro; Kagami, Sara; Deng, Yange; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-01

    A total OH reactivity measurement was conducted in coniferous forest located in Wakayama prefecture, Japan, during the summer of 2014. The average total OH reactivity, measured using a laser-induced pump and probe technique was 7.1 s-1. The measured OH reactivity was comparable with other coniferous and temperate forest measurements and much lower than that of tropical forests. OH reactivity varied diurnally and showed moderate linear correlation with temperature (r2 = 0.66) and light (r2 = 0.53). Monoterpene emitters, Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obutsa, are the dominant tree species in this forest. Although clean air from the sea was predominant, the beginning of the campaign was influenced by transported anthropogenic pollutants and consequently a higher average OH reactivity of 9.8 s-1 with high missing sinks of 37.3% was determined. Cleaner conditions, along with cooler day-time temperatures during in the second half of the campaign resulted in a lower average OH reactivity of 6.0 s-1 with a lower missing OH reactivity of 21.5%. Monoterpenes, isoprene, acetaldehyde were the dominant contributors to the total OH reactivity, accounting for 23.7%, 17.0% and 14.5%, respectively.

  15. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  16. Analysis of reciprocating compressor piston rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.; Drosjack, M.J.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the analysis of five piston rod failures which occurred on reciprocating compressors. Calculations are shown for rod stress which includes nominal rod loading sources as well as additional loads due to unusual pressure losses in the compressor valves, flexure of the rods due to misalignment, and manufacturing errors. The additional loads were incorporated on the basis of field measurements. The stress values are used with Baquin's equation to produce fatigue life curves for the rods. Based on the calculations, recommendations for modified rods were made. The calculation procedures are described in a manner which will permit their application to other reciprocating compressors.

  17. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  18. An automated dynamic chamber system for surface exchange measurement of non-reactive and reactive trace gases of grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, L.; Ammann, C.; Nyfeler-Brunner, A.; Spirig, C.; Hens, K.; Meixner, F. X.

    2009-03-01

    We present an automated dynamic chamber system which is optimised for continuous unattended flux measurements of multiple non-reactive and reactive trace gases on grassland ecosystems. Main design features of our system are (a) highly transparent chamber walls consisting of chemically inert material, (b) individual purging flow units for each chamber, and (c) a movable lid for automated opening and closing of the chamber. The purging flow rate was chosen high enough to keep the mean residence time of the chamber air below one minute. This guarantees a proven efficient mixing of the chamber volume and a fast equilibration after lid closing. The dynamic chamber system is able to measure emission as well as deposition fluxes of trace gases. For the latter case, the modification of the turbulent transport by the chamber (compared to undisturbed ambient conditions) is quantitatively described by a bulk resistance concept. Beside a detailed description of the design and functioning of the system, results of field applications at two grassland sites are presented. In the first experiment, fluxes of five trace gases (CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, O3) were measured simultaneously on small grassland plots. It showed that the dynamic chamber system is able to detect the characteristic diurnal cycles with a sufficient temporal resolution. The results also demonstrated the importance of considering the chemical source/sink in the chamber due to gas phase reactions for the reactive compounds of the NO-NO2-O3 triad. In a second field experiment, chamber flux measurements of CO2 and methanol were compared to simultaneous independent eddy covariance flux measurements on the field scale. The fluxes obtained with the two methods showed a very good agreement indicating a minimal disturbance of the chambers on the physiological activity of the enclosed vegetation.

  19. An automated dynamic chamber system for surface exchange measurement of non-reactive and reactive trace gases of grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, L.; Ammann, C.; Nyfeler-Brunner, A.; Spirig, C.; Hens, K.; Meixner, F. X.

    2008-08-01

    We present an automated dynamic chamber system which is optimised for continuous unattended flux measurements of multiple non-reactive and reactive trace gases on grassland ecosystems. Main design features of our system are (a) highly transparent chamber walls consisting of chemically inert material, (b) individual purging flow units for each chamber, and (c) a movable lid for automated opening and closing of the chamber. The purging flow rate was chosen high enough to keep the mean residence time of the chamber air below one minute. This guarantees a proven efficient mixing of the chamber volume and a fast equilibration after lid closing. The dynamic chamber system is able to measure emission as well as deposition fluxes of trace gases. For the latter case, the modification of the turbulent transport by the chamber (compared to undisturbed ambient conditions) is quantitatively described by a bulk resistance concept. Beside a detailed description of the design and functioning of the system, results of field applications at two grassland sites are presented. In the first experiment, fluxes of five trace gases (CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, O3) were measured simultaneously on small grassland plots. It showed that the dynamic chamber system is able to detect the characteristic diurnal cycles with a sufficient temporal resolution. The results also demonstrated the importance of considering the chemical source/sink in the chamber due to gas phase reactions for the reactive compounds of the NO-NO2-O3 triad. In a second field experiment, chamber flux measurements of CO2 and methanol were compared to simultaneous independent eddy covariance flux measurements on the field scale. The fluxes obtained with the two methods showed a very good agreement indicating a minimal disturbance of the chambers on the physiological activity of the enclosed vegetation.

  20. Using total OH reactivity to assess isoprene photooxidation via measurement and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Butler, T.; Auld, J.; Veres, P.; Muñoz, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Vereecken, L.; Lelieveld, J.; Williams, J.

    2014-06-01

    The Tropics provide a reactive atmospheric environment with high levels of biogenic emissions, rapidly growing anthropogenic influence, high solar radiation and temperature levels. The major reactive biogenic emission is isoprene which reacts rapidly with the primary daytime oxidant OH, the hydroxyl radical. This key photooxidation process has recently been the focus of several experimental and computational studies. A novel isoprene degradation mechanism was recently proposed (MIME) supplementing the commonly used MCM 3.2 scheme. This study examined the photooxidation of isoprene in the controlled conditions of the Valencia atmospheric reaction chamber, EUPHORE (EUropean PHOtoREactor). Besides the detection of isoprene and its major oxidation products formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR), the total loss rate of OH (total OH reactivity) was measured. The total OH reactivity was compared to the individual measurements of isoprene and its oxidation products to assess the significant contributors to the overall OH loss rate. Measured total OH reactivity showed excellent agreement to the calculation based on individual compounds detected by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction-Time-Of-Flight-Mass-Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). On average 97% of the measured total OH reactivity could be explained by isoprene and its major oxidation products. Total OH reactivity was also compared to various isoprene degradation schemes to evaluate known mechanisms. The MCM 3.2 isoprene mechanism reproduced the temporal degradation of total OH reactivity (and isoprene) reasonably well with a 57% (and 95%) agreement within the model uncertainties and a linear curve fit slope of 0.69 (and 1.02) for a model to measurement correlation. Large discrepancies between modeled values and all observed compounds were found for the recent isoprene oxidation scheme in MIME. Possible mechanistic reasons are discussed and improvements proposed. The subsequently modified version of MIME

  1. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  2. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  3. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-01-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes’ P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key points Reactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement template The reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive duties The handball specific “true-game” reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance. PMID:26336335

  4. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-09-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes' P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key pointsReactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement templateThe reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive dutiesThe handball specific "true-game" reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance.

  5. Measurement of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds over the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1996-01-01

    This report covers the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurement Group's (TTGAMG) participation in the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Pacific Exploratory Mission: Tropics A (PEM-TA) field measurement program. With other university and NASA centers, the Georgia Institute of Technology Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE) was deployed on the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft for the measurement of NO and NO2 One of the PEM-TA objectives was to collect the data and interpret the fast photo-chemical processes taking place in the remote and relatively pristine environment over Hawaii, Tahiti, Easter Island, New Zealand, and Fiji.

  6. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  7. Resilience, reactivity and variability: A mathematical comparison of ecological stability measures.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, J-F; Loreau, M; Haegeman, B

    2016-01-21

    In theoretical studies, the most commonly used measure of ecological stability is resilience: ecosystems asymptotic rate of return to equilibrium after a pulse-perturbation -or shock. A complementary notion of growing popularity is reactivity: the strongest initial response to shocks. On the other hand, empirical stability is often quantified as the inverse of temporal variability, directly estimated on data, and reflecting ecosystems response to persistent and erratic environmental disturbances. It is unclear whether and how this empirical measure is related to resilience and reactivity. Here, we establish a connection by introducing two variability-based stability measures belonging to the theoretical realm of resilience and reactivity. We call them intrinsic, stochastic and deterministic invariability; respectively defined as the inverse of the strongest stationary response to white-noise and to single-frequency perturbations. We prove that they predict ecosystems worst response to broad classes of disturbances, including realistic models of environmental fluctuations. We show that they are intermediate measures between resilience and reactivity and that, although defined with respect to persistent perturbations, they can be related to the whole transient regime following a shock, making them more integrative notions than reactivity and resilience. We argue that invariability measures constitute a stepping stone, and discuss the challenges ahead to further unify theoretical and empirical approaches to stability.

  8. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector response factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results presented represent the first successful attempt at the measurement of the driving capabilities of coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors. The required data have been obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel. The data describe the frequency dependence of the injector admittances, from which the frequency dependence of the injection response factors can be calculated. The measured injector admittances have been compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann (1967) analytical model assuming different values for the characteristic combustion time. The values of combustion time which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector system investigated in this study the characteristic combustion times vary between .7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of .57 to 1.31. The experimental data clearly show that the tested injector system could indeed drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  9. Midbrain volume predicts fMRI and ERP measures of reward reactivity.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joshua M; Foti, Dan; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Proudfit, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    Ventral striatal activation measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and feedback negativity amplitude measured with event-related potentials (ERPs) are each enhanced during reward processing. Recent research has found that these two neural measures of reward processing are also related to one another, such that increases in ventral striatal activity are accompanied by increases in the amplitude of the feedback negativity. Although there is a long history of research implicating the midbrain dopamine system in reward processing, there has been little research into the possibility that structural variability in the midbrain may be linked to functional variability in reward reactivity. Here, we used structural MRI to measure midbrain volumes in addition to fMRI and ERP measures of functional neural reactivity to rewards in a simple gambling task. The results suggest that as midbrain volumes increase, fMRI reward reactivity in the ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex also increases. A similar relationship exists between midbrain structure and the amplitude of the feedback negativity; further, this relationship is mediated specifically by activity in the ventral striatum. These data demonstrate convergence between neuroanatomical, hemodynamic, and electrophysiological measures. Thus, structural variability in the midbrain relates to variability in fMRI and ERP measures of functional reward reactivity, which may play a critical role in reward-related psychopathologies and the treatment of these disorders.

  10. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  11. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  12. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  13. In vivo electron spin resonance: An effective new tool for reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species measurement.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Yi; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2010-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are regarded as important factors in the initiation and progression of many diseases. Therefore, measurement of redox status would be helpful in understanding the "Redox Navigation" of such diseases. Because electron spin resonance (ESR) shows good signal responses to nitroxyl radical and various redox-related species, such as oxygen radicals and antioxidants, the in vivo ESR/nitroxyl probe technique can provide useful information on real-time redox status in a living body. ESR spectrometers for in vivo measurements can be operated at lower frequencies (approximately 3.5 GHz, 1 GHz, 700 MHz, and 300 MHz) than usual (9-10 GHz). Several types of resonators were also designed to minimize the dielectric loss of electromagnetic waves caused by water in animal bodies. In vivo ESR spectroscopy and its imaging have been used to analyze radical generation, redox status, partial pressure of oxygen and other conditions in various diseases. In addition, ESR has been used to analyze injury models related to oxidative stresses, such as nitroxyl radicals. The application of in vivo ESR for diseases related to oxidative injuries currently being investigated and the accumulation of basic data for therapy is ongoing. Recent progress in the instrumentation for in vivo ESR spectroscopy and its application to the life sciences are reviewed, because measurement of redox status in vivo is considered necessary to understand the initiation and progression of diseases.

  14. Reactivity worth measurements at the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Letícia Negrão; Santos, Adimir dos

    2013-05-01

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. The objective of this work was to perform a series of experiments of reactivity worth measurements, using a digital reactivity meter developed at IPEN. The experiments employed small metallic and ceramic samples inserted in the central region of the core of the experimental IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The theoretical analysis was performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  15. Reactivity worth measurements at the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Leticia Negrao; Santos, Adimir dos

    2013-05-06

    Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. The objective of this work was to perform a series of experiments of reactivity worth measurements, using a digital reactivity meter developed at IPEN. The experiments employed small metallic and ceramic samples inserted in the central region of the core of the experimental IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The theoretical analysis was performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

  16. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  17. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  18. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  19. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  20. Measurement Reactivity and Fatigue Effects in Daily Diary Research with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Bridget M.; Robles, Theodore F.; Repetti, Rena L.

    2016-01-01

    Methodological challenges associated with measurement reactivity and fatigue were addressed using diary data collected from mothers (n = 47), fathers (n = 39), and children (n = 47; 8-13 years) across 56 consecutive days. Demonstrating the feasibility of extended diary studies with families, on-time compliance rates were upward of 90% for all…

  1. Summer 2015 measurements of total OH reactivity at a UK coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, R.; Cryer, D. R.; Whalley, L. K.; Ingham, T.; Crilley, L.; Kramer, L. J.; Reeves, C.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; Bandy, B.; Reed, C.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, W.; Heard, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays a central role in the day time oxidative removal of pollutants and greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is essential that all production and loss pathways of OH are understood and included in computer models in order to accurately predict OH concentrations for a range of environments, and in turn the rate of production of secondary products, for example ozone and organic aerosol. Direct measurement of total OH reactivity, the pseudo first order rate coefficient for OH loss by reaction with its sinks, is a very useful tool to test how complete our knowledge is of OH loss pathways. Comparison with values of total OH reactivity calculated by computer models using concentrations of simultaneously measured OH 'sinks' and unmeasured intermediates enables environments to be identified where there are unidentified 'missing' OH sinks. Total OH reactivity was measured using the laser flash photolysis combined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique during the ICOZA (Integrated Chemistry of OZone in the Atmosphere) campaign in July 2015 at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO), Norfolk, UK. Air masses sampled ranged from polluted air from the UK or Europe containing processed urban emissions to very clean air of marine origin. Data for measured and calculated OH reactivity will be presented in addition to a discussion of the magnitude of the 'missing' OH sink determined for each type of air mass.

  2. ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA-660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL WORK PLATFORM ABOVE. THE REACTOR WAS IN A SMALL WATER-FILLED POOL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 66-6373. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1966 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. [Measurement of reactive oxygen species in a biological system and its perspectives].

    PubMed

    Todoki, K; Lee, C; Okabe, E

    1996-12-01

    In recent years, reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. Although the existence of reactive oxygen intermediates in drug metabolism can be inferred from end product analysis or from the effects of antioxidants or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, only the technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) allows the direct detection of these highly reactive species. However, some free radical species cannot be detected by ESR due to their extremely short half-lives, which result in low steady-state concentrations of the radicals or to short radical relaxation times, which lead to a very broad line. These facts made recent development of spin-trapping and chemiluminescence techniques are widely used to detect free radicals. The goal of this paper is to introduce the various assays available for measurement of reactive oxygen species in biological models. This paper will focus on two topics: (1) the spin-trapping/ESR technique in vitro and vivo and (2) the chemiluminescence-optical biosensor application of this technique, a very sensitive method that has the advantage of being able to provide continuous, online, nondestructive monitoring of reactive oxygen species.

  4. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  5. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways.

  6. X-ray tomography to measure size of fragments from penetration of high-velocity tungsten rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Bless, Stephan; Tolman, John; McDonald, Jason; Levinson, Scott; Hanna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particle board. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN and EPIC calculations. Fragments were steel or tungsten generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models.

  7. X-Ray Tomography to Measure Size of Fragments from Penetration of High-Velocity Tungsten Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Zach; Hanna, Romy; Bless, Stephan; Levinson, Scott; InstituteAdvanced Technology Collaboration; Department of Geological Sciences-UT Austin Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Behind-armor debris that results from tungsten rods penetrating armor steel at 2 km/s was studied by analysis of recovered fragments. Fragment recovery was by means of particleboard. Individual fragments were analyzed by x-ray tomography, which provides information for fragment identification, mass, shape, and penetration down to masses of a few milligrams. The experiments were complemented by AUTODYN SPH calculations to provide the exit velocity and the strain rate at the time of particle formation. There were four types of fragments: steel or tungsten, and generated from the channel or from the breakout through the target rear surface. Channel fragment motions were well described by Tate theory. Breakout fragments had velocities from the projectile remnant to the channel velocity, apparently depending on where in the projectile a fragment originated. The fragment size distribution was extremely broad and did not correlate well with simple uniform-fragment-size models, e.g., Grady Kipp.

  8. An overview of reactive chlorine measurements during the WINTER C-130 aircraft campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Jaegle, L.; Haskins, J.; Shah, V.; Brown, S. S.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Veres, P. R.; Dibb, J. E.; Sparks, T.; Ebben, C. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Sullivan, A.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, T. L.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity (WINTER) campaign, the University of Washington Iodide-adduct high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) was deployed aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. Calibrated measurements of ClNO2, Cl2, HCl, N2O5, HNO3, HONO, among several other compounds, were made at 2Hz on all 13 research flights. ClNO2 and HCl were often the dominant forms of reactive gas-phase chlorine compounds, with ClNO2 routinely reaching >1.5 ppb in the polluted outflow of the eastern U.S. urban corridor. ClNO2 often becomes a substantial fraction (~30%) of NOz (NOz = NOy - NOx) in these plumes at night. Preliminary analyses suggests that ClNO2 production is most efficient in the polluted marine boundary layer, with yields approaching unity and the evolution of nighttime ClNO2 highly correlated with that of HNO3 and particulate nitrate. However, ClNO2 production was observed throughout the region and a significant source of reactive chlorine from coal-fired power plants was directly confirmed with measurements of HCl strongly correlated with SO2. In addition, there is some evidence that biomass or biofuel combustion is a source of reactive chlorine that can lead to ClNO2 production. Examples of the nocturnal and diel evolution of reactive chlorine species are given, and we show to our knowledge the first measurements of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) in the polluted mid-latitude marine boundary layer.

  9. Total OH reactivity measurements within a suburban Tokyo forest in late summer 2012 during the AQUAS-TAMA campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Jones, C. E.; Yamasaki, S.; Kato, S.; Minejima, C.; Yoshino, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Matsuda, K.; Kajii, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is known to play a central role in initiating the oxidation of a number of atmospheric species. We have developed an OH reactivity measurement system using a laser pump probe technique and have previously deployed this instrument at urban and suburban sites across Tokyo, as well as within a remote forest in Colorado, US. Based upon these measurements of OH reactivity, we confirmed the existence of unknown reactive species at each location. To investigate the interaction between urban / suburban emissions and forest air, the AQUAS-TAMA (Air QUAlity Study in TAMA hills) field campaign was carried out at Field Museum of Tama hills (FM-Tama) during September 20th - October 4th, 2012 and total OH reactivity was measured continuously throughout this period. The FM-Tama experimental forest site is operated by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, and is located within a suburban forest ~30 km west of the center of Tokyo. Since FM-Tama is surrounded by residential areas and several major roads, the site is subjected to considerable anthropogenic emissions. The total OH reactivity was about 3-30 s-1, comparable with the OH reactivity measured in suburban areas of Tokyo. Diurnal variation of OH reactivity was observed, with OH reactivity higher during the daytime. In addition to the measurement of OH reactivity, trace species such as CO, NOx, O3, SO2, and VOCs, including biogenic VOCs, were analyzed. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of the observed trace species, about 31% of measured OH reactivity may be attributed to anthropogenic VOCs, and 14% from isoprene. However, about 26% of the measured OH reactivity was the result of missing OH sinks.

  10. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  11. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  12. Differentiating Challenge Reactivity from Psychomotor Activity in Studies of Children’s Psychophysiology: Considerations for Theory and Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Nicole R.; Alkon, Abbey; Obradović, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Current methods of assessing children’s physiologic “stress reactivity” may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examine the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for children ages 5–6 (N=338). Measures of parasympathetic (RSA) and sympathetic (PEP) reactivity were calculated for social, cognitive, sensory, and emotional challenge tasks. Reactivity was calculated relative to both resting and a paired comparison task that accounted for psychomotor activity effects during each challenge. Results indicated that comparison tasks themselves elicited RSA and PEP responses, and reactivity adjusted for psychomotor activity was incongruent with reactivity calculated using rest. Findings demonstrate the importance of accounting for confounding psychomotor activity effects on physiologic reactivity. PMID:21524757

  13. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  14. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  15. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  16. 1987 Sucker rod tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This reference identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API products such as fiberglass and hollow rods.

  17. Measurements of fuel pin/water hole worths and power peaking, void coefficients, and temperature coefficients for 4. 81 wt% enriched UO[sub 2] fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.R.; Rohr, R.R.; Angelo, P.L.; Patrou, N.T.; Buckwheat, K.W.; Hayes, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute reactor critical facility is currently the only facility in North America providing critical measurement data in support of the light water reactor electric power industry. The reactor is fueled by 4.81 wt% [sup 235]U enriched UO[sub 2] high-density pellets in stainless steel clad fuel rods at the present time, although experiments with other fuels are being analyzed. The fuel pins are supported by inexpensive stainless steel lattice plates in a large open water tank. Three sets of lattice plates have been fabricated for fuel pins in square array with pitches 0.585, 0.613, and 0.640 in. (1.486, 0.613, and 1.656 cm, respectively) to provide a relevant range of water-to-fuel volume ratios. The measurements reported here are for the first of these, a relatively tight lattice of considerable interest for reactor physics methods for advanced fuels and reactors.

  18. Measurements of NO and total reactive odd-nitrogen, NOy, in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Murphy, D. M.; Eubank, C. S.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. Roland; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of NO and total reactive N, NOy, were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment conducted in Punta Arenas, Chile during Aug. and Sept. 1987. The total reactive N reservoir includes the species NO, NO2, NO3, N2 O5, HNO3, and ClONO2. The instrument was located on board the NASA ER2 aircraft which conducted 12 flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 deg S latitude. The NOy technique utilized the conversion of component NOy species to NO on a gold catalyst and the subsequent detection of NO by the chemiluminescence reaction of NO with ozone. Since the inlet sample line is heated and the catalyst operates at 300 C, NOy incorporated in aerosols evaporates and is converted to NO. NO was measured on two separate flights by removing the catalyst from the sample inlet line.

  19. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-05-01

    The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

  20. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  1. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  2. Sucker rod construction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Goodman, J.L.; Tickle, J.D.; Liskey, A.K.

    1987-03-31

    A sucker rod construction is described comprising: a connector member being formed to define a rod receptacle having a closed axially inner end and an open axially outer end, the rod receptacle having axially spaced, tapered annular surfaces, a cylindrical fiberglass rod having an end having an outer surface being received within the rod receptacle through the outer end and cooperating therewith to define an annular chamber between the outer surface of the end of the rod and the tapered annular surfaces, and a bonding means positioned in the annular chamber for bonding to the outer surface of the end of the rod to confront the tapered annular surfaces, each annular surface having an angle of taper with respect to the outer surface of the fiberglass rod, and each angle of taper being progressively and uniformly less toward the open end by an amount between one and one-half degrees and two degrees, inclusive, and a collet connected to the connector member adjacent the open axially outer end of the rod receptacle and having an axial bore therethrough retaining the end of the rod in coaxial position within the rod receptacle.

  3. Longitudinal Impact of Rods: A Continuing Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, W. G. B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment of research potential. The experiment cconsists of measuring the time of contact of a metal rod bouncing on a steel base as a function of the velocity of impact, length, diameter, and material of the rod. (GA)

  4. Wear resistant rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.W.

    1991-12-03

    This paper describes a sucker rod guide. It comprises: a series of sucker rods connected end to end forming a sucker rod string, the sucker rod string extending down into a tubing string of a producing oil well from a pump jack located on the surface of the ground above the tubing string to a pump located at a bottom end of the tubing string, the pump forces produced fluid collected at the bottom end of the tubing string up to the ground's surface, the produced fluid occupies a space between the rod string and the tubing string through which the fluid is channeled from the bottom end of the tubing string to the ground's surface, the pump jack raises and lowers the rod string in the fluid being pumped up the tubing string while the fluid bathes the rod string within the tubing string, wherein the improvement comprises the following structure in combination with the above.

  5. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.J.; Starks, J.A.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes a sucker rod guide for mounting on a sucker rod and spacing the sucker rod from the tubing in an oil well. The guide comprising a generally cylindrically-shaped, extruded, ultra-high density polyethylene body having a substantially smooth outside surface; a longitudinal bore provided centrally of the body. The bore having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the sucker rod; a plurality of grooves provided in circumferential relationship in the bore; and a tapered slot extending longitudinally through the body from the outside surface to the bore. The tapered slot further comprising a slot mouth located at the outside surface and a slot throat spaced from the slot mouth. The slot throat lying adjacent to the sucker rod bore and wherein the slot throat is wider than the slot mouth for mounting the sucker rod guide on the sucker rod.

  6. Low turbulence rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, E.L.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes an improved sucker rod guide for fixedly engaging around a sucker rod at a selected location along the length of the rod. It comprises a substantially cylindrical polymeric body having a longitudinal axis, a terminal end substantially continually tapered to the rod, a radially-inward surface and a radially outward surface, the radially inward surface of the body adjacent to and in tripping engagement with the rod when the rod guide is fixedly engaged around the rod; and a plurality of substantially continuous, longitudinal vanes carried by the body, a vane having a selected length and width, and longitudinally disposed along the radially outward surface of the guide body, extending radially away from the guide body and having a radially outside wear surface.

  7. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  8. Development of airborne eddy-correlation flux measurement capabilities for reactive oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John (Principal Investigator); Zheng, Xiaonan; Sandholm, Scott T.

    1996-01-01

    This research is aimed at producing a fundamental new research tool for characterizing the source strength of the most important compound controlling the hemispheric and global scale distribution of tropospheric ozone. Specifically, this effort seeks to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of a new general purpose laser-induced fluorescence based spectrometer for making airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen compounds. The new all solid-state laser technology being used in this advanced sensor will produce a forerunner of the type of sensor technology that should eventually result in highly compact operational systems. The proof-of-concept sensor being developed will have over two orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity than present-day instruments. In addition, this sensor will offer the possibility of eventual extension to airborne eddy-correlation flux measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and possibly other compounds, such as ammonia (NH3), peroxyradicals (HO2), nitrateradicals (NO3) and several iodine compounds (e.g., I and IO). Demonstration of the new sensor's ability to measure NO fluxes will occur through a series of laboratory and field tests. This proof-of-concept demonstration will show that not only can airborne fluxes of important ultra-trace compounds be made at the few parts-per-trillion level, but that the high accuracy/precision measurements currently needed for predictive models can also. These measurement capabilities will greatly enhance our current ability to quantify the fluxes of reactive nitrogen into the troposphere and significantly impact upon the accuracy of predictive capabilities to model O3's distribution within the remote troposphere. This development effort also offers a timely approach for producing the reactive nitrogen flux measurement capabilities that will be needed by future research programs such as NASA's planned 1999 Amazon Biogeochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry

  9. Reactive Strength Index Modified Is a Valid Measure of Explosiveness in Collegiate Female Volleyball Players.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Kiely, Michael T; Geiser, Christopher F

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of the reactive strength index modified (RSImod) as a measure of lower body explosiveness. Fifteen female, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I volleyball players performed vertical countermovement jumps (CMJs) while standing on a force plate. Each player performed 3 CMJs. The vertical ground reaction forces collected during each jump were used to calculate jump height, time to take-off, time to peak force, peak force, peak rate of force development, and peak power; the latter 3 variables were all normalized to body mass. Reactive strength index modified was calculated as the ratio between jump height and time to take-off. All variables, except for jump height, were then entered a factor analysis, which reduced the input data into 2 factors: a force factor and a speed factor. Although RSImod loaded more strongly onto the force factor, further analysis showed that RSImod loaded positively onto both force and speed factors. Visual analysis of the Cartesian coordinates also showed that RSImod loaded into the quadrant of greater force and speed abilities. These results indicate that the construct of RSImod, as derived from CMJ force-time data, captures a combination of speed-force factors that can be interpreted as lower body explosiveness during the CMJ. Reactive strength index modified therefore seems to be a valid measure to study lower body explosiveness. PMID:26439787

  10. GUINEVERE experiment: Kinetic analysis of some reactivity measurement methods by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, G.; Burgio, N.; Carta, M.; Peluso, V.; Fabrizio, V.; Ricci, L.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE experiment (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) is an experimental program in support of the ADS technology presently carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol (Belgium). In the experiment a modified lay-out of the original thermal VENUS critical facility is coupled to an accelerator, built by the French body CNRS in Grenoble, working in both continuous and pulsed mode and delivering 14 MeV neutrons by bombardment of deuterons on a tritium-target. The modified lay-out of the facility consists of a fast subcritical core made of 30% U-235 enriched metallic Uranium in a lead matrix. Several off-line and on-line reactivity measurement techniques will be investigated during the experimental campaign. This report is focused on the simulation by deterministic (ERANOS French code) and Monte Carlo (MCNPX US code) calculations of three reactivity measurement techniques, Slope ({alpha}-fitting), Area-ratio and Source-jerk, applied to a GUINEVERE subcritical configuration (namely SC1). The inferred reactivity, in dollar units, by the Area-ratio method shows an overall agreement between the two deterministic and Monte Carlo computational approaches, whereas the MCNPX Source-jerk results are affected by large uncertainties and allow only partial conclusions about the comparison. Finally, no particular spatial dependence of the results is observed in the case of the GUINEVERE SC1 subcritical configuration. (authors)

  11. Reactivation of slow-moving landslides by earthquakes, kinematics measurements and mechanical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Pascal; Perfettini, Hugo; Berthier, Etienne; Taipe, Edu; Guillier, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Major earthquakes in mountainous areas often trigger landslides. The impact of earthquakes on slow-moving landslides is however not well constrained due to few co-seismic measurements of landslide motion. We document the first time-series of a landslide reactivation by an earthquake (Mw6.0, distance 20 km), using continuous GPS measurements over the Maca landslide (Peru). Our survey shows a coseismic response of the landslide of about 2 cm, followed by a relaxation period of 5 weeks during which postseismic slip is three times greater than the coseismic displacement itself. Our results confirm the coseismic activation of landslides and provide the first observation of a post seismic displacement. Finally, a multi-temporal survey using images from the very high resolution Pléiades optical satellite, allowed us to detect 9 active slow-moving landslides over the whole valley. Their pattern of motion show they have been reactivated by the same earthquake. We analyze this small but comprehensive database of landslides reactivated by the earthquake. We find that the landslide motion due to the earthquake is function of the shaking intensity, suggesting a friction at the basal interface dependent on the earthquake solicitation. These various observations are consistent with a mechanical model where slip on the landslide basal interface is governed by rate and state friction, analogous to the mechanics of creeping tectonic faults.

  12. Reproducibility of parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Rosas, Ernesto E.; Billings, Stephen A.; Chico, Timothy; Coca, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess microvascular function has shown promising results. An important limitation when using a single source-detector pair, however, is the lack of depth sensitivity. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) overcomes this limitation using an array of sources and detectors that allow the reconstruction of volumetric hemodynamic changes. This study compares the key parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured in the forearm using standard NIRS and DOT. We show that while the mean parameter values are similar for the two techniques, DOT achieves much better reproducibility, as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We show that DOT achieves high reproducibility for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.99), time to maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.94), maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.99), and time to maximal HbT (ICC: 0.99). Absolute reproducibility as measured by the standard error of measurement is consistently smaller and close to zero (ideal value) across all parameters measured by DOT compared to NIRS. We conclude that DOT provides a more robust characterization of the reactive hyperemic response and show how the availability of volumetric hemodynamic changes allows the identification of areas of temporal consistency, which could help characterize more precisely the microvasculature.

  13. Measuring Sensory Reactivity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Application and Simplification of a Clinician-Administered Sensory Observation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavassoli, Teresa; Bellesheim, Katherine; Siper, Paige M.; Wang, A. Ting; Halpern, Danielle; Gorenstein, Michelle; Grodberg, David; Kolevzon, Alexander; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory reactivity is a new DSM-5 criterion for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study aims to validate a clinician-administered sensory observation in ASD, the Sensory Processing Scale Assessment (SPS). The SPS and the Short Sensory Profile (SSP) parent-report were used to measure sensory reactivity in children with ASD (n = 35) and…

  14. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  15. End-of-life nondestructive examination of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorscak, D.A.; Campbell, W.R.; Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    In-bundle and out-of-bundle (single rod) nondestructive examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were performed. In-bundle examinations included visual examination and measurement of rod bow, rod-to-rod gaps, and rod removal forces. Out-of-bundle examinations included rod visuals and measurement of fuel rod length, diameter and ovality, cladding oxide and crud thickness, support grid induced cladding wear mark depth and volume, and fuel rod free hanging bow. The out-of-bundle examination also included ultrasonic inspection for cladding defects, neutron radiography for pellet integrity and plenum gap measurements, and gamma scans for instack axial gap screening and binary fuel stack length measurements. The measurements confirmed design predictions of fuel rod performance and provided evidence of excellent fuel rod performance for operation of Light Water Breeder Reactor to 29,047 effective full power hours (EFPH).

  16. A monobromobimane-based assay to measure the pharmacokinetic profile of reactive sulphide species in blood

    PubMed Central

    Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Langston, William; Bengtsson, Asa; Leviten, Dina; Hill, Paul; Insko, Michael A; Dumpit, Ronald; VandenEkart, Emily; Toombs, Christopher F; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a labile, endogenous metabolite of cysteine, with multiple biological roles. The development of sulphide-based therapies for human diseases will benefit from a reliable method of quantifying H2S in blood and tissues. Experimental approach: Concentrations of reactive sulphide in saline and freshly drawn whole blood were quantified by reaction with the thio-specific derivatization agent monobromobimane, followed by reversed-phase fluorescence HPLC and/or mass spectrometry. In pharmacokinetic studies, male rats were exposed either to intravenous infusions of sodium sulphide or to H2S gas inhalation, and levels of available blood sulphide were measured. Levels of dissolved H2S/HS- were concomitantly measured using an amperometric sensor. Key results: Monobromobimane was found to rapidly and quantitatively derivatize sulphide in saline or whole blood to yield the stable small molecule sulphide dibimane. Extraction and quantification of this bis-bimane derivative were validated via reversed-phase HPLC separation coupled to fluorescence detection, and also by mass spectrometry. Baseline levels of sulphide in blood were in the range of 0.4–0.9 µM. Intravenous administration of sodium sulphide solution (2–20 mg·kg−1·h−1) or inhalation of H2S gas (50–400 ppm) elevated reactive sulphide in blood in a dose-dependent manner. Each 1 mg·kg−1·h−1 of sodium sulphide infusion into rats was found to be pharmacokinetically equivalent to approximately 30 ppm of H2S gas inhalation. Conclusions and implications: The monobromobimane derivatization method is a sensitive and reliable means to measure reactive sulphide species in whole blood. Using this method, we have established a bioequivalence between infused sodium sulphide and inhaled H2S gas. PMID:20590590

  17. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  18. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, Olisse C.

    1990-01-01

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  19. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  20. Pull rod assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a pull rod assembly. It comprises: a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring. The piston device is mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  1. Observation of skin thermal inertia distribution during reactive hyperaemia using a single-hood measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Togawa, T

    2001-02-01

    An attempt was made to image the thermal inertia (defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) of the skin to observe the distribution of blood in the skin during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in normal healthy volunteers. The method was based on the ability to calculate thermal inertia by successive thermographic measurements of the skin after stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature surrounding the skin area. The stepwise change was achieved within 0.1 s through a single hood. Experimentation on the undisturbed volar forearm of normal subjects at the same site showed that the measurements thus achieved were reproducible. The thermal inertia values of forearm skin in normal subjects were scattered throughout the range 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.7 x 10(3) W s(1/2) m(-2) K(-1). Experiments on forearm skin subjected to arterial cuff occlusion indicated that thermal inertia can be detected at a low level of blood perfusion. A linear relationship was observed between thermal inertia and blood perfusion measured by laser Doppler imager before and during blood flow occlusion. During reactive hyperaemia, the thermal inertia image exhibited a non-uniform island-shaped pattern of distribution over the forearm, suggesting that, after release from occlusion, recovery of blood flow is non-uniform. PMID:11236879

  2. Long-Rod Moving-Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2002-07-01

    Understanding the mechanics of interaction of a long rod projectile with a forward moving plate at an angle is essential to understanding long rod interaction with an explosive reactive armor cassette. To investigate the mechanics of such an interaction we use AUTODIN2D/EULER in plane geometry, although the problem is 3D. We assume that this is a satisfactory approximation, as we're only interested in the main features, and are not comparing fine details to experimental results. From the simulations we learn that the interaction never reaches steady state. Initially each material splits into two streams, and the interaction plane is perpendicular to the rod. But with time the interaction plane rotates slowly, until it becomes parallel to the rod, which is then able to continue moving forward without interruption. During this process interacting rod material of length DeltaL is diverted at an angle and becomes ineffective for penetrating the main target. We made many such runs to determine the dependence of DeltaL on the parameters of the problem. This dependence makes it possible to predict DeltaL for a variety of rod-plate situations.

  3. Colour mixing LEDs with short microsphere doped acrylic rods.

    PubMed

    Deller, Chris; Smith, Geoff; Franklin, Jim

    2004-07-26

    The output colour distributions from red, green and blue (RGB) LEDs mixed with cross linked PMMA micro particle doped PMMA mixing rods is compared to output from a plain PMMA mixing rod. Distinctive patterns with clear colour separation result with the undoped rod. These are homogenised by our mixers, resulting in white light. Light output has been photographed, measured and computer simulated at a distance of 10 cm from the output end of the rods.

  4. The Arctic polar stratospheric cloud aerosol - Aircraft measurements of reactive nitrogen, total water, and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    In situ aircraft measurements in the lower stratosphere are used to investigate the reactive nitrogen, NO(y), total water, and particle components of the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) aerosol in the Arctic. The results are compared to findings from the Antarctic derived using similar measurements and interpretive techniques. The Arctic data show that particle volume well above background values is present at temperatures above the frostpoint, confirming the result from the Antarctic that the observed PSCs are not water ice particles. NO(y) measurements inside a PSC are enhanced above ambient values consistent with anisokinetic sampling of particles containing NO(y). In the Arctic data over long segments of several flights, calculations show saturation with respect to nitric acid trihydrate without significant PSC particle growth above background.

  5. Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Species From R/V Knorr During ICEALOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Degouw, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) was an International Polar Year research activity to explore the sources, transport, and chemical processing of aerosol and gas phase species in the Arctic marine boundary layer. Measurements were conducted aboard the research vessel Knorr north of 60 N from March 31 to April 24, 2008. The cruise track included portions of the Norwegian, Barents, and Greenland Seas between 20 W and 30 E. The highest latitude achieved was 80 N, at the sea ice edge north of Svalbard. Measurements of individual reactive nitrogen species included NO, NO2, PAN, PPN, alkyl nitrates (C1-C3), and NOy (but not HNO3). With the exception of ports and near-shore source regions (Kola Peninsula), NOy ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ppbv with a mean value of approximately 0.5 ppbv. The dominant individually measured NOy component was PAN which ranged from 0.05 to 0.35 ppbv with a mean value of approximately 0.24 ppbv. Mixing ratios of PPN ranged from 0.004 to 0.084 ppbv with a mean value of 0.044 ppbv. Mixing ratios of NOx were generally similar to PPN, with some periods when NOx was lower and some periods when PPN was lower. Mixing ratios of alkyl nitrates were typically quite low with 2-propyl nitrate levels higher than ethyl nitrate, which was higher than methyl nitrate. However, there were some episodes when methyl nitrate was present at levels higher than the others. Because HNO3 was not measured individually, we cannot conclude that the reactive nitrogen species budget was balanced. However, if the apparent deficit between the measured NOy and the sum of the individual NOy species is attributed to HNO3, then that compound is present in the Arctic atmosphere at levels substantially higher than previously measured.

  6. TRANC - a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Freibauer, A.

    2012-05-01

    The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr) from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter), which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr) in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO) within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD) for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3-, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal and catalytic

  7. Voltammetric measurements at the surface of cotton: absorption and catalase reactivity of a dinuclear manganese complex.

    PubMed

    Marken, Frank; Taylor, James E; Bonné, Michael J; Helton, Matthew E; Parry, Matthew L; McKee, Vickie

    2007-02-13

    Voltammetric measurements at the surface of cotton fabric were conducted after impregnating the surface of the textile with graphite flakes. The resulting conducting surface contact was connected to a conventional basal plane pyrolytic graphite substrate electrode and employed both in stagnant solution and in rotating disc voltammetry mode. Diffusion through the immobilized cotton sample (inter-fiber) is probed with the aqueous Fe(CN)6(4-/3-) redox system. With a small amount of platinum immobilized at the cotton surface, catalase reactivity toward hydrogen peroxide was observed and used to further quantify the diffusion (intra- and inter-fiber) into the reactive zone at the graphite-cotton interface. A well-known catalase model system, the dinuclear manganese metal complex [Mn(IV)2(micro-O)3L2](PF6)2 (with L=1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), is investigated in aqueous 0.1 M carbonate buffer at pH 9.8 in contact with cotton fabric. Absorption of the metal complex is monitored and quantified by voltammetric methods. A Langmurian binding constant of approximately K=2x103 M-1 was determined. Voltammetric measurements of the adsorbed metal complex reveal strong absorption and chemically irreversible reduction characteristics similar to those observed in solution. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, catalyst coverage dependent anodic catalase activity was observed approximately following the rate law rate=k[catalyst]surface[H2O2]solution and with k=3x104 dm3 s-1 mol-1. The catalyst reactivity was modified by the presence of cotton.

  8. Reactivity of Dogs' Brain Oscillations to Visual Stimuli Measured with Non-Invasive Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Törnqvist, Heini; Somppi, Sanni; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M.; Vainio, Outi; Kujala, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Studying cognition of domestic dogs has gone through a renaissance within the last decades. However, although the behavioral studies of dogs are beginning to be common in the field of animal cognition, the neural events underlying cognition remain unknown. Here, we employed a non-invasive electroencephalography, with adhesive electrodes attached to the top of the skin, to measure brain activity of from 8 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) while they stayed still to observe photos of dog and human faces. Spontaneous oscillatory activity of the dogs, peaking in the sensors over the parieto-occipital cortex, was suppressed statistically significantly during visual task compared with resting activity at the frequency of 15–30 Hz. Moreover, a stimulus-induced low-frequency (∼2–6 Hz) suppression locked to the stimulus onset was evident at the frontal sensors, possibly reflecting a motor rhythm guiding the exploratory eye movements. The results suggest task-related reactivity of the macroscopic oscillatory activity in the dog brain. To our knowledge, the study is the first to reveal non-invasively measured reactivity of brain electrophysiological oscillations in healthy dogs, and it has been based purely on positive operant conditional training, without the need for movement restriction or medication. PMID:23650504

  9. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  10. Correlation of total antioxidant capacity with reactive oxygen species (ROS) consumption measured by oxidative conversion.

    PubMed

    Çekiç, Sema Demirci; Çetinkaya, Aydan; Avan, Aslı Neslihan; Apak, Reşat

    2013-06-01

    Although both antioxidant capacity and oxidative conversion (hazard) are important in food and bioanalytical chemistry, there is considerable confusion in the literature between the results of these two types of assays. After the generation of ROS in the medium via Fe(III)-H₂O₂ reaction, attenuation of total oxidative conversion (TOC; as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPD) assays) was tested for possible correlation with the total antioxidant capacity (TAC; as measured by cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ABTS/TEAC) assays) of the introduced antioxidant sample. The inverse relationship between oxidative conversion and antioxidant capacity was processed to establish a curvilinear relationship between the absolute values of TAC increments and TOC decrements as a function of added antioxidant concentration. This simple relationship may form a bridge between the two diverse disciplines of medical biochemistry and food analytical chemistry mainly using TOC and TAC results, respectively.

  11. Measurements of total reactive nitrogen during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Anderson, L. C.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    Composite distributions of measured total reactive nitrogen NO(y), from the NASA ER-2 during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition are presented. The observed features of these distributions are discussed in terms of the controlling dynamical, chemical and microphysical processes. In the latitudinal profile from 58 deg N to within about 4 deg poleward of the polar vortex boundary, NO(y) conforms closely to predictions of NO(y) based on N2O measurements. Poleward of 5 deg of latitude within the boundary, the average NO(y) decreases sharply and is significantly lower than that predicted from N2O. This feature is consistent with loss of NO(y) through sedimentation of particles containing NO(y) in polar stratospheric clouds.

  12. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  13. Rod sequence advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.M. ); Lu, Yi ); Furia, R.V.; Thompson, R.J. ); Lin, Ching-lu )

    1992-01-01

    During startup and power shaping maneuvers of boiling water reactors (BWR's), control rods are sequentially withdrawn from the reactor core. The withdrawal sequences determine the overall reactor power and the local core power density and are based on the knowledge of station engineers. It is important that the control rods are withdrawn in such a manner that the local power level does not become excessive while the desired reactor power is generated. Rules that constrain the relative positions of control rod groups have been developed to do this. While these rules are relatively simple, applying them to all possible movements of the 17 control rod groups in a typical BWR is complex and time consuming. SMARTRODS, is a rule based pilot expert system, was developed in LISP for the determination of the rod sequences.

  14. TRANC - a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Freibauer, A.

    2011-12-01

    The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (N) from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for the measurement of total reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter), which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of total Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO) within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced N compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised N compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate N is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher N oxides or those originated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD) for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3-, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal and catalytic conversions to NO

  15. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  16. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  17. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  18. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  19. The attenuation of rod signals by bleachings

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Rushton, W. A. H.; Torii, S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Contrast flash technique allows the rod threshold to be measured even when it lies far above the cone threshold. In this way the rod dark adaptation curve after rhodopsin bleaching can be measured over 6 log units. 2. By retinal densitometry the regeneration of rhodopsin can be measured in the same subject. It is found that the log threshold is raised 1·2 units for each 10% of rhodopsin in the bleached state. 3. We have tried to discover whether bleaching raises the threshold by desensitizing the rods, or (like backgrounds) by attenuating their signals. Neither suggestion satisfies all conditions. 4. All are satisfied by [Formula: see text], where N is the size of rod signal, constant for threshold; θ, θD are steady backgrounds of light and receptor noise; ϕ is the threshold flash with σ a constant of about 2·5 log td sec; B the fraction of pigment in the bleached state. PMID:5499030

  20. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    PubMed

    Hill, Edward; Han, David; Dumouchel, Pierre; Dehak, Najim; Quatieri, Thomas; Moehs, Charles; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Giordano, John; Simpatico, Thomas; Barh, Debmalya; Blum, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX) as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality") in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP) and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™). We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01), and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction. PMID:23874860

  1. The Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale: Measurement Invariance, Stability, and Validity in Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlotz, Wolff; Yim, Ilona S.; Zoccola, Peggy M.; Jansen, Lars; Schulz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. We here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a…

  2. Differentiating Challenge Reactivity from Psychomotor Activity in Studies of Children's Psychophysiology: Considerations for Theory and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nicole R.; Alkon, Abbey; Obradovic, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338).…

  3. C-reactive Protein: Repeated Measurements will Improve Dialysis Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Gabriela; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a common feature in the uremic phenotype and associates with poor outcomes. The awareness regarding the importance of inflammation assessment in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has risen in recent years, and despite the development of novel biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) is still the most measured inflammatory parameter. Notwithstanding, the possible weak points of CRP determination, this biomarker has demonstrated being useful both for guidance in clinical practice and for risk estimation. In addition, regular determination of CRP among dialysis patients has been associated with better outcomes in different dialysis facilities. Because persistent inflammation may be a silent reflection of various pathophysiologic alterations in CKD, it is crucial that inflammatory markers are regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target this inflammation.

  4. In situ simple method for measuring size and density of nanoparticles in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kita, Makoto; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yukio

    2006-04-15

    A laser-light-scattering (LLS) method for measuring the size and density of nanoparticles generated in reactive plasmas has been developed. The size and density of the nanoparticles are determined from their thermal coagulation that takes place after turning off the discharge. The measurable size and density range of the LLS method is n{sub p} x 10{sup 13} (m{sup -3/2})xd{sub p}{sup -5/2}L{sup -2}n{sub g}{sup -1}, where n{sub p}, d{sub p}, L, and n{sub g} are the density, size, and diffusion length of the nanoparticles, and the density of a background gas, respectively. The method has been demonstrated by measurement of the size and density of nanoparticles formed by the radio-frequency discharge of dimethyldimethoxysilane Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2} diluted with Ar. Using a simple optical setup for the LLS measurement, nanoparticles are detected down to {approx_equal}1 nm in size when they are generated at a density of {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The developed method is widely applicable to other systems in which thermal coagulation takes place.

  5. Measurements of nitric oxide and total reactive nitrogen in the Antarctic stratosphere: Observations and chemical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, D.W.; Kelly, K.K. ); Murphy, D.M.; Proffitt, M.H.; Eubank, C.S. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); Ko, M.K.W. ); Ferry, G.V.; Lowenstein, M.; Chan, K.R. )

    1989-11-30

    Measurements of NO and the sum of reactive nitrogen species, NO{sub y}, were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) on flights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft over the Antarctic continent. Reactive nitrogen species include NO,NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, HNO{sub 3}, and ClONO{sub 2}. The technique utilized the conversion of NO{sub y} components to NO on a gold catalyst and the subsequent detection of NO by the chemiluminescent reaction of NO with O{sub 3}. NO was measured on two of the flights by removing the catalyst from the sample line. The boundary of a chemically perturbed region (CPR) above the continent occurred on average near 66{degree}S as indicated by a sharp increase in the level of ClO. Outside or equatorward of the CPR, NO{sub y} mixing ratios ranged between 6 and 12 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), with values increasing with latitude. At the edge of the CPR, large latitude gradients of NO{sub y}and NO were found with values decreasing poleward. Total NO{sub y} levels dropped to 4 ppbv or less within 5{degree} poleward of the boundary. NO values were 0.1-0.2 ppbv outside and below the detection limit of 0.03 ppbv inside the CPR. The levels of NO and NO{sub y} observed preclude a chemical loss of ozone due to reaction with NO.

  6. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    by means of either its relative position with respect to the constraint axis (contact-free segments) or its angular position on the constraint surface (continuous contacts.) This formulation circumvents both drawbacks that afflict the conventional Lagrangian approach associated with the segmentation strategy. As the a priori unknown domain, viz. the rod length, is substituted for the known constraint axis, the free boundary problem and the associated isoperimetric constraints are converted into a classical two-point boundary value problem. Additionally, the description of the rod deflection by means of its eccentricity with respect to the constraint axis trivializes the assessment of the unilateral contact condition. Along continuous contacts, this formulation expresses the strain variables, measuring the rod change of shape, in terms of the geometric invariants of the constraint surface, and emphasizes the influence of the constraint local geometry on the reaction pressure. Formalizing the segmentation strategy, a computational model that exploits the Eulerian formulation of the rod governing equations is devised. To solve the quasi-static deflection of elastic rods constrained inside or around a tube-like surface, this computational model identifies the number of contacts, their nature (either discrete or continuous), and the rod configuration at the connections that satisfies the unilateral contact condition and preserves the rod integrity along the sequence of elementary problems.

  7. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  8. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga

    2016-01-01

    "Predecisional information distortion" occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed "stepwise evolution of preference" (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option ("proleader" distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option ("antitrailer" distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture ("reactivity"). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs ("cues") in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its constituent processes, limiting

  9. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga

    2016-01-01

    "Predecisional information distortion" occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed "stepwise evolution of preference" (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option ("proleader" distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option ("antitrailer" distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture ("reactivity"). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs ("cues") in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its constituent processes, limiting

  10. Why rods and cones?

    PubMed

    Lamb, T D

    2016-02-01

    Under twenty-first-century metropolitan conditions, almost all of our vision is mediated by cones and the photopic system, yet cones make up barely 5% of our retinal photoreceptors. This paper looks at reasons why we additionally possess rods and a scotopic system, and asks why rods comprise 95% of our retinal photoreceptors. It considers the ability of rods to reliably signal the arrival of individual photons of light, as well as the ability of the retina to process these single-photon signals, and it discusses the advantages that accrue. Drawbacks in the arrangement, including the very slow dark adaptation of scotopic vision, are also considered. Finally, the timing of the evolution of cone and rod photoreceptors, the retina, and the camera-style eye is summarised.

  11. Accelerating flow propagator measurements for the investigation of reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourne, A. A.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.

    2016-11-01

    NMR propagator measurements are widely used for identifying the distribution of molecular displacements over a given observation time, characterising a flowing system. However, where high q-space resolution is required, the experiments are time consuming and therefore unsuited to the study of dynamic systems. Here, it is shown that with an appropriately sampled subset of the q-space points in a high-resolution flow propagator measurement, one can quickly and robustly reconstruct the fully sampled propagator through interpolation of the acquired raw data. It was found that exponentially sampling ∼4% of the original data-points allowed a reconstruction with the deviation from the fully sampled propagator below the noise level, in this case reducing the required experimental time from ∼2.8 h to <7 min. As a demonstration, this approach is applied to observe the temporal evolution of the reactive flow of acid through an Estaillades rock core plug. It is shown that 'wormhole' formation in the rock core plug provides a channel for liquid flow such that the remaining pore space is by-passed, thereby causing the flow velocity of the liquid in the remaining part of the plug to become stagnant. The propagator measurements are supported by both 1D profiles and 2D imaging data. Such insights are of importance in understanding well acidisation and CO2 sequestration processes.

  12. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  13. Flexible sucker rod unit

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.F.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a deep well having: a. an education tube with an inside diameter extending from the surface of the earth to far below the surface, b. a reciprocating pump housing attached to the bottom of the education tube, c. pump jack means at the surface for reciprocating the pump, d. a light sucker rod connected to the pump jack means and extending into the education tube, and e. a series of heavy sinker bars having a large cross sectional area in the education tube connecting the light sucker rod to the pump; f. an improved integral metal flexible rod unit interconnecting the sinker bars comprising in combination with the above: g. a coupling on each end of the integral metal flexible rod unit connecting the flexible rod unit to the contiguous sinker bar, h. a segment which is flexible as compared to the sinker bars connecting one of the couplings to i. an integral metal bearing adjacent to the other of the couplings, the bearing having j. a cylindrical surface with k. a diameter i. only slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the education tube thereby forming a sliding fit therewith, and ii. greater than the diameter of any other portion of the flexible rod unit and the sinker bar, and l. grooves in the cylindrical surface for the passage of fluid between in the education tube around the bearing.

  14. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  15. Polished rod liner puller assmbly

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, B.V.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes a polished rod liner puller assembly operable with a well casing head assembly to remove a polished rod liner member of a polished rod liner assembly from a well. It comprises: a work table assembly operable to be placed around the well casing head assembly and enclose the polished rod liner assembly; a base plate assembly mounted on the work table assembly; a piston and cylinder jack assembly mounted on the base plate assembly and extended upwardly therefrom; and a winged rod clamp assembly connectable to the piston and cylinder jack assembly and to a polished rod member of the polished rod liner assembly and operable on actuation of the piston and cylinder jack assembly to axially move the polished rod member and the polished rod liner member to remove the polished rod liner member from the well.

  16. Influence of control rod worth interactions on LMFBR control systems design

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, J. A.; Rittenberger, R. V.; Rathbun, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    These design criteria are interpreted to define the reactivity worth requirements for the primary and secondary control systems in terms of the minimum control systems capability under faulted conditions which will assure that the reactor can be safely shut down. The faulted conditions are postulated to occur upon the simultaneous failure of one of the redundant safety control systems to scram, a stuck rod in the scramming system, and a reactivity insertion resulting from the uncontrolled withdrawal of the highest worth control rod inserted in the reactor. The resulting positive reactivity insertion from the rod runout envelopes other postulated operational faults and is imposed on the shutdown requirements of both the primary and secondary control systems. In order to determine the minimum shutdown capability, an evaluation is made of the worst combination of control rod runout (reactivity fault) and stuck rod worth.

  17. Measurements of nitric oxide and total reactive nitrogen in the Antarctic stratosphere - Observations and chemical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Murphy, D. M.; Proffitt, M. H.; Eubank, C. S.; Ko, M. K. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements of NO and the sum of reactive nitrogen species, NO(y), which include NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, and ClONO2 (in addition to ClO, O3, H2O, and N2O measurements), obtained aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft flying over the Antarctica between the latitudes of 53 and 72 deg S during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The boundary of the chemically perturbed region (CPR), as indicated by a sharp increase in the level of ClO, occurred near 66 deg S; outside or equatorward of the CPR, the NO(y) mixing ratios ranged between 6 and 12 ppbv, with values decreasing poleward and reaching total NO(y) levels of 4 ppbv or less within 5-deg poleward of the boundary. Data presented in this paper clearly associate the Antarctic ozone decrease with perturbed conditions of ClO, NO(y), and H2O, which are in turn associated with processes defined as nonstandard heterogeneous chemistry, denitrification, and dehydration, respectively.

  18. C-reactive protein and fibrin clot strength measured by thrombelastography after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Breall, Jeffrey A; Lu, Deshun; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Bolad, Islam; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the progression of coronary artery disease and the molecular processes of inflammation and thrombosis are closely intertwined. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with an elevated risk of adverse ischaemic events after coronary stenting and hypercoagulability. Heightened whole blood clot strength measured by thrombelastography (TEG) has been associated with adverse ischaemic events after stenting. We intended to examine the relationship of CRP to plasma fibrin clot strength in patients after coronary stenting. Plasma fibrin clot strength was measured by TEG in 54 patients 16-24 h after undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coagulation was induced in citrated plasma by addition of kaolin and CaCl2. Plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Increasing quartiles of CRP were associated with increasing levels of maximal plasma fibrin clot strength measured by TEG (P < 0.001) and increasing BMI (P = 0.04). Patients in the highest quartile of CRP had significantly higher maximal fibrin clot strength (G) than the patients in the lowest quartile (G: 3438 ± 623 vs. 2184 ± 576 dyn/cm, P < 0.0001). Fibrinogen concentration was not significantly different across quartiles of CRP (P = 0.97). Patients with established coronary artery disease undergoing coronary stenting who have elevated CRP after PCI exhibit heightened maximal plasma fibrin clot strength as compared with those with low CRP. Thrombotic risk associated with elevated CRP may be linked to procoagulant changes and high tensile fibrin clot strength independent of fibrinogen concentration.

  19. Monitoring shipping emissions with MAX-DOAS measurements of reactive trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittrock, Folkard; Peters, Enno; Seyler, André; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Burrows, John P.; Chirkov, Maksym; Meier, Andreas C.; Richter, Andreas; Schönhardt, Anja; Schmolke, Stefan; Theobald, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution from ships contributes to overall air quality problems and it has direct health effects on the population in particular in coastal regions, and in harbor cities. In order to reduce the emissions the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) have tightened the regulations for air pollution. E.g. Sulfur Emission Control Areas (SECA) have been introduced where the sulfur content of marine fuel is limited. However, up to now there is no regular monitoring system available to verify that ships are complying with the new regulations. Furthermore measurements of reactive trace gases in marine environments are in general sparse. The project MeSMarT (Measurements of shipping emissions in the marine troposphere, www.mesmart.de) has been established as a cooperation between the University of Bremen and the German Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency) with support of the Helmholtz Research Centre Geesthacht to estimate the influence of ship emissions on the chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer and to establish a monitoring system for main shipping routes. Here we present MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 and SO2 carried out during ship campaigns in the North and Baltic Sea and from two permanent sites close to the Elbe river (Wedel, Germany) and on the island Neuwerk close to the mouths of Elbe and Weser river. Mixing ratios of both trace gases have been retrieved using different approaches (pure geometric and taking into account the radiative transfer) and compared to in situ and air borne observations (see Kattner et al., Monitoring shipping emissions with in-situ measurements of trace gases, and Meier et al., Airborne measurements of NO2 shipping emissions using imaging DOAS) observations. Furthermore simple approaches have been used to calculate emission factors of NOx and SO2 for single ships.

  20. New Directions in Measuring Reactive and Proactive Aggression: Validation of a Teacher Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Thomaes, Sander; van Aken, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The well-known distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is theoretically important but empirically controversial. Recently, aggression researchers have argued that we should separate the form and function of aggression to make a clearer distinction between reactive and proactive aggression. This article describes the validation of a…

  1. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    under a metre of sodium. 4 poles will have been required for this operation: - a pole for draining the rod and uncovering the bearing surface, - a borescope pole, - a pole for cleaning the bearing surface, - a pole for inspecting the bearing surface. The operation resulted in a very satisfactory bearing capacity of approx. 80 daN. This paper also examines the history of contamination of the control rod and the rod mechanism. It outlines the hypotheses for the source of this contamination and the measures taken to counteract this problem. (authors)

  2. Nonlinearity and noise at the rod - rod bipolar cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, E. Brady; Casti, Alexander R.R.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, rod bipolar (RBP) cells synapse with many rods, and suppression of rod outer segment and synaptic noise is necessary for their detection of rod single photon responses (SPRs). Depending on the rods’ signal to noise ratio (SNR), the suppression mechanism will likely eliminate some SPRs as well, resulting in decreased quantum efficiency. We examined this synapse in rabbit, where 100 rods converge onto each RBP. Suction electrode recordings showed that rabbit rod SPRs were difficult to distinguish from noise (independent SNR estimates were 2.3 and 2.8). Nonlinear transmission from rods to RBPs improved response detection (SNR = 8.7), but a large portion of the rod SPRs were discarded. For the dimmest flashes, the loss approached 90%. Despite the high rejection ratio, noise of two distinct types were apparent in the RBP traces: low amplitude rumblings and discrete events that resembled the SPR. The SPR-like event frequency suggests they result from thermal isomerizations of rhodopsin, which occured at the rate 0.033 s−1rod−1. The presence of low amplitude noise is explained by a sigmoidal input-output relationship at the rod - RBP synapse and the input of noisy rods. The rabbit rod SNR and RBP quantum efficiency are the lowest yet reported, suggesting that the quantum efficiency of the rod - RBP synapse may depend on the SNR in rods. These results point to the possibility that fewer photoisomerizations are discarded for species such as primate, which has a higher rod SNR. PMID:21047445

  3. A High Precision Method for Quantitative Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species in Frozen Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Mikael; Gustafsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Objective An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH) was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. Materials and Methods Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K) using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP•) with known spin concentration. Results The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1). The spin concentration of samples stored at −80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. Conclusion The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time. PMID:24603936

  4. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  5. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.; Gregurech, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  6. Direct measurement of the chemical reactivity of silicon electrodes with LiPF6-based battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Baggetto, Loic; Sacci, Robert L; Unocic, Raymond R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Browning, Jim

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the chemistry and extent of reactivity between a lithium ion battery electrode surface (Si) and a liquid electrolyte (1.2M LiPF6-3:7 wt% ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate). This layer is estimated to be 3.6 nm thick and partially originates from the consumption of the silicon surface.

  7. Intraoperative pulmonary embolism of Harrington rod during spinal surgery: the potential dangers of rod cutting.

    PubMed

    Aylott, Caspar E W; Hassan, Kamran; McNally, Donal; Webb, John K

    2006-12-01

    This is a case report and laboratory-based biomechanics study. The objective is to report the first case of Titanium rod embolisation during scoliosis surgery into the Pulmonary artery. To investigate the potential of an unconstrained cut Titanium rod fragment to cause wounding with reference to recognised weapons. Embolisation of a foreign body to the heart is rare. Bullet embolisation to the heart and lungs is infrequently reported in the last 80 years. Iatrogenic cases of foreign body embolisation are very rare. Fifty 1-2 cm segments of Titanium rod were cut in an unconstrained manner and a novel method was used to calculate velocity. A high-speed camera (6,000 frames/s) was used to further measure velocity and study projectile motion. The wounding potential was investigated using lambs liver, high-speed photography and local dissection. Rod velocities were measured in excess of 23 m s(-1). Rods were seen to tumble end-over-end with a maximum speed of 560 revolutions/s. The maximum kinetic energy was 0.61 J which is approximately 2% that of a crossbow. This is sufficient to cause significant liver damage. The degree of surface damage and internal disruption was influenced by the orientation of the rod fragment at impact. An unconstrained cut segment of a Titanium rod has a significant potential to wound. Precautions should be taken to avoid this potentially disastrous but preventable complication.

  8. Micrometeorological measurements of ammonia and total reactive nitrogen exchange over semi-natural peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Schrader, Frederik; Kutsch, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Intensive agriculture generates a substantial atmospheric burden for nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as peatlands when the latter are located in close vicinity to arable sites and animal houses. The exchange of reactive nitrogen compounds between these bog ecosystems and the atmosphere is still not very well understood due to the lack of suitable measurement techniques. With recent advancements in laser spectrometry, we used a quantum cascade laser spectrometer as well as a custom-built total reactive atmospheric nitrogen (ΣNr) converter (TRANC) coupled to a fast-response chemiluminescence detector to measure NH3 and ΣNr concentrations, respectively. The analyzers' high temporal resolution allowed for determination of the respective nitrogen exchange within eddy covariance-based setups. Field campaigns were conducted at a northwestern German peatland site that is surrounded by an area of highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). The field site is part of a natural park with a very small remaining protected zone of less than 2 km x 2 km. Ammonia and ΣNr concentrations were highly variable between 2 to 110 ppb and 10 to 120 ppb, respectively. Peak values coincided with main fertilization periods on the neighboring agricultural land in early spring and fall. The trend in weekly averaged ΣNr concentrations from TRANC measurements was in good agreement with results from KAPS denuder filter systems when the latter were combined with the missing and apparently highly variable NOx contribution. Wind direction and land use in the closer vicinity clearly regulated whether ΣNr concentrations were NH3 or NOx-dominated. Ammonia uptake rates between 40 ng N m-2 s-1 and near-neutral exchange were observed. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~700 g N ha-1 resulting in a dry net deposition of ~4 kg N ha-1 when extrapolated to an entire year, whereas KAPS denuder measurements in combination with dry

  9. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  10. Monolayers of hard rods on planar substrates. I. Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Oettel, M; Klopotek, M; Dixit, M; Empting, E; Schilling, T; Hansen-Goos, H

    2016-08-21

    The equilibrium properties of hard rod monolayers are investigated in a lattice model (where position and orientation of a rod are restricted to discrete values) as well as in an off-lattice model featuring spherocylinders with continuous positional and orientational degrees of freedom. Both models are treated using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Upon increasing the density of rods in the monolayer, there is a continuous ordering of the rods along the monolayer normal ("standing up" transition). The continuous transition also persists in the case of an external potential which favors flat-lying rods in the monolayer. This behavior is found in both the lattice and the continuum models. For the lattice model, we find very good agreement between the results from the specific DFT used (lattice fundamental measure theory) and simulations. The properties of lattice fundamental measure theory are further illustrated by the phase diagrams of bulk hard rods in two and three dimensions. PMID:27544121

  11. Comparing cerebrovascular reactivity measured using BOLD and cerebral blood flow MRI: The effect of basal vascular tension on vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reactivity.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sheliza; Kwinta, Jonathan B; Golestani, Ali M; Khatamian, Yasha B; Chen, J Jean

    2015-04-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is an important metric of cerebrovascular health. While the BOLD fMRI method in conjunction with carbon-dioxide (CO2) based vascular manipulation has been the most commonly used, the BOLD signal is not a direct measure of vascular changes, and the use of arterial-spin labeling (ASL) cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging is increasingly advocated. Nonetheless, given the differing dependencies of BOLD and CBF on vascular baseline conditions and the diverse CO2 manipulation types currently used in the literature, knowledge of potential biases introduced by each technique is critical for the interpretation of CVR measurements. In this work, we use simultaneous BOLD-CBF acquisitions during both vasodilatory (hypercapnic) and vasoconstrictive (hypocapnic) stimuli to measure CVR. We further imposed different levels of baseline vascular tension by inducing hypercapnic and hypocapnic baselines, separately from normocapnia by 4mmHg. We saw significant and diverse dependencies on vascular stimulus and baseline condition in both BOLD and CBF CVR measurements: (i) BOLD-based CVR is more sensitive to basal vascular tension than CBF-based CVR; (ii) the use of a combination of vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive stimuli maximizes the sensitivity of CBF-based CVR to vascular tension changes; (iii) the BOLD and CBF vascular response delays are both significantly lengthened at predilated baseline. As vascular tension can often be altered by potential pathology, our findings are important considerations when interpreting CVR measurements in health and disease.

  12. Is Intensive Measurement of Body Image Reactive? A Two-Study Evaluation Using Ecological Momentary Assessment Suggests Not

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Kristin E.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Intensive assessment methods (e.g., Ecological Momentary Assessment [EMA]) are increasingly used to capture body image experiences in daily life. One concern with EMA is multiple assessments may increase reactivity to internal or external cues, potentially biasing measurement. Reactivity to EMA was evaluated in two studies (Study 1: N = 63 female undergraduates, Study 2: N = 131 women with high body dissatisfaction/disordered eating). Participants completed five daily surveys on handheld computers for 1–2 weeks and body image-related questionnaires at the start and end of each study. Results showed no systematic changes in pre- and post-EMA measures or momentary EMA reports, suggesting women were not reactive to the EMA protocols. Completing 1–2 weeks of EMA does not appear to affect body dissatisfaction, mood, or attitudes in non-clinical or at-risk samples of women. These studies provide evidence that EMA methods can be used to assess real-world body image experiences without undue concern about measurement reactivity. PMID:22999225

  13. Welded oil well pump rod

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.F.

    1986-06-10

    A friction welded multiple component oil well sucker rod is described which consists of an elongated cylindrical rod section and apposed coupling end portions welded to opposite ends of the rod section, the coupling end portions being of a nominal maximum diameter at least 1.5 times greater than the rod section and including means for connecting the sucker rod to an adjacent rod in end to end relationship. The couplings end portions each include an axial tapered portion between the connecting means and an end face adapted to be butted to the rod section, the coupling end portions being butted against the opposed end portions of the rod section during a friction welding operation to form a radially outward projecting bulge of displaced material on the rod section and the coupling end portions, respectively. A greater cross-sectional area is formed at the transition of the rod section to the coupling end portion to reduce the unit tensile stress on the sucker rod in the vicinity of the weld, wherein the displaced material is machined to form a tapered surface between the rod section and the axial tapered portion of the coupling end portion, the tapered surface having an angle of taper with respect to the longitudinal axis of the sucker rod less than the angle of taper of the coupling end portion.

  14. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Part 2. Assessment of airtrak as a reactivity analyzer. Final report for the second year, March 1, 1994-February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Hurley, M.D.; Japar, S.M.; Chang, T.

    1996-06-13

    During the second year of the GM smog chamber study of incremental reactivity the authors performed smog chamber experiments to measure three important properties of incremental reactivity. First, they challenged the linear relationship between the Carter factors and the chamber-measured reactivities found during the first-year smog chamber study. Second, they compared the predicted and measured smog formation in simple and complex mixtures. Third, they measured the incremental reactivities of three hydrocarbons (n-butane, propene, and p-xylene) as well as the urban-surrogate mixture at three different temperatures, 22 deg C, 32 deg C (the default), and 42 deg C, to determine how temperature affects both the absolute and the relative reactivity. Finally, they conducted experiments in which the incremental reactivity of NO2 was measured in order to test the Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model.

  15. Closed form expressions for crack mouth displacements and stress intensity factors for chevron notched short bar and short rod specimens based on experimental compliance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubsey, R. T.; Orange, T. W.; Pierce, W. S.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A set of equations are presented describing certain fracture mechanics parameters for chevron notch bar and rod specimens. They are developed by fitting compliance calibration data reported earlier. The equations present the various parameters in their most useful forms. The data encompass the entire range of the specimen geometries most commonly used. Their use will facilitate the testing and analysis of brittle metals, ceramics, and glasses.

  16. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  17. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  18. Measurement and modeling of engineered nanoparticle transport and aging dynamics in a reactive porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftaly, Aviv; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    A continuous time random walk particle tracking (CTRW-PT) method was employed to model flow cell experiments that measured transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a reactive porous medium. The experiments involved a water-saturated medium containing negatively charged, polyacrylamide beads, resembling many natural soils and aquifer materials, and having the same refraction index as water. Negatively and positively charged ENPs were injected into a uniform flow field in a 3-D horizontal flow cell, and the spatial and temporal concentrations of the evolving ENP plumes were obtained via image analysis. As a benchmark, and to calibrate the model, Congo red tracer was employed in 1-D column and 3-D flow cell experiments, containing the same beads. Negatively charged Au and Ag ENPs demonstrated migration patterns resembling those of the tracer but were slightly more dispersive; the transport was well represented by the CTRW-PT model. In contrast, positively charged AgNPs displayed an unusual behavior: establishment of an initial plume of essentially immobilized ENPs, followed by development of a secondary, freely migrating plume. The mobile plume was found to contain ENPs that, with aging, exhibited aggregation and charge inversion, becoming negatively charged and mobile. In this case, the CTRW-PT model was modified to include a probabilistic law for particle immobilization, to account for the decreasing tendency (over distance and time) of the positively charged AgNPs to attach to the porous medium. The agreement between experimental results and modeling suggests that the CTRW-PT framework can account for the non-Fickian and surface-charge-dependent transport and aging exhibited by ENPs in porous media.

  19. A reassessment of Antarctic plateau reactive nitrogen based on ANTCI 2003 airborne and ground based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Douglas D.; Seelig, Jon; Huey, Greg; Crawford, Jim; Chen, Gao; Wang, Yuhang; Buhr, Marty; Helmig, Detlev; Neff, William; Blake, Don; Arimoto, Rich; Eisele, Fred

    The first airborne measurements of nitric oxide (NO) on the Antarctic plateau have demonstrated that the previously reported elevated levels of this species extend well beyond the immediate vicinity of South Pole. Although the current database is still relatively weak and critical laboratory experiments are still needed, the findings here suggest that the chemical uniqueness of the plateau may be substantially greater than first reported. For example, South Pole ground-based findings have provided new evidence showing that the dominant process driving the release of nitrogen from the snowpack during the spring/summer season (post-depositional loss) is photochemical in nature with evaporative processes playing a lesser role. There is also new evidence suggesting that nitrogen, in the form of nitrate, may undergo multiple recycling within a given photochemical season. Speculation here is that this may be a unique property of the plateau and much related to its having persistent cold temperatures even during summer. These conditions promote the efficient adsorption of molecules like HNO 3 (and very likely HO 2NO 2) onto snow-pack surface ice where we have hypothesized enhanced photochemical processing can occur, leading to the efficient release of NO x to the atmosphere. In addition, to these process-oriented tentative conclusions, the findings from the airborne studies, in conjunction with modeling exercises suggest a new paradigm for the plateau atmosphere. The near-surface atmosphere over this massive region can be viewed as serving as much more than a temporary reservoir or holding tank for imported chemical species. It defines an immense atmospheric chemical reactor which is capable of modifying the chemical characteristics of select atmospheric constituents. This reactor has most likely been in place over geological time, and may have led to the chemical modulation of some trace species now found in ice cores. Reactive nitrogen has played a critical role in both

  20. Class D sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Woodings, R. T.

    1984-10-23

    It has been found that API Class D sucker rods can be made inexpensively from low-alloy, low-cost steel by following a suitable induction-normalizing process and using a suitable steel to which there has been added 0.07 to 0.15 percent of vanadium.

  1. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12 to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  2. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1984-01-01

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  3. Dynamic, multiaxial impact response of confined and unconfined ceramic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Grady, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    A new configuration for impact testing was implemented which yielded time-resolved measurements of the dynamic response of materials undergoing multiaxial strain. With this`-Method, one end of an initially stationary rod (ie., right circular cylinder) of test material was subjected to planar impact with a flat-faced projectile. The test rod was either free (unconfined) or mounted within a close-fitting sleeve which provided lateral confinement. Velocity interferometer diagnostics monitored the axial (longitudinal) velocity of the rod free end, and the transverse (radial) velocity for one or more points on the periphery of the rod or confinement sleeve. Analysis of the resultant velocity records allowed assessment of material properties, such as wave speeds and compressive yield strength, without the requirement of intact recovery of the rod. Data were obtained for alumina (Coors AD-99.5) rods in a series of tests involving variations in confinement and peak impact stress.

  4. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  5. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  6. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  7. QUALITATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF IGE AND IGG IN HUMAN ASTHMATIC SERUM FOR MOLD REACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rational: Molds have the ability to induce allergic asthma-like responses in mouse models; however, their role in human disease is unclear. This study was to develop a screening tool for reactivity of human sera to mold extracts by using a minimal amount of sera for a qual...

  8. Cerebrovascular Reactivity Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongxia; Rodgers, Zachary B.; Kuo, Anderson H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) quantified with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques. Materials and Methods Sixteen healthy volunteers (age: 37.8±14.3 years; 6 women and 10 men; education attainment: 17+2.1 years) were recruited and completed a 5% CO2 gas-mixture breathing paradigm at 3T field strength. ASL and BOLD images were acquired for CVR determination assuming that mild hypercapnia does not affect the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Both CVR quantifications were derived as the ratio of the fractional cerebral blood flow (CBF) or BOLD signal change over the change in end-tidal CO2 pressure. Results The absolute CBF, BOLD and CVR measures were consistent with literature values. CBF derived CVR was 5.11 ± 0.87%/mmHg in gray matter (GM) and 4.64 ± 0.37%/mmHg in parenchyma. BOLD CVR was 0.23±0.04 %/mmHg and 0.22±0.04 %/mmHg for GM and parenchyma respectively. The most significant correlations between BOLD and CBF-based CVRs were also in GM structures, with greater vascular response in occipital cortex than in frontal and parietal lobes (6.8 %/mmHg versus 4.5 %/mmHg, 50% greater). Parenchymal BOLD CVR correlated significantly with the fractional change in CBF in response to hypercapnia (r=0.61, P=0.01), suggesting the BOLD response to be significantly flow driven. GM CBF decreased with age in room air (-5.58 mL/100g/min per decade for GM; r=-0.51, P=0.05), but there was no association of CBF with age during hypercapnia. A trend toward increased pCASL CVR with age was observed, scaling as 0.64 %/mmHg per decade for GM. Conclusion Consistent with previously reported CVR values, our results suggest that BOLD and CBF CVR techniques are complementary to each other in evaluating neuronal and vascular underpinning of hemodynamic processes. PMID:25708263

  9. Measurement of affective state during chronic nicotine treatment and withdrawal by affective taste reactivity in mice: the role of endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Wing, Victoria C; Cagniard, Barbara; Murphy, Niall P; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2009-10-01

    Despite tobacco being highly addictive, it is unclear if nicotine has significant affective properties. To address this, we studied taste reactions to gustatory stimuli, palatable sucrose and unpalatable quinine, which are believed to reflect ongoing affective state. Taste reactivity was assessed during chronic nicotine administration and spontaneous withdrawal and the role of the endogenous cannabinoids was also investigated. C57BL6J mice were implanted with intraoral fistula to allow passive administration of solutions. In the first study, taste reactivity was tracked throughout chronic vehicle or nicotine (12 mg/kg/day) infusion via osmotic minipumps and spontaneous withdrawal following removal of minipumps. In the second study, the endocannabinoid CB1-receptor antagonist AM251 (1, 3 and 10mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or vehicle was acutely administered before taste reactivity measurement during chronic nicotine administration. Chronic nicotine treatment and spontaneous withdrawal did not influence taste reactions to sucrose or quinine. AM251 decreased positive reactions to sucrose and increased negative reactions to quinine. The effects of AM251 were respectively attenuated and enhanced in nicotine infused mice. These results suggest chronic nicotine exposure and withdrawal has no apparent affective sequelae, as probed by taste reactivity, and thus may not explain the difficulty tobacco-users have in achieving abstinence. In contrast, endocannabinoids elevate affective state in drug-naïve animals and changes in endogenous endocannabinoid tone may underlie compensations in affective state during chronic nicotine exposure. PMID:19540830

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  11. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  12. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  13. The effect of relative humidity on the detection of pyrrole by PTR-MS for OH reactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Custer, T. G.; Kluepfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-05-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important atmospheric oxidant. Recently Sinha et al. [V. Sinha, J. Williams, J.N. Crowley, J. Lelieveld, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8 (2008) 2213] developed a new method to measure the total OH reactivity of ambient air (OH sink) employing a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) as a detector. The new method uses pyrrole (C4H4NH) as a reagent and for an OH reactivity measurement this species must be measured under both dry (~0% RH) and humid air (>30% RH). Here, we investigate the sensitivity dependence of the PTR-MS for pyrrole, as a function of relative humidity in the sampled air. Various normalizations with respect to the H3O+ ion and its different hydrated cluster ions H3O+(H2O)n=1,2,3 are compared. It is shown that both the primary ion signal (H3O+ ion m/z = 19) and the first water cluster ion H3O+(H2O) (m/z = 37) should be used for pyrrole quantification. However, in spite of using this normalization, the PTR-MS sensitivity for pyrrole changes by as much as 16% between dry (~0% RH) and humid air (above 30% RH), with higher sensitivity when the sampled air is humid. Thus, for accurate quantification of pyrrole using a PTR-MS, calibration factors appropriate to dry and humid air should be employed. We recommend that humidity dependence of the PTR-MS be taken into account when reactivity measurements are performed using the pyrrole based comparative reactivity method (CRM).

  14. The effect of relative humidity on the detection of pyrrole by PTR-MS for OH reactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Custer, T. G.; Kluepfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2009-04-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important atmospheric oxidant. Recently Sinha et al. [1] developed a new method to measure the total OH reactivity of ambient air (OH sink) employing a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) as a detector. The new method uses pyrrole (C4H4NH) as a reagent and for an OH reactivity measurement this species must be measured under both dry (~ 0% RH) and humid air ( > 30% RH). Here, we investigate the sensitivity dependence of the PTR-MS for pyrrole, as a function of relative humidity in the sampled air. Various normalizations with respect to the H3O+ ion and its different hydrated clusters ions H3O+(H2O)n=1,2,3 are compared. It is shown that both the primary ion signal (H3O+ ion m/z = 19) and the first water cluster ion H3O+(H2O) (m/z = 37) should be used for pyrrole quantification. However, in spite of using this normalization, the PTR-MS sensitivity for pyrrole changes by as much as 16 % between dry (~ 0% RH) and humid air (above 30 % RH), with higher sensitivity when the sampled air is humid. Thus, for accurate quantification of pyrrole using a PTR-MS, calibration factors appropriate to dry and humid air should be employed. We recommend that humidity dependence of the PTR-MS be taken into account when reactivity measurements are performed using the pyrrole based comparative reactivity method (CRM). [1]. V. Sinha, J. Williams, J.N. Crowley, and J. Lelieveld, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8 (2008) 2213-2227

  15. Sucker rod centralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, O.; Newski, A.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a device for centralizing at least one sucker rod within a production pipe downhole in a well and for reducing frictional forces between the pipe and at least one sucker rod. It comprises an elongate, substantially cylindrical body member having a longitudinal axis, a plurality of slots within the member and a rotatable member mounted within each slot, each of the plurality of slots has its major dimension along a first axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body member and is oriented with respect to the other seats so as to form a helicoidal array for maximizing the total surface contact area between the rotatable members and the pipe and for decreasing the forces acting on each rotatable member.

  16. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.C.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods for reciprocation in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright cylindrical member of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used, the member having sucker rod receiving female threaded openings at the upper and lower ends, the threaded openings being coaxial of the member cylindrical axis whereby the member may be positioned in a string of sucker rods, and including a plurality of spaced-apart parallel sided slots within the member, each slot being of semi-circular configuration and of depth greater than the radius and less than the diameter of the cylindrical member, the sidewalls of each slot being parallel to and equally spaced from a plane of the member cylindrical axis; the member having an axle bore therein for each of the slots, the axle bores being parallel and spaced apart from each other, a plane of the axis of each bore being perpendicular the member cylindrical axis and the axis of each bore being displaced away from the member cylindrical axis; an axle received in each axle bore; and a wheel received on each axle the diameter of each wheel being approximately the diameter of the cylindrical member, the periphery of each wheel extending beyond the member cylindrical wall whereby the wheels are positioned to engage and roll on the internal cylindrical surface of tubing, the planes of adjacent slots in the member being rotationally displaced from each other, a portion of each wheel extending beyond the cylindrical surface of the member, the opposed portion of each wheel being within the confines of the member cylindrical surface whereby each wheel can contact a tubing wall at only one point on its cylindrical surface.

  17. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  18. Sucker rod coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Klyne, A.A.

    1986-11-11

    An anti-friction sucker rod coupling is described for connecting a pair of sucker rods and centralizing them in a tubing string, comprising: an elongate, rigid, substantially cylindrical body member, each end of the body member forming means for threadably connecting the body member with a sucker rod. The body member further forms a transversely extending, substantially diametric, generally vertical slot extending therethrough. The body member further forms a pin bore, such pin bore extending transversely through the body member so as to intersect the slot substantially perpendicularly; a wheel member positioned within the slot to rotate in a generally vertical plane. The wheel member has a portion thereof extending beyond the periphery of the body member to engage the inner surface of the tubing string and centralize the coupling; and a pin mounted in the pin bore and supporting member thereon, whereby the wheel member is rotatable within the slot; the wheel member having sufficient clearance between its side surfaces and the wall surfaces of the slot, when the wheel member is centered in the slot on the pin, whereby the wheel member may shift along the pin to assist in ejecting sand and oil from the slot.

  19. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  20. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  1. Rod locking device

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, J.N. Jr.

    1986-07-22

    A ram locking apparatus used on a blowout preventer is described having a housing, a ram, ram actuating means having a closing side and a retracted side and a tail rod having its inner end connected to the ram actuating means and its outer end engaged by the apparatus to lock the ram. The apparatus consists of: a lock housing having a closed end and a hollow interior connected to the exterior of the preventer housing in which the tail rod is positioned, a body positioned within the lock housing, a primary piston, a lost motion connection between the primary piston and the body, a lock piston associated with the primary piston and movable axially with respect to the primary piston, a tapered split locking ring interconnected to the lock piston, wedging means with the split locking ring, and means for supplying fluid under pressure into the lock housing for movement of the pistons, the initial pressure on the primary pistons causing movement of the body to engage the ram tail rod and subsequently moving the lock piston relative to the wedging means and to thereby wedge the split locking ring against the interior of the lock housing to lock the body therein against movement in the lock housing.

  2. Chemical Dosimeter Tube With Coaxial Sensing Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved length-of-stain (LOS) chemical dosimeter indicates total dose of chemical vapor in air. Made with rods and tubes of various diameters to obtain various sensitivities and dynamic ranges. Sensitivity larger and dose range smaller when more room for diffusion in gap between tube and rod. Offers greater resistance to changing of color of exposed dye back to color of unexposed condition, greater sensitivity, and higher degree of repeatability. Developed to measure doses of gaseous HCI, dosimeter modified by use of other dyes to indicate doses of other chemical vapors.

  3. Total OH reactivity measurements in ambient air in a southern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine forest during BEACHON-SRM08 summer campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Greenberg, Jim; Harley, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Turnipseed, A.; Apel, Eric; Guenther, Alex B.; Smith, Jim; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2014-03-01

    Total OH reactivity was measured during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08) held at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado USA during the summer season in August, 2008. The averaged total OH reactivity was 6.8 s-1, smaller than that measured in urban or suburban areas, while sporadically high OH reactivity was also observed during some evenings. The total OH reactivity measurements were accompanied by observations of traces species such as CO, NO, NOy, O3 and SO2 and VOCs. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of these trace species, 35.3-46.3% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic species that are dominated by 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes. MBO was the most prominent contribution to OH reactivity of any other trace species. A comparison of observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is 29.5-34.8% less than the observed value, implying the existence of missing OH sink. One of the candidates of missing OH was thought to be the oxidation products of biogenic species.

  4. Modeling smog chamber measurements of incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. Y.; Nance, B. I.; Kelly, N. A.

    A series of experiments performed at the GM chamber facility provided useful data for the evaluation of two current chemical mechanisms used in airshed models (SAPRC97 and SAPRC93 mechanisms) and a test of their predictions of maximum incremental reactivities which describe the change in ozone caused by adding a small amount of a compound to a polluted urban mixture under high-NO x conditions. In general, the SAPRC97 detailed mechanism performed well in simulating the volatile organic compound (VOC) reactivity experiments for most test species; however, it had a tendency to underpredict incremental reactivities. For base-case runs containing a nine-component urban-surrogate mixture under high-NO x conditions, where maximum concentrations of either O 3 or the smog produced (SP=the initial NO oxidized plus the ozone produced) were not attained during a 12-h irradiation, the SAPRC97 performed well while the SAPRC93 underestimated SP or O 3 significantly. Under low-NO x conditions where SP or O 3 maximums were attained, the SAPRC97 as well as the SAPRC93 underpredicted SP or O 3 for runs containing the urban-surrogate mixture. Simulations of incremental reactivity experiments and special chamber runs showed that the SAPRC97 mechanism performed poorly for n-octane and some aromatic isomers such as ethylbenzene and p-xylene, while it performed well for other aromatic isomers such as toluene, m-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. Although, additional chamber data for aromatic isomers is needed to further clarify the parameterized chemical mechanisms for aromatic isomers, the newer SAPRC97 mechanism appears to be much improved over the older SAPRC93 mechanism for simulating aromatic chemistry.

  5. Stop sucker rod failures to save money

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.H.

    1981-07-01

    This study presents examples of frequent and common sucker rod failures, explains how failures occur, presents methods to recognize these failures, and discusses changes in conditions that cause failure. From early identification, corrective measures can be taken to prevent their recurrence, reducing downtime and lost production.

  6. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  7. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  8. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as

  9. Control rod heterogeneity effects in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors: Method developments and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Granget, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Soule, R.

    1988-11-01

    The control rod worth assessment in a large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is strongly dependent on the actual arrangement of the absorber pins inside the control rod subassemblies. The so-called heterogeneity effects (i.e., the effects on the rod reactivity of the actual rod internal geometry versus homogenization of the absorber atoms over all the subassembly volume) have been evaluated, using explicit and variational methods to derive appropriate cross sections. An experimental program performed at the MASURCA facility has been used to validate these methods.

  10. A rapid microneutralization assay for the measurement of neutralizing antibody reactive with human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, M; Faircloth, M; Vugler, L; Britt, W J

    1989-02-01

    We have developed a murine monoclonal antibody reactive with a major immediate early 72,000 dalton protein of human cytomegalovirus and utilized this reagent in a rapid virus titration and microneutralization assay. Because of the early expression of this virus encoded protein, both assays could be accomplished within 16 h following virus inoculation. In addition, both assays resulted in considerable savings of reagents because the assays were carried out in 96-well microtiter plates. These assays should prove useful in the preparation and study of neutralizing antibodies directed against human cytomegalovirus.

  11. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  12. Cone rod dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Christian P

    2007-01-01

    Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs) (prevalence 1/40,000) are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP), also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs) resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7). Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far). The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs), CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs), and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs). It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is always advised. Currently

  13. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  14. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  15. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    This technical report describes the experimental part of a program on thermal radiation properties of reactor materials. A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 ..mu.. to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  16. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  17. A measurement of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, together with NO₂, NO, and O₃ via cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Robert J; Edwards, Peter M; Dubé, William P; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S; Quinn, Patricia K; Roberts, James M; Rollins, Andrew W; Veres, Patrick R; Warneke, Carsten; Williams, Eric J; Yuan, Bin; Brown, Steven S

    2014-08-19

    We present a sensitive, compact detector that measures total reactive nitrogen (NOy), as well as NO2, NO, and O3. In all channels, NO2 is directly detected by laser diode based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) at 405 nm. Ambient O3 is converted to NO2 in excess NO for the O3 measurement channel. Likewise, ambient NO is converted to NO2 in excess O3. Ambient NOy is thermally dissociated at ∼700 °C to form NO2 or NO in a heated quartz inlet. Any NO present in ambient air or formed from thermal dissociation of other reactive nitrogen compounds is converted to NO2 in excess O3 after the thermal converter. We measured thermal dissociation profiles for six of the major NOy components and compared ambient measurements with other instruments during field campaigns in Utah and Alabama. Alabama measurements were made in a rural location with high biogenic emissions, and Utah measurements were made in the wintertime in unusual conditions that form high ozone levels from emissions related to oil and gas production. The NOy comparison in Alabama, to an accepted standard measurement method (a molybdenum catalytic converter/chemiluminescence instrument), agreed to within 12%, which we define as an upper limit to the accuracy of the NOy channel. The 1σ precision is <30 pptv at 1 s and <4 pptv at 1 min time resolution for all measurement channels. The accuracy is 3% for the NO2 and O3 channels and 5% for the NO channel. The precision and accuracy of this instrument make it a versatile alternative to standard chemiluminescence-based NOy instruments.

  18. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-01

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  19. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-15

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1 mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2 mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  20. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  1. Sucker rod assembly and method

    SciTech Connect

    Pagan, A.J.

    1986-07-01

    An improved sucker rod assembly is described comprising, in combination: a. a sucker rod; and b. a pair of fittings secured to opposite ends of the rod, each fitting including: i. a rigid elongated casing having interior surfaces defining an open front end and cavity extending rearwardly from the open front end in which cavity one end of the sucker rod is disposed, the side portions of the interior surfaces being contoured to define, with the side portions of the sucker rod end a single, annular elongated tapered wedge-shaped space; and ii. anchoring means filling the space and bonding to the side portions of the rod end to lock the rod end in place, the anchoring means having a narrower diameter at the front end thereof than at about the rear end thereof and being generally frusto-conical, the anchoring means comprising a plurality of separate rigid inserts, the interior surfaces of which collectively define a central elongated passageway in which the rod end is received, the interior surfaces of the inserts being tightly bonded to the side portions of the rod, and the inserts being bonded to each other along the contact lines therebetween to form a unitary structure.

  2. Improved instrumentation for near-real-time measurement of reactive hydrocarbons, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Drayton, P. J.; Blazer, C. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    1999-10-06

    The measurement of reactive hydrocarbons and associated nitrogen oxides, NO{sub 2}, and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) is of key importance to unraveling the complex chemistries involved in daytime photochemical oxidant formation and nighttime chemistry driven by the nitrate radical. Recent work has demonstrated that chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with hydrocarbons (and the temperature dependence of the reactions) can be used as a means of detecting a wide variety of organic compounds in the gas phase with sensitivity comparable to or better than that of the conventional flame ionization detection method (Marley and Gaffney, 1998). We have implemented a new design and built a new instrument to evaluate this approach for the monitoring of alkenes. This instrument makes use of a computer-controlled photon-counting system with a reaction chamber operated at room temperature. Signals are compared to those for an ethene standard to estimate relative reactivity. The instrument is described in detail here, along with a new version of a luminol-based chemiluminescence detection system with fast gas chromatography for measurement of NO{sub 2} and PANs. The photon-counting system, the reaction chamber, and the luminol detection system have been combined on one instrument rack for field use on both ground-based and aircraft platforms. Data presented show the response times of the instruments and indicate applications for examining reactive hydrocarbon emissions from both vegetation and anthropogenic sources. In addition, the luminol chemiluminescence instrument was field tested, and the data obtained are compared with data from a commercial NO{sub x} analyzer. Preliminary results demonstrating the potential use of this instrumentation for rapid measurement of key tropospheric trace species are presented and discussed.

  3. Assessing the Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier using Cr isotope measurements and 2D reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Zink, Sonja; Eggenberger, Urs; Mäder, Urs

    2012-04-01

    In Thun, Switzerland, a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for Cr(VI) reduction by gray cast iron was installed in May 2008. The PRB is composed of a double array of vertical piles containing iron shavings and gravel. The aquifer in Thun is almost saturated with dissolved oxygen and the groundwater flow velocities are ca. 10-15m/day. Two years after PRB installation Cr(VI) concentrations still permanently exceed the Swiss threshold value for contaminated sites downstream of the barrier at selected localities. Groundwater δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) measurements were used to track Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values of two samples downstream of the PRB showed a clear fractionation towards more positive values compared to four samples from the hotspot, which is clear evidence of Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. Another downstream sample did not show a shift to more positive δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values. Because this latter location correlates with the highest downstream Cr(VI) concentration it is proposed that a part of the Cr(VI) plume is bypassing the barrier. Using a Rayleigh fractionation model a minimum present-day overall Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of ca. 15% was estimated. A series of 2D model simulations, including the fractionation of Cr isotopes, confirm that only a PRB bypass of parts of the Cr(VI) plume can lead to the observed values. Additionally, the simulations revealed that the proposed bypass occurs due to an insufficient permeability of the individual PRB piles. It is concluded that with this type of PRB a complete and long-lasting Cr(VI) reduction is extremely difficult to achieve for Cr(VI) contaminations located in nearly oxygen and calcium carbonate saturated aquifer in a regime of high groundwater velocities. Additional remediation action would limit the environmental impact and allow to reach target concentrations.

  4. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  5. A study of the methods for preventing rod-wear tubing leaks in sucker-rod pumping wells

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, K.P. )

    1988-11-01

    Because of the high cost associated with tubing replacement, rod-wear tubing leaks are one of the most costly types of subsurface failures on sucker-rod-pumped wells. While severe hole deviation is most often blamed for rod-wear tubing leaks, case studies show that most rod-wear leaks are caused by accelerated corrosion, which is the result of the removal of a protective corrosion scale from the inside of the tubing. For this reason, the key to eliminating rod-wear tubing leaks economically is correctly identifying the problem as either mechanical wear or corrosion wear and then implementing the appropriate corrective measures. Four case histories involving a total of 90 problem wells are presented to illustrate the methods used to differentiate between corrosion wear and mechanical wear. In these fields, tubing leaks were reduced by as much as 80% by proper identification of the cause of the leaks.

  6. Measurement of d15 in Fe100-xGax (x=12.5,15,18.4,22), Fe50Co50, and Fe81Al19 highly textured polycrystalline rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restorff, J. B.; Wun-Fogle, M.; Clark, A. E.

    2008-04-01

    We report the first measurements of d15, which relate torsion to an applied field, in the high magnetostriction Galfenol alloys Fe100-xGax (x=12.5,15,18.4,22), Fe50Co50, and Fe81Al19. Measurements were performed on highly textured polycrystalline 6.4×50.8mm2 rods by simultaneously applying a longitudinal magnetic field H∥ (-1200rod axis and a circumferential magnetic field H⊥ generated by a current i (-60measurements did not yield a value. For Fe50Co50, d15=29±4 and for Fe81Al19, d15=8±1. Estimated values of λ111 were obtained by fitting ξ to 1/H∥ and are compared to those obtained from single crystal measurements.

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Affect Intensity and Reactivity Measure Adapted for Youth (AIR-Y)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rachel E.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Reardon, Laura E.; Hawks, Erin

    2009-01-01

    A valid and reliable instrument for measuring affect intensity does not exist for adolescents; such a measure may help to refine understanding of emotion among youths. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and clinical relevance of a measure of affect intensity adapted for youths. Two hundred five community…

  8. Analytical modeling of the buffeting of a rod in axial flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Wamsganss, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    Turbulent buffeting of a circular, flexible rod in axial flows is reported. The main excitation mechanisms are turbulent wall-pressure fluctuations and the motion-dependent force field caused by the rod motion. On the assumption that the turbulent wall-pressure fluctuations are independent of rod motion, a linear forced vibration model is proposed to compute the buffeting displacement of the rod with the aid of empirical constants determined from experimental measurements of wall-pressure fluctuations. Predicted and measured values of the root-mean-square rod displacement are shown to be in reasonably good agreement.

  9. Analysis of sucker rod and sinkerbar failures

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents results of a study of performance and failures of the sucker rod/sinkerbar string used in beam-pumping operations through metallography, finite element analysis, and failure data collection. Metallography showed that the microstructure of the steel bar stock needs to be considered to improve the fatigue resistance of the sucker rod strings. The current specification based on tensile strength, or yield strength, may not be appropriate since failure occurs because of fatigue and not yielding, and tensile strength is not always a good measure of fatigue resistance. Finite element analysis of the threaded connection quantitatively assesses the coupling designs under various loading conditions. Subcritical fractures in metallography are also suggested by calculated stress distribution in threaded coupling. Failure data illustrates both magnitude and frequency of failures, as well as categorizing the suspected cause of failure. Application of the results in each of these project areas is expected to yield improved choice of metal bar stock, thread design, and make-up practices which can significantly reduce the frequency of sucker rod failures. Sucker rod failures today are not inherent in the process, but can be minimized through the application of new technology and observation of common-sense practices.

  10. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  11. A Cambrian origin for vertebrate rods

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Grillner, Sten; Cangiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates acquired dim-light vision when an ancestral cone evolved into the rod photoreceptor at an unknown stage preceding the last common ancestor of extant jawed vertebrates (∼420 million years ago Ma). The jawless lampreys provide a unique opportunity to constrain the timing of this advance, as their line diverged ∼505 Ma and later displayed high-morphological stability. We recorded with patch electrodes the inner segment photovoltages and with suction electrodes the outer segment photocurrents of Lampetra fluviatilis retinal photoreceptors. Several key functional features of jawed vertebrate rods are present in their phylogenetically homologous photoreceptors in lamprey: crucially, the efficient amplification of the effect of single photons, measured by multiple parameters, and the flow of rod signals into cones. These results make convergent evolution in the jawless and jawed vertebrate lines unlikely and indicate an early origin of rods, implying strong selective pressure toward dim-light vision in Cambrian ecosystems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07166.001 PMID:26095697

  12. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  13. Sucker rod pump

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a subsurface well pump, it comprises: a working barrel; a plunger which reciprocates along the vertical axis within the working barrel between an upper and lower position; a rod connected to the plunger and extending to a means for providing reciprocating force; a well string extending from the top of the working barrel to the surface; an outlet check valve which permits flow to exit the working barrel into the well string and does not permit flow to exit the well string into the working barrel; and an inlet check valve which permits flow into the working barrel from outside of the subsurface pump, the inlet check valve being above the top position of the plunger, the inlet check valve having a cross sectional flow area about equal to or greater than the horizontal cross sectional area of the working barrel, and the inlet check valve being a hinged flapper valve.

  14. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. PMID:23778261

  15. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  16. Reactive transport modelling of a remediation measure at a former gasworks site in Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, T.; Herold, M.; Greskowiak, J.; Prommer, H.

    2009-12-01

    The aquifer beneath a former manufactured gas plant site is contaminated with polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that form large plumes and are only slowly degraded under natural conditions. This leaves active remediation as the only viable option to eliminate the risks of toxic substances to reach potential receptors. The aims of the study presented here were to verify the proposed conceptual model of interacting physical and biogeochemical processes and to assess the effectiveness of a proposed in-situ remediation approach with the help of multi-component reactive transport modelling, focusing on the situations (i) prior to the implementation of the in-situ remediation scheme and (ii) following the operation of a circulation well with O2 and H2O2 injection to aid aerobic microbial degradation of the contaminants in the otherwise anoxic surroundings. The model incorporates microbially mediated redox reactions, mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions as well as subsequent changes in the chemical composition of the aquifer. The degradation pathways proposed in the conceptual model could be verified. The model was then used (i) to explore two possible remediation scenarios where the results highlighted the importance of source remediation and (ii) to study the uncertainty regarding the presence of another electron donor in the form of pyrite.

  17. A combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering detector for measurements on reactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallenhag, Linda; Canton, Sophie E.; Sondhauss, Peter; Haase, Dörthe; Ossler, Frederik

    2011-08-01

    A detector with high dynamic range designed for combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments has been developed. It allows measurements on single events and reactive systems, such as particle formation in flames and evaporation of levitating drops. The detector consists of 26 channels covering a region from 0.5° to 60° and it provides continuous monitoring of the sampled signal without readout dead time. The time resolution for fast single events is about 40 μs and for substances undergoing slower dynamics, the time resolution is set to 0.1 or 1 s with hours of continuous sampling. The detector has been used to measure soot particle formation in a flame, burning magnesium and evaporation of a toluene drop in a levitator. The results show that the detector can be used for many different applications with good outcomes and large potential.

  18. Measuring steady-state cerebral vasomotor reactivity using non-triggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Liu, Yi-Jui; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2014-06-01

    To investigate cVMR by using CO2-based hypercapnic challenge and blood flow monitoring employing non-triggered phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging. Six healthy volunteers (6 male; mean age: 29 years) participated this study after providing institutionally approved consent. This study used non-triggered PC imaging to increase temporal resolution of dynamic blood flow measurements, allowing real-time monitoring of the hypercapnic challenge response. Results suggest that vasomotor reactivity measured by non-triggered PC imaging is positively associated with the concentration of inhaled CO2. This study concludes that CO2 challenge combined with non-triggered PC flow imaging is potentially useful to provide diagnostic information for patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  19. A combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering detector for measurements on reactive systems.

    PubMed

    Vallenhag, Linda; Canton, Sophie E; Sondhauss, Peter; Haase, Dörthe; Ossler, Frederik

    2011-08-01

    A detector with high dynamic range designed for combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments has been developed. It allows measurements on single events and reactive systems, such as particle formation in flames and evaporation of levitating drops. The detector consists of 26 channels covering a region from 0.5° to 60° and it provides continuous monitoring of the sampled signal without readout dead time. The time resolution for fast single events is about 40 μs and for substances undergoing slower dynamics, the time resolution is set to 0.1 or 1 s with hours of continuous sampling. The detector has been used to measure soot particle formation in a flame, burning magnesium and evaporation of a toluene drop in a levitator. The results show that the detector can be used for many different applications with good outcomes and large potential.

  20. Measuring steady-state cerebral vasomotor reactivity using non-triggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Liu, Yi-Jui; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2014-06-01

    To investigate cVMR by using CO2-based hypercapnic challenge and blood flow monitoring employing non-triggered phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging. Six healthy volunteers (6 male; mean age: 29 years) participated this study after providing institutionally approved consent. This study used non-triggered PC imaging to increase temporal resolution of dynamic blood flow measurements, allowing real-time monitoring of the hypercapnic challenge response. Results suggest that vasomotor reactivity measured by non-triggered PC imaging is positively associated with the concentration of inhaled CO2. This study concludes that CO2 challenge combined with non-triggered PC flow imaging is potentially useful to provide diagnostic information for patients with cerebrovascular disease. PMID:24629509

  1. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  2. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic. PMID:26524292

  3. In vivo imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Doble, Nathan; Choi, Stacey S.; Codona, Johanan L.; Christou, Julian; Enoch, Jay M.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Although single cone receptors have been imaged in the living human eye, there has been no observation of rods in vivo. Using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope and post processing, evidence of rod mosaic was observed at 5° and 10° eccentricities in the horizontal, temporal retina. For 4 normal human subjects, small structures were observed in between the larger cones, and were observed repeatedly at the same locations on different days and with varying wavelengths. Image analysis gave spacings that agree well with rod measurements from histological data. PMID:21209677

  4. Eulerian formulation of elastic rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre; Detournay, Emmanuel; Denoël, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    In numerous biological, medical and engineering applications, elastic rods are constrained to deform inside or around tube-like surfaces. To solve efficiently this class of problems, the equations governing the deflection of elastic rods are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of this generic tubular constraint defined as a perfectly stiff normal ringed surface. This reformulation hinges on describing the rod-deformed configuration by means of its relative position with respect to a reference curve, defined as the axis or spine curve of the constraint, and on restating the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate parametrizing this curve. Associated with a segmentation strategy, which partitions the global problem into a sequence of rod segments either in continuous contact with the constraint or free of contact (except for their extremities), this re-parametrization not only trivializes the detection of new contacts but also transforms these free boundary problems into classic two-points boundary-value problems and suppresses the isoperimetric constraints resulting from the imposition of the rod position at the extremities of each rod segment.

  5. Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NO/y/) within and above a tropical forest canopy in the wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Fan, Song-Miao

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of ambient concentrations of reactive nitrogen oxides were made in the Amazon rain forest, near Manaus, Brazil, continuously at 39 m (above the canopy), and on several days and nights at 19 m (within the canopy). Concentrations were very low, typically 100-700 pptv, except for brief periods when up to 5000 pptv of NO(y) was observed, indicating polluted air from the urban area of Manaus. The forest was a net sink for NO(y) with the NO(y) flux = -7.6 + or - 5.0) x 10 to the 9th molecules/sq cm per sec in unpolluted periods, even though soils emitted NO at a significant rate (8.9 + or - 1.5 x 10 to the 9th molecules/sq cm per sec). The deposition rate for NO(y) appeared to be much larger during the daytime than at night, suggesting that uptake was controlled either by plant processes (stomatal opening) or by supply of reactive components of NO(y) (e.g., HNO3) during the daytime. Implications for regional and global atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  6. Amelioration of the reactive nitrogen flux calculation by a day/night separation in weekly mean air concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Ono, Keisuke; Tokida, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2013-11-01

    The low time resolution of air concentration data of atmospheric deposition in regional monitoring networks makes it difficult to estimate fluxes between the land and the atmosphere. The present study was an evaluation of the effects of day/night separation for a low time resolution of air concentration measurements (i.e., weekly mean) for the estimation of reactive nitrogen fluxes. The target chemical species included reactive nitrogen primarily ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid gas (HNO3) and secondarily nitrous acid gas, particulate ammonium, and particulate nitrate in addition to sulfur dioxide (SO2) as a reference. Monitoring was conducted for one year at a single-crop rice paddy field in central Japan. The study period was divided into the cropping and fallow seasons, which were characterized by rice plants or a drained bare soil surface, respectively. The filter-pack method was applied to measure the weekly mean air concentrations with day/night separation for the target species at two heights (6 and 2 m above the ground surface). Both an inferential and a gradient method were applied to calculate the deposition and exchange fluxes, respectively. The day/night separation in a weekly sampling protocol, on average, reduced the underestimation of HNO3 fluxes for the inferential method by 15.2% ± 6.8% and 8.2% ± 6.1% in the cropping and fallow seasons, respectively, and reduced the overestimation of NH3 fluxes for the gradient method by 121% ± 128% in the cropping season. The fluxes calculated using the inferential method agreed relatively well with those calculated using the gradient method for HNO3 and SO2. The use of single-height measurements for air concentrations with day/night separation and flux calculations using the inferential method are recommended as an appropriate way to enhance the quality in calculated fluxes while simultaneously suppress the increase in labor cost.

  7. Validation of a commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. Objective The purpose of the study was to validate a new automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP method (Gentian cCRP). Methods Studies of imprecision, accuracy, prozone effect, interference, limit of quantification, and stability under different storage conditions were performed. The new method was compared with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. Results Total imprecision was < 2.4% for 4 tested serum pools analyzed twice daily over 10 days. The method was linear under dilution, and no prozone effect was detected at a concentration of 1200 mg/L. Recovery after spiking serum with purified canine CRP at 2 different concentrations was 123% and 116%, respectively. No interference from hemoglobin or triglycerides (10 g/L) was detected. CRP was stable for 14 days at 4°C and 22°C. In the method comparison study, there was good agreement between the validated human CRP assay and the new canine-specific assay. Healthy dogs had CRP concentrations that were less than the limit of quantification of the Gentian cCRP method (6.8 mg/L). Conclusions The new canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP assay is a reliable and rapid method for measuring canine CRP, suitable for clinical use due to the option for an automated assay. PMID:24798319

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Final report for the first year, January 1-December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Japar, S.M.; Hurley, M.D.; Wallington, T.J.

    1994-06-30

    A set of multiple indoor smog chambers were used to measure the increase in smog formation (smog = NO oxidation + O3 formation) from a series of individual test volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), as well as carbon monoxide (CO), when they were added to a standard urban mixture and irradiated for 10-12 hours with a solar simulator. The chambers and the mixtures were designed to simulate the Carter incremental reactivity concept that is being used in California. The test compounds covered a wide range of mechanistic uncertainties and predicted reactivities (reactivity is the increase in smog divided by the amount of test compound added). Also, the chambers were used to test the recently developed Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) Model which predicts that the smog formation of a mixture is constant and independent of NOx in the so-called light-limited regime.

  9. Measurements of gas phase reactive nitrogen during two wildfires in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenni, A. J.; Chen, X.; Hecobian, A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning represents an important source of particles and trace gases to the global atmosphere. In addition to carbon species, nitrogen compounds are abundant in biomass burning emissions, with NOx, N2O, and N2 released primarily during flaming combustion, and NH3, amines and nitriles associated with smoldering combustion. Although nitrogen emissions from fires have been documented from laboratory and satellite measurements, and during prescribed burns, few direct measurements have been made during major wildfires. In this presentation, we summarize measurements of gas-phase nitrogen species observed during two wildfires in northern Colorado in 2012: the Hewlett Gulch Fire and High Park Fire. The Hewlett Gulch Fire was directly northwest of Fort Collins, CO and covered 3,100 hectares, while the High Park fire was significantly larger (35,300 hectares), encompassing the Hewlett Gulch Fire and coming within 3-4 km of our laboratory at Colorado State University. Emissions from both fires reached our laboratory, where measurements were made of NOx, NOy, NH3, and additional, unspeciated gas-phase nitrogen compounds. Smoke impacts at our facility ranged from background conditions to periods with very heavy smoke, depending on the local meteorology. We observed dramatic increases in measured concentrations during periods influenced by the fires.

  10. Rod coupling for oil well sucker rods and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.

    1986-07-29

    A coupling is described for joining solid reciprocating sucker rods to form a rod string in a well pump or the like comprising a unitary metal sleeve having an axial threaded bore and an irregular outer surface, and a homogeneous and non-fibrous coating on the sleeve over the outer surface providing an externally substantially cylindrical coupling, the coating comprising a flexible and abrasive resistant thermoplastic hydrourethane polymer formed on the irregular outer surface of the sleeve while in the molten state.

  11. BWR fuel rod performance evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The joint EPRI/GE fuel performance program, RP510-1, involved thorough preirradiation characterization of fuel used in lead test assemblies, detailed surveillance of their operation, and interim site examinations of the assemblies during reactor outages. The program originally included four GE-5 lead test assemblies operating in the Peach Bottom-2 reactor. The program was later modified to include the pressurized fuel rod test assembly in the Peach Bottom-3 reactor (RP510-2). The program modification also included extending the operation of the Peach Bottom-2 and Peach Bottom-3 lead test assembly fuel beyond normal discharge exposures. Interim site examination results following the first four cycles of operation of the Peach Bottom-2 lead test assemblies up to 35 GWd/MT and the examination of the Peach Bottom-3 pressurized test assembly at 32 GWd/MT are presented in this report. Elements of the examinations included visual examination of the fuel bundles; individual fuel rod visual examinations, rod length measurements, ultrasonic and eddy current nondestructive testing, Zircaloy cladding oxide thickness measurements and fission gas measurements. Channel measurements were made on the PB-2 Lead Test Assemblies after each of the first three operating cycles. All of the bundles were found to be in good condition. Since the pressurized test assembly contained pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods in symmetric positions, it was possible to make direct comparisons of the fission gas release from pairs of pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods with identical power histories. With one exception, the release was less from the pressurized fuel rod of each pair. Fuel rod power histories were calculated using new physics methods for all of the fuel rods that were punctured for fission gas release measurements. 28 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Automated edge detection versus manual edge measurement in analysis of brachial artery reactivity: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric B; Bronas, Ulf G; Dengel, Donald R

    2008-09-01

    High resolution ultrasound, combined with computer imaging technology, is commonly used to measure changes in brachial artery diameter for the determination of endothelial-dependent vasodilation (EDD) and endothelial independent-vasodilation (EID). Currently, two methods of computerized edge-detection systems are in use to measure changes in artery diameter. One system involves the sonographer manually tracking the artery walls while the second system involves a computer automated edge-detection system that automatically tracks the artery wall. The purpose of this study was to compare the two types of computerized edge-detection systems for measuring vascular function and structure. One hundred fifty (female = 70, male = 80) participants agreed to participate. Baseline brachial diameter, carotid intima-medial thickness (cIMT), EDD and EID were measured by the two computerized edge-detection systems utilizing the same ultrasound B-mode image. Mean values (+/-standard error) for baseline diameter, cIMT, EDD and EID were 3.53 (+/-0.10) mm, 0.43 (+/-0.01) mm, 5.72 (+/-0.20)% and 22.17 (+/-0.60)%, respectively for the manual edge-detection software system. Mean values for baseline diameter, cIMT, EDD and EID were 3.59 (+/-0.10) mm, 0.44 (+/-0.01) mm, 7.33 (+/-0.30)% and 25.77 (+/-0.60)%, respectively for the automated edge-detection software system. Bland-Altman plots displayed large variations between the two edge-detection methods for assessing cIMT and changes in artery diameter following brachial EDD and EID. The results of the study demonstrate that manual and automated computerized edge-detection systems track dynamic changes in brachial artery diameter and cIMT measures differently. Therefore, caution should be used when comparing research utilizing different computerized edge-detection systems for measuring vascular function and structure.

  13. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    “Predecisional information distortion” occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed “stepwise evolution of preference” (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option (“proleader” distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option (“antitrailer” distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture (“reactivity”). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs (“cues”) in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its

  14. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    PubMed

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  15. The Weird World, and Equally Weird Measurement Models: Reactive Indicators and the Validity Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayduk, Leslie A.; Robinson, Hannah Pazderka; Cummings, Greta G.; Boadu, Kwame; Verbeek, Eric L.; Perks, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers using structural equation modeling (SEM) aspire to learn about the world by seeking models with causal specifications that match the causal forces extant in the world. This quest for a model matching existing worldly causal forces constitutes an ontology that orients, or perhaps reorients, thinking about measurement validity. This…

  16. Evaluation of a catalytic reduction technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Eubank, C. S.; Hubler, C. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of a technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy-containing species in the atmosphere has been examined. In the technique, an NOy component species, which may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and particulate nitrate, are catalytically reduced by CO to form NO molecules on the surface of a metal converter tube, and the NO product is detected by chemiluminescence produced in reaction with O3. Among the catalysts tested in the temperature range of 25-500 C, Au was the preferred catalyst. The results of laboratory tests investigating the effects of pressure, O3, and H2O on NOy conversion, and the possible sources of interference, have shown that the technique is suitable for atmospheric analyses. The results of a test in ambient air at a remote ground-based field site are included.

  17. Reproducibility of near-infrared spectroscopy parameters measured during brachial artery occlusion and reactive hyperemia in healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Sébastien; Gayda, Mathieu; Gremeaux, Vincent; Juneau, Martin; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Nigam, Anil

    2012-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive technique evaluating microvascular function. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia induced by a 5 min brachial artery occlusion. Twenty-four healthy young males (mean 34+/-8 years old) had two microvascular function evaluations by NIRS over a 7 to 30-day period (mean 16+/-10 days). Intra-subject and inter-observer reproducibility were evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and standard error of measurement (SEM%) for every parameter. Mean NIRS parameters did not differ between both evaluations. Reproducibility was greatest for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.84; CV: 6.51% SEM: 7.11%), time to basal O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 20.04%, SEM 27.22%), time to maximal O2Hb (ICC: 0.71; CV: 15.61% SEM: 19.27%), peak of O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 6.68%, SEM 8.53%), time to maximal tHb (ICC: 0.73, CV: 19,61%, SEM 24.56%) and area under the O2Hb and tHb curves (ICC: 0.68, CV: 16.15%, SEM 22.93% and ICC: 0.62, CV: 18.59%, SEM 26.64%, respectively). Moreover, inter-observer reproducibility ranged from excellent to perfect (ICC from 0.85 to 1.00) for every parameter. NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia are highly reproducible which enables their repeated measurement to study microvascular function in healthy subjects.

  18. In situ measurements of IO and reactive iodine aboard the RV Sonne during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne; Walker, Hannah; Ingham, Trevor; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wittrock, Folker

    2013-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combined ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo. In this paper we present measurements of IO radicals in coastal and open ocean regions made onboard the German research vessel RV Sonne in November 2011 between Singapore and Manila, via the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo (South China Sea) and the Sulu Sea. In situ measurements of IO were made on 12 days by the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument, with a detection limit of 0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging period. The cruise average IO concentration was found to be 1.2 pptv, with a maximum concentration of 2.4 pptv in the middle of the Sulu Sea, an area known for high biological activity. Only a weak diurnal profile was observed, with IO detected above the detection limit on 10 out of the 11 nights when the LIF instrument was operational. Measurements of IO at night in the open ocean have not previously been reported and indicate the presence of gas phase or heterogeneous mechanisms that recycle iodine species without requiring light. There was reasonable agreement for IO concentrations measured by the University of Leeds LIF and the University of Bremen MAX-DOAS instruments, for which a comparison will be presented. I2, ICl and HOI were measured by the University of Mainz using a coupled diffusion denuder system followed by analysis using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectroscopy, with a detection of 0.17 pptv for 30 mins (I2). The cruise average I2 concentration was found to be 2.0 pptv, with a maximum concentration observed during one night of 12.7 pptv on the northern coast

  19. Associations Between Abnormal Rod-Mediated Dark Adaptation and Health and Functioning in Older Adults With Normal Macular Health

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Jackson, Gregory R.; Curcio, Christine A.; Szalai, Alexander J.; Dashti, Nassrin; Clark, Mark; Rookard, Kia; McCrory, Mark A.; Wright, Tyler T.; Callahan, Michael A.; Kline, Lanning B.; Witherspoon, C. Douglas; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation (DA) is characteristic of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also can be observed in some older adults in normal macular health. We examine cross-sectional associations between rod-mediated DA and risk factors for AMD in older adults in normal macular health. Methods. The sample consisted of adults aged ≥60 years old in normal macular health per grading of fundus photos using an established disease classification system. Rod-mediated DA was measured psychophysically following a photobleach using a computer-automated dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the inferior vertical meridian. The speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept value, with abnormal DA defined as rod-intercept ≥ 12.3 minutes. We assessed several health and functional characteristics that the literature has suggested increase AMD risk (e.g., smoking, alcohol use, inflammatory markers, apolipoproteins, low luminance visual acuity, chronic medical conditions, body mass, family history). Results. Among 381 participants (mean age, 68.5 years; SD, 5.5), 78% had normal and 22% had abnormal DA, with the prevalence of abnormal DA increasing with age. After age-adjustment, abnormal DA was associated with increased odds of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), heavy use of or abstention from alcohol, high blood pressure, and drop in visual acuity under mesopic conditions. Conclusions. Despite having normal macular health according to accepted definitions of AMD presence, approximately one-quarter of older adults recruited from primary eye care clinics had abnormal DA, which was associated with known risk factors for AMD, including elevated CRP. PMID:24854857

  20. Development of Airborne Eddy-Correlation Flux Measurement Capabilities for Reactive Oxides of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurement Group (TTGAMG) endeavors to continue to push the evolution of the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE) into a sensor capable of making airborne eddy correlation measurements of nitrogen oxides. It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as well as its participation in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and the deliverables can not be achieved as proposed in the original funding of this grant. Most of these changes have been driven by the passing away of John Bradshaw, the original principal investigator.

  1. Measurements of admittances and characteristic combustion times of reactive gaseous propellant coaxial injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation that was concerned with the quantitative determination of the capabilities of combustion processes associated with coaxial injectors to amplify and sustain combustor oscillations was described. The driving provided by the combustion process was determined by employing the modified standing-wave method utilizing coaxial injectors and air-acetylene mixtures. Analyses of the measured data indicate that the investigated injectors are capable of initiating and amplifying combustion instabilities under favorable conditions of injector-combustion coupling and over certain frequency ranges. These frequency ranges and the frequency at which an injector's driving capacity is maximum are observed to depend upon the equivalence ratio, the pressure drop across the injector orifices and the number of injector elements. The characteristic combustion times of coaxial injectors were determined from steady state temperature measurements.

  2. Percolation thresholds for rod-like particles: polydispersity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    2008-06-01

    A model based upon excluded volume considerations is presented for the connectedness percolation thresholds in polydisperse systems of cylindrical rod-like nanoparticles. The dependence of the percolation threshold upon polydispersity index and number-averaged aspect ratio is examined for two different distribution functions for the rod radii and lengths. The importance of accounting for polydispersity is explored in the context of measurements of the elastic moduli and electrical conductance in fibre-filled nanocomposites.

  3. Investigation of potential interferences on the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphate using zirconium oxide-based DGT technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qin; Chen, Yifei; Xu, Di; Wang, Yan; Ding, Shiming

    2013-08-01

    A diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique based on hydrous zirconium oxide (Zr-oxide) has been recently developed for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP). In this study, the detailed performance of the DGT technique is reported. Spiking experiments revealed that several orthophosphate monoester compounds contributed to the Zr-oxide DGT measurements of DRP. However, such a phenomenon is unlikely to occur during field conditions due to the low concentration of organic P in typical natural waters. The presence of Cl- (up to 106 g/L), SO4(2-) (up to 16 g/L), HCO3- (up to 817 g/L), and AsO2- and AsO4(3-) (both up to 1 mg As/L) in solutions had negligible effects on the measurement of DRP. The threshold concentrations of Cl-, SO4(2-) and HCO3- have been increased from previous reports for the measurements of DRP using other adsorbent-based DGT techniques. The capacity for DGT measurements of DRP decreased with increasing solution pH (4.2-9.2). The lowest capacity (95 microg P/cm2 at pH 9.2) was still greater than that of other DGT techniques that are usually used for the measurement of DRP (2-12 microg P/cm2). The Zr-oxide binding gel could be stored for up to 2 years without any aging effect. This period of validity was considerably longer than the ferrihydrite binding gel that is commonly used in present DGT devices (6 months). The field application revealed that the concentrations of DRP measured in three fresh water samples using the Zr-oxide DGT technique were in agreement with those of the traditional colorimetric method.

  4. Rod coupling with mounted guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, M.L.

    1987-05-26

    This patent describes a well sucker rod string, in a well bore, the combination comprising: an axially elongated coupling section having threads at axially opposite ends thereof for coupling to and between successive sucker rods in the rod string, to transmit string loading. The section has first and second exposed surfaces adjacent an end of the section, and a third surface located between the first and second exposed surfaces; a rod guide consisting of molded plastic material extending about and bonded to the section third surface to project outwardly therefrom for engagement with the well bore during up and down stroking of the string; and one annular groove sunk in the section between the first and third surfaces, and another annular groove sunk in the section between the second and third surfaces. The depth of the one groove is less than about 15% of the radius of the section at the first surface.

  5. Relations between personality measures and physiological reactivity using a perceptual motor challenge.

    PubMed

    Randall, T; Crabtree, D; Antrim, L

    1989-12-01

    60 undergraduates participated in research designed to investigate the relations between psychological and physiological measures of personality under stress. Psychological assessments were elicited from responses to the Jenkins Activity Survey. Physiological assessments were elicited during 5 1-min. trials on the pursuit rotor, a perceptual motor task. Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses were consistent with the notion that psychological and physiological assessments yield contradictory information and that research is needed to develop valid methodologies with which to assess human stress.

  6. Measurements and Modelling of Reactive Iodine Oxides in the Coastal MBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najera, J. J.; Bloss, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The release of iodine compounds into the marine atmosphere can affect a number of aspects of atmospheric composition: Iodine species can participate in catalytic ozone destruction cycles, which may be augmented by bromine species; reactions of iodine compounds can perturb the OH:HO2 and NO:NO2 ratios, heterogeneous loss of reservoir compounds such as HOI and INO3 can lead to removal of HOx and NOx, and higher iodine oxides can contribute to the formation and/or growth of aerosol particles. In this work, we focus upon understanding the effect of the spatial distribution of iodine emissions upon local HOx and NOx levels in the immediate vicinity of a coastal sites, using new observations to re-evaluate previous field campaign data. We present an analysis of results from a new instruments which measures point inorganic iodine species concentrations. The technique of resonance fluorescence (RF) is employed for the detection of iodine atoms, and the total photolabile iodine content. Measurements made at Mace Head, Ireland during July-August 2007 and May 2011 are presented. A detailed 1-dimensional photochemical box model is employed in a lagrangian sense to simulate the evolving chemical composition of an air column advected across the coastal margin. The model is compared with the observed iodine species, and then used to explore the transient response of the NOx and HOx families at the Mace Head site to heterogeneous iodine emissions: The transit time between the intertidal iodine emission zone and the shoreline site where previous measurements of HOx, NOx etc. have been made is insufficient for steady-state to become established, although this assumption has been used in earlier model studies of such data. Finally, we consider the limitations in our ability to quantify the impacts of iodine chemistry, which arise from uncertainties in the iodine kinetics and photochemistry - for example, what is the atmospheric lifetime of inorganic iodine ? - and explore their

  7. Stabilization of reactive nitroxides using invasomes to allow prolonged electron paramagnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Haag, S F; Taskoparan, B; Bittl, R; Teutloff, C; Wenzel, R; Fahr, A; Chen, M; Lademann, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Meinke, M C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of the antioxidative capacity of the skin is of great practical relevance since free radicals are involved in many skin damaging processes, including aging and inflammation. The nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for measuring the antioxidative capacity since its reaction with reducing agents is considerably fast. Yet, in order to achieve longer measurement times, e.g. in inflammatory skin diseases, the stabilizing effect of an invasome (ultraflexible vesicle/liposome) suspension with TEMPO was investigated ex vivo on porcine skin and in vivo on human skin. Invasomes increased the measurement time ex vivo 2-fold and the reduction was significantly slowed down in vivo, which is due to membrane-associated and therefore protected TEMPO. Furthermore, TEMPO accumulation in the membrane phase as well as the decreasing polarity of the ultimate surroundings of TEMPO during skin penetration explains the stabilizing effect. Thus, an invasome suspension with TEMPO exhibits stabilizing effects ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21822032

  8. Stabilization of reactive nitroxides using invasomes to allow prolonged electron paramagnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Haag, S F; Taskoparan, B; Bittl, R; Teutloff, C; Wenzel, R; Fahr, A; Chen, M; Lademann, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Meinke, M C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of the antioxidative capacity of the skin is of great practical relevance since free radicals are involved in many skin damaging processes, including aging and inflammation. The nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for measuring the antioxidative capacity since its reaction with reducing agents is considerably fast. Yet, in order to achieve longer measurement times, e.g. in inflammatory skin diseases, the stabilizing effect of an invasome (ultraflexible vesicle/liposome) suspension with TEMPO was investigated ex vivo on porcine skin and in vivo on human skin. Invasomes increased the measurement time ex vivo 2-fold and the reduction was significantly slowed down in vivo, which is due to membrane-associated and therefore protected TEMPO. Furthermore, TEMPO accumulation in the membrane phase as well as the decreasing polarity of the ultimate surroundings of TEMPO during skin penetration explains the stabilizing effect. Thus, an invasome suspension with TEMPO exhibits stabilizing effects ex vivo and in vivo.

  9. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  10. Intracellular recordings of rod responses during dark-adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, S R; Pak, W L

    1975-01-01

    1. Dark-adaptation of rod photoreceptors has been studied in the isolated axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) retina by intracellular recordings. Rod responsiveness was greatly reduced immediately after a 30 sec partial bleach, but partially recovered with time in the dark. 2. In parallel spectrophotometric measurements using isolated retinas, regeneration of the rod pigment could not be detected after a 30 sec bleach. 3. During rod dark-adaptation, the response of a rod to a given stimulus increased in amplitude, duration, and rate of rise but did not recover completely to the dark-adapted values. Response latency was lengthened immediately after a bleach but ultimately returned to the dark-adapted level. 4. The time courses of dark-adaptation determined on the basis of the intensity of a stimulus needed to evoke a response having a criterion amplitude, a criterion duration, or a criterion rate of rise were similar. On the other hand changes in latency of the response and magnitude of the saturated amplitude followed different time courses. Change in log threshold was found to be related to change in saturated amplitude by an exponential function during dark-adaptation. 5. After bleaching 10% or less of the rod pigment, the kinetics of both recovery of log threshold and decrease in absorbance at 400 nm (metarhodopsin II+free retinal) could be described by two concurrent first-order processes having similar time constants. However, after bleaching more than 10% of the rod pigment, changes in sensitivity and absorbance did not follow parallel time courses. 6. Metarhodopsin III cannot be solely responsible for setting the axolotl rod sensitivity since rod thresholds decrease monotonically during dark-adaptation whereas meta III concentration reaches a peak 3 min after the bleach and decreases thereafter. PMID:1151778

  11. On-road Emissions of Reactive Nitrogen through In-situ, Mobile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Existing atmospheric measurements suggest that urban traffic may provide significant amount of NH3. NH3 emissions in urban areas may cause greater impact on air quality and human health, because other aerosol tracers, like NO and NO2, are emitted by similar on-road sources. However, the on-road NH3 emission inventories are subject to significant uncertainties. A mobile platform is developed by mounting multiple portable (total power ~ 100 W, weight ~ 25 kg), high-resolution (10 Hz), open-path sensors on top of a passenger car. On-road NH3 emissions are quantified in the real-world driving conditions by synchronized NH3, CO, and CO2 measurements. The mobile platform has covered over 16,000 km in the US and China since 2013. The total on-road sampling time is over 300 hours. Major US metropolitan areas that have been sampled include LA, SF, Houston, Philadelphia, and Denver. Three Chinese megacities (Beijing, Baoding, and Shijiazhuang) were sampled in both 2013 and 2014. The average emission factors (grams of NH3 emitted per kilogram of fuel) range from 0.3 to 0.5 g/kg. Different methodologies were compared, including on-road emission ratios, tunnel measurements, and city-scale gradient measurements. These methodologies yielded the same emission factor for Houston (0.4±0.05 g/kg) within the sampling uncertainties and showed that multiple approaches are consistent with one another. The observed NH3 emission ratios indicate that National Emisison Inventory (NEI) underestimates on-road NH3 emissions by up to 50% in some major urban areas. On-road NH3 emission factors show higher values in both stop-and-go driving conditions and freeway speeds with a minimum near 70 km/h. This is consistent with another observation that the emission factors in urban traffic are generally larger than suburban traffic. Road gradient

  12. In-Situ Measurement of Shock-Induced Reactive Flow in a Series of Related Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stahl, D. B.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding of the chemistry that occurs under extreme, high-pressure, high-temperature shock environments poses both a significant scientific challenge, due to the difficulty of direct experimental observations, and an opportunity for discovery of new materials and bonding constructs. The combined high pressure, high temperature conditions induced by shock loading results in prompt reactions that may include dynamic bond breaking, dimerization and polymerization, and dissociation to small molecules. Understanding of the evolution of different reaction pathways as a function of shock input remains a significant challenge, due to both the very short shock timescales, and difficulty in measurement of reaction intermediates and products. We have used in-situ multiple magnetic gauges to measure changes in mechanical variables (such as particle velocity waveforms) resulting from the shock-induced chemistry. This allows us to gain some understanding of the shock input conditions necessary to start chemical reaction. Seven experiments have been completed on a set of related organic liquids; 1-3 cyclohexadiene was found to react at 4.9 GPa, 1-4 cyclohexadiene at 7 GPa, cyclohexene between 10 and 12 GPa, and cyclopentene results were inconclusive. Since 1-3 cyclohexadiene could dimerize by a Diels-Alder reaction, it was expected to react at the lowest pressure.

  13. Chip electrophoresis as a novel approach to measure the polyphenols reactivity toward human saliva.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Iturmendi, Néréa; Gambuti, Angelita; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Moio, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Saliva is a biological fluid with a multifunctional role that makes it interesting in terms of research and diagnostic possibilities. In food research, human saliva represented a useful tool by which we measure the tactile sensation elicited by polyphenol-rich beverages called astringency. A method based on SDS-PAGE analysis of saliva before and after the binding reaction with wine polyphenols has been successfully used in previous studies for measuring wine astringency by means of the saliva precipitation index. In this work, chip electrophoresis was used alternatively to SDS-PAGE and results were compared. Chip electrophoresis provides a very good reproducibility for wine and grape astringency. Moreover, this approach is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method requiring several hours for an analysis. Another advantage over traditional gel is lower sample and reagent volume requirements, as well as the lower and less toxic wastes, contributing benefits to health and environment. The application of this novel method allowed, using the principal component analysis, to distinguish grapes and wines according to the saliva precipitation index and structural characteristics determined by the phoroglucinolysis analysis.

  14. ATMOS/ATLAS-3 Measurements of Stratospheric Chlorine and Reactive Nitrogen Partitioning Inside and Outside the November 1994 Antarctic Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Michelsen, H. A.; Zander, R.; Newchurch, M. J.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Chang, A. Y.; Irion, F. W.; Goldman, A.; Mahieu, E.

    1996-01-01

    Partitioning between HCl and ClONO2 and among the main components of the reactive nitrogen family (NO, NO2, HNO3, ClONO2, N2O5, and HO2NO2) has been studied inside and outside the Antarctic stratospheric vortex based on ATMOS profiles measured at sunrise during the 3-12 November 1994 ATLAS-3 Shuttle mission. Elevated mixing ratios of HCl in the lower stratosphere with a peak of approximately 2.9 ppbv (10(exp -9) parts per volume) were measured inside the vortex near 500 K potential temperature (approximately 19 km). Maximum ClONO2 mixing ratios of approximately 1.2, approximately 1.4, and approximately 0.9 ppbv near 700 K (approximately 25 km) were measured inside, at the edge, and outside the vortex, respectively. Model calculations reproduce the higher levels of HCl and NO(x) (NO + NO2) inside the lower stratospheric vortex both driven by photochemical processes initiated by low O3. The high HCl at low O3 results from chemical production of HC1 via the reaction of enhanced Cl with CH4, limited production of ClONO2, and the descent of inorganic chlorine from higher altitudes.

  15. In situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water, and aerosol in a Polar Stratospheric Cloud in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  16. Measurements of reactive nitrogen produced by tropical thunderstorms during BIBLE-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Takegawa, N.; Nishi, N.; Kashihara, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kudoh, S.; Blake, D.; Shirai, T.; Liley, B.; Ko, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ogawa, T.

    2007-09-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase C (BIBLE-C) aircraft mission was carried out near Darwin, Australia (12°S, 131°E) in December 2000. This was the first aircraft experiment designed to estimate lightning NO production rates in the tropics, where production is considered to be most intense. During the two flights (flights 10 and 13 made on December 9 and 11-12, respectively) enhancements of NOx (NO + NO2) up to 1000 and 1600 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, 10-s data) were observed at altitudes between 11.5 and 14 km. The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) cloud (brightness temperature) data and ground-based lightning measurements by the Global Positioning and Tracking System (GPATS) indicate that there were intensive lightning events over the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria, which took place upstream from our measurement area 10 to 14 h prior to the measurements. For these two flights, air in which NOx exceeded 100 pptv extended over 620 × 140 and 400 × 170 km2 (wind direction × perpendicular direction), respectively, suggesting a significant impact of lightning NO production on NOx levels in the tropics. We estimate the amount of NOx observed between 11.5 and 14 km produced by the thunderstorms to be 3.3 and 1.8 × 1029 NO molecules for flights 10 and 13, respectively. By using the GPATS lightning flash count data, column NO production rates are estimated to be 1.9-4.4 and 21-49 × 1025 NO molecules per single flash for these two flight data sets. In these estimations, it is assumed that the column NO production between 0 and 16 km is greater than the observed values between 11.5 and 14 km by a factor of 3.2, which is derived using results reported by Pickering et al. (1998). There are however large uncertainties in the GPATS lightning data in this study and care must be made when the production rates are referred. Uncertainties in these estimates are discussed. The impact on the ozone production rate is also described.

  17. Measurement of Local Reactive and Resistive Photoresponse of a Superconducting Microwave Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven M.; Zhuravel, Alexander P.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2006-03-01

    Despite the voluminous work on the nature of nonlinear effects in high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the causes are not completely clear and remain under debate. The Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) is a spatially-resolved method that can simultaneously measure optical and high frequency properties of HTS devices. Earlier results showed high resolution images of non-uniform microwave current distributions near the edge of a patterned transmission line structure [A. P. Zhuravel, A. V. Ustinov, K. S. Harshavardhan, and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4979 (2002)]. We have developed a new operational mode in which the microscope separately images the resistive and inductive components of the bolometric photoresponse. The two images show interesting and dramatic differences, leading to new insights about linear and nonlinear properties of HTS microwave devices.

  18. Taylor impact of glass rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Radford, D. D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ˜2GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ˜3GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ˜4GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5mmμs-1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  19. Taylor impact of glass rods

    SciTech Connect

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below {approx}2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above {approx}3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at {approx}4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7{+-}0.5 and 4.6{+-}0.5 mm {mu}s{sup -1} for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  20. Clustering-Induced Attraction in Granular Mixtures of Rods and Spheres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Depletion-induced aggregation of rods enhanced by clustering is observed to produce a novel model of attractive pairs of rods separated by a line of spheres in a quasi-2D, vertically-shaken, granular gas of rods and spheres. We show that the stability of these peculiar granular aggregates increases as a function of shaking intensity. Velocity distributions of spheres inside and outside of a pair of rods trapping a line of spheres show a clear suppression of the momentum acquired by the trapped spheres. The condensed phase formed between the rods is caused by a clustering instability of the trapped spheres, enhanced by a vertical guidance produced by the confining rods. The liberated area corresponding to direct excluded-volume pairs and indirect depletion-aggregated pairs is measured as a function of time. The stability of rod pairs mediated by spheres reveals an attraction comparable in strength to the one purely induced by depletion forces. PMID:27218804

  1. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  2. RP cone-rod degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Heckenlively, J R

    1987-01-01

    A group of patients with progressive retinal degeneration and visual field loss, who meet the basic definition of RP were investigated to better define the relationship of the findings on the ERG with clinical characteristics such as visual field size, presence or absence of scotomata or pseudo-altitudinal defects on visual field, amount of night blindness; and presence or absence of macular or optic nerve changes. These studies suggest that cone-rod degeneration patients of the RP type go through the following stages; early, the ERG has a definite cone-rod pattern where the rod ERG is larger than the cone ERG while both are abnormal. As the disease advances, there is more of a reduction in the scotopic ERG such that both the rod and cone ERGs become nearly equal. As the disease further progresses the ERG becomes non-recordable on single-flash technique, but there is good residual rod function and the final rod threshold remains good until the visual field is reduced, typically less than 10 degrees with the IV-4 isopter. Finally with advanced disease the patient becomes night blind and generally becomes very difficult to distinguished from patients who have advanced rod-cone degeneration. While it may seem logical to find that visual field size correlates with various ERG parameters; this has not been as consistent a finding in patients with rod-cone degeneration in the author's experience. The analysis shows several new pieces of information about visual field changes in cone-rod degeneration; enlarged blind spots are seen earlier in cases which have recordable cone-rod patterns (group I), and pseudo-altitudinal changes are more likely to occur in autosomal recessive patients. Patients with macular lesions and central scotomata had larger amplitudes than patients with normal appearing maculae and no central scotomata. Patients with temporal optic atrophy had an earlier onset of symptoms and significant correlation with both photopic a- and b-waves and bright flash

  3. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Eichler, Philipp; Fried, Alan; Keutsch, Frank N.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Walega, James G.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert J.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-03-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed ˜ 13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV-1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the

  4. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Anderson, B.; Beyersdorf, A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G.; Eichler, P.; Fried, A.; Keutsch, F. N.; Mikoviny, T.; Thornhill, K. L.; Walega, J. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Yokelson, R.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-11-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin for deriving emission factors and followed ~ 13.6 km downwind for observing chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution (10 m/0.1 s). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3 and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butandione and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 ppbV ppmV-1 CO emitted. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a near-explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into PAN and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the plume. Formaldehyde, acetone

  5. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to measure repair of alkylating DNA damage for assessing risk of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luo; Wei, Qingyi; Shi, Qiuling; Guo, Zhaosheng; Qiao, Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R

    2007-07-01

    The nicotine-derived nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lung adenocarcinoma through formation of DNA adducts. Our previous research on susceptibility to tobacco-induced carcinogenesis focused on benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the in vitro mutagen for phenotype measurements of DNA repair capacity (DRC) in mammalian cells. Here, we present a modified host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay to measure lymphocytic DRC for alkylating DNA damage as is induced by the tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK. We substituted dimethyl sulfate (DMS) to create alkylating damage in pCMVluc plasmid DNA and established the damage-repair dose-response curves in both normal and nucleotide excision repair-deficient lymphoblastoid cell lines and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated primary lymphocytes. We then successfully measured the DRC in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes from 48 patients with lung adenocarcinoma and 45 cancer-free controls and tested our hypothesis that lower DRC for alkylating damage is associated with an increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma. The cases exhibited a lower mean DRC than did the controls. A >3-fold increased risk (odds ratio = 3.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.25-8.21) was found for those with DRC levels below the control median. There was no correlation between the DRC measured with this DMS-HCR assay and that from the parallel BPDE-HCR assay. Interestingly, risk increased to >10-fold for those with sub-optimal DRC measured by both DMS- and BPDE-HCR assays. We conclude that variability in DRC is a risk factor for lung cancer and our results provide proof of principle for a new assay that can assess DRC for NNK-induced DNA damage. PMID:17341660

  6. Process-based tolerance assessment of connecting rod machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G. V. S. S.; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Surendra Babu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Process tolerancing based on the process capability studies is the optimistic and pragmatic approach of determining the manufacturing process tolerances. On adopting the define-measure-analyze-improve-control approach, the process potential capability index ( C p) and the process performance capability index ( C pk) values of identified process characteristics of connecting rod machining process are achieved to be greater than the industry benchmark of 1.33, i.e., four sigma level. The tolerance chain diagram methodology is applied to the connecting rod in order to verify the manufacturing process tolerances at various operations of the connecting rod manufacturing process. This paper bridges the gap between the existing dimensional tolerances obtained via tolerance charting and process capability studies of the connecting rod component. Finally, the process tolerancing comparison has been done by adopting a tolerance capability expert software.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  8. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the troposphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently the atmospheric sinks of OH are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink term of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. The first direct measurements of total OH reactivity were performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) [1], [2]. Recently a new method for determining OH reactivity was developed called the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [3]. The measurement principle is based on a competitive reaction between a reactive molecule not normally present in air with OH, and atmospheric OH reactive molecules with OH. The reactive molecule (X), is passed through a Teflon coated glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced into the reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the competing ambient air molecules directly provides the atmospheric total OH reactivity. In the first version of this set up, molecule X is pyrrole (C5H4N) and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In comparison to the original LIF based system, the PTR-MS has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and commercially available. However, using the PTR-MS for total OH reactivity measurements prevents it from probing the broad variety of volatile organic compounds in ambient air. Moreover, even smaller, less expensive and more portable detectors are available. This work examines the potential for a GC-PID in order to make the total OH reactivity measurement accessible to more practitioners. This study presents measurements of total OH reactivity with a custom built GC-PID (VOC-Analyzer from IUT-Berlin, now ENIT (Environics-IUT GmbH))[4]. The GC-PID is small (260

  9. Experimental and computational studies of rod-deployment mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalbe, L.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stofleth, J.H.; Greene, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    We describe experimental measurements and hydrocode simulations of two tests in which long (L/D=12), steel rods were accelerated laterally with charges of Detasheet-C high explosive (HE). In each test configuration, 84 rods were initially aligned parallel to one another in an array of four concentric rings. The first test had a central core of HE that dispersed the rods isotropically. The second test had a narrow, 180 degree strip of HE on one side of the assembly that focused the rods directionally. Using radiographic data taken at several milliseconds after HE initiation, we measured the dynamic distributions of the rods, and their translational velocities and tumble rates. To compare with the data, we also modeled the experiments with our smooth particle hydrocode SPHINX. Within the context of our numerical model, the hydrocode results agree satisfactorily with the test data. We include in our discussion many of the inferences and insights that our results provide to the phenomenology and performance of multimode, rod-deployment mechanisms.

  10. In vitro analysis of rod composition and actin dynamics in inherited myopathies.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, Aurélie; Domazetovska, Ana; Mokbel, Nancy; Cooper, Sandra T; Ilkovski, Biljana; North, Kathryn N

    2010-05-01

    Rods are the pathological hallmark of nemaline myopathy, but they can also occur as a secondary phenomenon in other disorders, including mitochondrial myopathies such as complex I deficiency. The mechanisms of rod formation are not well understood, particularly when rods occur in diverse disorders with very different structural and metabolic defects. We compared the characteristics of rods associated with abnormalities in structural components of skeletal muscle thin filament (3 mutations in the skeletal actin gene ACTA1) with those of rods induced by the metabolic cell stress of adenosine triphosphate depletion. C2C12 and NIH/3T3 cell culture models and immunocytochemistry were used to study rod composition and conformation. Fluorescent recovery after photobleaching was used to measure actin dynamics inside the rods. We demonstrate that not all rods are the same. Rods formed under different conditions contain a unique fingerprint of actin-binding proteins (cofilin and alpha-actinin) and display differences in actin dynamics that are specific to the mutation, to the cellular location of the rods (intranuclear vs cytoplasmic), and/or to the underlying pathological process (i.e. mutant actin or adenosine triphosphate depletion). Thus, rods likely represent a common morphological end point of a variety of different pathological processes, either structural or metabolic. PMID:20418783

  11. Genetic Dissection Reveals Two Separate Pathways for Rod and Cone Regeneration in the Teleost Retina

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ann C.; Scholz, Tamera L.; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Fadool, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Development of therapies to treat visual system dystrophies resulting from the degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors may directly benefit from studies of animal models, such as the zebrafish, that display continuous retinal neurogenesis and the capacity for injury-induced regeneration. Previous studies of retinal regeneration in fish have been conducted on adult animals and have relied on methods that cause acute damage to both rods and cones, as well as other retinal cell types. We report here the use of a genetic approach to study progenitor cell responses to photoreceptor degeneration in the larval and adult zebrafish retina. We have compared the responses to selective rod or cone degeneration using, respectively, the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line and zebrafish with a null mutation in the pde6c gene. Notably, rod degeneration induces increased proliferation of progenitors in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and is not associated with proliferation or reactive gliosis in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Molecular characterization of the rod progenitor cells demonstrated that they are committed to the rod photoreceptor fate while they are still mitotic. In contrast, cone degeneration induces both Müller cell proliferation and reactive gliosis, with little change in proliferation in the ONL. We found that in both lines, proliferative responses to photoreceptor degeneration can be observed as 7 days post fertilization (dpf). These two genetic models therefore offer new opportunities for investigating the molecular mechanisms of selective degeneration and regeneration of rods and cones. PMID:18265406

  12. Measurements of C-reactive protein in serum and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hurter, K; Spreng, D; Rytz, U; Schawalder, P; Ott-Knüsel, F; Schmökel, H

    2005-03-01

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) is based upon the clinical orthopaedic examination and the radiographic assessment, both of which can be non-specific and insensitive in early joint disease. The aim of our study was to investigate if there is an increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in degenerative joint disease (DJD) and if CRP could be used to help diagnose OA. We also wished to investigate whether it was possible to distinguish a joint with clinically and radiographically confirmed OA from a healthy joint by comparing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels within the synovial fluid and the serum. We have shown a difference in synovial LDH levels between diseased and healthy joints (P<0.0001). There was also a significant difference between LDH in arthritic synovial fluid and serum, with no correlation between the values. Despite the fact that the values of our clinical patients tended to be higher than the values of our control group (P=0.05) all measured values were within the normal limits of previous publications. From these data, we conclude that single measurements of serum CRP do not permit detection of OA in clinical patients and that serum LDH is not a reliable marker for osteoarthritis. LDH levels in the synovial fluid could be of diagnostic value for identifying osteoarthritis. PMID:15727922

  13. Balloon-Borne Measurements of Total Reactive Nitrogen, Nitric Acid, and Aerosol in the Cold Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Murcray, D. G.; Hofmann, D. J.; Johnston, P. V.; Iwasaka, Y.; Iwata, A.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Total reactive nitrogen (NO(Y)) between 15 and 29 km was measured for the first time on board a balloon within the Arctic cold vortex. Observations of HNO3, aerosol, and ozone were made by instruments on the same balloon gondola which was launched from Esrange, Sweden (68 deg N, 20 deg E) on January 23, 1989. The NO(y) mixing ratio was observed to increase very rapidly from 6 ppbv at 18 km altitude to a maximum of 21 ppbv at 21 km, forming a sharp layer with a thickness of about 2 km. A minimum in the NO(y) mixing ratio of 5 ppbv was found at 27 km. The measured HNO3 profile shows broad similarities to that of NO(y). This observation, together with the observed very low column amount of NO2, shows that NO(x) had been almost totally converted to HNO3, and that NO(y) was composed mainly of HNO3. The enhanced aerosol concentration between 19 and 22 km suggests that the maximum abundance of HNO3 trapped in the form of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was about 6 ppbv at 21 km. The sampled air parcels were highly supersaturated with respect to NAT. Although extensive denitrification throughout the stratosphere did not prevail, an indication of denitrification was found at altitudes of 27 and 22 km, and between 18 and 15 km.

  14. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30∗α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90–1.10∗α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40–0.55∗α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00∗α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30–2.30∗α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex. PMID:27588002

  15. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30(∗)α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90-1.10(∗)α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40-0.55(∗)α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00(∗)α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30-2.30(∗)α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex. PMID:27588002

  16. Total OH reactivity measurements aboard the Zeppelin NT during the PEGASOS campaigns 2012 and 2013: Spatial and vertical distribution and contribution of substance classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, R.; Jäger, J.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Fuchs, H.; Gomm, S.; Broch, S.; Häseler, R.; Holland, F.; Tillmann, R.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.; Kaiser, J.; Lu, K.; Wolfe, G.; Keutsch, F. N.; Thayer, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals are the main oxidants of atmospheric pollutants. The quantification of their sources and sinks is necessary to fully comprehend the measured OH concentration. Due to difficulties quantifying all the individual compounds contributing to the OH loss, the direct quantification of the OH loss is a crucial means to have predictive capability of atmospheric OH concentrations and thus oxidation rates. Especially in forested areas, where OH reactivity is dominated by highly reactive organic compounds, the directly measured OH loss rate often exceeds the calculated total OH reactivity. Here we present the total OH loss data and data for the individual sinks of OH measured on board of the Zeppelin NT in summer 2012 and 2013. The campaigns were part of the Pan-European Gas AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) and were performed from May - July 2012 in the area of Rotterdam (the Netherlands) and Bologna (Italy) and from April - July 2013 over Finland. Total OH reactivity was measured monitoring the decay of photolytically produced OH with laser induced fluorescence (LIF). OH, HO2, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), CO, formaldehyde, NOx, HONO and ozone were analyzed online together with photolysis frequencies, particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters. The Zeppelin NT was flying at low speed at altitudes of up to 900 m which provided insight into the vertical structure of the lower troposphere. On average, the total OH reactivity was 6.1 ± 1.2 s-1 over the area of Rotterdam, 3.8 ± 1.4 s-1 over the region of Bologna and only 2.1 ± 1.1 s-1 over Finland. During almost the entire campaigns, the measured total OH reactivity could be explained by the contributions of measured species. Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) contributed the major part of the total OH reactivity measured with a percentage share of 30% over the Rotterdam area and 40% over the area of Bologna. In the morning hours when layered structures had been

  17. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  18. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O₂ Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch and 7-Tube Clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Murphy, Michael F.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  19. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  20. Rod guide/paraffin scraper

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, J.F.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a rod guide and paraffin scraper. It comprises: a body including longitudinal ribs spaced radially and extending out from the body; having two identical halves with the body surrounding a bore to accept a sucker rod, and each of the identical halves having a locking and tightening feature using a tongue and groove concept for interfitting the halves together over the sucker rod. This improvement comprises a rod guide and paraffin scraper with two identical halves comprising; a cylindrical central body including, at each end, three longitudinal ribs radially spaced to form a triad leaving three flow channels, at each end of the body, of essentially the same size and spacing as the ribs; and an angular wedge with opposingly ramped sides at the inside end of each of the ribs for scraping and directing material into the flow channels; and a set of triangular shaped tongues that interfit with a set of triangular shaped grooves for tightening the identical halves together and over the sucker rod; and a pair of cone-shaped male locks at one end of the identical half to mate with a pair of cone-shaped female locks at the opposite end of the other identical half.

  1. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Final report, 1 September 1990--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.; Lu, W.; Lilly, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed what we believe to be the very first, a priori, correlation/prediction technique for the gasification reactivity of coal char. With this method the gasification reactivity of a coal char as a function of temperature can be correlated using the data from a temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiment following gasification under conditions where the reactivity is controlled by the thermal desorption of oxygen surface complexes formed during gasification. The current project was directed at extending and developing related techniques for the characterization and prediction/correlation of the reactivity of the ``young`` chars to CO{sub 2} and steam. Of particular interest was mapping of the reactivity behavior of the resultant chars, as revealed by the energetic heterogeneity of the complexes with char preparation conditions.

  2. Combining Ambient Measurements of OH Radicals and OH Reactivity in a Tropical Rainforest during the OP-3 Project: Resolving the Magnitude of the Missing OH Sources and Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P.; Furneaux, K. L.; Goddard, A.; George, I. J.; Evans, M. J.; Heard, D. E.; Team Op-3

    2010-12-01

    The self cleansing capacity of the troposphere and the lifetime of key greenhouse gases are controlled to a large extent by the OH radical. In environments where biogenic VOC emissions are high and NOx concentrations are low, for example in tropical rainforests, the current understanding of tropospheric chemistry suggests that OH radical concentrations should be suppressed. OH measurements made in such regions, however, have highlighted higher than expected OH radical concentrations that cannot be replicated by chemical models constrained with the currently known OH formation pathways [1]. Here we report OH and OH reactivity measurements made during the OP-3 project that took place in the Borneo rainforest in 2008. Concentrations of OH displayed a clear diurnal cycle, peaking at solar noon, with significant concentrations observed: up to 8.7×106 molecule cm-3 (60 min average). Although j(O1D) levels and humidity were high, low O3 concentrations limited the rate of primary OH production from ozone photolysis. OH reactivity measurements were made using a sliding injector flow-tube reactor technique, with OH detection by LIF. Mean OH reactivities of 15.5 s-1 were observed with daily maximum OH reactivity of 24.7 ± 11.1 s-1 shortly after local solar noon, coinciding with peak isoprene concentrations. Minimum values of 7.2 ± 2.2 s-1 were observed just before sun rise. Using the measured OH and OH reactivity in a constrained box model containing detailed MCM chemistry we are able to fully resolve the magnitude of the missing OH source. We find that significant OH sources must be present - in addition to primary production - in order to maintain the elevated levels of OH levels recorded. Inclusion of an additional OH source formed as a recycled product of isoprene oxidation [2] improves the modelled OH agreement but reduces the modelled to measured HO2 agreement. To replicate both OH and HO2, a process that recycles HO2 to OH is required; equivalent to the OH recycling

  3. Atmospheric mercury speciation: laboratory and field evaluation of a mist chamber method for measuring reactive gaseous mercury.

    PubMed

    Stratton, W J; Lindberg, S E; Perry, C J

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of atmospheric mercury speciation is critical to modeling its fate. Thus there is a crucial need for reliable methods to measure the fraction of gaseous atmospheric Hg which is in the oxidized Hg(II) form (termed reactive gaseous mercury, RGM). We have developed a novel method for measurement of RGM using a refluxing mist chamber, and we recently reported the results of sampling campaigns for RGM in Tennessee and Indiana. In general, measured RGM levels were about 3% of total gaseous mercury (TGM), and our results support prevailing hypotheses about the nature and behavior of RGM in ambient air. Because its use for RGM is growing, we now report in more detail the development and testing of the mist chamber method. Several styles of mist chambers have been investigated. The most versatile design employs a single nebulizer nozzle and can operate at flows of 15-20 L/min. The water-soluble Hg is collected in ca. 20 mL of absorbing solution, which is then analyzed for Hg(II) by SnCl2 reduction and CVAFS. One-hour samples (ca. 1 m3 of air) generally contain 50-200 pg of RGM. The method detection limit for 1-h samples is approximately 6-10 pg/m3. Thus short sample times can reveal temporal variations in RGM that would not otherwise be observable. The efficiency of collecting RGM in mist chambers is highly dependent on Cl- concentration in the absorbing solution, in keeping with equilibrium calculations. Artifact formation of Hg(II) by oxidation of Hg0 under ozone ambient conditions appears to be sufficiently slow so as to be negligible for the short (ca. 1 h) runs that are typically employed. We observed no significant error from cosampled particles or aerosols in rural nonimpacted air samples. We have developed a simple approach to analyzing mist chamber samples in the field using an automated Hg sampler.

  4. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  5. Experimental measurements and techniques in turbulent reactive and non-reactive flows; Proceedings of the Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, December 9-14, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    So, R.M.C.; Whitlaw, J.H.; Lapp, M.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-based diagnostics for flowfield measurements are discussed along with considerations for the application of CARS to turbulent reacting flows, Raman measurements of surface deposition from combustion flows, laser light scattering methods for simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements, and the characterization of sprays. Attention is given to concentration distributions in cylindrical combustors, scalar and momentum turbulent transport experiments with swirling and nonswirling flows, velocity and concentration measurements in a model diesel engine, an LDV system for turbulence length scale measurements, and laser measurement techniques applied to turbulent combustion in piston engines. Other topics explored are related to the role of vortex shedding in a bluff-body combustor, the structure and dynamics of reacting two stream plane mixing layers, conditional sampling of velocity and scalars in turbulent flames using simultaneous LDV-Raman scattering, and an investigation of temperature and velocity correlations in turbulent flames.

  6. Echinoderm reactive oxygen species (ROS) production measured by peroxidase, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (PLCL) as an immunotoxicological tool.

    PubMed

    Coteur, G; Danis, B; Dubois, P

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in invertebrate immunity prompted the use of this response in immunotoxicological studies in several taxa including marine organisms. In this chapter, we review the effects of environmental factors and contaminants such as heavy metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on the production of ROS by the main immune effector cells of echinoderms, the so-called amoebocytes. ROS production was measured by the peroxidase, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (PLCL) method. This method was found to predominantly reflect the production of superoxide anions and peroxides, among which hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite are the main species detected. Exogenous factors such as water temperature and salinity can influence this immune response in echinoderms. However, gender, handling stress and parasitism by a castrating ciliate apparently did not affect it. The impact of metals on ROS production differed greatly according to the duration and routes of exposure; in vitro and short-term in vivo exposures to metals caused an inhibition of this immune response, while the opposite effect was observed in a long-term in vivo exposure study. On the other hand, PCBs systematically had a stimulatory effect on ROS production independent of the echinoderm species or exposure routes. From the study of complex field contaminations, it appeared that contaminants released in the environment, such as metals, modulate starfish amoebocyte ROS production. This impact potentially represents a threat to the sustainability of natural populations of echinoderms and thereby to the stability of benthic ecosystems.

  7. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique. PMID:19350912

  8. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

  9. Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Assembly of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Triangular Pitch)

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Margaret A.

    2014-11-04

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UOIdaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States) fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel wasmore » in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.« less

  10. Application of fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Fiberglass sucker rods are assuming a place in artificial-lift technology. This paper briefly describes the manufacturing process and gives some design and operational hints for practical applications. It also describes some mathematical modeling modifications needed for fiberglass wave-equation design programs.

  11. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  12. Axial power monitor rod issues and resolution for K-14.1

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, T.C.; Fields, C.C.; Hightower, N.T. III; Wooten, L.A.; Andre, S.K.; Apperson, C.E.; Bailey, M.H.; Bell, D.L.; Clare, G.H.; Collins, S.L.; Croft, W.D.; Edwards, T.B.; Geiger, G.T.; Harris, S.P.; Lietzow, J.L.; McCulloch, R.W.; McFarlane, A.F.; Randolph, H.W.; Reed, R.L.; Reeve, C.P.; Revolinski, S.M.; Sessions, H.T.; Shine, E.P.; Smith, T.A.; Sossman, C.L.; Taylor, J.J.; Weber, J.H.

    1992-05-01

    A recent concern arose over the treatment of uncertainty associated with the K-Reactor axial power monitors (APMs). There are nine axial power monitor rods located at various positions in the K-Reactor core. By comparing the output of one sensor near the top of the rod to the output of another sensor near the bottom of the rod, the relative ratio of the neutron flux from the top to the bottom of the core can be determined. This ratio is called the roof-top-ratio (RTR) and is the output of a top sensor (Sensor 2) divided by the output of a bottom sensor (Sensor 6). The RTR is important to the safety analyses because when the RTR is maintained within certain ranges, the severity of reactivity transients is limited. There are uncertainties associated with the equipment`s ability to measure the true roof top ratio. It was determined recently that sufficient uncertainty was not accounted for either in reactor operation or in the safety analyses. The concern about uncertainty was addressed for three separate issues. One issue dear with the linear response of the sensors for power ranges planned for K-Reactor operation. The second issue dear with overall uncertainty in the RTR channel. The third issue dear with apparent large ranges in confidence bands for the RTR at low reactor powers as represented by original vendor data. Plots of sparse vendor data indicated unacceptably large uncertainties in RTR would have to be accounted for at the power ranges planned for K-Reactor operation. These concerns were brought to management`s attention through the existing procedures for notification, irrespective of their potential impact on the restart schedule. Analyses have been completed to resolve the APM issues described above, and work is progressing to take the needed steps to change operational procedures.

  13. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  14. What operators say about fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1984-11-01

    This article presents the results of an informal survey of oil producing companies and one design engineering firm in the Permian Basin about the use and performance of fiberglass sucker rods in sucker rod pumps.

  15. CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo: assessment by measuring circulating complement-C-reactive protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Brouwer, M C; Buysmann, S; ten Berge, I J; Hack, C E

    1996-07-01

    The in vivo function of C-reactive protein (CRP) is unknown. Among the in vitro functions assigned to CRP is the ability to activate complement via the classical pathway. To date, there is no evidence supporting that CRP exerts this function in vivo. We here show a novel approach to assess CRP-mediated complement activation in vivo, which is based on the property that activated complement factors C3 and C4 fix to CRP during complement activation induced by this acute phase protein. We developed specific ELISAs for complexes between CRP and C4b, C4d, C3b, or C3d. We established that in vitro complement-CRP complexes were formed only during CRP-dependent activation, and not during activation by other activators, even in the presence of high CRP levels. Circulating levels of complement-CRP complexes were undetectable in normal donors, but significantly increased in nine patients following implantation of a renal allograft. Importantly, levels of complement-CRP complexes did not change in these patients upon a bolus infusion of mAb OKT3, which induces activation of the classical complement pathway, demonstrating in vivo that complement-CRP complexes are not formed during CRP-independent activation of complement, even when CRP is elevated. We conclude that measurement of complement-CRP complexes provides a suitable tool to study CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo. Furthermore, increased levels of these complexes occur in clinical samples, indicating that CRP may induce activation of complement in vivo.

  16. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  17. From line to dots: an improved computerised rod and frame system for testing subjective visual vertical and horizontal

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Perception of subjective visual vertical (SVV) and horizontal (SVH) has traditionally been measured by rotating a mechanical rod either with or without a frame present. The computerised rod and frame (CRAF) system has previously only been used to measure SVV. We have expanded the use of this system by testing its feasibility to measure SVH. This was done by comparing two groups of subjects (n = 103) randomly assigned to be tested for SVV or SVH. Findings Preliminary results showed a higher than expected percentage of individuals with SVH errors < 0.5°. This was attributed to additional visual cues provided by the changing appearance of the rod as it approached the horizontal. A solution to this problem was sought by replacing the rod by two dots to mark its ends. In a second investigation 30 subjects were tested using both the "rod as line" and "rod as dots" presentation. Bland and Altman analysis showed no difference between the rod and dots presentations in the measurement of SVV, but confirmed a fixed error of -0.93° between rods and dots for SVH. Changing the rod from a line to dots in the computer system resulted in errors for both SVV and SVH that were comparable to previous studies using manual systems. Conclusions The computerized rod and frame system may be improved by replacement of the line with two dots. This reduces clues provided to the subject by the appearance of the rod on the screen. PMID:20205858

  18. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  19. Dependence of lightning rod efficacy on its geometric dimensions—a computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bazelyan, E. M.; D'Alessandro, F.; Raizer, Yu P.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical simulation is used to investigate the effect of rod dimensions on lightning attachment to the lightning rod. The effect is studied by considering a sequence of discharge processes, from a corona ignited in a slowly rising thundercloud electric field to the development of an upward leader in the electric field of an approaching downward leader. It is concluded that the efficacy of a lightning rod is almost independent of the rod radius in the range 0.05-5 cm. This is in agreement with measurements of the breakdown voltage in long laboratory rod-to-plane air gaps for various rod tip radii but is at variance with the conclusions reached by Moore et al (2000a Geophys. Res. Lett. 27 1487, 2000b J. Appl. Meteorol. 39 593, 2003 J. Appl. Meteorol. 42 984) from their observations under thunderstorm conditions.

  20. Who makes API sucker rods and couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This guide identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API rods such as fiberglass and aluminum.

  1. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  2. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  3. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  4. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  7. A novel approach for predicting acyl glucuronide reactivity via Schiff base formation: development of rapidly formed peptide adducts for LC/MS/MS measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyao; Davis, Margaret; Li, Fangbiao; Azam, Farooq; Scatina, JoAnn; Talaat, Rasmy

    2004-09-01

    A novel technique to study the reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites to protein has been developed and is described herein. Considered here are acyl glucuronide metabolites, which have undergone the rearrangement of the glucuronic acid moiety at physiological temperature and pH. The investigation of the reactivity of these electrophilic metabolites was carried out by measuring the rate of reaction of rearranged AG metabolites in forming the corresponding acyl glucuronide-peptide adduct in the presence of Lys-Phe. This differs from the parallel technique used in forming AG adducts of proteins that have been previously reported. In the study described here, the Schiff base adduct, diclofenac acyl glucuronide-Lys-Phe product, was generated and structurally elucidated by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis. The product structure was proved to be a Schiff base adduct by chemical derivatization by nucleophilic addition of HCN and chemical reduction with NaCNBH(3), followed by LC/MS/MS analysis. It is proposed here that the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronides as measured by covalent binding to protein is proportional to the amount of its peptide adduct generated with the peptide technique described. The application of this technique to the assessment of the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites was validated by developing a reactivity rank of seven carboxylic acid-containing drugs. Consistency was achieved between the ranking of reactivity in the peptide technique for these seven compounds and the rankings found in the literature. In addition, a correlation (R(2) = 0.95) was revealed between the formation of a peptide adduct and the rearrangement rate of the primary acyl glucuronide of seven tested compounds. A structure effect on the degree of reactivity has demonstrated the rate order: acetic acid > propionic acid > benzoic acid derivatives. A rational explanation of this order was proposed, based on the inherent

  8. Noise Radiation from Single and Multiple Rod Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were performed on single and multiple rod configurations to study the effect of Reynolds number, surface roughness, freestream turbulence, proximity and wake interference on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.8 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 5). Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the different model configurations tested. The dependence of the peak Sound Pressure Level on velocity was also examined. Several concepts for the reduction of the noise radiating from cylindrical rods were tested. It was shown that wire wraps and collar distributions could be used to significantly reduce the noise radiating from rods in tandem configurations.

  9. Blocks and residual stresses in sapphire rods of different crystallographic orientations grown by the Stepanov method

    SciTech Connect

    Krymov, V. M. Nosov, Yu. G.; Bakholdin, S. I.; Maslov, V. N.; Shul’pina, I. L.

    2015-05-15

    The formation of blocks in shaped sapphire rods of two crystallographic orientations has been investigated. It is shown that, when growth occurs in the direction of the optical c axis, blocks are formed with a higher probability than in the case of growth in the a direction. A model of formation of blocks in rods of different orientations is proposed. The distribution of residual stresses over sapphire rod cross sections is measured by conoscopy. It is found that stresses increase from the middle of a rod to its periphery and reach 20 MPa.

  10. Assessing adaptability and reactive scope: Introducing a new measure and illustrating its use through a case study of environmental stress in forest-living baboons.

    PubMed

    MacLarnon, A M; Sommer, V; Goffe, A S; Higham, J P; Lodge, E; Tkaczynski, P; Ross, C

    2015-05-01

    In order to maintain regulatory processes, animals are expected to be adapted to the range of environmental stressors usually encountered in their environmental niche. The available capacity of their stress responses is termed their reactive scope, which is utilised to a greater or lesser extent to deal with different stressors. Typically, non-invasive hormone assessment is used to measure the physiological stress responses of wild animals, but, for methodological reasons, such measurements are not directly comparable across studies, limiting interpretation. To overcome this constraint, we propose a new measure of the relative strength of stress responses, 'demonstrated reactive scope', and illustrate its use in a study of ecological correlates (climate, food availability) of faecal glucocorticoid (fGC) levels in two forest-living troops of baboons. Results suggest the wild-feeding troop experiences both thermoregulatory and nutritional stress, while the crop-raiding troop experiences only thermoregulatory stress. This difference, together with the crop-raiding troop's lower overall physiological stress levels and lower demonstrated fGC reactive scope, may reflect nutritional stress-buffering in this troop. The relatively high demonstrated fGC reactive scope levels of both troops compared with other baboons and primate species, may reflect their extreme habitat, on the edge of the geographic range for baboons. Demonstrated reactive scope provides a means of gauging the relative strengths of stress responses of individuals, populations, or species under different conditions, enhancing the interpretive capacity of non-invasive studies of stress hormone levels in wild populations, e.g. in terms of animals' adaptive flexibility, the magnitude of their response to anthropogenic change, or the severity of impact of environmental conditions.

  11. Combining moving inlets for measuring gradients of reactive trace gases and thoron measurements for the determination of near surface fluxes -first results from the Amazon rain forest-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Artaxo, Paulo; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto; Trebs, Ivonne; Vega, Oscar; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many compounds of interest no fast response sensors for the determination of eddy covariance fluxes are available. Therefore, flux-gradient relationships are used. The most common are the aerodynamic gradient method and the modified Bowen ratio method. For those approaches some assumptions have to be made which restrict their use. An alternative approach to calculate these fluxes might be given by the "thoron clock" method. The radon isotope Thoron (220Rn) is exhaled from the soil and has a half life time of 56 seconds. Therefore, it exists in measureable amounts only close to the ground and is hardly advected. Its only source is the radioactive decay of Thorium in soil. As it is a noble gas Thoron is not influenced by biochemical processes in air. Consequently, its concentration profile only depends on vertical mixing and the radioactive decay which is a physical constant. According to Lehmann et al. (1999) and Plake and Trebs (2013) a transport-time can be directly calculated from two heights thoron concentration/activity for the layer in-between without further assumptions. From this transport time the transfer velocity is derived which is then applied to calculate the fluxes of other (reactive) trace gases. A major advantage of the method is that the transport-time is known and using the measured concentration profile the chemical loss of a compound can be directly calculated and corrected for. We have applied this method for a first time in the Amazon rainforest during a field campaign at the ATTO site 150 km North East of Manaus in the dry season of 2014. We measured gradients of NO, NO2, O3, HONO and VOCs by using a movable inlet on a lift system close to the forest floor (0.19 m, 0.52 m and 1.59 m). A Thoron profile was measure in parallel at the lower two heights. First results of the gradients, the transport times and some preliminary flux values will be presented. References: Lehmann, B.E., Lehmann, M., Neftel, A .: 220 Radon calibration of near

  12. Pellet relocation testing results for four-foot-long tritium target rods

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Harding, N.E.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses four-foot-long sections of a new production light-water reactor (NP-LWR) generic tritium target rod which were tested to determine if the length of the pellet pencils affects the amount of pellet material relocated during a burst and to characterize the burst. This testing was conducted as a follow-on study of cladding strength and pellet relocation behavior of short target rod specimens [11 cm (4-4 in.)]. The results of these tests could be used to support safety analyses of the effects of rod bursting and pellet relocation on the performance of a NP-LWR reactor core during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). All burst tests of the target rods were performed in air because air is more reactive than the air-steam or water environment that accompanies a LOCA.

  13. Measuring the reactivity of commercially available zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for environmental remediation with iopromide.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Doris; Micić, Vesna; Laumann, Susanne; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-10-01

    The high specific surface area and high reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have led to much research on their application to environmental remediation. The reactivity of nZVI is affected by both the water chemistry and the properties of the particular type of nZVI particle used. We have investigated the reactivity of three types of commercially available Nanofer particles (from Nanoiron, s.r.o., Czech Republic) that are currently either used in, or proposed for use in full scale environmental remediation projects. The performance of one of these, the air-stable and thus easy-to-handle Nanofer Star particle, has not previously been reported. Experiments were carried out first in batch shaking reactors in order to derive maximum reactivity rates and provide a rapid estimate of the Nanofer particle's reactivity. The experiments were performed under near-natural environmental conditions with respect to the pH value of water and solute concentrations, and results were compared with those obtained using synthetic water. Thereafter, the polyelectrolyte-coated Nanofer 25S particles (having the highest potential for transport within porous media) were chosen for the experiments in column reactors, in order to elucidate nanoparticle reactivity under a more field-site realistic setting. Iopromide was rapidly dehalogenated by the investigated nZVI particles, following pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics that was independent of the experimental conditions. The specific surface area normalized reaction rate constant (kSA) value in the batch reactors ranged between 0.12 and 0.53Lm(-2)h(-1); it was highest for the uncoated Nanofer 25 particles, followed by the polyacrylic acid-coated Nanofer 25S and air-stable Nanofer Star particles. In the batch reactors all particles were less reactive in natural water than in synthetic water. The kSA values derived from the column reactor experiments were about 1000 times lower than those from the batch reactors, ranging

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  15. Guide for rotating sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrel, R.D.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods rotated in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright solid cylindrical coupling body of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used; a pair of spaced apart axle holders positioned in three recess; an axle received in each recess in the coupling body, the axis of each axle being parallel and spaced from the body longitudinal axis; a roller rotatably received on each axle, the periphery of each roller extending exteriorly of the external cylindrical surface of the coupling body; and means to retain each of the holders in the coupling body recess.

  16. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  17. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  18. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  19. The rod circuit in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Young, H M; Gynther, I C

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have a well-defined neuronal pathway that serves rod vision. In rabbit retina, the different populations of interneurons in the rod pathway can be selectively labeled, either separately or in combination. The rod bipolar cells show protein kinase C immunoreactivity; the rod (AII) amacrine cells can be distinguished in nuclear-yellow labeled retina; the rod reciprocal (S1 & S2) amacrine cells accumulate serotonin; and the dopaminergic amacrine cells show tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Furthermore, intracellular dye injection of the microscopically identified interneurons enables whole-population and single-cell studies to be combined in the same tissue. Using this approach, we have been able to analyze systematically the neuronal architecture of the rod circuit across the rabbit retina and compare its organization with that of the rod circuit in central cat retina. In rabbit retina, the rod interneurons are not organized in a uniform neuronal module that is simply scaled up from central to peripheral retina. Moreover, peripheral fields in superior and inferior retina that have equivalent densities of each neuronal type show markedly different rod bipolar to AII amacrine convergence ratios, with the result that many more rod photoreceptors converge on an AII amacrine cell in superior retina. In rabbit retina, much of the convergence in the rod circuit occurs in the outer retina whereas, in central cat retina, it is more evenly distributed between the inner and outer retina.

  20. Tests pinpoint sucker-rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A.; Elagdel, E.

    1997-05-26

    A detailed metallurgical examination of a 7/8-inch and a 1-inch sucker rod revealed corrosion fatigue had caused their failure. The 7 to 8-inch rod had failed after a few months of service while the 1-inch rod failed after 1 year. Both rods had been used in a sweet-oil environment. Both rods failed by corrosion fatigue because of repeated loads during operations. Pitting because of the presence of chloride ions and carbon dioxide was initiated on the rod surface, which in turn acted as a crack origin from which the fatigue crack initiated and propagated during operations. The pitting was on the external surface. These pits were large and penetrated through the rod cross-section. Fatigue cracking is initiated at the bottom of the pit where high stress concentration is expected and propagated because the rods were subjected to the alternating stresses during operation. The extent of the fatigue crack varied in the two examined rods because of the difference in the rod heat treatment and microstructure. The paper discusses fatigue failure, the visual examination, macroscopic and microscopic examinations, rod properties, and future operations.

  1. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  2. Noise reduction in a Mach 5 wind tunnel with a rectangular rod-wall sound shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Keyes, J. W.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1980-06-01

    A rod wall sound shield was tested over a range of Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x 10 to the 7th power to 8.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter. The model consisted of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Suitable measurement techniques were used to determine properties of the flow and acoustic disturbance in the shield and transition in the rod boundary layers. Measurements indicated that for a Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power the noise in the shielded region was significantly reduced, but only when the flow is mostly laminar on the rods. Actual nozzle input noise measured on the nozzle centerline before reflection at the shield walls was attenuated only slightly even when the rod boundary layer were laminar. At a lower Reynolds number, nozzle input noise at noise levels in the shield were still too high for application to a quiet tunnel. At Reynolds numbers above 2.0 x 10 the the 7th power per meter, measured noise levels were generally higher than nozzle input levels, probably due to transition in the rod boundary layers. The small attenuation of nozzle input noise at intermediate Reynolds numbers for laminar rod layers at the acoustic origins is apparently due to high frequencies of noise.

  3. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Quarterly technical progress report, 15 December 1991--15 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.H.; Lu, W.; Lilly, W.D.

    1992-06-10

    We have developed what we believe to be the very first a priori prediction technique for the gasification reactivity of coal char. With this method the gasification reactivity of a coal char as function of temperature can be predicted from a single temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiment following mild gasification at a single temperature (Calo et al., 1989; Hall and Calo, 1990a). This approach has been demonstrated for C0{sub 2} gasification of coal chars where the gasification reactivity is controlled by the thermal desorption of oxygen surface complexes formed during gasification. This approach may be extended to other oxidant species, such as steam, and carbon-hydrogen complexes for hydrogen gasification as well. In the current report, we present a summary of the work that has been conducted to date in constructing a new TGA/TPD-MS experimental system which provides us with the capability of simultaneous monitoring of transient sample mass data, as well as gas phase composition during thermal desorption experiments. In addition, we present some steam reactivity data obtained with another TGA (Cahn 113 system) which has been modified for steam gasification experiments.

  4. Measuring Proactive and Reactive Criminal Thinking with the Picts: Correlations with Outcome Expectancies and Hostile Attribution Biases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2007-01-01

    Research studies have determined that proactive or instrumental aggression correlates with positive outcome expectancies for violence, whereas reactive aggression correlates with hostile attribution biases. It was hypothesized that the Problem Avoidance factor scale of the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) would serve as…

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ANNULAR DENUDER METHODOLOGY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF DIVALENT INORGANIC REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric mercury is predominantly present in the gaseous elemental form (Hg0). However, anthropogenic emissions (e.g. incineration, fossil fuel combustion) emit and natural processes create particulate-phase mercury (Hg(p)) and divalent reactive gas-phase mercury (RGM). RG...

  6. Failure kinetics in borosilicate glass during rod impact

    SciTech Connect

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Anderson, Charles E. Jr.; Behner, Thilo; Hohler, Volker; Wickert, Matthias; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2007-12-12

    Failure front (FF) and penetration velocity have been measured for long gold rods impacting and penetrating borosilicate (BS) glass. Data are obtained by visualizing simultaneously FF propagation with a high speed camera and rod penetration with flash X-rays. Results for BS glass are qualitatively similar to those of DEDF (PbO) glass. FF velocity rapidly decreases from an initial value to a lower, approximately constant value. FF velocity increases with impact velocity, v{sub p}. The FF velocity remains significantly lower than the shear velocity, even at the highest impact velocity tested, about 2.5 km/s. The ratio of the FF velocity to the rod penetration velocity, v{sub F}/u, decreases with increasing v{sub p} and appears to be approaching v{sub F}/u = 1 asymptotically, as observed previously for DEDF glass. The separation of the FF and the tip of the rod decreases with increasing impact velocity. Importantly, since v{sub F}/u{>=}1, the gold rod is always penetrating glass behind the FF.

  7. Airborne Measurements of Nitric Oxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Ozone, and Total Reactive Nitrogen During the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Fabrication of the University of Michigan Multichannel Chemiluminescence Instrument (UMMCI) was completed in early 1996 and the instrument participated in test flights on the NASA P3B at Wallops Island prior to integration and deployment for the PEM- Tropics A Mission. The UMMCI consists of 4 channels for simultaneous measurements of ozone and NO with the option for measurements of NO2 and NOy (total reactive nitrogen) when converters are placed upstream of the NO channels. Each NO channel consists of a zeroing volume and reaction vessel, while the ozone channel consists of an ozone catalyst (or scrubber) trap that is not in line with the reaction vessel. The detectors in all for channels are Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes, which are followed by pulse amplifier discriminators on the NO channels and an electrometer on the ozone channel. Schematics of the Detector Module and NOx/03 Probe Insert and Diagrams of the Control and Data System, the Power and Ground System, the Gas Flow System, and the Calibration System Flow are attached. Intercomparisons were conducted with G. Gregory, NASA/Langley, during the test flights (following prior calibration of the ozone generator/calibrators at the Wallops Long-Path Absorption facility). Initial test results appeared to be reasonable, and instrument characterization studies proceeded for the ozone channel and the 3 NO channels until deployment for integration for the PEM-Tropics Mission. Ozone data was obtained for Flights #4, and 6-2 1, and finalized data was submitted to the PEM-Tropics Data Archive and to the Science Team during the April 1997 Data Workshop. Although it initially appeared that the instrument sensitivity varied, subsequent tests showed that this was the fault of a leak in the ozone calibrator. In fact; the instrument sensitivity has not been observed to vary in a large number of tests over the years since the PEM-Tropics mission. We have, therefore, a very high degree of confidence in the O3 data that we

  8. Direct Evidence for Daily Plasticity of Electrical Coupling between Rod Photoreceptors in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors are electrically coupled through gap junctions. Coupling is a key determinant of their light response properties, but whether rod electrical coupling is dynamically regulated remains elusive and controversial. Here, we have obtained direct measurements of the conductance between adjacent rods in mouse retina and present evidence that rod electrical coupling strength is dependent on the time of day, the lighting conditions, and the mouse strain. Specifically, we show in CBA/Ca mice that under circadian conditions, the rod junctional conductance has a median value of 98 pS during the subjective day and of 493 pS during the subjective night. In C57BL/6 mice, the median junctional conductance between dark-adapted rods is ∼140 pS, regardless of the time in the circadian cycle. Adaptation to bright light decreases the rod junctional conductance to ∼0 pS, regardless of the time of day or the mouse strain. Together, these results establish the high degree of plasticity of rod electrical coupling over the course of the day. Estimates of the rod coupling strength will provide a foundation for further investigations of rod interactions and the role of rod coupling in the ability of the visual system to anticipate, assimilate, and respond to the daily changes in ambient light intensity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many cells in the CNS communicate via gap junctions, or electrical synapses, the regulation of which remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the strength of electrical coupling between rod photoreceptors of the retina is regulated by the time of day and the lighting conditions. This mechanism may help us understand some key aspects of day and night vision as well as some visual malfunctions. PMID:26740659

  9. Self-diffusion and sedimentation of tracer spheres in (semi)dilute dispersions of rigid colloidal rods

    PubMed

    Kluijtmans; Koenderink; Philipse

    2000-01-01

    Long-time self-diffusion and sedimentation of fluorescent tracer spheres in electrostatically stabilized dispersions of rigid colloidal host rods have been measured in situ with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and gravitational and ultracentrifugal sedimentation. The dynamics of silica tracer spheres of 39 and 370 nm radius was monitored in dispersions of host rods with aspect ratios 9.6 and 25.7 at various rod volume fractions. The translational and rotational diffusion coefficient of the host rods was obtained independently with dynamic light scattering and birefringence decay measurements. Our results indicate that sedimentation and long-time self-diffusion are determined by the same friction factor. Furthermore we find that, as long as the host rods are relatively mobile, tracer sphere sedimentation and long-time self-diffusion are governed by the macroscopic solution viscosity, regardless of the tracer and host rod size. However, when the host rods are immobilized, due to rod entanglements at higher volume fractions, tracer sphere dynamics depends strongly on the tracer size relative to the pore size of the host rod network. The large tracers are completely trapped in the network whereas the small tracer spheres remain mobile. Current models for tracer sphere motion in rod assemblies do not satisfactorily explain the complete dynamic regime covered by our experimental model system because the effect of host rod mobility is not properly taken into account.

  10. BWR control-rod cobalt-alloy replacement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, P.

    1982-03-01

    Cobalt base pin and roller alloys in BWR Control Rods are a source for the Co-60 isotope which contributes to radiation buildup in the BWR core, the recirculation piping system and the spent fuel pool. It thereby influences personnel radiation exposure during BWR plant maintenance. The program objectives were (a) to identify non-cobalt alloys which could potentially replace the cobalt alloys, (b) evaluate the alloys by testing to qualify them for in-reactor surveillance testing, and (c) to initiate reactor tests at 2 BWRs. Wear resistance, an important requirement for pins and rollers, was measured in a simulated BWR environment (excluding irradiation). Prototypic wear tests were emphasized and a prototype control rod drive test facility was used to evaluate several pin and roller alloy combinations during prototype control rod operations.

  11. Calcium spikes in toad rods.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Gerschenfeld, H M; Quandt, F N

    1980-01-01

    1. When the retina of the toad, Bufo marinus, was superfused with 6-12 mM-tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), intracellular recordings from rods showed large, depolarizing regenerative potentials. For brief exposures to TEA, these potentials occurred during the recovery phase of the light responses; whereas, during longer exposures, they were spontaneous in darkness but suppressed during illumination. Similar regenerative potentials were observed during perfusion with 3-10 mM-4-aminopyridine and 1-2 mM-BaCl2. 2. The amplitude of the regenerative potentials depended upon the extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca2+]o). Lowering [Ca2+]o decreased their amplitude and in zero [Ca2+]o they were reversibly abolished. Increasing [Ca2+]o by 1.5-2 times produced a small hyperpolarization of membrane potential and a large augmentation in regenerative response amplitude. However, larger increases in [Ca2+]o produced large membrane hyperpolarizations and reversibly suppressed the regenerative responses. 3. High concentrations of Sr2+ in TEA also enhanced regenerative activity but did not affect the rod resting membrane potential. The amplitude of regenerative potentials increased continuously with increasing [Sr2+]o, and in 28 mM-Sr2+ the rods generated 60-70 mV action potentials, even in the absence of extracellular Na+. 4. The regenerative potentials were blocked by 25 microM-Cd2+, 50-100 microM-Co2+, 5mM-Mg2+, and 100 microM-D-600. They were unaffected by 2 microM-TTX or 2-5 mM-Na aspartate. 5. In Ringer containing 12 mM-TEA, large anode break responses could be recorded from rods at the termination of inward current pulses. These anode break responses were also suppressed by Co2+ and unaffected by TTX or Na aspartate. 6. We conclude that the membrane of toad rods contains a conductance normally selective for Ca2+, which is activated by depolarization. In normal Ringer, the inward current through this conductance produces little effect, since it is balanced by a large outward

  12. Hemispheric Correlates of the Rod-And-Frame Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F.; Languis, Marlin L.

    1981-01-01

    Right-handed sixth graders were administered the WISC Block Design and verbal and nonverbal versions of the Rod-and-Frame Test (RFT), measuring field dependence/independence. Results seemed to reflect a right hemisphere processing for the nonverbal RFT and a possible sex bias against girls in its traditional verbal administration. (Author/SJL)

  13. Rod and dish cathode improves penning-type vacuum gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peppin, G. B.

    1966-01-01

    Improved penning-type ionization gage provides range and sensitivity required to measure gas pressure below .01 torr under high vacuum conditions. The gage uses a highly conductive cathode composed of two disks of high magnetic permeability separated by a rod of low magnetic permeability.

  14. Reliability assessment of a rod photoreceptor outer segment grading system.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, M M; Graney, M J; Kritchevsky, S B; Iannaccone, A

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a rod photoreceptor outer segment (PR-OS) grading system based on the analysis of 1 microm thick retinal sections obtained from Xenopus laevis whole-eye organ cultures. Digitally captured images, representative of the entire spectrum of rod PR-OS organization levels, were selected and coded numerically. A total of 102 individual rod PR-OS profiles were graded according to a six-step classification scheme based on the percentage of rod PR-OS membrane organization. Unweighted (exact agreement) and weighted kappa (kappa) coefficients (for use with ordered categorical rating scales) were calculated. Differences between kappa coefficients were tested for by chi-square analysis. To investigate the intra- and inter-rater variability and the possible presence of an interaction of the measurements with time, a repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed. The overall unweighted and weighted intra-rater kappa coefficients were 0.78 and 0.92, respectively. The overall unweighted and weighted inter-rater kappa coefficients were 0.73 and 0.90, respectively. There was no significant difference between raters or between first and second reading, nor was interaction between raters and time of rating documented. Individual kappa coefficients were equivalent both between raters and between sessions. Intra- and inter-rater agreement was within one step in 100% of cases. The estimated values of the kappa coefficients are consistent with a good to excellent degree of reliability and reproducibility of this rod PR-OS grading system. This system will be useful in the assessment of rod PR-OS morphology in studies of photoreceptor physiology and pathology.

  15. The role of serum C-reactive protein measured by high-sensitive method in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Owecki, Maciej; Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Woliński, Kosma; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Budny, Bartłomiej; Florek, Ewa; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Miechowicz, Izabela; Bączyk, Maciej; Sawicka, Nadia; Dhir, Sumit; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration as a marker of the inflammatory state in many different thyroid diseases and its dependence on the stage and duration of disease. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 444 randomly selected patients with different kinds of thyroid disease (106 men and 338 women, ranging 18-72 years of age; mean 56.2 ± 5.0 years; median 52 years). Group 1 (G1) comprised 250 patients with hyperthyroidism. Group 2 (G2) consisted of 72 euthyroid patients. Group 3 (G3) consisted of 122 patients with hypothyroidism. Free T4, free T3, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were measured using the electrochemiluminescent method. Human serum thyroglobulin autoantibodies (Tg-Abs), thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPO-Abs), and autoantibodies against the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR-Abs) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The high-sensitive CRP (Hs-CRP) level (reference range <3 mg/L) was determined with a highly sensitive latex-based immunoassay. The mean value of Hs-CRP in G1 was 3.6 ± 2.8 mg/L, in G2 2.5 ± 1.5 mg/L and in G3 5.9 ± 5.8 mg/L. Hs-CRP (in mg/L) medians, interquartile and the total ranges in G1 were 3.0 (2.0 [0.1-21.0] 4.0); in G2: 2.3 [1.8 (0.2-9.2) 3.2]; and in G3: 4.3 [2.2 (0.3-31.5) 7.8]. We found statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test) in serum Hs-CRP values between G1 and G2 (P = 0.007), G1 and G3 (P = 0.001), G2 and G3 (P < 0.001). In G1, statistically significant correlation was confirmed between Hs-CRP and Tg-Abs (r = -0.22, P = 0.0016), CRP and TPO-Abs (r = -0.26, P < 0.001), and also between Hs-CRP and TSHR-Abs (r = -0.18, P = 0.02). In the remaining cases, differences between Hs-CRP and TSH levels (r = -0.09, P = 0.16) were not statistically significant. In G2, no statistically significant correlation was observed: Hs-CRP and Tg-Abs (r = -0.18, P = 0.13), Hs-CRP and TPO-Abs (r = -0.17, P = 0.15), Hs-CRP and TSH (r = 0.01, P = 0.91), Hs-CRP and TSHR-Abs (r

  16. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  17. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I. Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-15

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  18. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  19. Constraints on NOx-dependent O3 production and VOC Reactivity over New York City from measurements of NO2 columns and surface O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valin, L. C.; Miller, P. J.; Fiore, A. M.; Kebschull, K.

    2015-12-01

    UV/Visible spectrometers are capable of making high-precision measurements of the NO2 column and future measurements of the NO2 column will provide neighborhood-scale hourly information. We use current measurements of the NO2 column at 1:30 PM local solar time from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and in situ measurements of surface O3 from the EPA AQS monitoring system for select summertime days (June, July, August) from 2005 to 2014 to estimate the NOx-dependence of O3 production over and downwind of the New York City metropolitan area. From this estimate, we provide constraints on the reactivity-weighted VOC concentration necessary to achieve the observed pattern of O3 production. Our findings suggest that future hourly NO2-column measurements will provide valuable near-real time information on the production of O3 upwind of communities in the wake of NOx emission outflow.

  20. Radial pressure sensor of sucker rod based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyu; Yan, Hu; Li, Qiang

    2013-10-01

    The eccentric wear, fracture and other phenomena often occur to the sucker rod in major oil fields. It turns out that the radial pressure of sucker rod suffered is the main reason for its eccentric wear. It is necessary to analyze the eccentric wear and fracture of sucker rod in the pumping process. It is also important to measure the radial pressure for the downhole sucker rod accurately. The radial pressure could be analyzed when sucker rod is extruded, collided or sustained friction based on the material mechanics and the fluid dynamics. The mechanical structure is designed for measuring the radial pressure. The data processing system for radial pressure of down-hole sucker rod based on LabVIEW is developed in this paper. The functions are real-time data acquisition and processing for sucker rod radial pressure. The communication of LabVIEW and Access database had been realized. The database management system for radial pressure of sucker rod is built, which could be used to achieve the data storage, historical data retrieval analysis, data organization and calculation. The computer simulation is carried out to verify the reasonability of the theoretical analysis and structure design.

  1. Combustion of solid carbon rods in zero and normal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuckler, C. M.

    1981-05-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of carbon combustion and to assess the importance of gravitational induced convection on the process, zero and normal gravity experiments were conducted in which spectroscopic carbon rods were resistance ignitied and burned in dry oxygen environments. In the zero-gravity drop tower tests, a blue flame surrounded the rod, showing that a gas phase reaction in which carbon monoxide was oxidized to carbon dioxide was taking place. The ratio of flame diameter to rod diameter was obtained as a function of time. It was found that this ratio was inversely proportional to both the oxygen pressure and the rod diameter. In the normal gravity tests, direct mass spectrometric sampling was used to measure gas phase concentrations. The gas sampling probe was positioned near the circumference of a horizontally mounted 0.615 cm diameter carbon rod, either at the top or at angles of 45 deg to 90 deg from the top, and yielded concentration profiles of CO2, CO, and O2 as a function of distance from the surface. The mechanism controlling the combustion process was found to change from chemical process control at the 90 deg and 45 deg probe positions to mass transfer control at the 0 deg probe position at the top of the rod. Under the experimental conditions used, carbon combustion was characterized by two surface reactions, 2C + O2 yields 2CO and CO2 + C yields 2CO, and a gas phase reaction, 2CO + O2 yields 2CO2.

  2. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  3. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  4. Spontaneous Patterning of Confined Granular Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanis, Jennifer; Harries, Daniel; Sackett, Dan L.; Losert, Wolfgang; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Vertically vibrated rod-shaped granular materials confined to quasi-2D containers self-organize into distinct patterns. We find, consistent with theory and simulation, a density dependent isotropic-nematic transition. Along the walls, rods interact sterically to form a wetting layer. For high rod densities, complex patterns emerge as a result of competition between bulk and boundary alignment. A continuum elastic energy accounting for nematic distortion and local wall anchoring reproduces the structures seen experimentally.

  5. Feedback induction of a photoreceptor-specific isoform of retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor β by the rod transcription factor NRL.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulong; Liu, Hong; Ng, Lily; Kim, Jung-Woong; Hao, Hong; Swaroop, Anand; Forrest, Douglas

    2014-11-21

    Vision requires the generation of cone and rod photoreceptors that function in daylight and dim light, respectively. The neural retina leucine zipper factor (NRL) transcription factor critically controls photoreceptor fates as it stimulates rod differentiation and suppresses cone differentiation. However, the controls over NRL induction that balance rod and cone fates remain unclear. We have reported previously that the retinoid-related orphan receptor β gene (Rorb) is required for Nrl expression and other retinal functions. We show that Rorb differentially expresses two isoforms: RORβ2 in photoreceptors and RORβ1 in photoreceptors, progenitor cells, and other cell types. Deletion of RORβ2 or RORβ1 increased the cone:rod ratio ∼2-fold, whereas deletion of both isoforms in Rorb(-/-) mice produced almost exclusively cone-like cells at the expense of rods, suggesting that both isoforms induce Nrl. Electroporation of either RORβ isoform into retinal explants from Rorb(-/-) neonates reactivated Nrl and rod genes but, in Nrl(-/-) explants, failed to reactivate rod genes, indicating that NRL is the effector for both RORβ isoforms in rod differentiation. Unexpectedly, RORβ2 expression was lost in Nrl(-/-) mice. Moreover, NRL activated the RORβ2-specific promoter of Rorb, indicating that NRL activates Rorb, its own inducer gene. We suggest that feedback activation between Nrl and Rorb genes reinforces the commitment to rod differentiation. PMID:25296752

  6. Early Retinal Neuronal Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice: Reduced Light-Evoked Inhibition Increases Rod Pathway Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Dotson, Johnnie M.; Beckman, Jamie J.; Mazade, Reece E.; Hoon, Mrinalini; Bernstein, Adam S.; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Eggers, Erika D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies suggest that the neural retinal response to light is compromised in diabetes. Electroretinogram studies suggest that the dim light retinal rod pathway is especially susceptible to diabetic damage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diabetes alters rod pathway signaling. Methods Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice by three intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (STZ; 75 mg/kg), and confirmed by blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL. Six weeks after the first injection, whole-cell voltage clamp recordings of spontaneous and light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents from rod bipolar cells were made in dark-adapted retinal slices. Light-evoked excitatory currents from rod bipolar and AII amacrine cells, and spontaneous excitatory currents from AII amacrine cells were also measured. Receptor inputs were pharmacologically isolated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on whole mounted retinas. Results Rod bipolar cells had reduced light-evoked inhibitory input from amacrine cells but no change in excitatory input from rod photoreceptors. Reduced light-evoked inhibition, mediated by both GABAA and GABAC receptors, increased rod bipolar cell output onto AII amacrine cells. Spontaneous release of GABA onto rod bipolar cells was increased, which may limit GABA availability for light-evoked release. These physiological changes occurred in the absence of retinal cell loss or changes in GABAA receptor expression levels. Conclusions Our results indicate that early diabetes causes deficits in the rod pathway leading to decreased light-evoked rod bipolar cell inhibition and increased rod pathway output that provide a basis for the development of early diabetic visual deficits. PMID:27028063

  7. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  8. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  9. Improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1981-01-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. The system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. It is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions where liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations. Refs.

  10. An improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1983-02-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished-rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. The model is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions for which liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations.

  11. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  12. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  13. Isolation of components of admittance change in rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, G.; Fatt, P.

    1973-01-01

    1. Rods were separated by equilibration on a bovine serum albumin (BSA) density gradient into two major fractions, differing in their response to light. 2. In one fraction the response, measured as a change in the real part of admittance ΔG, appeared to consist exclusively of component I, while in the other, component II was prominent. 3. Evidence is presented that component I arose in damaged rods. This follows from observations on rods which have been deliberately damaged by freezing followed by thawing, or by fragmentation. 4. In such damaged rods, component II was absent while component I was increased in amplitude. 5. The frequency dependence of component I in isolation was characterized as a positive ΔG of constant amplitude from low frequencies up to the characteristic frequency fY for the major dispersion of admittance. Above this frequency, it declined to a variable extent. 6. The frequency dependence of component II observed in isolation was consistent with the previous analysis. 7. A negative-going ΔG is described which was linear with the amount of rhodopsin bleached and which was frequency independent up to the highest frequency of measurement (17 MHz). 8. The origins of component I and the negative component are discussed. PMID:4540196

  14. Extra-mitochondrial aerobic metabolism in retinal rod outer segments: new perspectives in retinopathies.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, I; Calzia, D; Ravera, S; Morelli, A M; Traverso, C E

    2012-04-01

    Vertebrate retinal rods are photoreceptors for dim-light vision. They display extreme sensitivity to light thanks to a specialized subcellular organelle, the rod outer segment. This is filled with a stack of membranous disks, expressing the proteins involved in visual transduction, a very energy demanding process. Our previous proteomic and biochemical studies have shed new light on the chemical energy processes that supply ATP to the outer segment, suggesting the presence of an extra-mitochondrial aerobic metabolism in rod outer segment, devoid of mitochondria, which would account for a quantitatively adequate ATP supply for phototransduction. Here the functional presence of an oxidative phosphorylation in the rod outer limb is examined for its relationship to many physiological and pathological data on the rod outer segment. We hypothesize that the rod outer limb is at risk of oxidative stress, in any case of impairment in the respiratory chain functioning, or of blood supply. In fact, the electron transfer chain is a major source of reactive O(2) species, known to produce severe alteration to the membrane lipids, especially those of the outer segment that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. We propose that the disk membrane may become the target of reactive oxygen species that may be released by the electron transport chain under pathologic conditions. For example, during aging reactive oxygen species production increases, while cellular antioxidant capacity decreases. Also the apoptosis of the rod observed after exposure to bright or continuous illumination can be explained considering that an overfunctioning of phototransduction may damage the disk membrane to a point at which cytochrome c escapes from the intradiskal space, where it is presently supposed to be, activating a putative caspase 9 and the apoptosome. A pathogenic mechanism for many inherited and acquired retinal degenerations, representing a major problem in clinical ophthalmology, is

  15. Integration of field measurements and reactive transport modelling to evaluate contaminant transport at a sulfide mine tailings impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, A. E.; Blowes, D. W.; Mayer, K. U.

    2006-11-01

    Over a decade of field observations including geochemical, mineralogical and hydrological information are available on the generation of acid mine drainage from the Pistol Dam region of the P-area of Inco's tailings impoundment in Copper Cliff, Ontario. This work focuses on the integration and quantitative assessment of this data set using reactive transport modeling. The results of the reactive transport simulations are in general agreement with the field observations; however, exact agreement between the field and simulated results was not the objective of this study, and was not attained. Many factors contribute to the discrepancies between the field observations and simulation results including geochemical and hydrogeological complexities and necessary model simplifications. For example, fluctuating water levels observed at the site were averaged and described using a steady state flow system. In addition, the lack of representative thermodynamic and rate expression data contributed to the discrepancies between observations and simulation results, thus further research into the applicability of laboratory-derived thermodynamic and rate expression data to field conditions could minimize these discrepancies. Despite the discrepancies between the field observations and simulated results, integrating field observations with numerical modelling of the P-area tailings impoundment allowed for a more complete understanding of what affects the complex geochemical reactions.

  16. Integration of field measurements and reactive transport modelling to evaluate contaminant transport at a sulfide mine tailings impoundment.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, A E; Blowes, D W; Mayer, K U

    2006-11-20

    Over a decade of field observations including geochemical, mineralogical and hydrological information are available on the generation of acid mine drainage from the Pistol Dam region of the P-area of Inco's tailings impoundment in Copper Cliff, Ontario. This work focuses on the integration and quantitative assessment of this data set using reactive transport modeling. The results of the reactive transport simulations are in general agreement with the field observations; however, exact agreement between the field and simulated results was not the objective of this study, and was not attained. Many factors contribute to the discrepancies between the field observations and simulation results including geochemical and hydrogeological complexities and necessary model simplifications. For example, fluctuating water levels observed at the site were averaged and described using a steady state flow system. In addition, the lack of representative thermodynamic and rate expression data contributed to the discrepancies between observations and simulation results, thus further research into the applicability of laboratory-derived thermodynamic and rate expression data to field conditions could minimize these discrepancies. Despite the discrepancies between the field observations and simulated results, integrating field observations with numerical modelling of the P-area tailings impoundment allowed for a more complete understanding of what affects the complex geochemical reactions. PMID:16844261

  17. Experimental Study on Reactivity Worth of Burnable Poison in Ultra-Long Life,Small LMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeto Kikuchi; Kenichi Yoshioka; Hisato Matsumiya; Mitsuaki Yamaoka; Kenji Tsuji; Akira Nishikawa; Hiromitsu Inagaki

    2002-07-01

    Experimental study using an LWR-type critical assembly, NCA, has been conducted on the reactivity worth of the burnable poison (BP) that is employed in a small reactor, 4S, for achieving an extremely long core life. The experimental BP is composed of natural gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) mixed in polyethylene. Three types of BPs are prepared: polyethylene without Gd, polyethylene with Gd/H ratio of 0.015 at% and 0.943 at%. Reactivity worth of each BP assembly is measured through change in critical water height. Power profile of fuel rods and flux profile are also measured. Analyses are conducted with a Monte-Carlo code, MCNP. (authors)

  18. Rapid kinetics of endocytosis at rod photoreceptor synapses depends upon endocytic load and calcium.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-05-01

    Release from rods is triggered by the opening of L-type Ca2+ channels that lie beneath synaptic ribbons. After exocytosis, vesicles are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis. Previous work showed that endocytosis is dynamin-dependent in rods but dynamin-independent in cones. We hypothesized that fast endocytosis in rods may also differ from cones in its dependence upon the amount of Ca2+ influx and/or endocytic load. We measured exocytosis and endocytosis from membrane capacitance (C m) changes evoked by depolarizing steps in voltage clamped rods from tiger salamander retinal slices. Similar to cones, the time constant for endocytosis in rods was quite fast, averaging <200 ms. We manipulated Ca2+ influx and the amount of vesicle release by altering the duration and voltage of depolarizing steps. Unlike cones, endocytosis kinetics in rods slowed after increasing Ca2+ channel activation with longer step durations or more strongly depolarized voltage steps. Endocytosis kinetics also slowed as Ca2+ buffering was decreased by replacing BAPTA (10 or 1 mM) with the slower Ca2+ buffer EGTA (5 or 0.5 mM) in the pipette solution. These data provide further evidence that endocytosis mechanisms differ in rods and cones and suggest that endocytosis in rods is regulated by both endocytic load and local Ca2+ levels.

  19. Real-time measurement of reactive gases (NO, NO2, O3, CO) at ERSA, Cape Corsica, a long term Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, Jean-Marc; Colomb, Aurelie; Gheusi, Francois; Sauvage, Stephane; Pont, Veronique; Tison, Emmanuel; Bordier, Florent; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli, Jean-Luc; Dulac, Francois; Sciare, Jean; Nicolas, Jose; Bourrianne, Thierry; Bouvier, Laetitia

    2013-04-01

    Important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly airmasses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The ERSA observatory is a french initiative within the framework of CHARMEX (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) and CORSICA (Centre d'Observation Régional pour la Surveillance du Climat et de l'environnement Atmosphérique et océanographique en Méditerranée occidentale (http://www2.obs-mip.fr/corsica) . The measurements of the station include real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges), a broad spectrum of aerosol properties (chemical composition, ground optical properties, integrated and space-resolved optical properties , size distribution properties, mass, hygroscopicity as well as dry/wet depositions). Among all the parameters, reactive gases are recognized as precursors of ozone and aerosol. The primarily emitted nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) have a substantial impact on radical chemistry, ozone (O3) formation and aerosol by their atmospheric oxidation to aerosol nitrate. Carbon monoxide (CO) is mostly primarily emitted from combustion processes, but it is also formed in substantial amounts from the oxidation of methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to its high global turn-over rates CO is a major O3 precursor, and it has a strong impact on the oxidizing capacity and thus indirectly on the concentration of the climate gas CH4. O3 is a climate gas itself, however, also strongly involved in NO/NO2 partitioning and oxidizing capacity, thus coupling back on several photochemical processes. Accordingly, impacts on climate are multiple and rather complex. The understanding requires high quality, long-term observations of these reactive species. We

  20. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Use Your Own Computer Timer: Velocity of Stress Waves in a Solid Rod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to measure the penultimate laboratory speed, a stress wave velocity in a solid rod. Also includes background information on stress waves, apparatus, and procedures. Employs a homemade interface for the IBM platform. (DDR)

  2. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurement. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Mackinnon, J.A.; Zhang, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The correlation and prediction of kinetic rates and mechanisms of the reactions of gas phase species with coal chars represent a difficulty undertaking under the best of circumstances. Solid phase heterogeneity and impurities, complex pore structure, transport limitation, and evolution of active surface represent just a few of the well known problems. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) has become a standard technique for investigating the physics-chemical state of adsorbed species on surfaces. The predecessor of TPD-type methods was the flash filament technique, whereby gases adsorbed on wire filaments are rapidly desorbed upon rapid heating in an ultrahigh vacuum. This technique was subsequently adapted to catalytic surfaces. Experimental methods and interpretation of TPD spectra for well defined crystalline surfaces have been well established. However, corresponding techniques for polycrystalline, amorphous, and heterogeneous materials are not as well developed. TPD spectra usually consist of one or more peaks. The shapes of the peaks and the position of the peak maxima with respect to temperature are related in a fundamental manner to the desorption process, and, therefore, provide basic information regarding the energetics of the desorbed species. The current project is directed at developing related techniques for the characterization and prediction/correlation of the reactivity of ``young`` chars to steam and oxygen. Of particular interest is mapping of the reactivity behavior of the resultant chars, as revealed by the energetic heterogeneity of the complexes with char preparation conditions; i.e., heating rate and ultimate temperature. In this quarterly report, TPD results on two CO{sub 2}-gasified chars are summarized.

  3. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  4. Sucker rod makers offer a selection

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, D.

    1983-11-01

    In their ongoing effort to produce better, more cost-effective sucker rods, manufacturers have selected one of three materials - fiberglass, aluminum, and steel - that they feel best suits the production system function of the rods, which is to connect the downhole pump to the pumpjack on the surface. Characteristics of each are described.

  5. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  6. Porous tantalum rods for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z H; Guo, W S; Li, Z R; Cheng, L M; Zhang, Q D; Yue, D B; Shi, Z C; Wang, B L; Sun, W; Zhang, N F

    2014-10-20

    This study evaluated the outcomes of using porous tantalum rods for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We performed core decompression and inserted porous tantalum implants in 149 patients (168 consecutive hips) with ONFH. Hips had large (65), medium (64), or small (39) lesions; 63 lesions were lateral, 68 were central, and 35 were medial. Conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) was the end point of this survey. A total of 130 cases (138 hips) were followed. The mean follow-up time was 38.46 ± 5.76 months; 43 hips (31%) were converted to or needed THA. Of the 43 hips requiring THA, 33 had large lesions, including 1 medial, 3 central, and 29 lateral lesions; 9 had medium, lateral lesions, and 1 hip had a small, lateral lesion. Bone grafting was used in 59 hips, with 3 hips failing; 40 of 79 hips without bone grafts failed. The sum distances between the tops of the rods and the lateral lesion boundaries (SDTL, mm) were measured in anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In the failure and spared groups, the average SDTLs were 7.65 ± 2.759 and 0.83 ± 2.286 mm, respectively. The survival of porous tantalum rods used for treating early-stage ONFH was affected by the size and location of the lesion, whether or not a bone graft was used, as well as the distance between top of the rod and the lateral boundary of the lesion.

  7. Safety rod/thimble melt failure characterization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Hawkes, G.L.

    1992-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) requested that he INEL perform experiments to study the thermal failure characteristics of a simulated Savannah River Site nuclear reactor safety rod and its surrounding thimble assembly. An electrically heated stainless steel rod simulated a reactor safety rod located eccentrically or concentrically within a perforated aluminum guide tube or thimble. A total of 37 experiments were conducted for a range of power levels and safety rod/thimble relative orientations. Video tapes were made of the four failure tests that were conducted to the melting point of the thimble. Although the primary emphasis of the experiments were to characterize the melting of the thimble qualitatively, experimental transient measurements included heater voltage and current, heater surface temperatures, aluminum thimble temperatures, and ambient temperature. Numerical studies were also performed in support of the experiments and data interpretation. Two finite element models were created to model the heat conduction-radiation between the stainless steel heater and thimble. The predicted temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  9. Attachment for sucker rod depth adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, N.D.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a surface unit of an oil well pumping system, having a walking beam, a suspended carrier bar and an interconnected sucker rod assembly for stroking a reciprocating down-hole pump. It comprises a cross bar having a centrally located passage therein for the sucker rod assembly and adapted to be transversely supported by the carrier bar; a depth adjusting bar, having a centrally located passage therein for the sucker rod assembly, positioned at a selected fixed dimension above and parallel to the cross bar and adapted to operatively support the sucker rod assembly; clamping means for fixing the sucker rod relative to the depth adjusting bar; and hydraulically extendable means supportively connecting the depth adjusting bar to the cross bar on at least each side of the carrier bar for adjusting the selected fixed dimension and maintaining the adjustment during operation.

  10. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  11. Relative contributions of interface pressure, shear stress, and temperature on ischemic-induced, skin-reactive hyperemia in healthy volunteers: a repeated measures laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lachenbruch, Charlie; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Karg, Patricia E; Lachenbruch, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Although the primary risk factors for pressure ulcer development - pressure, shear, skin temperature, moisture, and friction - have been identified for decades, the relative contribution of each to this risk remains unclear. To confirm the results of and expand upon earlier research into the relative contributions of interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature among 4 healthy volunteers, a study involving 6 additional healthy 40- to 75-year-old volunteers was conducted and results of the 2 studies were pooled. All 3 variables (interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature) were systematically and randomly varied. In the prone position, volunteers each underwent 18 test conditions representing different combinations of temperature (28˚ C, 32˚ C, 36˚ C), pressure (8.0 and 13.3 kPa), and shear (0, 6.7, and 14.0 kPa) using a computer-controlled indenter applied to the sacrum for 20 minutes exerting weights of 100 g and 200 g to induce 0.98 N and 1.96 N of shear force, respectively. Each condition was tested twice, resulting in a total of 360 trials. Magnitude of postload reactive hyperemia as an index of ischemia was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fixed effects regression models were used to predict 3 different indices of reactive hyperemic magnitude. Friedman tests were performed to compare the reactive hyperemia among 3 different skin temperatures or shear stresses under the same amount of localized pressure. In all regression models, pressure and temperature were highly significant predictors of the extent of reactive hyperemia (P <0.0001 and P <0.0001, respectively); the contributions of shear stress were not statistically significant (P = 0.149). With higher temperature, reactive hyperemia increased significantly, especially at greater localized pressure and shear stress, and the difference was more profound between 32˚ C and 36˚ C than between 28˚ C and 32˚ C. These results confirm that, in laboratory settings, temperature is an

  12. Correlation between Depth Perception by Three-Rods Test and Stereoacuity by Distance Randot Stereotest

    PubMed Central

    Negayama, Ryo; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Hasebe, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background The examination of depth perception with three-rods test, in addition to visual acuity testing, is required to obtain motor vehicle license to drive taxies and trucks, according to the Road Traffic Act in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine whether the results of the three-rods test would correlate with the results of static stereopsis tests, used in ophthalmic practice. Methods This study involved 54 normal subjects, 9 women and 45 men, with ages ranging from 18 to 25 (mean, 20.8) years. All had visual acuity of 0.8 or better with or without glasses or contact lenses correction and had no strabismus at the distant (5 m) or near (0.3 m) fixation. TNO Stereotest and Titmus Stereotest were examined at 40 cm while Distance Randot Stereotest was at 3 m. At three-rods test, a central rod was moved at the speed of 50 mm/sec forward and backward automatically against two laterally located fixed rods, placed inside the illuminated box. An examinee at the distance of 2.5 m observed the rods inside the box from a small viewing window and pushed a button to stop the central rod in alignment with the fixed rods. Erred distance (mm) of the central rod from the fixed rods as a mean of 4 measurements was correlated with stereoacuity in second of arc, measured by three kinds of the stereopsis tests. Results The erred distance of three-rods test was positively correlated with static stereoacuity at distance measured with Distance Randot Stereotest (ρ = 0.418, p = 0.0023, Spearman rank correlation test) and also with the other stereopsis tests at near fixation. The stereoacuity at near fixation, measured by TNO Stereotest and Titmus Stereotest, was positively correlated with each other (ρ = 0.431, p = 0.0017). Conclusion Three-rods test, examining depth perception, together with the response by eye-hand coordination, gave consistent results with distant static stereoacuity when measured with Distance Randot Stereotest. PMID:25058604

  13. Enhancement of fiberglass sucker-rod design is offered

    SciTech Connect

    Hallden, D.F.

    1985-09-30

    This paper discribes the effective use of fiberglass-reinforced plastic sucker rods (FRP). FRP sucker rods have proven to be an economical solution to many sucker rod beam pumping problems. Two important characteristics that contribute to the effectiveness of FRP sucker rods are effective modulus of elasticity and fatigue life. Computerized simulations show that FRP sucker rod installations can benefit from using rod designs with a lower modulus of elasticity.

  14. Nondestructive post-irradiation examination of Loop-1, S1 and B1 rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    As a part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Tritium Target Development Program, eleven tritium target rods were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory during 1991. Both nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination on all eleven rods was planned under the Tritium Target Development Program. Funding for the program was reduced in 1991 resulting in the early removal of the program experiments before reaching their irradiation goals. Post-irradiation examination was only performed on one of the irradiated rods at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory before the program was terminated in 1992. On December 6, 1995, the Secretary of Energy announced the pursuit of the Commercial Light-Water Reactor option for producing tritium establishing the Tritium Target Qualification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This program decided to pursue nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination of the ten remaining rods from the previous program. The ten rods comprise three experiments. The Loop-1 experiment irradiated eight target rods in a loop configuration for 217 irradiation days. The other two rods were irradiated in two separate irradiation experiments, designated as S1 and B1 for 143 effective full-power days, but at different power levels. After the ten rods were transferred from the ATR Canal to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility, the following examinations were performed: (1) visual examination and photography; (2) neutron radiography; (3) axial gamma scanning; (4) contact profilometry measurement; (5) bow and length measurements; (6) rod puncture and plenum gas analysis/measurement of plenum gas quantity; (7) void volume determination; and (8) internal pressure determination. This report presents the data collected during these examinations.

  15. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  16. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  17. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  18. A multiple metrics approach to prioritizing strategies for measuring and managing reactive nitrogen in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Ariel I.; Moomaw, William R.; Liptzin, Daniel; Gramig, Benjamin M.; Reeling, Carson; Meyer, Johanna; Hurley, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle exceeds the safe planetary boundary for the use of reactive nitrogen (Nr). We complement global analysis by analyzing regional mass flows and the relative consequences of multiple chemical forms of Nr as they ‘cascade’ through multiple environmental media. The goals of this paper are (1) to identify the amounts of Nr that flow through a specific nitrogen rich region, (2) develop multiple metrics to characterize and compare multiple forms of Nr and the different damages that they cause, and (3) to use these metrics to assess the most societally acceptable and cost effective means for addressing the many dimensions of Nr damage. This paper uses a multiple metrics approach that in addition to mass flows considers economic damage, health and mitigation costs and qualitative damages to evaluate options for mitigating Nr flows in California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Most analysis focuses attention on agricultural Nr because it is the largest flow in terms of mass. In contrast, the multiple metrics approach identifies mobile source Nr emissions as creating the most economic and health damage in the SJV. Emissions of Nr from mobile sources are smaller than those from crop agriculture and dairy in the SJV, but the benefits of abatement are greater because of reduced health impacts from air pollution, and abatement costs are lower. Our findings illustrate the benefit of a comprehensive multiple metrics approach to Nr management.

  19. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  20. Method speeds tapered rod design for directional well

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yongquan; Yuan Xiangzhong

    1995-10-16

    Determination of the minimum rod diameter, from statistical relationships, can decrease the time needed for designing a sucker-rod string for a directional well. A tapered rod string design for a directional well is more complex than for a vertical well. Based on the theory of a continuous beam column, the rod string design in a directional well is a trial and error method. The key to reduce the time to obtain a solution is to rapidly determine the minimum rod diameter. This can be done with a statistical relationship. The paper describes sucker rods, design method, basic analysis rod design, and minimum rod diameter.

  1. Experimental investigation of secondary flow vortices in a rod cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonka, V.; Hoornstra, J.; Boersma, P.

    1985-12-01

    Secondary flow vortices were measured in 2 regular subchannels of a triangularly arranged bare rod bundle with pitch-to-diameter ratio = 1.3 at Reynolds numbers Re = 60,000 and 175,000. A laser Doppler anemometer measured total time average velocity vectors in the central subchannels of a four rod bundle. Results show that half the momentum transport in the circumferential direction is due to the secondary flow vortex convection. In nonisothermal situations the secondary vortices contribute to heat transport in radial and circumferential directions. In radial direction, the contribution can improve the heat transfer coefficient and contribute to better economy of heat transfer installations. In circumferential direction, the contribution helps to smooth out circumferential temperature differences, improves the heat removal from heated surfaces thus decreasing the maximum surface temperature, and contributes to passive safety of heat transfer installations.

  2. Self-sensing CF-GFRP rods as mechanical reinforcement and sensors of concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, F.; Auricchio, F.; Sarchi, F.; Forte, G.; Gusmano, G.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper testing carried out on concrete beams reinforced with self-sensing composite rods is presented. Such concrete beams, whose peculiarity is to be reinforced by self-sensing materials able to generate an alarm signal when fixed loads are reached, were designed, manufactured and tested. The reinforcing rods were manufactured by pultrusion and consisted of self-sensing hybrid composites containing both glass and carbon fibres in an epoxy resin. The experimentation was carried out by performing simultaneously mechanical tests on the reinforced beams and electrical measurements on the composite rods. The results showed that the developed system reached the target proposed, giving an alarm signal.

  3. Comparison between the measured and calculated reactivity in measuring the effectiveness of the emergency protection at the stage of physical start-up of unit no. 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A.; Shevchenko, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents comparisons between the effectiveness of the emergency protection under both stationary and nonstationary formulations calculated with the use of the RADUGA-7.5 package [1] and experimental data obtained in measuring the "weight" of the emergency protection in the process of physical start-up of the VVER-1000 reactor of unit no. 3 of the Kalinin NPP. On the basis of the results obtained, recommendations are given on comparing the measured and calculated reactivity and parameters determined by using its value.

  4. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  5. Gelation and mechanical response of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig E

    2015-10-28

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that in detail the rod-rod surface interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space-spanning network will form. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface, f, that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in f. At low f, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high f, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate f, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, more clumpy networks at high f re-orient relatively little with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal mechanical properties.

  6. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  7. Damage characterisation of InP after reactive ion etching using the low-frequency noise measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, P.; Kräutle, H.; Szentpáli, B.; Kincses, Zs; Hartnagel, H. L.

    1997-04-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is a basic tool in the processing of InP optoelectronic and photonic integrated circuits (OEICs and PICs). However, due to the bombardment of the high energy ions of the plasma, heavy damage of the semiconductor surface occurs. Additionally, when using a CH 4 + Ar + H 2 plasma significant proton implantation also takes place. Investigating n-type InP etched by specific RIE processes, we show, that the low-frequency noise (LFN) generated in an appropriately designed planar resistor pattern is affected in a characteristic manner depending on the process-parameters. Further, a decrease of the pattern resistance and also significant surface leakage currents were observed, due to a strong enhancement of the surface electron concentration. In n-type material the {1}/{f} noise component is enhanced as the damaged portion of the current path increases. Additionally, generation-recombination (g-r) components are also present in the spectrum indicating that specific deep levels appear in the damaged region. Using rapid thermal annealing (RTA) as a post-process step, the {1}/{f} noise component decreases and the sample resistance increases. At the same time the surface leakage currents disappear. These observations are due to the fact, that an out diffusion of the implanted H + takes place and it is likely that process-induced modifications of the surface layer will tend to recover. To avoid proton implantation, etching only by Ar plasma was investigated. Damage and an enhanced surface conduction were observed. Applying a short HF-dip, a slight increase of the g-r noise intensity was detected.

  8. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae. PMID:27651858

  9. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae.

  10. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, 3, AND 1X OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-09-03

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, 3, and 1X of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A rodded assembly is one that contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) for some period of time during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H calculated isotopic compositions of depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison for each fuel assembly to be used in subsequent CRC reactivity calculations containing the fuel assemblies.

  11. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, AND 3 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-29

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, and 3 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, M. K.; Kakavand, T.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Ghaforian, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity ( ρ), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  13. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 4 AND 5 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-30

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 4 and 5 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  14. An explanation for the anomalous wave profiles obtained in Composition B-3 impacted by flat nosed steel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Hugh; Gustavsen, Richard; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2015-06-01

    When firing flat nosed steel rods into the 60/40 RDX/TNT explosive Composition B-3, Gustavsen et al. (``Initiation of Composition B-3 by impact of flat nosed rods,'' in 15th Int. Det. Symp.) found an apparently anomalous ``hump'' in particle velocity wave profiles. The hump occurred on the center-line established by the rod, and at relatively late times, > 1 μs, after detonation onset. Several explanations, including that of a late time reaction, were postulated. This report will present evidence that the anomalous late time ``hump'' is due to the arrival of rarefaction waves from the rod periphery. Simple analytic calculations and reactive-burn hydro-code calculations will be presented supporting this hypothesis.

  15. VARIABLE AREA CONTROL ROD FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Huston, N.E.

    1960-05-01

    A control rod is described which permits continual variation of its absorbing strength uniformly along the length of the rod. The rod is fail safe and is fully inserted into the core but changes in its absorbing strength do not produce axial flux distortion. The control device comprises a sheet containing a material having a high thermal-neutron absorption cross section. A pair of shafts engage the sheet along the longitudinal axis of the shafts and gears associated with the shafts permit winding and unwinding of the sheet around the shafts.

  16. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  17. Is structured observation a valid technique to measure handwashing behavior? Use of acceleration sensors embedded in soap to assess reactivity to structured observation.

    PubMed

    Ram, Pavani K; Halder, Amal K; Granger, Stewart P; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3-10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0-18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior.

  18. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  19. Method of cleaning and inhibiting sucker rod corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M. B.; Griffin, J. B.

    1985-01-22

    Method of cleaning tubular goods, especially sucker rods, and inhibiting the sucker rods against corrosion as the rod string is being withdrawn from a borehole. The method is carried out by the provision of an enclosure which is attached to the upper end of a cased borehole. The upper end of the sucker rod string is extended axially through the enclosure as the rod string is withdrawn from the casing. A medial length of the rod string is engaged by a resilient packer device which wipes the rod clean of well fluids and loose debris. The rod string is next cleaned within a second chamber by impacting the outer surface thereof with an abrasive substance. The rod surface is again cleaned of any residual material. The rod is then moved through another chamber where corrosion inhibitor is applied to the external surface of the rod. As each treated joint of rod is withdrawn from the enclosure, the rod joints are sequentially unscrewed and suitably stacked, where the rods are protected from the elements, as well as being protected when the rods are subsequently made up into a rod string as the rod is replaced into a borehole.

  20. Use of a plane jet for flow-induced noise reduction of tandem rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Zhao; Xi-xiang, Yang; Patrick, N. Okolo; Wei-hua, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady wake from upstream components of landing gear impinging on downstream components could be a strong noise source. The use of a plane jet is proposed to reduce this flow-induced noise. Tandem rods with different gap widths were utilized as the test body. Both acoustic and aerodynamic tests were conducted in order to validate this technique. Acoustic test results proved that overall noise emission from tandem rods could be lowered and tonal noise could be removed with use of the plane jet. However, when the plane jet was turned on, in some frequency range it could be the subsequent main contributor instead of tandem rods to total noise emission whilst in some frequency range rods could still be the main contributor. Moreover, aerodynamic tests fundamentally studied explanations for the noise reduction. Specifically, not only impinging speed to rods but speed and turbulence level to the top edge of the rear rod could be diminished by the upstream plane jet. Consequently, the vortex shedding induced by the rear rod was reduced, which was confirmed by the speed, Reynolds stress as well as the velocity fluctuation spectral measured in its wake. This study confirmed the potential use of a plane jet towards landing gear noise reduction. Project partially supported by the European Union FP7 CleanSky Joint Technology Initiative “ALLEGRA” (Grant No. 308225).

  1. Rod electrical coupling is controlled by a circadian clock and dopamine in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nan Ge; Chuang, Alice Z; Masson, Philippe J; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-04-01

    Rod single-photon responses are critical for vision in dim light. Electrical coupling via gap junction channels shapes the light response properties of vertebrate photoreceptors, but the regulation of rod coupling and its impact on the single-photon response have remained unclear. To directly address these questions, we developed a perforated patch-clamp recording technique and recorded from single rod inner segments in isolated intact neural mouse retinae, maintained by superfusion. Experiments were conducted at different times of the day or under constant environmental conditions, at different times across the circadian cycle. We show that rod electrical coupling is regulated by a circadian clock and dopamine, so that coupling is weak during the day and strong at night. Altogether, patch-clamp recordings of single-photon responses in mouse rods, tracer coupling, receptive field measurements and pharmacological manipulations of gap junction and dopamine receptor activity provide compelling evidence that rod coupling is modulated in a circadian manner. These data are consistent with computer modelling. At night, single-photon responses are smaller due to coupling, but the signal-to-noise ratio for a dim (multiphoton) light response is increased at night because of signal averaging between coupled rods. PMID:25616058

  2. Rapid bioassay to measure early reactive oxygen species production in Arabidopsis leave tissue in response to living Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) provide an excellent plant-bacteria model system to study innate immunity. During pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), cognate host receptors perceive pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as non-self molecules. Pto harbors many PAMPs; thus for experimental ease, many studies utilize single synthesized PAMPs such as flg22, a short protein peptide derived from Pseudomonas flagellin. Flg22 recognition by Arabidopsis Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) initiates a plethora of signaling responses including rapid production of apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Assessing flg22-ROS has been instrumental in identifying novel PAMP-signaling components; but comparably little is known whether in Arabidopsis, ROS is produced in response to intact live Pto and whether this response can be used to dissect genetic requirements of the plant host and live bacterial pathogens in planta. Results Here, we report of a fast and robust bioassay to quantitatively assess early ROS in Arabidopsis leaves, a tissue commonly used for pathogen infection assays, in response to living bacterial Pto strains. We establish that live Pto elicits a transient and dose-dependent ROS that differed in timing of initiation, amplitude and duration compared to flg22-induced ROS. Our control experiments confirmed that the detected ROS was dependent on the presence of the bacterial cells. Utilizing Arabidopsis mutants previously shown to be defective in flg22-induced ROS, we demonstrate that ROS elicited by live Pto was fully or in part dependent on RbohD and BAK1, respectively. Because fls2 mutants did not produce any ROS, flagellin perception by FLS2 is the predominant recognition event in live Pto-elicited ROS in Arabidopsis leaves. Furthermore using different Pto strains, our in planta results indicate that early ROS production appeared to be independent of the Type III Secretion System. Conclusions We provide evidence and

  3. Rolling contact fatigue of surface modified 440C using a 'Ge-Polymet' type disc rod test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Through hardened 440 C martensitic stainless steel test specimens were surface modified and tested for changes in rolling contact fatigue using a disc on rod test rig. The surface modifications consisted of nitrogen, boron, titanium, chromium, tantalum, carbon, or molybdenum ion implantation at various ion fluences and energies. Tests were also performed on specimens reactively sputtered with titanium nitride.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of spent nuclear fuel isotopics and rod internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Ryan N.

    The bias and uncertainty in fuel isotopic calculations for a well-defined radio- chemical assay benchmark are investigated with Sampler, the new sampling-based uncertainty quantification tool in the SCALE code system. Isotopic predictions are compared to measurements of fuel rod MKP109 of assembly D047 from the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 core at three axial locations, representing a range of discharged fuel burnups. A methodology is developed which quantifies the significance of input parameter uncertainties and modeling decisions on isotopic prediction by compar- ing to isotopic measurement uncertainties. The SCALE Sampler model of the D047 assembly incorporates input parameter uncertainties for key input data such as multigroup cross sections, decay constants, fission product yields, the cladding thickness, and the power history for fuel rod MKP109. The effects of each set of input parameter uncertainty on the uncertainty of isotopic predictions have been quantified. In this work, isotopic prediction biases are identified and an investiga- tion into their sources is proposed; namely, biases have been identified for certain plutonium, europium, and gadolinium isotopes for all three axial locations. More- over, isotopic prediction uncertainty resulting from only nuclear data is found to be greatest for Eu-154, Gd-154, and Gd-160. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle as- sembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each considered WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burn- able absorber (IFBA) layers is

  5. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  6. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  7. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H.; Atcheson, Donald B.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  8. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  9. 1984 tubing and sucker rod tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The first section of this handy reference lists companies that produce API tubing and couplings, giving specifications for pipe in sizes from 3/4 to 41/2 in. Also listed and illustrated are special tubing joints, identified by manufacturer Additional tables provide details on API sucker rods, including manufacturers, mechanical and chemical properties, dimensions and make-up recommendations. Similar data are presented for non-API rods.

  10. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  11. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-03-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) ×106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2=0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK and toluene had been added. However, this discrepancy has a large uncertainty and

  12. Evaluation of scavenging rate constants of DOPA and tyrosine enantiomers against multiple reactive oxygen species and methyl radical as measured with ESR trapping method.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Takemoto, Tsubasa

    2015-04-15

    The scavenging rates of DOPA (dl- and l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine) and Tyr (tyrosine (dl- and l-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)alanine)) against five reactive oxygen species (ROS) and methyl radical were measured with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method and the scavenging rate constants of DOPA and Tyr were determined. The scavenging rate constants for multiple active species increased in the order of O2(-)

  13. Ideal illuminants for rod/L-cone color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Humans see multicolor complex images with illuminants that have very low amounts of 400 to 580nm light when there is enough long-wave light greater than 590nm. Interactions between rods and long-wave (L) cones generate these colors. They are observed when there is insufficient light for a threshold response from M- and S-cones. This paper measures the spectral emission of a wood fire and a wax candle and it compares these low-color temperature spectral radiant exitances with the sensitivities of rods and long-wave cones. The paper reviews some of the literature on the evolution of human cone pigments and the early use of fire by hominids.

  14. ATMOS Measurements of H2O + 2CH4 and Total Reactive Nitrogen in the November 1994 Antarctic Stratosphere: Dehydration and Denitrification in the Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Newchurch, M. J.; Zander, R.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous stratospheric volume mixing ratios (VMR's) measured inside and outside the Antarctic vortex by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument in November 1994 reveal previously unobserved features in the distributions of total reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) and total hydrogen (H2O + 2CH4). Maximum removal of NO(y) due to sedimentation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) inside the vortex occurred at a potential temperature (Theta) of 500-525 K (approximately 20 km), where values were 5 times smaller than measurements outside. Maximum loss of H2O + 2CH4 due to PSC's occurred in the vortex at 425-450 K, approximately 3 km lower than the peak NO(y) loss. At that level, H2O + 2CH4 VMR's inside the vortex were approximately 70% of corresponding values outside. The Antarctic and April 1993 Arctic measurements by ATMOS show no significant differences in H2O + 2CH4 VMR's outside the vortices in the two hemispheres. Elevated NO(y) VMRs were measured inside the vortex near 700 K. Recent model calculations indicate that this feature results from downward transport of elevated NO(y) produced in the thermosphere and mesosphere.

  15. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  16. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  17. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  18. Oil well sucker rod shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, F.B.

    1986-02-18

    An oil well sucker rod shock absorber is described which consists of: an outer cylindrical casing defined by a cylindrical wall and having a removable upper plug and lower plug disposed respectively at upper and lower extremities of the casing. The upper plug has an axial bore and the lower plug defines a closed lower end and has an upwardly facing top surface. The plunger rod is connected to the sucker rod and is slidably disposed in the bore of the upper plug. A piston within the cylindrical casing is coupled to the plunger rod and has a downwardly facing bottom surface. Biasing means have a maximum vertical length disposed vertically within the casing and extending between the downwardly facing surface of the piston and the upwardly facing surface of the lower plug means at all times. This allows vertical reciprocal translation of the plunger rod and the piston within the cylindrical casing downwardly against the biasing means. Apertures are disposed through the cylindrical casing along the entire length thereof opposite the length of the biasing means, allowing downhole fluid pressure to be applied to the piston within the cylindrical casing via the apertures to be added to the force of the biasing means, without causing a fluid lock within the cylinder. Slap and wear of the sucker rod resulting therefrom are reduced and damage prevented.

  19. Crippling Strength of Axially Loaded Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natalis, FR

    1921-01-01

    A new empirical formula was developed that holds good for any length and any material of a rod, and agrees well with the results of extensive strength tests. To facilitate calculations, three tables are included, giving the crippling load for solid and hollow sectioned wooden rods of different thickness and length, as well as for steel tubes manufactured according to the standards of Army Air Services Inspection. Further, a graphical method of calculation of the breaking load is derived in which a single curve is employed for determination of the allowable fiber stress. Finally, the theory is discussed of the elastic curve for a rod subject to compression, according to which no deflection occurs, and the apparent contradiction of this conclusion by test results is attributed to the fact that the rods under test are not perfectly straight, or that the wall thickness and the material are not uniform. Under the assumption of an eccentric rod having a slight initial bend according to a sine curve, a simple formula for the deflection is derived, which shows a surprising agreement with test results. From this a further formula is derived for the determination of the allowable load on an eccentric rod. The resulting relations are made clearer by means of a graphical representation of the relation of the moments of the outer and inner forces to the deflection.

  20. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  1. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1-3 cm and a resistance of about 100-500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005-0.4 m s-1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15-60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m-2 h-1.

  2. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  3. Mechanical performance of fiberglass sucker-rod strings

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.

    1988-08-01

    The natural frequencies of fiberglass sucker-rod strings can be calculated by treating the rod strings as modified spring/mass vibration systems. The ratio of the pumping-unit operating speed to the rod-string natural frequency can then be used as a basis for understanding fiberglass-rod performance and for predicting downhole pump stroke lengths.

  4. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  5. Direct measurement of the chemical reactivity of silicon electrodes with LiPF6-based battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Veith, Gabriel M; Baggetto, Loïc; Sacci, Robert L; Unocic, Raymond R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Browning, James F

    2014-03-21

    We report the first direct measurement of the extent of the spontaneous non-electrochemically driven reaction between a lithium ion battery electrode surface (Si) and a liquid electrolyte (1.2 M LiPF6-3 : 7 wt% ethylene carbonate : dimethyl carbonate). This layer is estimated to be 35 Å thick with a SLD of ∼ 4 × 10(-6) Å(-2) and likely originates from the consumption of the silicon surface. PMID:24513965

  6. Comparison of measured reactive trace gas profiles with a multi-layer canopy chemical exchange model in an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Stefan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Pöhlker, Christopher; de Abreu Sá, Leonardo Deane; Ocimar Manzi, Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, an 80 m high walk up tower for atmospheric research was erected at the ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W) in the remote Amazonian rainforest. The nearly pristine environment allows biosphere-atmosphere studies within an ecosystem far away from large anthropogenic emission sources. Since April 2012 vertical mixing ratio profiles of H2O, CO2 and O3 were measured at 8 different heights between 0.05 m and 79.3 m. During five intensive campaigns (Oct-Dec 2012, Oct-Nov 2013, Mar 2014, Aug-Sep 2014, Oct-Dec 2015) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also measured. We applied the Multi-layer Canopy Chemical Exchange Model - MLC-CHEM to support the analysis of the observed profiles of NOx and O3. This includes inferring bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes as well as the role of the canopy interactions between the emissions, dry deposition, chemistry and turbulent transport of trace gases. During our investigation of diurnal and seasonal differences between model and measurements, we conducted a set of sensitivity studies to analyse the effects of changes in NOx-soil emissions, in-canopy turbulence and resistances for O3 and NO2 uptake on wet surfaces. These analyses suggest some modification in the representation of some of the poorly constrained canopy processes resulting in a significantly better comparison between the simulated and measured exchange fluxes and concentrations.

  7. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-09-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough

  8. An automated online instrument to quantify aerosol-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) for ambient measurement and health-relevant aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Freshwater, Ray; Green, David C.; Kelly, Frank J.; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The adverse health effects associated with ambient aerosol particles have been well documented, but it is still unclear which aerosol properties are most important for their negative health impact. Some studies suggest the oxidative effects of particle-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potential major contributors to the toxicity of particles. Traditional ROS measurement techniques are labour-intensive, give poor temporal resolution and generally have significant delays between aerosol sampling and ROS analysis. However, many oxidising particle components are reactive and thus potentially short-lived. Thus, a technique to quantify particle-bound ROS online would be beneficial to quantify also the short-lived ROS components. We introduce a new portable instrument to allow online, continuous measurement of particle-bound ROS using a chemical assay of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), via fluorescence spectroscopy. All components of the new instrument are attached to a containing shell, resulting in a compact system capable of automated continuous field deployment over many hours or days. From laboratory measurements, the instrument was found to have a detection limit of ˜ 4 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per cubic metre (m3) air, a dynamic range up to at least ˜ 2000 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air and a time resolution of ≤ 12 min. The instrument allows for ˜ 16 h automated measurement if unattended and shows a fast response to changes in concentrations of laboratory-generated oxidised organic aerosol. The instrument was deployed at an urban site in London, and particulate ROS levels of up to 24 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air were detected with PM2.5 concentrations up to 28 µg m-3. The new and portable Online Particle-bound ROS Instrument (OPROSI) allows fast-response quantification; this is important due to the potentially short-lived nature of particle-bound ROS as well as fast-changing atmospheric conditions

  9. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  10. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  11. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2012-09-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also support an

  12. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  13. Micrometer size rod formed by secondary self assembly of omeprazole with α- and β-cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Venkatesh, G.

    2015-02-01

    Self assembly of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) micro rods induced by omeprazole (OMP) were observed by SEM and TEM. OMP/CD inclusion complexes have formed the secondary self assembly micro meter size rod like structure. This structure was driven by the intermolecular hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals forces. Both forces induced the ordered assembly and arrangement of OMP/CD inclusion complexes, whereas CD molecules acted as molecular bricks. The OMP/CD inclusion complexes primary assembled form individual nanorods and then secondary self aggregate nanorods were form a micro meter rod structure. The results indicate that inter-nanotubular hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the formation of the self assembled micro rods. The inclusion complexes were also characterized using FT-IR, DSC, powder XRD, 1H NMR, absorption, fluorescence, life time measurements and molecular modeling methods.

  14. Micrometer size rod formed by secondary self assembly of omeprazole with α- and β-cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Venkatesh, G

    2015-02-25

    Self assembly of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) micro rods induced by omeprazole (OMP) were observed by SEM and TEM. OMP/CD inclusion complexes have formed the secondary self assembly micro meter size rod like structure. This structure was driven by the intermolecular hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals forces. Both forces induced the ordered assembly and arrangement of OMP/CD inclusion complexes, whereas CD molecules acted as molecular bricks. The OMP/CD inclusion complexes primary assembled form individual nanorods and then secondary self aggregate nanorods were form a micro meter rod structure. The results indicate that inter-nanotubular hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the formation of the self assembled micro rods. The inclusion complexes were also characterized using FT-IR, DSC, powder XRD, (1)H NMR, absorption, fluorescence, life time measurements and molecular modeling methods.

  15. A tetrachromatic display for the spatiotemporal control of rod and cone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Florian S; Paulun, Vivian C; Weiss, David; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-08-01

    We present an apparatus that allows independent stimulation of rods and short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cones. Previously presented devices allow rod and cone stimulation independently, but only for a spatially invariant stimulus design (Pokorny, Smithson, & Quinlan, 2004; Sun, Pokorny, & Smith, 2001b). We overcame this limitation by using two spectrally filtered projectors with overlapping projections. This approach allows independent rod and cone stimulation in a dynamic two-dimensional scene with appropriate resolution in the spatial, temporal, and receptor domains. Modulation depths were ±15% for M-cones and L-cones, ±20% for rods, and ±50% for S-cones, all with respect to an equal-energy mesopic background at 3.4 cd/m2. Validation was provided by radiometric measures and behavioral data from two trichromats, one protanope, one deuteranope, and one night-blind observer. PMID:26305863

  16. Failure and penetration response of borosilicate glass during short-rod impact

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C. E. Jr.; Orphal, D. L.; Behner, Th.; Hohler, V.; Wickert, M.; Templeton, D. W.

    2007-12-12

    The failure characterization of brittle materials like glass is of fundamental importance in describing the penetration resistance against projectiles. A critical question is whether this failure front remains 'steady' after the driving stress is removed. A test series with short gold rods (D = 1 mm, L/D{approx_equal}5-11) impacting borosilicate glass at {approx}1 to 2 km/s was carried out to investigate this question. The reverse ballistic method was used for the experiments, and the impact and penetration process was observed simultaneously with five flash X-rays and a 16-frame high-speed optical camera. Very high measurement accuracy was established to ensure reliable results. Results show that the failure front induced by rod impact and penetration does arrest (ceases to propagate) after the rod is totally eroded inside the glass. The impact of a second rod after a short time delay reinitiates the failure front at about the same speed.

  17. In-situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water vapor, and aerosols in polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  18. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  19. The force generated by biological membranes on a polymer rod and its response: Statics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a theory for the force exerted by a fluctuating membrane on a polymer rod tip. Using statistical mechanical methods, the expression for the generated force is written in terms of the distance of the rod tip from the membrane "frame." We apply the theory in calculating the stall force and membrane displacement required to cease the growth of a growing fiber induced by membrane fluctuations, as well as the membrane force and membrane displacement required for rod/fiber buckling. We also consider the dynamics of a growing fiber tip under the influence of a fluctuation-induced membrane force. We discuss the importance of our results in various biological contexts. Finally, we present a method to simultaneously extract both the rigidity of the semiflexible rod and the force applied by, e.g., the membrane from the measurements of the bending fluctuations of the rod. Such a measurement of the force would give information about the thermodynamics of the rod polymerization that involves the usual Brownian ratchet mechanism.

  20. Conductance changes produced by light in rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gertrude; Fatt, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Changes in the admittance of rod outer segments produced by illumination with brief flashes were studied by two methods: one, in which maintained changes in real and imaginary parts of admittance were observed in the frequency range 15 c/s-60 kc/s; the other, in which the time course of change in absolute value of admittance (Δ|Y|) was observed at frequencies of 100 kc/s-1·0 Mc/s. 2. The response to light absorbed by rhodopsin was resolved into components. One of these components was a transient increase in conductance which arose from a rapid degradation into heat of the light energy. Another component, prominent at high frequencies where the conductivity of the rod interior was accessible to measurement, was produced by the uptake of H+ by visual pigment in its conversion from metarhodopsin I to metarhodopsin II, causing a change in ionization of buffer. 3. Two other components, designated I and II, appeared as maintained changes of admittance involving the organized structure of the rod. Component I appeared as a frequency-independent increase in the real part of admittance (ΔG), the amplitude of which varied in proportion to the conductivity of the medium, without specificity as to ion species. Component II appeared as a ΔG which rose linearly with log frequency over the range 1-60 kc/s, while the imaginary part of admittance change (ΔB) rose to a plateau which was maintained for more than a tenfold frequency range. This component was unaffected by variations in conductivity in the region of low conductivities. 4. When rods were suspended in a solution containing 100 mM hydroxylamine, component II no longer appeared as a maintained admittance change while component I was unaffected. Examination of the time course of response showed component II to appear transiently, decaying over the course of 2 sec following a flash. 5. Measurements of Δ|Y| for rods in solutions of widely different conductivities showed component II to have a more rapid time course

  1. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  2. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  3. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  4. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P. Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  5. Gelation of rod particle suspension in Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyejin; Kim, Chongyoup

    2015-05-01

    The gelation of FeOOH rod particles in a glycerin-water mixture under shear flows is investigated using rheological measurements. The average length and the average diameter of the rod particles are 1 μm and 120 nm, respectively. The van der Waals energy is much larger than the Brownian and electrostatic contributions. To examine the effect of shear history on gelation, two different kinds of experimental procedures are used: A strong, but short preshear followed by a creep test and a preshear for a long time followed by a creep test. The rod particle suspension becomes a gel during the creep test showing the plateau in G' and yield stress. The gelation time during the creep test is dependent on preshear time while it is not affected by the preshear stress for a short time before the creep test. Both the plateau in G' and the yield stress are larger when the preshear time is longer. The gelation appears to occur by two steps of the formation of flocs by the aggregation of individual particles and then the formation of the sample spanning network by the aggregation of the flocs. Gel strength appears to be dependent on floc size which is determined by the imposed shear stress in the present case of shear induced gelation.

  6. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  7. DeltaE effect for polycrystalline ferromagnetic rods.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Nicolae; Nita, Gelu; Boer, Aatlla

    2008-02-01

    We performed experimental and computational studies of the acoustic transfer power coefficient for carbon steel cylindric bars placed in axial magnetic field. By experiment, the transmission coefficients of velocity were measured for ferromagnetic bars during the first magnetization curve below saturation. Using the magnetic and magnetostriction material measurements we obtained the profile of the magnetostriction along the distance for a ferromagnetic cylindrical rod placed in a magnetic field parallel with its axis. The data were compared with numerical results obtained by computer simulation, under the assumption of spatial dependent acoustic impedance and phase velocity, leading to the conclusion that the Young modulus is affected by the magnetoelastic interaction according to a linear decrease.

  8. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  9. End fitting for oil well sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C.P.

    1984-02-07

    An end fitting for a sucker rod for oil wells is described with the end fitting having a chamber portion extending inwardly from one end thereof and an externally threaded portion at its other end. The chamber portion is defined by a plurality of spaced-apart annular ridges which define frusto-conical shaped cavities therebetween. The end fitting also has a bore extending inwardly thereinto from its other end which communicates with the inner end of the chamber portion. A valve is mounted in the end fitting and has a valve stem positioned in the bore and a valve head positioned at the inner end of the chamber portion. The chamber portion is adapted to receive a glass reinforced resin bonded cylindrical rod which is maintained therein by a two-part epoxy resin which surrounds the rod and is received in the cavities to form epoxy wedges bonded to the rod. The outer end of the bore is provided with internal threads which threadably receive a screw therein which engages the end of the valve stem so that longitudinal force may be applied to the valve thereby transmitting longitudinal force to the end of the rod.

  10. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  11. Dynamic behavior of rod photoreceptor disks.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhe; Jiang, Yunhai; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2002-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use membrane organelles, like the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi, to carry out different functions. Vertebrate rod photoreceptors use hundreds of membrane sacs (the disks) for the detection of light. We have used fluorescent tracers and single cell imaging to study the properties of rod photoreceptor disks. Labeling of intact rod photoreceptors with membrane markers and polar tracers revealed communication between intradiskal and extracellular space. Internalized tracers moved along the length of the rod outer segment, indicating communication between the disks as well. This communication involved the exchange of both membrane and aqueous phase and had a time constant in the order of minutes. The communication pathway uses approximately 2% of the available membrane disk area and does not allow the passage of molecules larger than 10 kDa. It was possible to load the intradiskal space with fluorescent Ca(2+) and pH dyes, which reported an intradiskal Ca(2+) concentration in the order of 1 microM and an acidic pH 6.5, both of them significantly different than intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and pH. The results suggest that the rod photoreceptor disks are not discrete, passive sacs but rather comprise an active cellular organelle. The communication between disks may be important for membrane remodeling as well as for providing access to the intradiskal space of the whole outer segment. PMID:12202366

  12. [Development of a method for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and dissolved ferrous iron in large batch in pore water samples of sediments with micro-volumes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhu, Chun-Gang; Di, Xu; Ding, Shi-Ming

    2014-04-01

    A method was established to measure the concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP) and dissolved ferrous iron (Fe) in micro-volume solution samples through colorimetric determination in large batch using a 384-well Microplate Spectrophotometer. Concentrations of DRP and dissolved Fe were determined by the molybdenum blue and phenanthroline colorimetric methods, respectively. The results showed that the sample consumption used for each parameter was between 20 and 50 microL after dilution, and the detection limits for DRP and dissolved Fe were 0.006 mg x L(-1) and 0.010 mg x L(-1) respectively, while the analytical precision varied between 1% and 5%. The established method was applied to measure DRP and dissolved Fe in pore waters of sediment profiles in Lake Taihu, which were collected by a high-resolution Peeper (HR-Peeper) device with a vertical resolution of 2 mm. The results showed a simultaneous increase of DRP and dissolved Fe in their concentrations with the depth of two sediment profiles investigated.

  13. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature.

  14. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Interpretation of calculated forces on sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Pattillo, P.D. ); Studenmund, W.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of working loads in a sucker rod string during a pumping cycle has received substantial coverage in the petroleum literature. These load predictions have tended to focus on mechanical design considerations such as excess load and fatigue prediction. In contrast, the current study addresses the issues of buckling associated with working axial/pressure loads in an attempt to clarify the means of both predicting buckling and minimizing its effects. The study begins with a review of the static loads acting near the pump, and proceeds to a discussion of how these loads relate to the tendency of a rod string to buckle on the downstroke. Critical to this discussion is the concept of effective tension. Definition of the effective tension leads to the application of this concept to sinker bar design as a means of mitigating the buckling tendency of a rod string. Key points are reinforced by illustrative examples.

  16. System analysis for sucker-rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Z.; Doty, D.R.

    1989-05-01

    Pumping free gas in an oil well can significantly decrease the efficiency of a sucker-rod-pumping installation. Pump placement depth and use of a downhole gas/liquid separator (gas anchor) were found to be significant variables in improving the overall efficiency. A procedure is presented that shows when and to what degree the use of a gas anchor improves the efficiency of a sucker-rod pumping system. It was found that at lower pump intake pressures, the gas anchor usually improves efficiency, but at higher pump intake pressures, use of a gas anchor produces no positive effect. Also, elevating the pump to the highest position that still allows proper pump loading was found to reduce the operating costs of a sucker-rod-pumping installation significantly. Finally, a procedure is presented to calculate directly the pump volumetric efficiency and required volumetric pump displacement rate.

  17. System analysis for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Z.; Doty, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Pumping free gas in an oil well can significantly decrease the efficiency of a sucker rod pumping installation. Pump placement depth and the use of a down hole gas-liquid separator (gas anchor) found to be significant variables in improving the overall efficiency. A procedure is presented which shows when and by how much the use of a gas anchor improves the efficiency of a sucker rod pumping system. It was found that at lower pump intake pressures the gas anchor usually improves efficiency, while at higher pump intake pressures the use of a gas anchor will produce no positive effect. Also, it was found at elevating the pump to the highest position which still allows for proper pump loading can significantly reduce the operating costs for a sucker rod pumping installation. Finally, a procedure is presented for directly calculating pump volumetric efficiency as well as the required volumetric pump displacement rate.

  18. Alcohol intoxication impairs mesopic rod and cone temporal processing in social drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaohua; Kang, Para; King, Andrea; Cao, Dingcai

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol-related driving accidents and fatalities occur most frequently at nighttime and at dawn, i.e. a mesopic lighting condition in which visual processing depends on both rod and cone photoreceptors. The temporal functions of the rod and cone pathways are critical for driving in this lighting condition. However, how alcohol influences the temporal functions in the rod and cone pathways at mesopic light levels is inconclusive. To address this, the present study investigated whether an acute intoxicating dose of alcohol impairs rod- and/or cone-mediated critical fusion frequency (CFF, the lowest frequency of which an intermittent or flickering light stimulus is perceived as steady). Methods In Experiment I, we measured the CFFs for three types of visual stimuli (rod stimulus alone, cone stimulus alone, and the mixture of both stimuli types), under three illuminant light levels (dim illuminance: 2Td; low illuminance: 20Td; and medium illuminance 80Td) in moderate-heavy social drinkers before and after they consumed an intoxicating dose of alcohol (0.8g/kg) compared with a placebo beverage. In Experiment II, we examined if the illuminance level (dark versus light) of the visual area surrounding the test stimuli alters alcohol’s effect on the temporal processing of rods and cones. Results The results showed that compared with placebo, alcohol significantly reduced CFFs of all stimulus types at all illuminance levels. Furthermore, alcohol intoxication produced a larger impairment on rod-pathway-mediated CFFs under light versus dark surround. Conclusions These results indicate that alcohol intake slows down rod and cone-pathway-mediated temporal processing. Further research may elucidate if this effect may play a role in alcohol-related injury and accidents, which often occur under low light conditions. PMID:26247196

  19. Comparing the Performance of Hyperbolic and Circular Rod Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers with Applied Higher Order Auxiliary Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, D.J.; Block, B.P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    This work applies higher order auxiliary excitation techniques to two types of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs): commercial systems and spaceborne instruments. The operational settings of a circular rod geometry commercial system and an engineering test-bed for a hyperbolic rod geometry spaceborne instrument were matched, with the relative performance of each sensor characterized with and without applied excitation using isotopic measurements of Kr+. Each instrument was operated at the limit of the test electronics to determine the effect of auxiliary excitation on extending instrument capabilities. For the circular rod sensor, with applied excitation, a doubling of the mass resolution at 1% of peak transmission resulted from the elimination of the low-mass side peak tail typical of such rod geometries. The mass peak stability and ion rejection efficiency were also increased by factors of 2 and 10, respectively, with voltage scan lines passing through the center of stability islands formed from auxiliary excitation. Auxiliary excitation also resulted in factors of 6 and 2 in peak stability and ion rejection efficiency, respectively, for the hyperbolic rod sensor. These results not only have significant implications for the use of circular rod quadrupoles with applied excitation as a suitable replacement for traditional hyperbolic rod sensors, but also for extending the capabilities of existing hyperbolic rod QMSs for the next generation of spaceborne instruments and low-mass commercial systems.

  20. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.