Science.gov

Sample records for rodent hepatocytes coinciding

  1. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Masafumi; Kojima, Takashi . E-mail: ktakashi@sapmed.ac.jp; Lan, Mengdong; Son, Seiichi; Murata, Masaki; Osanai, Makoto; Chiba, Hideki; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2007-05-15

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi.

  2. Perioperative hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) infusions improve hepatic regeneration following portal branch ligation (PBL) in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mangieri, Christopher W; McCartt, Jason C; Strode, Matthew A; Lowry, John E; Balakrishna, Prasad M

    2017-07-01

    As hepatic surgery has become safer and more commonly performed, the extent of hepatic resections has increased. When there is not enough expected hepatic reserve to facilitate primary resection of hepatic tumors, a clinical adjunct to facilitating primary resection is portal vein embolization (PVE). PVE allows the hepatic remnant to increase to an appropriate size prior to resection via hepatocyte regeneration; however, PVE is not always successful in facilitating adequate regeneration. One of the strongest trophic factors for hepatocyte regeneration is hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The purpose of this study was to improve hepatic regeneration with perioperative HGF infusions in an animal model that mimics PVE. Portal branch ligation (PBL) in rodents is equivalent to PVE in humans. We performed left-sided PBL in Sprague-Dawley rodents with the experimental group receiving perioperative HGF infusions. Baseline and postoperative liver volumetrics were obtained with CT scanning methods as performed in clinical practice. Baseline and postoperative liver functions were assessed via indocyanine green (ICG) elimination testing. HGF infused rodents had statistically significant increase in all postoperative liver volumetrics. Most clinically relevant were increased right liver volumes (RLV), 14.10 versus 7.85 cm(3) (p value 0.0001), and increased degree of hypertrophy (DH %), 159.23 versus 47.11 % (p value 0.0079). HGF infused rodents also had a quick return to baseline liver function, 2.38 days compared to 6.13 days (p value 0.0001). Perioperative HGF infusions significantly increase hepatic regeneration following PBL in rodents. Perioperative HGF infusions following PVE are a possible adjunct to increase the amount of patients able to successfully undergo primary resection for hepatic tumors. Further basic science is warranted in examining the use of HGF infusions to increase hepatic regeneration and translating that basic science work to clinical practice.

  3. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Measurement of unscheduled DNA synthesis and S-phase synthesis in rodent hepatocytes following in vivo treatment: Testing of 24 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsalis, J.C.; Tyson, C.K.; Steinmetz, K.L.; Loh, E.K.; Hamilton, C.M.; Bakke, J.P. ); Spalding, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been shown to be useful for studying genotoxic hepatocarcinogens. In addition, measurement of S-phase synthesis (SPS) provides an indirect indicator of hepatocellular proliferation, which may be an important mechanism in rodent carcinogenesis. This assay was used to examine 24 chemicals for their ability to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) or SPS in Fischer-344 rats or B6C3F1 mice following in vivo treatment. Hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and incubated with {sup 3}H-thymidine following in vivo treatment by gavage. Chemicals chosen for testing were from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) genetic toxicology testing program and most were also evaluated in long-term animal studies conducted by the NTP. Dinitrotoluene and Michler's Ketone induced positive UDS response in rat, while N-nitrosodiethanolamine and selenium sulfide induced equivocal UDS results in mouse and rat, respectively. BCMEE, bromoform, chloroform, PBB, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene were all potent inducers of SPS in mouse liver, while C.I. Solvent Yellow 14, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane yielded equivocal SPS results in rat and mouse, respectively. These results indicate that most of the test compounds do not induced UDS in the liver; however, the significant S-phase response induced by many of these compounds, especially the halogenated solvents, may be an important mechanism in their hepatocarinogenicity.

  5. The current status of primary hepatocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Mitaka, Toshihiro

    1998-01-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances toward the development of culture conditions that promote proliferation of primary rodent hepatocytes. There are two major methods for the multiplication of hepatocytes in vitro: one is the use of nicotinamide, the other is the use of a nutrient-rich medium. In the medium containing a high concentration of nicotinamide and a growth factor, primary hepatocytes can proliferate well. In this culture condition small mononucleate cells, which are named small hepatocytes, appear and form colonies. Small hepatocytes have a high potential to proliferate while maintaining hepatic characteristics, and can differentiate into mature ones. On the other hand, combining the nutrient-rich medium with 2% DMSO, the proliferated hepatocytes can recover the hepatic differentiated functions and maintain them for a long time. In this review I describe the culture conditions for the proliferation and differentiation of primary hepatocytes and discuss the small hepatocytes, especially their roles in liver growth. PMID:10319020

  6. Hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olsavsky Goyak, Katy M; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, research suggests that for certain systems, animal models are insufficient for human toxicology testing. The development of robust, in vitro models of human toxicity is required to decrease our dependence on potentially misleading in vivo animal studies. A critical development in human toxicology testing is the use of human primary hepatocytes to model processes that occur in the intact liver. However, in order to serve as an appropriate model, primary hepatocytes must be maintained in such a way that they persist in their differentiated state. While many hepatocyte culture methods exist, the two-dimensional collagen "sandwich" system combined with a serum-free medium, supplemented with physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, appears to robustly maintain hepatocyte character. Studies in rat and human hepatocytes have shown that when cultured under these conditions, hepatocytes maintain many markers of differentiation including morphology, expression of plasma proteins, hepatic nuclear factors, phase I and II metabolic enzymes. Functionally, these culture conditions also preserve hepatic stress response pathways, such as the SAPK and MAPK pathways, as well as prototypical xenobiotic induction responses. This chapter will briefly review culture methodologies but will primarily focus on hallmark hepatocyte structural, expression and functional markers that characterize the differentiation status of the hepatocyte.

  7. Current status of hepatocyte xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Meier, Raphael P H; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Morel, Philippe; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Strom, Stephen; Bühler, Leo H

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of acute liver failure, a condition with high mortality, comprises optimal clinical care, and in severe cases liver transplantation. However, there are limitations in availability of organ donors. Hepatocyte transplantation is a promising alternative that could fill the medical need, in particular as the bridge to liver transplantation. Encapsulated porcine hepatocytes represent an unlimited source that could function as a bioreactor requiring minimal immunosuppression. Besides patients with acute liver failure, patients with alcoholic hepatitis who are unresponsive to a short course of corticosteroids are a target for hepatocyte transplantation. In this review we present an overview of the innate immune barriers in hepatocyte xenotransplantation, including the role of complement and natural antibodies; the role of phagocytic cells and ligands like CD47 in the regulation of phagocytic cells; and the role of Natural Killer cells. We present also some illustrations of physiological species incompatibilities in hepatocyte xenotransplantation, such as incompatibilities in the coagulation system. An overview of the methodology for cell microencapsulation is presented, followed by proof-of-concept studies in rodent and nonhuman primate models of fulminant liver failure: these studies document the efficacy of microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes which warrants progress towards clinical application. Lastly, we present an outline of a provisional clinical trial, that upon completion of preclinical work could start within the upcoming 2-3 years.

  8. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  9. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  10. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  11. Endothelial Signals Modulate Hepatocyte Apicobasal Polarization in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Takuya F.; Sadler, Kirsten C.; Crosnier, Cecile; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Emerging evidence indicates that paracrine signals from endothelial cells play a role in tissue differentiation and organ formation [1–3]. Here, we identify a novel role for endothelial cells in modulating hepatocyte polarization during liver organogenesis. We find that in zebrafish, the apical domain of the hepatocytes predicts the location of the intrahepatic biliary network. The refinement of hepatocyte polarization coincides with the invasion of endothelial cells into the liver, and these endothelial cells migrate along the maturing basal surface of the hepatocytes. Using genetic, pharmacological, and transplantation experiments, we provide evidence that endothelial cells influence the polarization of the adjacent hepatocytes. This influence of endothelial cells on hepatocytes is mediated at least in part by the cell-surface protein Heart of glass and contributes to the establishment of coordinately aligned hepatocyte apical membranes and evenly spaced intrahepatic conduits. PMID:18951027

  12. Hepatic heme catabolism in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, B.C.; Bonkovsky, H.L.

    1987-05-01

    Uncertainty persists concerning the role and importance of heme oxygenase in the catabolism of heme by hepatocytes. The products of heme oxygenase catalyzed heme catabolism are equimolar amounts of biliverdin IX..cap alpha.., CO, and iron. Previous reports from studies with rodent hepatocyte cultures have suggested the possibility that non-heme oxygenase pathway(s) predominate in the breakdown of hepatic hemoprotein heme. The authors have studied this question in cultured chick embryo hepatocytes, which retain normal regulation of heme metabolism and levels of cytochromes P-450 as in intact animals. Exogenous heme added to the culture medium with control chick embryo hepatocyte cultures was quantitatively converted to biliverdin IX..cap alpha... To study endogenous heme breakdown, cellular heme was labelled by exposing cultured cells to (5-/sup 14/C) 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The hepatocytes were also treated with mephenytoin that increases cytochrome P-450, total hepatic heme and heme oxygenase. At various times after labelling heme, biliverdin, and CO were isolated and counted. For at least 8 hrs, the increase in CO radioactivity corresponded to the loss of radioactivity in heme. Beyond 1 h biliverdin was unstable in culture medium, but for 1 h after labelling (dpm BVIX..cap alpha.. + dpm CO) ..delta..dpm heme. All BV detected was the ..cap alpha.. isomer. They conclude that heme oxygenase accounts for both endogenous and exogenous heme breakdown by hepatocytes.

  13. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  14. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  15. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  16. Coincidence Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J H

    1950-11-21

    A coincidence proportional counter having a plurality of collecting electrodes so disposed as to measure the range or energy spectrum of an ionizing particle-emitting source such as an alpha source, is disclosed.

  17. Coincident disruptive coloration

    PubMed Central

    Cuthill, Innes C.; Székely, Aron

    2008-01-01

    Even if an animal matches its surroundings perfectly in colour and texture, any mismatch between the spatial phase of its pattern and that of the background, or shadow created by its three-dimensional relief, is potentially revealing. Nevertheless, for camouflage to be fully broken, the shape must be recognizable. Disruptive coloration acts against object recognition by the use of high-contrast internal colour boundaries to break up shape and form. As well as the general outline, characteristic features such as eyes and limbs must also be concealed; this can be achieved by having the colour patterns on different, but adjacent, body parts aligned to match each other (i.e. in phase). Such ‘coincident disruptive coloration’ ensures that there is no phase disjunction where body parts meet, and causes different sections of the body to blend perceptually. We tested this theory using field experiments with predation by wild birds on artificial moth-like targets, whose wings and (edible pastry) bodies had colour patterns that were variously coincident or not. We also carried out an experiment with humans searching for analogous targets on a computer screen. Both experiments show that coincident disruptive coloration is an effective mechanism for concealing an otherwise revealing body form. PMID:18990668

  18. Triple Coincidence Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2004-09-22

    The Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is on e of the world’s most sensitive systems for monitoring the four radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 133mXE, 131mXe and 135Xe. However, due to size, weight and power specifications appropriate to meet treaty-monitoring requirements; the ARSA is unsuitable for rapid deployment using modest transportation means. To transition this technology to a portable unit can be easily and rapidly deployed can be achieved by significant reductions in size, weight and power consumption if concentration were not required. As part of an exploratory effort to reduce both the size of the air sample and the gas processing requirement PNNL has developed an experimental nuclear detector to test and qualify the use of triple coincidence signatures (beta, conversion electron, x-ray) from two of the radioxenon isotopes (135Xe and 133Xe) as well as the more traditional beta-gamma coincidence signatures used by the ARSA system. The additional coincidence requirement allows for reduced passive shielding, and makes it possible for unambiguous detection of 133Xe and 153Xe in the presence of high 222Rn backgrounds. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the results obtained for a 133Xe sample with and without 222Rn as an interference signature.

  19. Hepatocyte transplantation in children with liver cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamooda, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatic failure and liver-based metabolic disorders require management which is both costly and complex. Hepatocyte transplantation has been very encouraging as an alternative to organ transplantation for liver disease treatment, and studies in rodents, show that transplants involving isolated liver cells can reverse hepatic failure, and correct various metabolic deficiencies of the liver. This 2016 review is based on a literature search using PubMed including original articles, reviews, cases and clinical guidelines. The search terms were “hepatocyte transplantation”, “liver transplantation”, “liver cell failure”, “metabolic liver disorders”, “orthotropic liver transplantation”, “hepatocytes” and “stem cell transplantation”. The goal of this review is to summarize the significance of hepatocyte transplantation, the sources of hepatocytes and the barriers of hepatocyte transplantation using a detailed review of literature. Our review shows that treatment of patients with liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation has expanded exponentially, especially for patients suffering from liver-based metabolic disorders. Once hepatocyte transplantation has been shown to effectively replace organ transplantation for a portion of patients with life-threatening liver metabolic diseases and those with liver failure it will make cell therapy effective and available for a broad population of patients with liver disorders. PMID:27957309

  20. Rodent repellency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Bellack, E.

    1950-01-01

    In the course of studies involving more than 2,500 chemical repellents, it has been found that certain groups of- compounds containing nitrogen or sulfur are repellent to rats under the , test conditions and it appears probable that some of these compounds might be used for the protection of packaged goods against rodent attacks. Additional tests to determine optimum methods of application will be necessary before final evaluation of these compounds will be possible and extensive field trials will be required to establish the degree of protection which may be afforded by the use of these materials. Pending such final evaluation, it may be assumed that the results,to date offer a means of selecting the most promising types of'materials for further trial....On the basis of the test data, it appears that some amine derivative, such as a salt of some organic, acid, or a complex with trinitrobenzene or with a metallic salt of a dialkyl dithiocarbamic acid might offer promise of protection of packaging materials against rodent attacks....Protection might be obtained through the use of certain 'physical deterrents' such as plastics, waxes or drying oils.

  1. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  2. TEMPORAL CHANGE IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TEMPORAL CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY *

    The objective of this study was to examine the reduction in gap junction communication (GJC) in primary hepatocytes due to coincident melatonin and magnetic field treatments to determine if these conditions could prov...

  3. TEMPORAL CHANGE IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TEMPORAL CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY *

    The objective of this study was to examine the reduction in gap junction communication (GJC) in primary hepatocytes due to coincident melatonin and magnetic field treatments to determine if these conditions could prov...

  4. Mechanism of Hepatocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Quan, Xi-Bing; Zeng, Wen-Jiao; Yang, Xiao-Ou; Wang, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte apoptosis plays important roles in both the removal of external microorganisms and the occurrence and development of liver diseases. Different conditions, such as virus infection, fatty liver disease, hepatic ischemia reperfusion, and drug-induced liver injury, are accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. This review summarizes recent research on the mechanism of hepatocyte apoptosis involving the classical extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. We emphasized the major causes of apoptosis according to the characteristics of different liver diseases. Several concerns regarding future research and clinical application are also raised. PMID:28058033

  5. Development of a chemically defined medium and discovery of new mitogenic growth factors for mouse hepatocytes: mitogenic effects of FGF1/2 and PDGF.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William C; Michalopoulos, Amantha W; Orr, Anne; Ding, Michael Q; Stolz, Donna B; Michalopoulos, George K

    2014-01-01

    Chemically defined serum-free media for rat hepatocytes have been useful in identifying EGFR ligands and HGF/MET signaling as direct mitogenic factors for rat hepatocytes. The absence of such media for mouse hepatocytes has prevented screening for discovery of such mitogens for mouse hepatocytes. We present results obtained by designing such a chemically defined medium for mouse hepatocytes and demonstrate that in addition to EGFR ligands and HGF, the growth factors FGF1 and FGF2 are also important mitogenic factors for mouse hepatocytes. Smaller mitogenic response was also noticed for PDGF AB. Mouse hepatocytes are more likely to enter into spontaneous proliferation in primary culture due to activation of cell cycle pathways resulting from collagenase perfusion. These results demonstrate unanticipated fundamental differences in growth biology of hepatocytes between the two rodent species.

  6. Susceptibility to Plasmodium liver stage infection is altered by hepatocyte polyploidy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Laura S.; Kaushansky, Alexis; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium parasites infect hepatocytes of their mammalian hosts and within undergo obligate liver stage development. The specific host cell attributes that are important for liver infection remain largely unknown. Several host signaling pathways are perturbed in infected hepatocytes, some of which are important in the generation of hepatocyte polyploidy. To test the functional consequence of polyploidy in liver infection, we infected hepatocytes with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii both in vitro and in vivo and examined the ploidy of infected and uninfected hepatocytes by flow cytometry. In both hepatoma cell lines and in the mouse liver, the fraction of polyploid cells was higher in the infected cell population than in the uninfected cell population. When the data were reanalyzed by comparing the extent of Plasmodium infection within each ploidy subset, we found that infection rates were elevated in more highly polyploid cells and lower in diploid cells. Furthermore, we found that the parasite’s preference for host cells with high ploidy is conserved among rodent malaria species and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This parasite preference for host cells of high ploidy cannot be explained by differences in hepatocyte size or DNA replication. We conclude that Plasmodium preferentially infects and develops in polyploid hepatocytes. PMID:24612025

  7. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  8. Characterization of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa) -Independent Effects of PPARa Activators in the Rodent Liver: Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Also Activates the Constitutive Activated Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor alpha (PPARa). Recent studies indicate that one such PPC, the plasticizer di2- et...

  9. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  10. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  11. Disappearance of GFP-Positive Hepatocytes Transplanted into the Liver of Syngeneic Wild-Type Rats Pretreated with Retrorsine

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiromichi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Wang, Yongchun; Fu, Yingxin; Wesson, Russell N.; Lin, Qing; Montgomery, Robert A.; Enzan, Hideaki; Sun, Zhaoli

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a widely used molecular tag to trace transplanted cells in rodent liver injury models. The differing results from various previously reported studies using GFP could be attributed to the immunogenicity of GFP. Methods Hepatocytes were obtained from GFP-expressing transgenic (Tg) Lewis rats and were transplanted into the livers of wild-type Lewis rats after they had undergone a partial hepatectomy. The proliferation of endogenous hepatocytes in recipient rats was inhibited by pretreatment with retrorsine to enhance the proliferation of the transplanted hepatocytes. Transplantation of wild-type hepatocytes into GFP-Tg rat liver was also performed for comparison. Results All biopsy specimens taken seven days after transplantation showed engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes, with the numbers of transplanted hepatocytes increasing until day 14. GFP-positive hepatocytes in wild-type rat livers were decreased by day 28 and could not be detected on day 42, whereas the number of wild-type hepatocytes steadily increased in GFP-Tg rat liver. Histological examination showed degenerative change of GFP-positive hepatocytes and the accumulation of infiltrating cells on day 28. PCR analysis for the GFP transgene suggested that transplanted hepatocytes were eliminated rather than being retained along with the loss of GFP expression. Both modification of the immunological response using tacrolimus and bone marrow transplantation prolonged the survival of GFP-positive hepatocytes. In contrast, host immunization with GFP-positive hepatocytes led to complete loss of GFP-positive hepatocytes by day 14. Conclusion GFP-positive hepatocytes isolated from GFP-Tg Lewis rats did not survive long term in the livers of retrorsine-pretreated wild-type Lewis rats. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon most likely involves an immunological reaction against GFP. The influence of GFP immunogenicity on cell transplantation models should be

  12. Whole-body γ-irradiation decelerates rat hepatocyte polyploidization.

    PubMed

    Ikhtiar, Adnan M

    2015-07-01

    To characterize hepatocyte polyploidization induced by intermediate dose of γ-ray. Male Wistar strain rats were whole-body irradiated (WBI) with 2 Gy of γ-ray at the age of 1 month, and 5-6 rats were sacrificed monthly at 0-25 months after irradiation. The nuclear DNA content of individual hepatocytes was measured by flow cytometry, then hepatocytes were classified into various ploidy classes. Survival percentage, after exposure up to the end of the study, did not indicate any differences between the irradiated groups and controls. The degree of polyploidization in hepatocytes of irradiated rats, was significantly lower than that for the control after 1 month of exposure, and it continued to be lower after up to 8 months. Thereafter, the degree of polyploidization in the irradiated group slowly returned to the control level when the irradiated rats reached the age of 10 months. Intermediate dose of ionizing radiation, in contrast to high doses, decelerate hepatocyte polyploidization, which may coincides with the hypothesis of the beneficial effects of low doses of ionizing radiation.

  13. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  14. Activation of Kupffer cells and caspase-3 involved in rat hepatocyte apoptosis induced by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Hamada, E; Nishida, T; Uchiyama, Y; Nakamura, J; Isahara, K; Kazuo, H; Huang, T P; Momoi, T; Ito, T; Matsuda, H

    1999-05-01

    Sepsis and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) cause mild to severe hepatic dysfunction. In this study, Kupffer cell activation, involvement of TNFalpha and caspases downstream of the TNFalpha receptor were examined in hepatocyte apoptosis induced by LPS. In in vivo experiments, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with LPS, and small amounts of the blood and liver were sampled to evaluate apoptosis. Kupffer cells were inactivated by pretreatment with gadolinium chloride for 2 days. In in vitro experiments, hepatocytes and Kupffer cells were separately isolated from rat livers using collagenase perfusion. LPS induced time-dependent and dose-dependent increases in the number of TUNEL-positive cells, which coincided with the apoptotic features of hepatocytes demonstrated by electron microscopy and DNA ladder. Activation of caspase-3-like proteases was observed with an increase in the number of apoptotic hepatocytes. Immunostaining with activated caspase-3-specific antibody showed that caspase-3 was activated only in the cytoplasm of TUNEL-positive hepatocytes. Inactivation of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride was concomitantly accompanied by the prevention of caspase-3 activation, hepatocyte apoptosis and liver injury induced by LPS. The co-culture system of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells, but neither cell culture system, individually, showed LPS-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. Kupffer cell-conditioned medium induced hepatocyte apoptosis, whereas addition of anti-TNFalpha antibody to Kupffer cell-conditioned medium did not. Additions of acetyl-DEVD-CHO, acetyl-YVAD-CHO, and acetyl-IETD-CHO to Kupffer cell-conditioned medium decreased the number of apoptotic hepatocytes. These results suggest that the activation of Kupffer cells, TNFalpha and caspases downstream of TNFR1 were involved in hepatocyte apoptosis induced by LPS.

  15. The ploidy conveyor of mature hepatocytes as a source of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Andrew W; Taylor, Matthew H; Hickey, Raymond D; Hanlon Newell, Amy E; Lenzi, Michelle L; Olson, Susan B; Finegold, Milton J; Grompe, Markus

    2010-10-07

    Mononucleated and binucleated polyploid hepatocytes (4n, 8n, 16n and higher) are found in all mammalian species, but the functional significance of this conserved phenomenon remains unknown. Polyploidization occurs through failed cytokinesis, begins at weaning in rodents and increases with age. Previously, we demonstrated that the opposite event, ploidy reversal, also occurs in polyploid hepatocytes generated by artificial cell fusion. This raised the possibility that somatic 'reductive mitoses' can also happen in normal hepatocytes. Here we show that multipolar mitotic spindles form frequently in mouse polyploid hepatocytes and can result in one-step ploidy reversal to generate offspring with halved chromosome content. Proliferating hepatocytes produce a highly diverse population of daughter cells with multiple numerical chromosome imbalances as well as uniparental origins. Our findings support a dynamic model of hepatocyte polyploidization, ploidy reversal and aneuploidy, a phenomenon that we term the 'ploidy conveyor'. We propose that this mechanism evolved to generate genetic diversity and permits adaptation of hepatocytes to xenobiotic or nutritional injury.

  16. Multiple channel programmable coincidence counter

    DOEpatents

    Arnone, Gaetano J.

    1990-01-01

    A programmable digital coincidence counter having multiple channels and featuring minimal dead time. Neutron detectors supply electrical pulses to a synchronizing circuit which in turn inputs derandomized pulses to an adding circuit. A random access memory circuit connected as a programmable length shift register receives and shifts the sum of the pulses, and outputs to a serializer. A counter is input by the adding circuit and downcounted by the seralizer, one pulse at a time. The decoded contents of the counter after each decrement is output to scalers.

  17. Coincidence/Multiplicity Photofission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W. H. Geist; D.R. Norman; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman; K. J. Haskell

    2009-09-01

    An series of experiments using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system and a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-supplied, list-mode data acquisition method have shown enhanced performance utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator for nuclear material detection and identification. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security, treaty-related support, and weapon dismantlement applications. For the latter, this technology can directly support of Department of Energy/NA241 programmatic mission objectives relative to future Rocky Ridge-type testing campaigns for active inspection systems.

  18. Soft coincidence in late acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2005-06-15

    We study the coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration by assuming that the present ratio between dark matter and dark energy is a slowly varying function of the scale factor. As the dark energy component we consider two different candidates, first a quintessence scalar field, and then a tachyon field. In either case analytical solutions for the scale factor, the field, and the potential are derived. Both models show a good fit to the recent magnitude-redshift supernovae data. However, the likelihood contours disfavor the tachyon field model as it seems to prefer a excessively high value for the matter component.

  19. Digital coincidence counting - initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, K. S. A.; Watt, G. C.; Alexiev, D.; van der Gaast, H.; Davies, J.; Mo, Li; Wyllie, H. A.; Keightley, J. D.; Smith, D.; Woods, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique in radiation metrology, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) of the United Kingdom, as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue-to-digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4π beta detector and an NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high-speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software-based algorithms. In this letter we describe some recent results obtained with the new acquistion hardware being tested at ANSTO. The system is fully operational and is now in routine use. Results for 60Co and 22Na radiation activity calibrations are presented, initial results with 153Sm are also briefly mentioned.

  20. Susceptibility to Plasmodium yoelii preerythrocytic infection in BALB/c substrains is determined at the point of hepatocyte invasion.

    PubMed

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Austin, Laura S; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Lo, Fang Y; Miller, Jessica L; Douglass, Alyse N; Arang, Nadia; Vaughan, Ashley M; Gardner, Malcolm J; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2015-01-01

    After transmission by Anopheles mosquitoes, Plasmodium sporozoites travel to the liver, infect hepatocytes, and rapidly develop as intrahepatocytic liver stages (LS). Rodent models of malaria exhibit large differences in the magnitude of liver infection, both between parasite species and between strains of mice. This has been mainly attributed to differences in innate immune responses and parasite infectivity. Here, we report that BALB/cByJ mice are more susceptible to Plasmodium yoelii preerythrocytic infection than BALB/cJ mice. This difference occurs at the level of early hepatocyte infection, but expression levels of reported host factors that are involved in infection do not correlate with susceptibility. Interestingly, BALB/cByJ hepatocytes are more frequently polyploid; thus, their susceptibility converges on the previously observed preference of sporozoites to infect polyploid hepatocytes. Gene expression analysis demonstrates hepatocyte-specific differences in mRNA abundance for numerous genes between BALB/cByJ and BALB/cJ mice, some of which encode hepatocyte surface molecules. These data suggest that a yet-unknown receptor for sporozoite infection, present at elevated levels on BALB/cByJ hepatocytes and also polyploid hepatocytes, might facilitate Plasmodium liver infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Susceptibility to Plasmodium yoelii Preerythrocytic Infection in BALB/c Substrains Is Determined at the Point of Hepatocyte Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Austin, Laura S.; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Lo, Fang Y.; Miller, Jessica L.; Douglass, Alyse N.; Arang, Nadia; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Gardner, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    After transmission by Anopheles mosquitoes, Plasmodium sporozoites travel to the liver, infect hepatocytes, and rapidly develop as intrahepatocytic liver stages (LS). Rodent models of malaria exhibit large differences in the magnitude of liver infection, both between parasite species and between strains of mice. This has been mainly attributed to differences in innate immune responses and parasite infectivity. Here, we report that BALB/cByJ mice are more susceptible to Plasmodium yoelii preerythrocytic infection than BALB/cJ mice. This difference occurs at the level of early hepatocyte infection, but expression levels of reported host factors that are involved in infection do not correlate with susceptibility. Interestingly, BALB/cByJ hepatocytes are more frequently polyploid; thus, their susceptibility converges on the previously observed preference of sporozoites to infect polyploid hepatocytes. Gene expression analysis demonstrates hepatocyte-specific differences in mRNA abundance for numerous genes between BALB/cByJ and BALB/cJ mice, some of which encode hepatocyte surface molecules. These data suggest that a yet-unknown receptor for sporozoite infection, present at elevated levels on BALB/cByJ hepatocytes and also polyploid hepatocytes, might facilitate Plasmodium liver infection. PMID:25312960

  2. Malaria parasite liver stages render host hepatocytes susceptible to mitochondria-initiated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, A; Metzger, P G; Douglass, A N; Mikolajczak, S A; Lakshmanan, V; Kain, H S; Kappe, S HI

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular eukaryotic parasites and their host cells constitute complex, coevolved cellular interaction systems that frequently cause disease. Among them, Plasmodium parasites cause a significant health burden in humans, killing up to one million people annually. To succeed in the mammalian host after transmission by mosquitoes, Plasmodium parasites must complete intracellular replication within hepatocytes and then release new infectious forms into the blood. Using Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites, we show that some liver stage (LS)-infected hepatocytes undergo apoptosis without external triggers, but the majority of infected cells do not, and can also resist Fas-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, apoptosis is dramatically increased in hepatocytes infected with attenuated parasites. Furthermore, we find that blocking total or mitochondria-initiated host cell apoptosis increases LS parasite burden in mice, suggesting that an anti-apoptotic host environment fosters parasite survival. Strikingly, although LS infection confers strong resistance to extrinsic host hepatocyte apoptosis, infected hepatocytes lose their ability to resist apoptosis when anti-apoptotic mitochondrial proteins are inhibited. This is demonstrated by our finding that B-cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors preferentially induce apoptosis in LS-infected hepatocytes and significantly reduce LS parasite burden in mice. Thus, targeting critical points of susceptibility in the LS-infected host cell might provide new avenues for malaria prophylaxis. PMID:23928701

  3. Well coincidence counting and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.; Ceo, R.N.; Collins, L.L.

    1994-03-01

    In several recent papers a physical/mathematical model was developed to describe the nuclear multiplicative processes in samples containing fissile material from a general statistical viewpoint, starting with the basic underlying physical phenomena. The results of this model agreed with the established picture used in ``standard`` HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) measurements, but considerably extended them, and allowed a more detailed interpretation of the underlying physical mechanisms and of the higher moments of the neutron counts. The present paper examines some recent measurements made at Y-12 (Oak Ridge) using the AWCC, in the light of this model. The results show internal consistency under a variety of conditions, and give good agreement between experiment and theory.

  4. Concepts for Alpha Coincidence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of conventional measurement techniques for environmental monitoring is limited by background and other interferences. We are exploring a new measurement approach involving the detection of α particles in coincidence with conversion electrons as a means to simultaneously assay environmental samples for actinides without chemical separation. The initial target isotopes studied in this work are 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am. We explore various aspects of the design, such as impact of the mounting of the source material, resolution requirements and impact of a background on isotopic uncertainties. We conclude that a dual gas proportional counter and a dual-sided, large-area silicon detector could provide similar performance for the measurement scenario examined.

  5. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  6. Human hepatocyte and kidney cell metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene and comparison to the respective rat cells.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, R; Rudo, K

    1988-12-01

    The metabolism and mutagenic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene by human and rat hepatocytes and kidney cells were measured. High performance liquid chromatography was used to separate the 2-acetylaminofluorene metabolites, and a cell-mediated Salmonella typhimurium mutagenesis assay was used to detect mutagenic intermediates. Rat and human differences were observed with cells from both organs and levels of metabolism and mutagenesis were higher in human cells. Within a species, liver and kidney cell differences were also evident, with levels of hepatocyte-mediated metabolism and mutagenesis being greater than kidney cells. Human inter-individual variation was apparent with cells from both organs, but the variation observed was significantly greater in hepatocytes than kidney cells. A knowledge of such differences, including an understanding that they may vary with the chemical being studied, should be useful in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to humans.

  7. Role of CYP2B in Phenobarbital-Induced Hepatocyte Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Bao, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) promotes liver tumorigenesis in rodents, in part through activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the consequent changes in hepatic gene expression and increases in hepatocyte proliferation. A typical effect of CAR activation by PB is a marked induction of Cyp2b10 expression in the liver; the latter has been suspected to be vital for PB-induced hepatocellular proliferation. This hypothesis was tested here by using a Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null (null) mouse model in which all Cyp2b genes are deleted. Adult male and female wild-type (WT) and null mice were treated intraperitoneally with PB at 50 mg/kg once daily for 5 successive days and tested on day 6. The liver-to-body weight ratio, an indicator of liver hypertrophy, was increased by 47% in male WT mice, but by only 22% in male Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice, by the PB treatment. The fractions of bromodeoxyuridine-positive hepatocyte nuclei, assessed as a measure of the rate of hepatocyte proliferation, were also significantly lower in PB-treated male null mice compared with PB-treated male WT mice. However, whereas few proliferating hepatocytes were detected in saline-treated mice, many proliferating hepatocytes were still detected in PB-treated male null mice. In contrast, female WT mice were much less sensitive than male WT mice to PB-induced hepatocyte proliferation, and PB-treated female WT and PB-treated female null mice did not show significant difference in rates of hepatocyte proliferation. These results indicate that CYP2B induction plays a significant, but partial, role in PB-induced hepatocyte proliferation in male mice. PMID:28546505

  8. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  9. Artifacts in Digital Coincidence Timing

    PubMed Central

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e., the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the “optimal” method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  10. A portable neutron coincidence counter

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Bowyer, S.M.; Craig, R.A.; Dudder, G.B.; Knopf, M.A.; Panisko, M.E.; Reeder, P.L.; Stromswold, D.C.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1996-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has designed and constructed a prototype portable neutron coincidence counter intended for use in a variety of applications, such as the verification and inspection of weapons components, safety measurements for novel and challenging situations, portable portal deployment to prevent the transportation of fissile materials, uranium enrichment measurements in hard-to-reach locations, waste assays for objects that cannot be measured by existing measurement systems, and decontamination and decommissioning. The counting system weighs less than 40 kg and is composed of parts each weighing no more than 5 kg. In addition, the counter`s design is sufficiently flexible to allow rapid, reliable assembly around containers of nearly arbitrary size and shape. The counter is able to discern the presence of 1 kg of weapons-grade plutonium within an ALR-8 (30-gal drum) in roughly 100 seconds and 10 g in roughly 1000 seconds. The counter`s electronics are also designed for maximum adaptability, allowing operation under a wide variety of circumstances, including exposure to gamma-ray fields of 1 R/h. This report provides a detailed review of the design and construction process. Finally, preliminary experimental measurements that confirm the performance capabilities of this counter are discussed. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2009-09-15

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  12. Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert E.; Reyes, Morayma; Koodie, Lisa; Jiang, Yuehua; Blackstad, Mark; Lund, Troy; Lenvik, Todd; Johnson, Sandra; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived from normal human, mouse, and rat postnatal bone marrow primitive, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) that can differentiate into most mesodermal cells and neuroectodermal cells in vitro and into all embryonic lineages in vivo. Here, we show that MAPCs can also differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rat MAPCs, cultured on Matrigel with FGF-4 and HGF, differentiated into epithelioid cells that expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β (HNF-3β), GATA4, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), transthyretin, and α-fetoprotein by day 7, and expressed CK18, HNF-4, and HNF-1α on days 14–28. Virtually all human, as well as a majority of rodent cells stained positive for albumin and CK18 on day 21; 5% (rodent) to 25% (human) cells were binucleated by day 21. These cells also acquired functional characteristics of hepatocytes: they secreted urea and albumin, had phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome p450, could take up LDL, and stored glycogen. MAPCs, which can be expanded in vitro and maintained in an undifferentiated state for more than 100 population doublings, can thus differentiate into cells with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. MAPCs may therefore be an ideal cell for in vivo therapies for liver disorders or for use in bioartificial liver devices. PMID:12021244

  13. Bioactivation of fluorotelomer alcohols in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jonathan W; Chan, Katie; Mabury, Scott A; O'Brien, Peter J

    2009-02-12

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs; C(x)F(2x+1)C(2)H(4)OH) are intermediates in the production of specialty surfactants and stain-repellent polymers. The magnitude and pathways of human exposure to FTOHs are not understood, but FTOHs are present in ambient air and house dust, and FTOH-derivatives are used in food-contact applications. Previously, electrophilic FTOH biotransformation products were detected in rat hepatocytes, and liver lesions were found in FTOH exposed rodents. To begin elucidating the mechanism(s) of action, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated with FTOHs, or FTOH biotransformation products, and toxicity was followed in the presence or absence of carbonyl scavengers and metabolic enzyme modulators. The LC(50) depended on perfluorinated chain length, with the shortest (4:2 FTOH; x=4) and longest (8:2 FTOH; x=8) FTOHs tested being more toxic than the medium chain length FTOH (6:2 FTOH; x=6); a structure-toxicity relationship that is consistent with that for 2-alkenals. For hepatocytes treated with 8:2 FTOH, cytotoxicity corresponded to depletion of glutathione (GSH), increased protein carbonylation, and lipid peroxidation. Aminobenzotriazole, a P450 inhibitor, diminished cytotoxicity for all FTOHs tested, and decreased protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation for 8:2 FTOH, indicating that a biotransformation product was responsible for FTOH cytotoxicity. Preincubation of hepatocytes with hydralazine or aminoguanidine decreased the cytotoxicity of 8:2 FTOH, suggesting that reactive aldehyde intermediates contributed to the cytotoxicity. A GSH-reactive alpha/beta-unsaturated acid metabolite was also more toxic than the corresponding FTOH, and may have contributed to the observed effects. Overall, these results suggested that FTOH toxicity was related to electrophilic aldehydes or acids through GSH depletion and protein carbonylation. Further research into the nature of protein modification is warranted for these current-use fluorochemicals.

  14. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  15. The largest fossil rodent.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2008-04-22

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene-Pleistocene (4-2Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities.

  16. Kupffer cells induce Notch-mediated hepatocyte conversion in a common mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Maiko; Horisawa, Kenichi; Miura, Shizuka; Takashima, Yasuo; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sekiya, Sayaka; Matsuda-Ito, Kanae; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of cells resembling cholangiocytes that line the intrahepatic bile ducts in portal areas of the hepatic lobule. Although ICC has been defined as a tumor arising from cholangiocyte transformation, recent evidence from genetic lineage-tracing experiments has indicated that hepatocytes can be a cellular origin of ICC by directly changing their fate to that of biliary lineage cells. Notch signaling has been identified as an essential factor for hepatocyte conversion into biliary lineage cells at the onset of ICC. However, the mechanisms underlying Notch signal activation in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here, using a mouse model of ICC, we found that hepatic macrophages called Kupffer cells transiently congregate around the central veins in the liver and express the Notch ligand Jagged-1 coincident with Notch activation in pericentral hepatocytes. Depletion of Kupffer cells prevents the Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion of hepatocytes to biliary lineage cells, inducing hepatocyte apoptosis and increasing mortality in mice. These findings will be useful for uncovering the pathogenic mechanism of ICC and developing prevenient and therapeutic strategies for this refractory disease. PMID:27698452

  17. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE PAGES

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  18. Electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hweiyan; Tsai, Shang-heng; Ting, Wei-Jen; Hu, Chao-Chin; Fuh, C Bor

    2014-05-21

    We investigated the use of amperometric and chronoamperometric methods with a double mediator system and screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability. Cell counts were determined based on measuring cellular respiration via interaction of electroactive redox mediators. The oxidation currents of chronoamperometric measurement were proportional to the concentrations of ferrocyanide which was produced via interaction of cellular respiration, succinate and ferricyanide. The integrated oxidation charges increased linearly with the density of the cultured primary rat hepatocytes over a range of 1 × 10(5) to 5 × 10(5) cells per well (slope = 1.98 (±0.08) μC per 10(5) cells; R(2) = 0.9969), and the detection limit was 7600 (±300) cells per well based on S/N = 3. Each density of cells was cultured in triple replicates and individual cell samples were evaluated. The results of the cytotoxic effect of the chronoamperometric method are comparable to those of the tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay. The chronoamperometric method with ferricyanide and succinate mediators is an efficient, alternative method for assessing the viability of primary hepatocytes which can be completed in 20 min. Succinate did not provide an efficient electron shuttle between cytosolic respiratory redox activity of cancer cells and extracellular ferricyanide, an effect that may be useful for distinguishing hepatocarcinoma cells from healthy hepatocytes.

  19. The biosynthesis of ascorbate protects isolated rat hepatocytes from cumene hydroperoxide-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tom S; Shangari, Nandita; Wilson, John X; Chan, Helen; Butterworth, Roger F; O'Brien, Peter J

    2005-04-01

    Most animals synthesize ascorbate. It is an essential enzymatic cofactor for the synthesis of a variety of biological molecules and also a powerful antioxidant. There is, however, little direct evidence supporting an antioxidant role for endogenously produced ascorbate. Recently, we demonstrated that incubation of rat hepatocytes with 1-bromoheptane or phorone simultaneously depleted glutathione (GSH) and triggered rapid ascorbate synthesis. The present study investigates the hypothesis that endogenous ascorbate synthesis can confer protection against oxidative stress. Rat and guinea pig hepatocytes were depleted of GSH with 1-bromoheptane and subsequently treated with the oxidative stressor cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the presence or absence of the ascorbate synthesis inhibitor sorbinil. In rat hepatocytes, ascorbate content increased linearly (from 15.1 to 35.8 nmol/10(6) cells) over a 105-min incubation. Prior depletion of GSH increased CHP-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and cell death in rat and guinea pig hepatocytes. Inhibiting ascorbate synthesis, however, further elevated ROS production (2-fold), lipid peroxidation (1.5-fold), and cell death (2-fold) in rat hepatocytes only. This is the first time that endogenous ascorbate synthesis has been shown to decrease cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress. Protection by endogenously produced ascorbate may therefore need to be addressed when extrapolating data to humans from experiments using rodents capable of synthesizing ascorbate.

  20. Reduced expression of mature TGF beta 1 correlates with the suppression of rat hepatocyte apoptosis by the peroxisome proliferator, nafenopin.

    PubMed

    Strange, J; Roberts, R A

    1996-11-11

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens cause cancer without damaging the DNA. Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) are a class of potent rodent non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that may act by perturbing hepatocyte growth regulation. Previously, we have shown that although cultured rat hepatocytes degenerate rapidly in culture, their survival can be reversibly maintained by the PP nafenopin. This prolonged survival is associated with a decrease in the number of hepatocytes displaying the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. The addition of the negative growth regulator TGF beta-1 induced high levels of hepatocyte apoptosis but nafenopin was able to suppress this TGF beta-1 induced apoptosis. These data suggested that increased levels of mature TGF beta-1 may be involved in the signalling of the apoptosis seen in degenerating hepatocyte cultures. To test this hypothesis, we carried out Western blot analyses using a anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. There was an increase (p = 0.014) in expression of mature TGF beta 1 in degenerating rat hepatocyte cultures compared with hepatocyte cultures surviving in the presence of nafenopin. However, there was a concomitant decrease (p = 0.024) in TGF beta 1-latency activated protein (TGF beta 1-LAP), the precursor of the active, mature form. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that TGF beta 1/TGF beta 1-LAP expression was predominantly in the hepatocytes displaying apoptotic morphology although expression was detected also in non-parenchymal liver cells. The immunocytochemistry data indicate that TGF beta 1 is involved during the onset of hepatocyte apoptosis and that the PP nafenopin can impinge on this cell death pathway. TGF beta 1-LAP, probably produced mainly by the non-parenchymal liver cells, may be processed less efficiently to the mature, active form in the presence of nafenopin, although more data are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  1. From Mere Coincidences to Meaningful Discoveries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2007-01-01

    People's reactions to coincidences are often cited as an illustration of the irrationality of human reasoning about chance. We argue that coincidences may be better understood in terms of rational statistical inference, based on their functional role in processes of causal discovery and theory revision. We present a formal definition of…

  2. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  3. Sensitivity to coincidences and paranormal belief.

    PubMed

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim

    2011-12-01

    Often it is difficult to find a natural explanation as to why a surprising coincidence occurs. In attempting to find one, people may be inclined to accept paranormal explanations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether people with a lower threshold for being surprised by coincidences have a greater propensity to become believers compared to those with a higher threshold. Participants were exposed to artificial coincidences, which were formally defined as less or more probable, and were asked to provide remarkability ratings. Paranormal belief was measured by the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale. An analysis of the remarkability ratings revealed a significant interaction effect between Sheep-Goat score and type of coincidence, suggesting that people with lower thresholds of surprise, when experiencing coincidences, harbor higher paranormal belief than those with a higher threshold. The theoretical aspects of these findings were discussed.

  4. Hepatocytes: critical for glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Klover, Peter J; Mooney, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Maintaining blood glucose levels within a narrow range is a critical physiological function requiring multiple metabolic pathways and involving several cell types, including a prominent role for hepatocytes. Under hormonal control, hepatocytes can respond to either feeding or fasting conditions by storing or producing glucose as necessary. In the fasting state, the effects of glucagon avoid hypoglycemia by stimulating glucogenesis and glycogenolysis and initiating hepatic glucose release. Postprandially, insulin prevents hyperglycemia, in part, by suppressing hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and facilitating hepatic glycogen synthesis. Both transcriptional regulation of rate limiting enzymes and modulation of enzyme activity through phosphorylation and allosteric regulation are involved. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common serious metabolic condition in the world, and results from a subnormal response of tissues to insulin (insulin resistance) and a failure of the insulin-secreting beta cells to compensate. In type 2 diabetes, glucose is overproduced by the hepatocyte and is ineffectively metabolized by other organs. Impairments in the insulin signal transduction pathway appear to be critical lesions contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  5. Redesign of the GATE PET coincidence sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Buvat, Irène

    2016-09-01

    The GATE software platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit for simulating particle interactions with matter, enables simulation of, among other medical imaging and treatment systems, positron emission tomography. However, at least one publication (Moraes et al 2015 Phys. Med. 31 43-8) has reported discrepancies between the expected results and those obtained using GATE simulations, specifically with respect to the coincidence sorter which processes single events detected by the scanner to find coincidence pairs. In particular, the current software appears to overestimate the number of ‘true’ coincidence pairs when in multi-window mode, while the delayed coincidence window, used to estimate the randoms present in the prompt coincidence window, underestimates the randoms. Both effects are particularly evident at high count rates. We have investigated this discrepancy and reproduced the reported problems. We have also rewritten the relevant portion of the GATE code to correct the issue. In this note we describe the modifications to the coincidence sorter and repeat the simulations which previously showed unexpected results. Some discrepancies remain in the estimation of the randoms with the single-window mode which are a consequence of the algorithm itself. In multi-window mode however, the simulation agrees exactly with the expected results. The modifications to the coincidence sorter code will be incorporated into the next release of GATE (> version 7.2).

  6. The MAPK MEK1/2-ERK1/2 Pathway and Its Implication in Hepatocyte Cell Cycle Control

    PubMed Central

    Guégan, Jean-Philippe; Frémin, Christophe; Baffet, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of hepatocytes are powerful models in studying the sequence of events that are necessary for cell progression from a G0-like state to S phase. The models mimic the physiological process of hepatic regeneration after liver injury or partial hepatectomy. Many reports suggest that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2 can support hepatocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo and the MEK/ERK cascade acts as an essential element in hepatocyte responses induced by the EGF. Moreover, its disregulation has been associated with the promotion of tumor cell growth of a variety of tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Whereas the strict specificity of action of ERK1 and ERK2 is still debated, the MAPKs may have specific biological functions under certain contexts and according to the differentiation status of the cells, notably hepatocytes. In this paper, we will focus on MEK1/2-ERK1/2 activations and roles in normal rodent hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo after partial hepatectomy and in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The possible specificity of ERK1 and ERK2 in normal and transformed hepatocyte will be discussed in regard to other differentiated and undifferentiated cellular models. PMID:23133759

  7. Coincidence lattices in the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Andrade, M A; Aragón-González, G; Aragón, J L; Gómez-Rodríguez, A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of coincidences of lattices in the space R(p,q), with p + q = 2, is analyzed using Clifford algebra. We show that, as in R(n), any coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of at most two reflections by vectors of the lattice. Bases and coincidence indices are constructed explicitly for several interesting lattices. Our procedure is metric-independent and, in particular, the hyperbolic plane is obtained when p = q = 1. Additionally, we provide a proof of the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem for R(p,q), with p + q = 2, that includes an algorithm to decompose an orthogonal transformation into a product of reflections.

  8. Strategies for immortalization of primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eva, Ramboer; Bram, De Craene; Joery, De Kock; Tamara, Vanhaecke; Geert, Berx; Vera, Rogiers; Mathieu, Vinken

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the unique capacity to regenerate in response to a damaging event. Liver regeneration is hereby largely driven by hepatocyte proliferation, which in turn relies on cell cycling. The hepatocyte cell cycle is a complex process that is tightly regulated by several well-established mechanisms. In vitro, isolated hepatocytes do not longer retain this proliferative capacity. However, in vitro cell growth can be boosted by immortalization of hepatocytes. Well-defined immortalization genes can be artificially overexpressed in hepatocytes or the cells can be conditionally immortalized leading to controlled cell proliferation. This paper discusses the current immortalization techniques and provides a state-of-the-art overview of the actually available immortalized hepatocyte-derived cell lines and their applications. PMID:24911463

  9. Rodent models of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Rodent models of sleep apnea have long been used to provide novel insight into the generation and predisposition to apneas as well as to characterize the impact of sleep apnea on cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychological health in humans. Given the significant body of work utilizing rodent models in the field of sleep apnea, the aims of this review are three-fold: first, to review the use of rodents as natural models of sleep apnea; second, to provide an overview of the experimental interventions employed in rodents to simulate sleep apnea; third, to discuss the refinement of rodent models to further our understanding of breathing abnormalities that occur during sleep. Given mounting evidence that sleep apnea impairs cognitive function, reduces quality of life, and exacerbates the course of multiple chronic diseases, rodent models will remain a high priority as a tool to interrogate both the pathophysiology and sequelae of breathing related abnormalities during sleep and to improve approaches to diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  11. Coincident indices of exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Chen, R; Ling, L; Shen, R; Sun, J

    1993-07-01

    In this paper, the coincident index, proposed by W. F. Friedman in cryptology, is made use of in DNA sequence analysis and exon prediction. The coincident index of exons exceeds that of introns by many times, and is mainly affected by window length, which is correlated negatively with the coincident index. An optimal exon prediction scheme was obtained by experimental analysis with an orthogonal table. Besides exons, many other special sites such as tandem repeats can be identified by using the coincident index approach. The application of this approach to the ARV-2 (AIDS associated retrovirus 2) genome found three new possible coding regions and some unusual base composition regions which are probably related to definite biological functions.

  12. Determining activities of radionuclides from coincidence signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, L. Eric; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, Edward; Hossbach, Todd W.; Valsan, Andrei B.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral analysis of simultaneously observed photons in separate detectors may provide an invaluable tool for radioisotope identification applications. A general recursive method to determine the activity of an isotope from the observed coincidence signature rate is discussed. The method coherently accounts for effects of true coincidence summing within a single detector and detection efficiencies. A verification of the approach with computer simulations is also discussed.

  13. Rodent carcinogens: Setting priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Stern, B.R.; Manley, N.B.; Ames, B.N. )

    1992-10-09

    The human diet contains an enormous background of natural chemicals, such as plant pesticides and the products of cooking, that have not been a focus of carcinogenicity testing. A broadened perspective that includes these natural chemicals is necessary. A comparison of possible hazards for 80 daily exposures to rodent carcinogens from a variety of sources is presented, using an index (HERP) that relates human exposure to carcinogenic potency in rodents. A similar ordering would be expected with the use of standard risk assessment methodology for the same human exposure values. Results indicate that, when viewed against the large background of naturally occurring carcinogens in typical portions of common foods, the residues of synthetic pesticides or environmental pollutants rank low. A similar result is obtained in a separate comparison of 32 average daily exposures to natural pesticides and synthetic pesticides residues in the diet. Although the findings do not indicate that these natural dietary carcinogens are important in human cancer, they cast doubt on the relative importance for human cancer of low-dose exposures to synthetic chemicals.

  14. Simulation of triple coincidences in PET.

    PubMed

    Cal-González, J; Lage, E; Herranz, E; Vicente, E; Udias, J M; Moore, S C; Park, M-A; Dave, S R; Parot, V; Herraiz, J L

    2015-01-07

    Although current PET scanners are designed and optimized to detect double coincidence events, there is a significant amount of triple coincidences in any PET acquisition. Triple coincidences may arise from causes such as: inter-detector scatter (IDS), random triple interactions (RT), or the detection of prompt gamma rays in coincidence with annihilation photons when non-pure positron-emitting radionuclides are used (β(+)γ events). Depending on the data acquisition settings of the PET scanner, these triple events are discarded or processed as a set of double coincidences if the energy of the three detected events is within the scanner's energy window. This latter option introduces noise in the data, as at most, only one of the possible lines-of-response defined by triple interactions corresponds to the line along which the decay occurred. Several novel works have pointed out the possibility of using triple events to increase the sensitivity of PET scanners or to expand PET imaging capabilities by allowing differentiation between radiotracers labeled with non-pure and pure positron-emitting radionuclides. In this work, we extended the Monte Carlo simulator PeneloPET to assess the proportion of triple coincidences in PET acquisitions and to evaluate their possible applications. We validated the results of the simulator against experimental data acquired with a modified version of a commercial preclinical PET/CT scanner, which was enabled to acquire and process triple-coincidence events. We used as figures of merit the energy spectra for double and triple coincidences and the triples-to-doubles ratio for different energy windows and radionuclides. After validation, the simulator was used to predict the relative quantity of triple-coincidence events in two clinical scanners assuming different acquisition settings. Good agreement between simulations and preclinical experiments was found, with differences below 10% for most of the observables considered. For clinical

  15. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α in adult mice results in increased hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Walesky, Chad; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Edwards, Genea; Borude, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) is known as the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. Recent studies indicate that HNF4α may inhibit hepatocyte proliferation via mechanisms that have yet to be identified. Using a HNF4α knockdown mouse model based on delivery of inducible Cre recombinase via an adeno-associated virus 8 viral vector, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of HNF4α resulted in increased hepatocyte proliferation. Global gene expression analysis showed that a majority of the downregulated genes were previously known HNF4α target genes involved in hepatic differentiation. Interestingly, ≥500 upregulated genes were associated with cell proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, we identified potential negative target genes of HNF4α, many of which are involved in the stimulation of proliferation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed binding of HNF4α at three of these genes. Furthermore, overexpression of HNF4α in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells resulted in a decrease in promitogenic gene expression and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these data indicate that, apart from its role in hepatocyte differentiation, HNF4α actively inhibits hepatocyte proliferation by repression of specific promitogenic genes. PMID:23104559

  16. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α in adult mice results in increased hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Walesky, Chad; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Edwards, Genea; Borude, Prachi; Apte, Udayan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) is known as the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. Recent studies indicate that HNF4α may inhibit hepatocyte proliferation via mechanisms that have yet to be identified. Using a HNF4α knockdown mouse model based on delivery of inducible Cre recombinase via an adeno-associated virus 8 viral vector, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of HNF4α resulted in increased hepatocyte proliferation. Global gene expression analysis showed that a majority of the downregulated genes were previously known HNF4α target genes involved in hepatic differentiation. Interestingly, ≥500 upregulated genes were associated with cell proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, we identified potential negative target genes of HNF4α, many of which are involved in the stimulation of proliferation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed binding of HNF4α at three of these genes. Furthermore, overexpression of HNF4α in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells resulted in a decrease in promitogenic gene expression and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these data indicate that, apart from its role in hepatocyte differentiation, HNF4α actively inhibits hepatocyte proliferation by repression of specific promitogenic genes.

  17. Comparative metabolism of geranyl nitrile and citronellyl nitrile in mouse, rat, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Raymond A; Nabb, Diane L; Gannon, Shawn A; Snow, Timothy A; Api, Anne Marie

    2006-06-01

    Geranyl nitrile (GN) and citronellyl nitrile (CN) are fragrance components used in consumer and personal care products. Differences in the clastogenicity of these two terpenes are postulated to result from differential biotransformation, presumably involving the conjugated nitrile moiety. The metabolic clearance and biotransformation of GN and CN were compared in primary hepatocytes from mice, rats, and humans. For determination of intrinsic clearance, GN and CN were incubated with hepatocytes in sealed vials, and the headspace was sampled periodically by solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For metabolite identification, GN and CN were incubated with hepatocytes from each species for 60 min, and reaction mixtures were extracted and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Both GN and CN were rapidly metabolized in hepatocytes from all species (T1/2, 0.7-11.6 min). Within a species, intrinsic clearance was similar for both compounds and increased in the order human < rat < mouse. Major common pathways for biotransformation of GN and CN involved 1) epoxidation of the 6-alkenyl moiety followed by conjugation with glutathione, 2) hydroxylation of the terminal methyl group(s) followed by direct conjugation with glucuronic acid in rodents or further oxidation to the corresponding acid in human cells, and 3) hydroxylation of the allylic C5 position. No evidence for either phase I or phase II metabolism of the conjugated nitrile moiety was obtained. Thus, the presumed metabolic basis for differences in genotoxicity remains elusive.

  18. Exclusion of copper from altered hepatocytes in white perch (Morone americana) with hepatic copper storage.

    PubMed

    Bunton, T E

    1995-01-01

    Iron is excluded from foci of hepatocellular alteration in carcinogenesis of rodents and some fish. Among white perch (Morone americana), there is a condition of hepatic copper storage in which copper-loaded livers are produced naturally. In a group of fish collected from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (USA), from September to December 1990, we observed hepatic lesions which excluded copper similar to the phenomenon of iron exclusion, in a white perch with over 3,600 micrograms/g wet weight hepatic copper. The lesions were of two types: one with cells morphologically different from normal hepatocytes and which had diminished to absolute exclusion of copper with the copper specific histochemical stain rubeinic acid, and a second with cells morphologically similar to normal hepatocytes which had only a partial exclusion of copper. Although the exact cause and nature of the lesions was not determined, intrinsic copper toxicity, environmental pollution, or a combination of these factors may have contributed to their development.

  19. Hepatocyte Death: A Clear and Present Danger

    PubMed Central

    MALHI, HARMEET; GUICCIARDI, MARIA EUGENIA; GORES, GREGORY J.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatocyte is especially vulnerable to injury due to its central role in xenobiotic metabolism including drugs and alcohol, participation in lipid and fatty acid metabolism, its unique role in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, the widespread prevalence of hepatotropic viruses, and its existence within a milieu of innate immune responding cells. Apoptosis and necrosis are the most widely recognized forms of hepatocyte cell death. The hepatocyte displays many unique features regarding cell death by apoptosis. It is quite susceptible to death receptor-mediated injury, and its death receptor signaling pathways involve the mitochondrial pathway for efficient cell killing. Also, death receptors can trigger lysosomal disruption in hepatocytes which further promote cell and tissue injury. Interestingly, hepatocytes are protected from cell death by only two anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, which have nonredundant functions. Endoplasmic reticulum stress or the unfolded protein response contributes to hepatocyte cell death during alterations of lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Finally, the current information implicating RIP kinases in necrosis provides an approach to more fully address this mode of cell death in hepatocyte injury. All of these processes contributing to hepatocyte injury are discussed in the context of potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:20664081

  20. Aquaporins in desert rodent physiology.

    PubMed

    Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-01

    Desert rodents face a sizeable challenge in maintaining salt and water homeostasis due to their life in an arid environment. A number of their organ systems exhibit functional characteristics that limit water loss above that which occurs in non-desert species under similar conditions. These systems include renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, nasal, and skin epithelia. The desert rodent kidney preserves body water by producing a highly concentrated urine that reaches a maximum osmolality nearly three times that of the common laboratory rat. The precise mechanism by which urine is concentrated in any mammal is unknown. Insights into the process may be more apparent in species that produce highly concentrated urine. Aquaporin water channels play a fundamental role in water transport in several desert rodent organ systems. The role of aquaporins in facilitating highly effective water preservation in desert rodents is only beginning to be explored. The organ systems of desert rodents and their associated AQPs are described.

  1. Preparation of equine isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bakala, A; Karlik, W; Wiechetek, M

    2003-01-01

    In this study a detailed description of the equine hepatocyte isolation procedure is presented. Livers were obtained from horses slaughtered at the local slaughterhouse. For blood removal and liver preservation the following steps are suggested: perfusion with the oxygenated HBSS (0-2 degrees C, with continuous flow of 500-800 ml/min for 3-6 min), protection from ischemia injury by flushing with ice-cold University of Wisconsin Solution (UW, flow rate of 500-800 ml/min), and finally immersion of the liver lobe in UW solution (2 degrees C) during its transport to the laboratory. For equine isolated hepatocyte preparation a "three-step" perfusion procedure was elaborated: rewarming, chelating and collagenase perfusion. We found optimal cell yield and viability under the following conditions: rewarming with UW (38 degrees C) for 8-14 min, chelating with calcium free Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS, 38 degrees C) supplemented with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis[beta-aminoethyl esther]-N,N,N'N'-tetracetic acid at the flow rate of 450 ml/min for 6 min and enzymatic digestion with HBSS supplemented with 0.1% collagenase at 38 degrees C and 450 ml/min flow rate for 8-27 min. These conditions consistently generated cell harvests of 21 x 10(6)+/-4.86 cells/g of perfused liver tissue with viability of 82.7%+/-10.2.

  2. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affects distinct molecular signalling pathways in human primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Buhrke, Thorsten; Krüger, Eileen; Pevny, Sophie; Rößler, Manuela; Bitter, Katja; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-07-03

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was shown to damage the liver of rodents and to impair embryonic development. At the molecular level, the hepatotoxic effects were attributed to the PFOA-mediated activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). In general, PPARα-dependent effects are less pronounced in humans than in rodents, and the hazard potential of PFOA for humans is controversially discussed. To analyse the effects of PFOA in human hepatocytes, a microarray analysis was conducted to screen for PFOA-mediated alterations in the transcriptome of human primary hepatocytes. A subsequent network analysis revealed that PFOA had an impact on several signalling pathways in addition to the well-known activation of PPARα. The microarray data confirmed earlier findings that PFOA: (i) affects the estrogen receptor ERα, (ii) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and (iii) inhibits the function of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) which is an essential factor for liver development and embryogenesis. Finally, as a novel finding, PFOA was shown to stimulate gene expression of the proto-oncogenes c-Jun and c-Fos. This was confirmed by using the HepG2 cell line as a model for human hepatocytes. PFOA stimulated cellular proliferation and the metabolic activity of the cells, and upregulated the expression of various cyclins which have a central function in the regulation of cell cycle control. Functional studies, however, indicated that PFOA had no impact on c-Jun and c-Fos phosphorylation and on AP-1-dependent gene transcription, thus demonstrating that PFOA-induced proliferation occurs largely independent of c-Jun and c-Fos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coincidence imaging system with electron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Jakubek, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Zemlicka, J.; Horacek, M.; Radlicka, T.; Vlcek, I.

    2011-05-01

    As a part of multiple-detector system for coincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis (CINAA) a new method which includes a devoted electron optic unit has been built. In order to achieve higher sensitivity, enhanced contrast and higher spatial resolution the new coincidence imaging arrangement newly incorporates to electron optic unit, source, the gamma detector and the Timepix electron detector. The electron optic unit can be configured for different electron energies. The description of the assembled apparatus, calibration and performance for different electron energies are presented.

  4. On Points of Coincidence of Two Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidjan, V. R.

    1981-02-01

    This paper is devoted to the coincidence theory of two continuous mappings.A definition is given, in cohomological terms, of the coincidence index I_{f, g} of two continuous mappings f, g \\colon M \\to N, where M and N are connected (not necessarily compact), orientable, n-dimensional topological manifolds without boundary, f is a compact mapping and g is a proper mapping.Invariance of the index I_{f, g} under compact homotopies of f and proper homotopies of g is proved. It is shown that I_{f, g} \

  5. WNT5A Inhibits Hepatocyte Proliferation and Concludes β-Catenin Signaling in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Cusimano, Antonella; Monga, Jappmann K.; Preziosi, Morgan E.; Pullara, Filippo; Calero, Guillermo; Lang, Richard; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Nejak-Bowen, Kari N.; Monga, Satdarshan P.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during liver regeneration (LR) after partial hepatectomy (PH) is observed in several species. However, how this pathway is turned off when hepatocyte proliferation is no longer required is unknown. We assessed LR in liver-specific knockouts of Wntless (Wls-LKO), a protein required for Wnt secretion from a cell. When subjected to PH, Wls-LKO showed prolongation of hepatocyte proliferation for up to 4 days compared with littermate controls. This coincided with increased β-catenin–T-cell factor 4 interaction and cyclin-D1 expression. Wls-LKO showed decreased expression and secretion of inhibitory Wnt5a during LR. Wnt5a expression increased between 24 and 48 hours, and Frizzled-2 between 24 and 72 hours, after PH in normal mice. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes and liver tumor cells with Wnt5a led to a notable decrease in β-catenin–T-cell factor activity, cyclin-D1 expression, and cell proliferation. Intriguingly, Wnt5a-LKO did not display any prolongation of LR because of compensation by other cells. In addition, Wnt5a-LKO hepatocytes failed to respond to exogenous Wnt5a treatment in culture because of a compensatory decrease in Frizzled-2 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate Wnt5a to be, by default, a negative regulator of β-catenin signaling and hepatocyte proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide evidence that the Wnt5a/Frizzled-2 axis suppresses β-catenin signaling in hepatocytes in an autocrine manner, thereby contributing to timely conclusion of the LR process. PMID:26100214

  6. WNT5A inhibits hepatocyte proliferation and concludes β-catenin signaling in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Cusimano, Antonella; Monga, Jappmann K; Preziosi, Morgan E; Pullara, Filippo; Calero, Guillermo; Lang, Richard; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Nejak-Bowen, Kari N; Monga, Satdarshan P

    2015-08-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during liver regeneration (LR) after partial hepatectomy (PH) is observed in several species. However, how this pathway is turned off when hepatocyte proliferation is no longer required is unknown. We assessed LR in liver-specific knockouts of Wntless (Wls-LKO), a protein required for Wnt secretion from a cell. When subjected to PH, Wls-LKO showed prolongation of hepatocyte proliferation for up to 4 days compared with littermate controls. This coincided with increased β-catenin-T-cell factor 4 interaction and cyclin-D1 expression. Wls-LKO showed decreased expression and secretion of inhibitory Wnt5a during LR. Wnt5a expression increased between 24 and 48 hours, and Frizzled-2 between 24 and 72 hours, after PH in normal mice. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes and liver tumor cells with Wnt5a led to a notable decrease in β-catenin-T-cell factor activity, cyclin-D1 expression, and cell proliferation. Intriguingly, Wnt5a-LKO did not display any prolongation of LR because of compensation by other cells. In addition, Wnt5a-LKO hepatocytes failed to respond to exogenous Wnt5a treatment in culture because of a compensatory decrease in Frizzled-2 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate Wnt5a to be, by default, a negative regulator of β-catenin signaling and hepatocyte proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide evidence that the Wnt5a/Frizzled-2 axis suppresses β-catenin signaling in hepatocytes in an autocrine manner, thereby contributing to timely conclusion of the LR process.

  7. A light- and electron-microscope study of hepatocytes of rats fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Douglas A; Chapman, George B

    2007-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are used in the treatment of epilepsy in children refractory to drug therapy. This study identifies changes in liver morphology in rats fed four different diets: a normal rodent chow diet, a calorie-restricted high-fat (ketogenic) diet and each diet supplemented with clofibric acid. Hepatocytes of rats fed the ketogenic diet show many lipid droplets and these are reduced to control levels when clofibrate is present in the diet. Mitochondria are enlarged in the livers of rats fed the ketogenic diet and further enlarged if clofibrate is present. Alterations in the appearance or numbers of other organelles are also found.

  8. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  9. A generalized model for coincidence counting

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.

    1993-12-31

    A generalized model for coincidence counting has been developed based on the dual probability generating function introduced. The model accounts explicitly and simultaneously the effects of multiplication, absorption by poison and instrument detection and is applicable for a wide class of NDA including Pu in waste.

  10. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oculoscopy in Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2015-09-01

    Ophthalmic diseases are common in rabbits and rodents. Fast and definitive diagnosis is imperative for successful treatment of ocular diseases. Ophthalmic examination in rabbits and rodents can be challenging. Oculoscopy offers great magnification for the examination of the ocular structures in such animals, including the evaluation of cornea, anterior eye chamber, limbus, iris, lens, and retina. To date, oculoscopy has been described only sporadically and/or under experimental conditions. This article describes the oculoscopy technique, normal and abnormal ocular findings, and the most common eye disorders diagnosed with the aid of endoscopy in rabbits and rodents.

  12. Using Compton scattering for random coincidence rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) project presents a new approach for the design of nuclear medicine imaging devices by using highly segmented pixel CdTe sensors. CdTe detectors can achieve an energy resolution of ≈ 1% FWHM at 511 keV and can be easily segmented into submillimeter sized voxels for optimal spatial resolution. These features help in rejecting a large part of the scattered events from the PET coincidence sample in order to obtain high quality images. Another contribution to the background are random events, i.e., hits caused by two independent gammas without a common origin. Given that 60% of 511 keV photons undergo Compton scattering in CdTe (i.e. 84% of all coincidence events have at least one Compton scattering gamma), we present a simulation study on the possibility to use the Compton scattering information of at least one of the coincident gammas within the detector to reject random coincidences. The idea uses the fact that if a gamma undergoes Compton scattering in the detector, it will cause two hits in the pixel detectors. The first hit corresponds to the Compton scattering process. The second hit shall correspond to the photoelectric absorption of the remaining energy of the gamma. With the energy deposition of the first hit, one can calculate the Compton scattering angle. By measuring the hit location of the coincident gamma, we can construct the geometric angle, under the assumption that both gammas come from the same origin. Using the difference between the Compton scattering angle and the geometric angle, random events can be rejected.

  13. Progressive induction of hepatocyte progenitor cells in chronically injured liver

    PubMed Central

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Yuji; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated epithelial cells show substantial lineage plasticity upon severe tissue injuries. In chronically injured mouse livers, part of hepatocytes become Sry-HMG box containing 9 (Sox9) (+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule (−) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (+) biphenotypic hepatocytes. However, it is not clear whether all Sox9+ hepatocytes uniformly possess cellular properties as hepatocyte progenitors. Here, we examined the microarray data comparing Sox9+ hepatocytes with mature hepatocytes and identified CD24 as a novel marker for biphenotypic hepatocytes. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that part of Sox9+ hepatocytes near expanded ductular structures expressed CD24 in the liver injured by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-collidine (DDC) diet and by bile duct ligation. Indeed, Sox9+ hepatocytes could be separated into CD24− and CD24+ cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The ratio of CD24+ cells against CD24− ones in Sox9+ hepatocytes gradually increased while DDC-injury progressed and colony-forming capability mostly attributed to CD24+ cells. Although hepatocyte markers were remarkably downregulated in of Sox9+ CD24+ hepatocytes, they re-differentiated into mature hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Our current results demonstrate that the emergence of biphenotypic hepatocytes is a sequential event including the transition from CD24− and CD24+ status, which may be a crucial step for hepatocytes to acquire progenitor properties. PMID:28051157

  14. Coincidence velocity map imaging using a single detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Arthur; Sándor, Péter; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a single-detector velocity map imaging setup which is capable of rapidly switching between coincidence and non-coincidence measurements. By rapidly switching the extraction voltages on the electrostatic lenses, both electrons and ions can be collected in coincidence with a single detector. Using a fast camera as the 2D detector avoids the saturation problem associated with traditional delay line detectors and allows for easy transitions between coincidence and non-coincidence data collection modes. This is a major advantage in setting up a low-cost and versatile coincidence apparatus. We present both coincidence and non-coincidence measurements of strong field atomic and molecular ionization.

  15. Reciprocal interaction of Wnt and RXR-α pathways in hepatocyte development and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Chanrion, Maia; Sawey, Eric; Wang, Tim; Chow, Edward; Tward, Aaron; Su, Yi; Xue, Wen; Lucito, Robert; Zender, Lars; Lowe, Scott W; Bishop, J Michael; Powers, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is potentially confounded by the differentiation state of the hepatic cell-of-origin. Here we integrated genomic analysis of mouse HCC (with defined cell-of-origin) along with normal development. We found a major shift in expression of Wnt and RXR-α pathway genes (up and down, respectively) coincident with the transition from hepatoblasts to hepatocytes. A combined Wnt and RXR-α gene signature categorized HCCs into two subtypes (high Wnt, low RXR-α and low Wnt, high RXR-α), which matched cell-of-origin in mouse models and the differentiation state of human HCC. Suppression of RXR-α levels in hepatocytes increased Wnt signaling and enhanced tumorigenicity, whereas ligand activation of RXR-α achieved the opposite. These results corroborate that there are two main HCC subtypes that correspond to the degree of hepatocyte differentation and that RXR-α, in part via Wnt signaling, plays a key functional role in the hepatocyte-like subtype and potentially could serve as a selective therapeutic target.

  16. ESRP2 controls an adult splicing programme in hepatocytes to support postnatal liver maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Amruta; Parker, Darren J.; Bebee, Thomas W.; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Arif, Waqar; Rashan, Edrees H.; Chorghade, Sandip; Chau, Anthony; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Carstens, Russ P.; Xiao, Xinshu; Kalsotra, Auinash

    2015-01-01

    Although major genetic networks controlling early liver specification and morphogenesis are known, the mechanisms responsible for postnatal hepatic maturation are poorly understood. Here we employ global analyses of the mouse liver transcriptome to demonstrate that postnatal remodelling of the liver is accompanied by large-scale transcriptional and post-transcriptional transitions that are cell-type-specific and temporally coordinated. Combining detailed expression analyses with gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identify epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2 (ESRP2) as a conserved regulatory factor that controls the neonatal-to-adult switch of ∼20% of splice isoforms in mouse and human hepatocytes. The normal shift in splicing coincides tightly with dramatic postnatal induction of ESRP2 in hepatocytes. We further demonstrate that forced expression of ESRP2 in immature mouse and human hepatocytes is sufficient to drive a reciprocal shift in splicing and causes various physiological abnormalities. These findings define a direct role for ESRP2 in the generation of conserved repertoires of adult splice isoforms that facilitate terminal differentiation and maturation of hepatocytes. PMID:26531099

  17. Perilipin-5 is regulated by statins and controls triglyceride contents in the hepatocyte.

    PubMed

    Langhi, Cédric; Marquart, Tyler J; Allen, Ryan M; Baldán, Angel

    2014-08-01

    Perilipin-5 (PLIN5) is a member of the perilipin family of lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins. PLIN5 is expressed in oxidative tissues including the liver, and is critical during LD biogenesis. Studies showed that statins reduce hepatic triglyceride contents in some patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and in rodent models of diet-induced hepatosteatosis. Whether statins alter triglyceride synthesis, storage, and/or utilization within the hepatocyte is unknown, though. Here we tested the hypothesis that statins alter the metabolism of LD in the hepatocyte during physiological conditions, such as fasting-induced steatosis. Mice were gavaged with saline or atorvastatin, and the expression of LD-associated genes was determined in fed and fasted animals. The accumulation of triglycerides and LD was studied in mouse or human primary hepatocytes in response to statins, and following knock-down of SREBP2 or PLIN5. We show that statins decrease the levels of PLIN5, but not other LD-associated genes, in both mouse liver and mouse/human primary hepatocytes, which is paralleled by a significant reduction in both intracellular triglycerides and the number of LD. We identify an atypical negative sterol regulatory sequence in the proximal promoter of mouse/human PLIN5 that recruits the transcription factor SREBP2 and confers response to statins. Finally, we show that the statin-dependent reduction of hepatocyte triglyceride contents is mimicked by partial knock-down of PLIN5; conversely, ectopic overexpression of PLIN5 reverts the statin effect. PLIN5 is a physiological regulator of triglyceride metabolism in the liver, and likely contributes to the pleiotropic effects of statins. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rodent Empathy and Affective Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, Jules B.; Lahvis, Garet P.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, several experimental studies have suggested that empathy occurs in the social lives of rodents. This indicates that rodent behavioral models can be developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanistic substrates of empathy at levels that have heretofore been unavailable. For example, the finding that mice from certain inbred strains express behavioral and physiological responses to conspecific distress, while others do not, underscores that the genetic underpinnings of empathy are specifiable and that in the future they could be harnessed to develop new therapies for human psychosocial impairments. However, the advent of rodent models of empathy is met at the outset with a number of theoretical and semantic problems that are similar to those previously confronted by studies of empathy in humans. The distinct underlying components of empathy must be differentiated from one another and from lay usage of the term. The primary goal of this paper is to review a set of seminal studies that are directly relevant to developing a concept of empathy in rodents. We first consider some of the psychological phenomena that have been associated with empathy, and within this context, we consider the component processes, or endophenotypes of rodent empathy. We then review a series of recent experimental studies that demonstrate the capability of rodents to detect and respond to the affective state of their social partners. We focus primarily on experiments that examine how rodents share affective experiences of fear, but we also highlight how similar types of experimental paradigms can be utilized to evaluate the possibility that rodents share positive affective experiences. Taken together, these studies were inspired by Jaak Panksepp’s theory that all mammals are capable of felt affective experiences. PMID:21672550

  19. Rodent empathy and affective neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, Jules B; Lahvis, Garet P

    2011-10-01

    In the past few years, several experimental studies have suggested that empathy occurs in the social lives of rodents. Thus, rodent behavioral models can now be developed to elucidate the mechanistic substrates of empathy at levels that have heretofore been unavailable. For example, the finding that mice from certain inbred strains express behavioral and physiological responses to conspecific distress, while others do not, underscores that the genetic underpinnings of empathy are specifiable and that they could be harnessed to develop new therapies for human psychosocial impairments. However, the advent of rodent models of empathy is met at the outset with a number of theoretical and semantic problems that are similar to those previously confronted by studies of empathy in humans. The distinct underlying components of empathy must be differentiated from one another and from lay usage of the term. The primary goal of this paper is to review a set of seminal studies that are directly relevant to developing a concept of empathy in rodents. We first consider some of the psychological phenomena that have been associated with empathy, and within this context, we consider the component processes, or endophenotypes of rodent empathy. We then review a series of recent experimental studies that demonstrate the capability of rodents to detect and respond to the affective state of their social partners. We focus primarily on experiments that examine how rodents share affective experiences of fear, but we also highlight how similar types of experimental paradigms can be utilized to evaluate the possibility that rodents share positive affective experiences. Taken together, these studies were inspired by Jaak Panksepp's theory that all mammals are capable of felt affective experiences.

  20. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; ...

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity atmore » every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.« less

  1. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztaray, Balint

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  2. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron-ion coincidence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztáray, Bálint

    2016-10-01

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ˜103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. This advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  3. The ethics of rodent control.

    PubMed

    Meerburg, Bastiaan G; Brom, Frans W A; Kijlstra, Aize

    2008-12-01

    Because western societies generally see animals as objects of moral concern, demands have been made on the way they are treated, e.g. during animal experimentation. In the case of rodent pests, however, inhumane control methods are often applied. This inconsistency in the human-animal relationship requires clarification. This paper analyses the criteria that must be met when judging the use of animals during experiments, and investigates whether these can be applied in rodent control. This is important, because, until now, animal welfare has been less of an issue in pest control: effectiveness, hygiene and cost efficiency have been leading principles. Two options are available to solve the inconsistency: the first is to abandon the criteria used in animal experimentation; the second is to apply these criteria to both animal experimentation and rodent control. This latter option implies that rodent control methods should not lead to intense pain or discomfort, and any discomfort should have a short duration and should allow escaped rodents to lead a natural life. Adherence to this option will, however, require a shift in the design of rodent control methods: effectiveness will no longer be the leading principle. It will have to share its position with animal welfare and humaneness.

  4. In utero Transplanted Human Hepatocytes Allows for Postnatal Engraftment of Human Hepatocytes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James E; Lillegard, Joseph B; Mckenzie, Travis J; Rodysill, Brian R; Wettstein, Peter J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2012-01-01

    In utero cell transplantation (IUCT) can lead to postnatal engraftment of human cells in the xenogeneic recipient. Most reports of IUCTs have involved hematopoietic stem cells. It is unknown if human hepatocytes used for IUCT in fetal pigs will lead to engraftment of these same cells in the postnatal environment. In this study, fetal pigs received direct liver injections of 1×107 human hepatocytes in utero and were delivered by cesarean-section at term. Piglets received a second direct liver injection of 5×107 human hepatocytes 1 week postnatally. Serum was analyzed for human albumin at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-engraftment. Piglet livers were harvested 6 weeks after transplantation and examined by immunohistochemistry, PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization for human specific sequences. Piglets receiving IUCT with human hepatocytes that were postnatally engrafted with human hepatocytes showed significant levels of human albumin production in their serum at all post-engraftment time points. Human albumin gene expression, the presence of human hepatocytes and the presence of human beta-2 microglobulin were all confirmed 6 weeks post-engraftment. IUCT in fetal pigs using human hepatocytes early in gestation allowed for engraftment of human hepatocytes, which remained viable and functional for weeks after transplantation. IUCT followed by postnatal engraftment may provide a future means for large scale expansion of human hepatocytes in genetically-engineered pigs. PMID:23280879

  5. Toward a solution of the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2008-07-15

    The coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration constitutes a serious riddle with regard to our understanding of the evolution of the Universe. Here we argue that this problem may someday be solved - or better understood - by expressing the Hubble expansion rate as a function of the ratio of densities (dark matter/dark energy) and observationally determining the said rate in terms of the redshift.

  6. Genetic tracing of hepatocytes in liver homeostasis, injury, and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Huang, XiuZhen; He, Lingjuan; Pu, Wenjuan; Li, Yan; Liu, Qiaozhen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Libo; Yu, Wei; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Yingqun; Zhou, Bin

    2017-05-26

    The liver possesses a remarkable capacity to regenerate after damage. There is a heated debate on the origin of new hepatocytes after injuries in adult liver. Hepatic stem/progenitor cells have been proposed to produce functional hepatocytes after injury. Recent studies have argued against this model and suggested that pre-existing hepatocytes, rather than stem cells, contribute new hepatocytes. This hepatocyte-to-hepatocyte model is mainly based on labeling of hepatocytes with Cre-recombinase delivered by the adeno-associated virus. However, the impact of virus infection on cell fate determination, consistency of infection efficiency, and duration of Cre-virus in hepatocytes remain confounding factors that interfere with the data interpretation. Here, we generated a new genetic tool Alb-DreER to label almost all hepatocytes (>99.5%) and track their contribution to different cell lineages in the liver. By "pulse-and-chase" strategy, we found that pre-existing hepatocytes labeled by Alb-DreER contribute to almost all hepatocytes during normal homeostasis and after liver injury. Virtually all hepatocytes in the injured liver are descendants of pre-existing hepatocytes through self-expansion. We concluded that stem cell differentiation is unlikely to be responsible for the generation of a substantial number of new hepatocytes in adult liver. Our study also provides a new mouse tool for more precise in vivo genetic study of hepatocytes in the field. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Fast coincidence counting with active inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Hausladen, P. A.; Pozzi, S. A.; Mihalczo, J. T.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes 2nd and 3rd order time coincidence distributions measurements with a GHz processor that synchronously samples 5 or 10 channels of data from radiation detectors near fissile material. On-line, time coincidence distributions are measured between detectors or between detectors and an external stimulating source. Detector-to-detector correlations are useful for passive measurements also. The processor also measures the number of times n pulses occur in a selectable time window and compares this multiplet distribution to a Poisson distribution as a method of determining the occurrence of fission. The detectors respond to radiation emitted in the fission process induced internally by inherent sources or by external sources such as LINACS, DT generators either pulsed or steady state with alpha detectors, etc. Data can be acquired from prompt emission during the source pulse, prompt emissions immediately after the source pulse, or delayed emissions between source pulses. These types of time coincidence measurements (occurring on the time scale of the fission chain multiplication processes for nuclear weapons grade U and Pu) are useful for determining the presence of these fissile materials and quantifying the amount, and are useful for counter terrorism and nuclear material control and accountability. This paper presents the results for a variety of measurements.

  8. Optimality in the zonation of ammonia detoxification in rodent liver.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Pfaff, Michael; Ghallab, Ahmed; Driesch, Dominik; Henkel, Sebastian G; Hengstler, Jan G; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zellmer, Sebastian; Li, Pu

    2015-11-01

    The rodent liver eliminates toxic ammonia. In mammals, three enzymes (or enzyme systems) are involved in this process: glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and the urea cycle enzymes, represented by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The distribution of these enzymes for optimal ammonia detoxification was determined by numerical optimization. This in silico approach predicted that the enzymes have to be zonated in order to achieve maximal removal of toxic ammonia and minimal changes in glutamine concentration. Using 13 compartments, representing hepatocytes, the following predictions were generated: glutamine synthetase is active only within a narrow pericentral zone. Glutaminase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase are located in the periportal zone in a non-homogeneous distribution. This correlates well with the paradoxical observation that in a first step glutamine-bound ammonia is released (by glutaminase) although one of the functions of the liver is detoxification by ammonia fixation. The in silico approach correctly predicted the in vivo enzyme distributions also for non-physiological conditions (e.g. starvation) and during regeneration after tetrachloromethane (CCl4) intoxication. Metabolite concentrations of glutamine, ammonia and urea in each compartment, representing individual hepatocytes, were predicted. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed a striking robustness of the results. These bioinformatics predictions were validated experimentally by immunohistochemistry and are supported by the literature. In summary, optimization approaches like the one applied can provide valuable explanations and high-quality predictions for in vivo enzyme and metabolite distributions in tissues and can reveal unknown metabolic functions.

  9. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  10. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  11. [Use of hepatocytes in primary cultures to predict potential hepatocarcinogenicity of compounds

    PubMed

    Bieri, F.; Muakkassah-Kelly, S.; Bentley, P.

    1990-01-01

    Short-term tests for genotoxic activity will detect a variety of potential carcinogens. However, experience over the last few years has shown that many chemical carcinogens are not detected in these tests. A large proportion of these non-mutagenic (non-genotoxic) carcinogens induce tumors in the rodent liver after life-long feeding. One class of such carcinogens are the hypolipidemic drugs many of which induce a characteristic hepatomegaly upon subchronic treatment. Typically this liver enlargement is accompanied by increased mitotic activity and a proliferation of the hepatic peroxisome compartment. Results also suggest a correlation between the degree and the nature of the hepatomegalic response to a compound, and its hepatocarcinogenic potency, but it remains unclear whether the growth stimulation and/or the peroxisome proliferation is correlated with the carcinogenicity. Both, the induction of peroxisomal enzyme and of replicative DMA synthesis may be measured in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes following in vitro exposition. Moreover, the ability of the compounds tested to induce in vitro replicative DNA synthesis in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes correlated well with the potency of the hepatomegalic response induced in vivo in treated rodents. Consequently, studies using such cultures might be useful to characterize and possibly predict in vitro the hepatocarcinogenic potency of some new compounds. The early recognition of the possible carcinogenic property of a new substance might accordingly contribute to the reduction of a number of life-long studies.

  12. Organic anion uptake by hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Allan W

    2014-10-01

    Many of the compounds taken up by the liver are organic anions that circulate tightly bound to protein carriers such as albumin. The fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver permits these compounds to have access to hepatocytes. Studies to characterize hepatic uptake of organic anions through kinetic analyses, suggested that it was carrier-mediated. Attempts to identify specific transporters by biochemical approaches were largely unsuccessful and were replaced by studies that utilized expression cloning. These studies led to identification of the organic anion transport proteins (oatps), a family of 12 transmembrane domain glycoproteins that have broad and often overlapping substrate specificities. The oatps mediate Na(+)-independent organic anion uptake. Other studies identified a seven transmembrane domain glycoprotein, Na(+)/taurocholate transporting protein (ntcp) as mediating Na(+)-dependent uptake of bile acids as well as other organic anions. Although mutations or deficiencies of specific members of the oatp family have been associated with transport abnormalities, there have been no such reports for ntcp, and its physiologic role remains to be determined, although expression of ntcp in vitro recapitulates the characteristics of Na(+)-dependent bile acid transport that is seen in vivo. Both ntcp and oatps traffic between the cell surface and intracellular vesicular pools. These vesicles move through the cell on microtubules, using the microtubule based motors dynein and kinesins. Factors that regulate this motility are under study and may provide a unique mechanism that can alter the plasma membrane content of these transporters and consequently their accessibility to circulating ligands.

  13. Organic Anion Uptake by Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, Allan W.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the compounds taken up by the liver are organic anions that circulate tightly bound to protein carriers such as albumin. The fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver permits these compounds to have access to hepatocytes. Studies to characterize hepatic uptake of organic anions through kinetic analyses, suggested that it was carrier-mediated. Attempts to identify specific transporters by biochemical approaches were largely unsuccessful and were replaced by studies that utilized expression cloning. These studies led to identification of the organic anion transport proteins (oatps), a family of 12 transmembrane domain glycoproteins that have broad and often overlapping substrate specificities. The oatps mediate Na+-independent organic anion uptake. Other studies identified a seven transmembrane domain glycoprotein, Na+/taurocholate transporting protein (ntcp) as mediating Na+-dependent uptake of bile acids as well as other organic anions. Although mutations or deficiencies of specific members of the oatp family have been associated with transport abnormalities, there have been no such reports for ntcp, and its physiologic role remains to be determined, although expression of ntcp in vitro recapitulates the characteristics of Na+-dependent bile acid transport that is seen in vivo. Both ntcp and oatps traffic between the cell surface and intracellular vesicular pools. These vesicles move through the cell on microtubules, using the microtubule based motors dynein and kinesins. Factors that regulate this motility are under study and may provide a unique mechanism that can alter the plasma membrane content of these transporters and consequently their accessibility to circulating ligands. PMID:25428858

  14. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background. PMID:27110457

  15. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig R

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background.

  16. A method for coincidence timing resolution enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Ermis, E. E. Celiktas, C.; Pilicer, E.

    2016-05-15

    A method including the coincidence time resolution improvement for a TOF/positron emission tomography system was suggested. The spectrometer for this aim was composed of two NaI(Tl) and two plastic scintillation detectors. Experimental results were supported by FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation program by constructing the detector setup in software medium. Present experimental results verified our previous results and conclusions obtained from the suggested method. It was concluded that better resolutions would help the improvement not only on the TOF gain but also on the spatial resolution, leading to better images and helping the Physician in his/her diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Differentiation-Promoting Medium Additives for Hepatocyte Cultivation and Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Gouliarmou, Varvara; Pelkonen, Olavi; Coecke, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Isolated primary hepatocytes are considered as the reference system for in vitro hepatic methods. Following the isolation of primary hepatocytes from liver tissue, an unfavorable process named dedifferentiation is initiated leading to the attenuation of the hepatocellular phenotype both at the morphological and functional level. Freshly isolated hepatocytes can be used immediately or can be cryopreserved for future purposes. Currently, a number of antidedifferentiation strategies exist to extend the life span of isolated hepatocytes. The addition of differentiation-promoting compounds to the hepatocyte culture medium is the oldest and simplest antidedifferentiation approach applied. In the present chapter, the most commonly used medium additives for cultivation and cryopreservation of primary hepatocytes are reviewed.

  18. A coincidence detection system based on real-time software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, Sindulfo; José Blanco, Juan; Medina, José; Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; García-Población, Oscar; García Tejedor, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Conventional real-time coincidence systems use electronic circuitry to detect coincident pulses (hardware coincidence). In this work, a new concept of coincidence system based on real-time software (software coincidence) is presented. This system is based on the recurrent supervision of the analogue-to-digital converters status, which is described in detail. A prototype has been designed and built using a low-cost development platform. It has been applied to two different experimental sets for cosmic ray muon detection. Experimental muon measurements recorded simultaneously using conventional hardware coincidence and our software coincidence system have been compared, yielding identical results. These measurements have also been validated using simultaneous neutron monitor observations. This new software coincidence system provides remarkable advantages such as higher simplicity of interconnection and adjusting. Thus, our system replaces, at least, three Nuclear Instrument Modules (NIMs) required by conventional coincidence systems, reducing its cost by a factor of 40 and eliminating pulse delay adjustments.

  19. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  20. Histological Organization in Hepatocyte Organoid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.; Bowen, William C.; Mulè, Karen; Stolz, Donna Beer

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocytes and other cellular elements isolated by collagenase perfusion of the liver and maintained in defined culture conditions undergo a series of complex changes, including apoptosis and cell proliferation, to reconstruct tissue with specific architecture. Cultures in collagen-coated pleated surface roller bottles, with hepatocyte growth medium medium and in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), form characteristic and reproducible tissue architecture composed of a superficial layer of biliary epithelial cells, an intermediate layer of connective tissue and hepatocytes, and a basal layer of endothelial cells. Dexamethasone, EGF, and HGF are required for the complete histological organization. Analysis of the structures formed demonstrates that the receptor tyrosine kinase ligands HGF and EGF are required for the presence, growth, and phenotypic maturation of the biliary epithelium on the surface of the cultures and for the formation of connective tissue in the cultures. Dexamethasone, in the presence of HGF and EGF, was required for the phenotypic maturation of hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the role of these molecules for the formation and phenotypic maturation of specific histological elements of the liver and suggest roles for these signaling molecules in the formation and structure of the in vivo hepatic architecture. PMID:11696448

  1. Interrogation of infected hepatocyte signaling reveals that suppression of host p53 is critical for Plasmodium liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Ye, Albert S.; Austin, Laura S.; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Camargo, Nelly; Metzger, Peter G.; Douglass, Alyse N.; MacBeath, Gavin; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium parasites infect the liver and replicate inside hepatocytes before they invade erythrocytes and trigger clinical malaria. Analysis of host signaling pathways affected by liver stage infection could provide critical insights into host-pathogen interactions and reveal targets for intervention. Using protein lysate microarrays we found that Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites perturb hepatocyte regulatory pathways involved in cell survival, proliferation and autophagy. Notably, the pro-death protein p53 was substantially decreased in infected hepatocytes, suggesting it could be targeted by the parasite to foster survival. Indeed, mice that express increased levels of p53 showed reduced liver stage parasite burden whereas p53 knockout mice suffered increased liver stage burden. Furthermore, boosting p53 levels using the small molecule Nutlin-3 dramatically reduced liver stage burden in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that perturbation of the hepatocyte p53 pathway critically impacts parasite survival. Thus, host pathways might constitute potential targets for host-based antimalarial prophylaxis. PMID:23478020

  2. Cholangiocarcinomas can originate from hepatocytes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Biao; Malato, Yann; Calvisi, Diego F.; Naqvi, Syed; Razumilava, Nataliya; Ribback, Silvia; Gores, Gregory J.; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) are primary liver tumors with a poor prognosis. The development of effective therapies has been hampered by a limited understanding of the biology of ICCs. Although ICCs exhibit heterogeneity in location, histology, and marker expression, they are currently thought to derive invariably from the cells lining the bile ducts, biliary epithelial cells (BECs), or liver progenitor cells (LPCs). Despite lack of experimental evidence establishing BECs or LPCs as the origin of ICCs, other liver cell types have not been considered. Here we show that ICCs can originate from fully differentiated hepatocytes. Using a mouse model of hepatocyte fate tracing, we found that activated NOTCH and AKT signaling cooperate to convert normal hepatocytes into biliary cells that act as precursors of rapidly progressing, lethal ICCs. Our findings suggest a previously overlooked mechanism of human ICC formation that may be targetable for anti-ICC therapy. PMID:22797301

  3. Guide to Commensal Rodent Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    slaughterhouses. Pigs have been shown to contract trichinosis from infected rat feces in their food. i. Tapeworms - Hymenolepis nana and H. dimanuta...are two of the intestinal parasites transmitted to man by food that has been contaminated with tapeworm - bearing rodent feces. j. Tetanus - The wound

  4. Allometric disparity in rodent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, allometric trajectories for 51 rodent species, comprising equal representatives from each of the major clades (Ctenohystrica, Muroidea, Sciuridae), are compared in a multivariate morphospace (=allometric space) to quantify magnitudes of disparity in cranial growth. Variability in allometric trajectory patterns was compared to measures of adult disparity in each clade, and dietary habit among the examined species, which together encapsulated an ecomorphological breadth. Results indicate that the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents is characterized by different features in sciurids compared with muroids and Ctenohystrica. Sciuridae was found to have a reduced magnitude of inter-trajectory change and growth patterns with less variation in allometric coefficient values among members. In contrast, a greater magnitude of difference between trajectories and an increased variation in allometric coefficient values was evident for both Ctenohystrica and muroids. Ctenohystrica and muroids achieved considerably higher adult disparities than sciurids, suggesting that conservatism in allometric trajectory modification may constrain morphological diversity in rodents. The results provide support for a role of ecology (dietary habit) in the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents. PMID:23610638

  5. The Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakhle, A.; Hammerton, K.; Kohley, Z.; Yurkon, J.; Stiefel, K.

    2017-08-01

    A Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) based fission detector system, called the Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD), has been developed for the ReA3 re-accelerator facility of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Binary reaction kinematics are reconstructed based on position and time-of-flight measurements of fission fragments. Large area PPACs provide 1 ns level time resolution and mm level position resolution. The detectors allow measurements of fission product angular and mass distributions of heavy-ion induced fusion reactions. The 30 cm by 40 cm active area of each PPAC provides large solid angle coverage well suited for measurements of low intensity rare-isotope beams (RIBs).

  6. Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.; Ressler, J. J.

    2013-05-23

    When two truly coincident gamma-rays deposit their energy within the same detector, a composite pulse which is indistinguishable from one due to a single event may be recorded by that detector. This summing e effct is known to become more important as the distance from source to detector is decreased [1]. In this short report, we give a rough estimate for the size of this e ect as a function of source-to-detector distance. The formalism used in this report is taken mainly from [2], and similar results can also be found, e.g., in [1, 3, 4]. In general, the size of the e ect will depend on the exact level scheme of the nucleus studied, but for the sake of extracting numerical values, we will assume a particular level scheme in this report.

  7. Combining attosecond XUV pulses with coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbar, M. Heuser, S.; Boge, R.; Lucchini, M.; Cirelli, C.; Keller, U.; Gallmann, L.

    2014-10-15

    Here we present a successful combination of an attosecond beamline with a COLTRIMS apparatus, which we refer to as AttoCOLTRIMS. The setup provides either single attosecond pulses or attosecond pulse trains for extreme ultraviolet-infrared pump-probe experiments. We achieve full attosecond stability by using an active interferometer stabilization. The capability of the setup is demonstrated by means of two measurements, which lie at the heart of the COLTRIMS detector: firstly, we resolve the rotating electric field vector of an elliptically polarized few-cycle infrared laser field by attosecond streaking exploiting the access to the 3D momentum space of the charged particles. Secondly, we show streaking measurements on different atomic species obtained simultaneously in a single measurement making use of the advantage of measuring ions and electrons in coincidence. Both of these studies demonstrate the potential of the AttoCOLTRIMS for attosecond science.

  8. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  9. Response attenuation during coincident afferent excitatory inputs.

    PubMed

    Kogo, N; Ariel, M

    1999-06-01

    The linearity of the synaptic summation of two unitary excitatory synaptic events was investigated during whole cell recordings from retinal target neurons in an eye-attached isolated brain stem preparation. Pairs of unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were evoked by bipolar stimulation electrodes that were directed to two distinct foci on the retinal surface based on the visual receptive field boundaries. The interval between stimulation of each retinal site was incremented by 0.5-1 ms to quantify the time course of nonlinear summation using an exponential fit. Response facilitation was never observed; however, the coincident arrival of synaptic inputs caused a response attenuation in 26 of the 37 pairs studied. Twelve of the 26 pairs had time constants of their attenuation that were similar to the time constants of the decaying phases of the first EPSPs of each pair. This suggests that the attenuation of these 12 pairs may be entirely due to voltage-dependent mechanisms, such as a reduction in driving force or a change of the activity of voltage-sensitive channels. On the other hand, the 14 other pairs had their time constant of attenuation shorter than the time constants of the decaying phase of the first EPSP. In fact, the attenuation time constants were often closer to the time constants of the decaying phases of the first excitatory postsynaptic currents of each pair. This finding suggests that the attenuation of these 14 pairs involve a shunting mechanism due to the opening of synaptic channels. The presence of this conductance-dependent mechanism is supported by the finding of asymmetric effects on the time course of attenuation when the stimulation sequence was reversed. These results are discussed in terms of the processing by neurons of coincident excitatory inputs onto spatially distinct points of their dendritic trees.

  10. On coincident loop transient electromagnetic induction logging

    DOE PAGES

    Swidinsky, Andrei; Weiss, Chester J.

    2017-05-31

    Coincident loop transient induction wireline logging is examined as the borehole analog of the well-known land and airborne time-domain electromagnetic (EM) method. The concept of whole-space late-time apparent resistivity is modified from the half-space version commonly used in land and airborne geophysics and applied to the coincident loop voltages produced from various formation, borehole, and invasion models. Given typical tool diameters, off-time measurements with such an instrument must be made on the order of nanoseconds to microseconds — much more rapidly than for surface methods. Departure curves of the apparent resistivity for thin beds, calculated using an algorithm developed tomore » model the transient response of a loop in a multilayered earth, indicate that the depth of investigation scales with the bed thickness. Modeled resistivity logs are comparable in accuracy and resolution with standard frequency-domain focused induction logs. However, if measurement times are longer than a few microseconds, the thicknesses of conductors can be overestimated, whereas resistors are underestimated. Thin-bed resolution characteristics are explained by visualizing snapshots of the EM fields in the formation, where a conductor traps the electric field while two current maxima are produced in the shoulder beds surrounding a resistor. Radial profiling is studied using a concentric cylinder earth model. Results found that true formation resistivity can be determined in the presence of either oil- or water-based mud, although in the latter case, measurements must be taken several orders of magnitude later in time. Lastly, the ability to determine true formation resistivity is governed by the degree that the EM field heals after being distorted by borehole fluid and invasion, a process visualized and particularly evident in the case of conductive water-based mud.« less

  11. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  12. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control. ...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control. ...

  14. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control. ...

  15. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control. ...

  16. Rodent Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Samuel E; Eshar, David; Wouda, Raelene M

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence in rodent species varies dramatically from a common occurrence in mice and rats to just a limited number of documented cases in chinchillas and degus. This article summarizes common tumors, both benign and malignant, that have been reported to occur in rodents. Outlined are clinical signs, diagnostics, and treatments that have been described for rodents presenting with specific neoplasms.

  17. Rodent nutrition: digestive comparisons of 4 common rodent species.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerrin

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the literature regarding digestive strategies and captive diets of common rodent pocket pets. A comparison is made between the 2 suborders in which chinchillas, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils occur, highlighting digestive anatomy and dietary adaptations. Recommended captive diets are provided, as well as common nutritionally related health issues that may be presented to veterinary clinics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Pérez, Mayra; Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Luna-López, Armando; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Miranda, Roxana U.; Muñoz, Linda; Gomez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system. PMID:27143995

  19. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pérez, Mayra; Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Luna-López, Armando; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Miranda, Roxana U; Muñoz, Linda; Gomez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system.

  20. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  1. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  2. Targeted transplantation of mitochondria to hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Catherine H; Wu, George Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial defects in hepatocytes can result in liver dysfunction and death. Hepatocytes have cell-surface asialoglycoprotein receptors (AsGRs) which internalize AsGs within endosomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondria could be targeted to hepatocytes by AsGR-mediated endocytosis. Materials and methods An AsG, AsOR, was linked to polylysine to create a conjugate, AsOR-PL, and complexed with healthy and functional mitochondria (defined by normal morphology, cytochrome c assays, and oxygen-consumption rates). Huh7 (AsGR+) and SK Hep1 (AsGR−) cells were treated with a mitochondrial toxin to form Huh7-Mito− and SK Hep1-Mito− cells, lacking detectable mitochondrial DNA. An endosomolytic peptide, LLO, was coupled to AsOR to form AsOR-LLO. A lysosomal inhibitor, amantadine, was used in mitochondria-uptake studies as a control for nonspecific endosomal release. Results Coincubation of complexed mitochondria and AsOR-LLO with Huh7-Mito− cells increased mitochondrial DNA to >9,700-fold over control at 7 days (P<0.001), and increased mitochondrial oxygen-consumption rates to >90% of control by 10 days. Conclusion Rescue of mitochondria-damaged hepatocytes can be achieved by targeted uptake of normal mitochondria through receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27942238

  3. Low-level HIV infection of hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are only limited data on whether HIV infection occurs within the liver; therefore, we explored early and late stages of the HIV life cycle in two hepatocyte cell lines – Huh7.5 and Huh7.5JFH1 – as well as in primary human hepatocytes. Results Integrated HIV DNA was detected in Huh7.5 and Huh7.5JFH1 cells, as well as in primary hepatocytes, and was inhibited by the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a dose-dependent manner. HIV p24 protein was also detected in cell culture supernatants at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-infection and was inhibited by AZT, although levels were modest compared to those in a lymphocyte cell line. Culture supernatants from HIV-infected hepatocytes were capable of infecting a non-hepatic HIV indicator cell line. Conclusions These results indicating low-level HIV replication in hepatoctyes in vitro complement evidence suggesting that HIV has deleterious effects on the liver in vivo. PMID:22877244

  4. K-chameleon and the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we present a hybrid model of k-essence and chameleon, named as k-chameleon. In this model, due to the chameleon mechanism, the directly strong coupling between the k-chameleon field and matters (cold dark matters and baryons) is allowed. In the radiation-dominated epoch, the interaction between the k-chameleon field and background matters can be neglected; the behavior of the k-chameleon therefore is the same as that of the ordinary k-essence. After the onset of matter domination, the strong coupling between the k-chameleon and matters dramatically changes the result of the ordinary k-essence. We find that during the matter-dominated epoch, only two kinds of attractors may exist: one is the familiar K attractor and the other is a completely new, dubbed C attractor. Once the Universe is attracted into the C attractor, the fraction energy densities of the k-chameleon {omega}{sub {phi}} and dust matter {omega}{sub m} are fixed and comparable, and the Universe will undergo a power-law accelerated expansion. One can adjust the model so that the K attractor does not appear. Thus, the k-chameleon model provides a natural solution to the cosmological coincidence problem.

  5. Coincidence avoidance principle in surface haptic interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Steven G.; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Peshkin, Michael A.; Colgate, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    When multiple fingertips experience force sensations, how does the brain interpret the combined sensation? In particular, under what conditions are the sensations perceived as separate or, alternatively, as an integrated whole? In this work, we used a custom force-feedback device to display force signals to two fingertips (index finger and thumb) as they traveled along collinear paths. Each finger experienced a pattern of forces that, taken individually, produced illusory virtual bumps, and subjects reported whether they felt zero, one, or two bumps. We varied the spatial separation between these bump-like force-feedback regions, from being much greater than the finger span to nearly exactly the finger span. When the bump spacing was the same as the finger span, subjects tended to report only one bump. We found that the results are consistent with a quantitative model of perception in which the brain selects a structural interpretation of force signals that relies on minimizing coincidence stemming from accidental alignments between fingertips and inferred surface structures. PMID:25675477

  6. Coincidence avoidance principle in surface haptic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Steven G; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Colgate, James Edward

    2015-02-24

    When multiple fingertips experience force sensations, how does the brain interpret the combined sensation? In particular, under what conditions are the sensations perceived as separate or, alternatively, as an integrated whole? In this work, we used a custom force-feedback device to display force signals to two fingertips (index finger and thumb) as they traveled along collinear paths. Each finger experienced a pattern of forces that, taken individually, produced illusory virtual bumps, and subjects reported whether they felt zero, one, or two bumps. We varied the spatial separation between these bump-like force-feedback regions, from being much greater than the finger span to nearly exactly the finger span. When the bump spacing was the same as the finger span, subjects tended to report only one bump. We found that the results are consistent with a quantitative model of perception in which the brain selects a structural interpretation of force signals that relies on minimizing coincidence stemming from accidental alignments between fingertips and inferred surface structures.

  7. Broadband Electromagnetic Pulses Coinciding with Sprite Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Symbalisty, E.; Chanrion, O.; van der Velde, O. A.; Odzimek, A.; Whitley, T.; Neubert, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study reports novel optical sprite observations in southern France during the summer months 2009 and the associated electromagnetic radiation emitted in the frequency range >50 kHz. About 10% of the observed sprites are associated with consecutive pulses of >50 kHz electromagnetic radiation. Some of these broadband pulses occur simultaneously with the sprite luminosity. In particular, the electromagnetic radiation of the sprite itself can coincide with a broadband pulse. This behaviour is predicted by the relativistic runaway breakdown theory, in which the lightning electromagnetic field accelerates free electrons to form a narrow particle beam shooting upward into near-Earth space. This vertical relativistic runaway breakdown describes a novel physical process within the Earth's atmosphere, even though it may occur only on extremely rare occasions, i.e., ~100 upward particle beams per day around the globe. The wealth of currently planned future space missions in this research area will greatly enhance the detection likelihood of the predicted particle beams.

  8. Incoherent coincidence imaging of space objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Gu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    Incoherent Coincidence Imaging (ICI), which is based on the second or higher order correlation of fluctuating light field, has provided great potentialities with respect to standard conventional imaging. However, the deployment of reference arm limits its practical applications in the detection of space objects. In this article, an optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected single-pixel photo-detectors was proposed to remove the reference arm. The correlation in our proposed method is the second order correlation between the intensity fluctuations observed by any two detectors. With appropriate locations of single-pixel detectors, this second order correlation is simplified to absolute-square Fourier transform of source and the unknown object. We demonstrate the image recovery with the Gerchberg-Saxton-like algorithms and investigate the reconstruction quality of our approach. Numerical experiments has been made to show that both binary and gray-scale objects can be recovered. This proposed method provides an effective approach to promote detection of space objects and perhaps even the exo-planets.

  9. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  10. Identifying Rodent Hantavirus Reservoirs, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bisordi, Ivani; Levis, Silvana; Garcia, Jorge; Pereira, Luiz E.; Souza, Renato P.; Sugahara, Teresa K.N.; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Souza, Luiza T.M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the genetic analysis of samples from hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) patients from southern and southeastern states of Brazil and rodents captured at the presumed site of infection of these patients. A total of 65 samples that were antibody-positive for Sin Nombre or Laguna Negra virus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were processed by nested reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) by using several primer combinations in the M and S genome segments. PCR products were amplified and sequenced from samples from 11 HPS patient and 7 rodent samples. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequence differences showed the cocirculation of Araraquara and Juquitiba-like viruses, previously characterized from humans. Our genetic data indicate that Araraquara virus is associated with Bolomys lasiurus (hairy-tailed Bolo mouse) and the Juquitiba-like virus is associated with Oligoryzomys nigripes (black-footed pigmy rice rat). PMID:15663849

  11. Preclinical imaging anesthesia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vesce, Giancarlo; Micieli, Fabiana; Chiavaccini, Ludovica

    2017-03-01

    Despite the outstanding progress achieved by preclinical imaging science, laboratory animal anesthesia remains quite stationary. Ninety percent of preclinical imaging studies are carried on small rodents (mice and rats) anesthetized by outdated injectable and/or inhalation agents. A need for imaging awake (conscious) animals is questionably registered mainly for brain research, for phMRI and for accomplishing pain and analgesia studies. A need for improving current rodent anesthesia protocols and for enforcing the 3Rs paradigm is sought. Patient monitoring throughout the procedure and recovery phases, as well as vital parameter's data must be recorded in basic consciousness states and during imaging sessions. A multidrug approach is suggested to overcome the limits of monoanesthesia and well-timed physiological data are required to ground findings and to interpret imaging data.

  12. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  13. Extensive Epigenetic Changes Accompany Terminal Differentiation of Mouse Hepatocytes After Birth

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Matthew V.; Pilarowski, Genay; Liu, Xiuli; Serre, David

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is traditionally thought to be established during early development and to remain mostly unchanged thereafter in healthy tissues, although recent studies have shown that this epigenetic mark can be more dynamic. Epigenetic changes occur in the liver after birth, but the timing and underlying biological processes leading to DNA methylation changes are not well understood. We hypothesized that this epigenetic reprogramming was the result of terminal differentiation of hepatocyte precursors. Using genomic approaches, we characterized the DNA methylation patterns in mouse liver from E18.5 until adulthood to determine if the timing of the DNA methylation change overlaps with hepatocyte terminal differentiation, and to examine the genomic context of these changes and identify the regulatory elements involved. Out of 271,325 CpGs analyzed throughout the genome, 214,709 CpGs changed DNA methylation by more than 5% (e.g., from 5 to 10% methylation) between E18.5 and 9 wk of age, and 18,863 CpGs changed DNA methylation by more than 30%. Genome-scale data from six time points between E18.5 and P20 show that DNA methylation changes coincided with the terminal differentiation of hepatoblasts into hepatocytes. We also showed that epigenetic reprogramming occurred primarily in intergenic enhancer regions while gene promoters were less affected. Our data suggest that normal postnatal hepatic development and maturation involves extensive epigenetic remodeling of the genome, and that enhancers play a key role in controlling the transition from hepatoblasts to fully differentiated hepatocytes. Our study provides a solid foundation to support future research aimed at further revealing the role of epigenetics in stem cell biology. PMID:27652892

  14. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  15. Comparison of the effects of the synthetic pyrethroid Metofluthrin and phenobarbital on CYP2B form induction and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Yamada, Tomoya; Deguchi, Yoshihito; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Isobe, Naohiko; Lake, Brian G; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-05

    High doses of Metofluthrin (MTF) have been shown to produce liver tumours in rats by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor leading to liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms and increased cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MTF with those of the known rodent liver tumour promoter phenobarbital (PB) on the induction CYP2B forms and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Treatment with 50 microM MTF and 50 microM PB for 72 h increased CYP2B1 mRNA levels in male Wistar rat hepatocytes and CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Replicative DNA synthesis was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine over the last 24 h of a 48 h treatment period. Treatment with 10-1000 microM MTF and 100-500 microM PB resulted in significant increases in replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. While replicative DNA synthesis was increased in human hepatocytes treated with 5-50 ng/ml epidermal growth factor or 5-100 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor, treatment with MTF and PB had no effect. These results demonstrate that while both MTF and PB induce CYP2B forms in both species, MTF and PB only induced replicative DNA synthesis in rat and not in human hepatocytes. These results provide further evidence that the MOA for MTF-induced rat liver tumour formation is similar to that of PB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B form inducers and that the key event of increased cell proliferation would not occur in human liver.

  16. The Higgs and top mass coincidence problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrente-Lujan, E.

    2015-05-01

    On the light of the recent LHC boson discovery, we present a phenomenological evaluation of the ratio ρt = mZmt/m2H, from the LHC combined mH value, we get ((1σ)) {ρ _t}(exp) = 0.9956 ± 0.0081. This value is close to one with a precision of the order ˜ 1%. Similarly we evaluate the ratio ρWt = (mW + mt)/(2mH). From the up-to-date mass values we get ρ(exp)wt = 1.0066 ± 0.0035 (1σ). The Higgs mass is numerically close (at the 1% level) to the mH ˜ (mW + mt)/2. From these relations we can write any two mass ratios as a function of, exclusively, the Weinberg angle (with a precision of the order of 1% or better): {{{m_i}} over {{m_j}}} ≃ {fij}({θ _W}), i, j = W,Z, H, t. For example: mH/mZ ≃ 1 + √2s2θW/2, mH/mtcθW ≃ 1 - √2s2θW/2. In the limit cos θW → 1 all the masses would become equal mZ = mW = mt = mH. It is tempting to think that such a value, it is not a mere coincidence but, on naturalness grounds, a signal of some more deeper symmetry. In a model independent way, ρt can be viewed as the ratio of the highest massive representatives of the spin (0, 1/2, 1) SM and, to a very good precision the LHC evidence tell us that ms=1ms=1/2/m2s=0 ≃ 1. Somehow the "lowest" scalar particle mass is the geometric mean of the highest spin 1, 1/2 masses. We review the theoretical situation of this ratio in the SM and beyond. In the SM these relations are rather stable under RGE pointing out to some underlying UV symmetry. In the SM such a ratio hints for a non-casual relation of the type λ ≃ κ(g2 + g'2) with κ ≃ 1 + o(g/gt). Moreover the existence of relations mi/mj ≃ fij(θW) could be interpreted as a hint for a role of the SU(2)c custodial symmetry, together with other unknown mechanism. Without a symmetry at hand to explain then in the SM, it arises a Higgs mass coincidence problem, why the ratios ρt, ρWt are so close to one, can we find a mechanism that naturally

  17. Advances in coincidence time resolution for PET.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2016-03-21

    Coincidence time resolution (CTR), an important parameter for time-of-flight (TOF) PET performance, is determined mainly by properties of the scintillation crystal and photodetector used. Stable production techniques for LGSO:Ce (Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce) with decay times varying from ∼ 30-40 ns have been established over the past decade, and the decay time can be accurately controlled with varying cerium concentration (0.025-0.075 mol%). This material is promising for TOF-PET, as it has similar light output and equivalent stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons compared to industry standard LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce, and the decay time is improved by more than 30% with proper Ce concentration. This work investigates the achievable CTR with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%) when coupled to new silicon photomultipliers. Crystal element dimension is another important parameter for achieving fast timing. 20 mm length crystal elements achieve higher 511 keV photon detection efficiency, but also introduce higher scintillation photon transit time variance. 3 mm length crystals are not practical for PET, but have reduced scintillation transit time spread. The CTR between pairs of 2.9 × 2.9 × 3 mm(3) and 2.9 × 2.9 × 20 mm(3) LGSO:Ce crystals was measured to be 80 ± 4 and 122 ± 4 ps FWHM, respectively. Measurements of light yield and intrinsic decay time are also presented for a thorough investigation into the timing performance with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%).

  18. Human hepatocytes support the hypertrophic but not the hyperplastic response to the murine nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen sodium phenobarbital in an in vivo study using a chimeric mouse with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Takeuchi, Hayato; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takako; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    High doses of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator, have been shown to produce hepatocellular tumors in rodents by a mitogenic mode of action (MOA) involving CAR activation. The effect of 1-week dietary treatment with NaPB on liver weight and histopathology, hepatic CYP2B enzyme activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA expression, replicative DNA synthesis and selected genes related to cell proliferation, and functional transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses was studied in male CD-1 mice, Wistar Hannover (WH) rats, and chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. The treatment of chimeric mice with 1000-1500-ppm NaPB resulted in plasma levels around 3-5-fold higher than those observed in human subjects given therapeutic doses of NaPB. NaPB produced dose-dependent increases in hepatic CYP2B activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA levels in all animal models. Integrated functional metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the responses to NaPB in the human liver were clearly different from those in rodents. Although NaPB produced a dose-dependent increase in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CD-1 mice and WH rats, no increase in replicative DNA synthesis was observed in human hepatocyte-originated areas of chimeric mice. In addition, treatment with NaPB had no effect on Ki-67, PCNA, GADD45β, and MDM2 mRNA expression in chimeric mice, whereas significant increases were observed in CD-1 mice and/or WH rats. However, increases in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis were observed in chimeric mice both in vivo and in vitro after treatment epidermal growth factor. Thus, although NaPB could activate CAR in both rodent and human hepatocytes, NaPB did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice, whereas it was mitogenic to rat and mouse hepatocytes. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of NaPB, the MOA for NaPB-induced rodent liver tumor formation is thus not relevant for humans.

  19. Rodent consumption in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S

    2014-09-01

    Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne infections worldwide, including Southeast Asia and Northeast Thailand (Isaan), where rodent consumption may be a source of rodent-borne diseases. The behavior of consuming rodents is related to a population's traditions, knowledge, cultural, and household contexts, among other factors. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand during November-December 2011. It aimed to elicit information about rodent consumption among residents of this province, and to identify factors associated with rodent consumption there. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that male gender, large family size, and use of rainwater as the main source of drinking water were positively associated with reported rodent consumption in this province, while having proper knowledge/attitudes towards animal-borne disease was negatively associated. These results provide evidence-base information for further studies, such as participatory ac- tion research, to further explore how people interact with rodents in different contexts. Further research is also needed to characterize risk of zoonotic diseases in relation to rodent consumption.

  20. Autocrine expression of hepatocyte growth factor and its cytoprotective effect on hepatocyte poisoning

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Zhou, Jun; Dou, Ke-Feng; Chen, Yong; Yan, Qing-Guo; Li, Hai-Min

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct pEGFP-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression vector, the to detect its expression in transfected human hepatocytes, and to investigate the influence of autocrine HGF expression on the proliferative potential and cytoprotective effects in human hepatocytes. METHODS: Human HGF cDNA was ligated to the pEGFP vector. Recombinant plasmid was transfected into human hepatocyte line QZG with liposome. Expression of HGF protein was observed by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Hepatic cells were collected 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection to detect the number of [3H]-TdR uptake in DNA. DNA synthesis was observed by using PCNA stain immunohistochemistry. Acute liver cell damage was induced by carbon tetrachloride. Cytoprotective effect was observed by examining the survival rate of hepatocytes and leakage of intracellular alanine transaminase (ALT) and potassium ions. RESULTS: HGF identification of pEGFP-HGF by enzyme digestion showed that HGF fragment was cloned into BamH I and Sal I sites of pEGFP-N3. Expression of GFP in transfected hepatocytes was observed with fluorescence microscopy. The [3H]-TdR uptake became 7 times as many as in the control group 96 h after transfection. After HGF transfection, the survival rate of hepatocytes poisoned by CCl4 significantly increased (83% vs 61%, P < 0.05), and the leakage of intracellular alanine transaminase and potassium ions decreased (586 nkat/L vs 1089 nkat/L, P < 0.01; and 5.59 mmol/L vs 6.02 mmol/L, P < 0.01 respectively). Culture of transfected hepatic cells promoted the proliferation of other non-transfected cells. CONCLUSION: Transfected HGF is expressed in hepatic cells and has the activity of promoting cell division and protecting hepatic cells against poisoning. PMID:15334679

  1. Hepatocyte Culture in Autologous Decellularized Spleen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Wu, Wanquan; Xiang, Junxi; Lv, Yi; Zheng, Xinglong; Chen, Qian; Wang, Haohua; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhengwen; Ma, Feng

    2015-01-01

    abstract Background and Aims: Using decellularized scaffold to reengineer liver tissue is a promising alternative therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Though the decellularized human liver matrix is the ideal scaffold for reconstruction of the liver theoretically, the shortage of liver donors is still an obstacle for potential clinical application. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In the present study, we used a tissue engineering approach to prepare a rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) and evaluate the effectiveness of this DSM for primary rat hepatocytes culture. Methods: Rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) was prepared by perfusion of a series of detergents through spleen vasculature. DSM was characterized by residual DNA and specific extracellular matrix distribution. Thereafter, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in the DSM in a 3-dimensional dynamic culture system, and liver cell survival and biological functions were evaluated by comparison with 3-dimensional sandwich culture and also with cultured in decellularized liver matrix (DLM). Results: Our research found that DSM did not exhibit any cellular components, but preserved the main extracellular matrix and the intact vasculature evaluated by DNA detection, histology, immunohistochemical staining, vessel corrosion cast and upright metallurgical microscope. Moreover, the method of DSM preparation procedure was relatively simple with high success rate (100%). After seeding primary hepatocytes in DSM, the cultured hepatocytes survived inside DSM with albumin synthesis and urea secretion within 10 d. Additionally, hepatocytes in dynamic culture medium had better biological functions at day 10 than that in sandwich culture. Albumin synthesis was 85.67 ± 6.34 μg/107cell/24h in dynamic culture in DSM compared to 62.43 ± 4.59 μg/107cell/24h in sandwich culture (P < 0.01) and to 87.54 ± 5.25 μg/107cell/24h in DLM culture (P > 0.05); urea release was 32.14 ± 8.62

  2. Brain development in rodents and humans: Identifying benchmarks of maturation and vulnerability to injury across species

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Blomgren, Klas; Gimlin, Kayleen; Ferriero, Donna M.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic and traumatic brain injuries are leading causes of long-term mortality and disability in infants and children. Although several preclinical models using rodents of different ages have been developed, species differences in the timing of key brain maturation events can render comparisons of vulnerability and regenerative capacities difficult to interpret. Traditional models of developmental brain injury have utilized rodents at postnatal day 7–10 as being roughly equivalent to a term human infant, based historically on the measurement of post-mortem brain weights during the 1970s. Here we will examine fundamental brain development processes that occur in both rodents and humans, to delineate a comparable time course of postnatal brain development across species. We consider the timing of neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, oligodendrocyte maturation and age-dependent behaviors that coincide with developmentally regulated molecular and biochemical changes. In general, while the time scale is considerably different, the sequence of key events in brain maturation is largely consistent between humans and rodents. Further, there are distinct parallels in regional vulnerability as well as functional consequences in response to brain injuries. With a focus on developmental hypoxicischemic encephalopathy and traumatic brain injury, this review offers guidelines for researchers when considering the most appropriate rodent age for the developmental stage or process of interest to approximate human brain development. PMID:23583307

  3. Neutron coincidence counting with digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagi, Janos; Dechamp, Luc; Dransart, Pascal; Dzbikowicz, Zdzislaw; Dufour, Jean-Luc; Holzleitner, Ludwig; Huszti, Joseph; Looman, Marc; Marin Ferrer, Montserrat; Lambert, Thierry; Peerani, Paolo; Rackham, Jamie; Swinhoe, Martyn; Tobin, Steve; Weber, Anne-Laure; Wilson, Mark

    2009-09-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is a widely adopted nondestructive assay (NDA) technique used in nuclear safeguards to measure the mass of nuclear material in samples. Nowadays, most neutron-counting systems are based on the original-shift-register technology, like the (ordinary or multiplicity) Shift-Register Analyser. The analogue signal from the He-3 tubes is processed by an amplifier/single channel analyser (SCA) producing a train of TTL pulses that are fed into an electronic unit that performs the time- correlation analysis. Following the suggestion of the main inspection authorities (IAEA, Euratom and the French Ministry of Industry), several research laboratories have started to study and develop prototypes of neutron-counting systems with PC-based processing. Collaboration in this field among JRC, IRSN and LANL has been established within the framework of the ESARDA-NDA working group. Joint testing campaigns have been performed in the JRC PERLA laboratory, using different equipment provided by the three partners. One area of development is the use of high-speed PCs and pulse acquisition electronics that provide a time stamp (LIST-Mode Acquisition) for every digital pulse. The time stamp data can be processed directly during acquisition or saved on a hard disk. The latter method has the advantage that measurement data can be analysed with different values for parameters like predelay and gate width, without repeating the acquisition. Other useful diagnostic information, such as die-away time and dead time, can also be extracted from this stored data. A second area is the development of "virtual instruments." These devices, in which the pulse-processing system can be embedded in the neutron counter itself and sends counting data to a PC, can give increased data-acquisition speeds. Either or both of these developments could give rise to the next generation of instrumentation for improved practical neutron-correlation measurements. The paper will describe the

  4. Is the ``IR Coincidence'' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Jörn; Heinz, Sebastian; Pooley, Guy; Pottschmidt, Katja; Corbel, Stephane

    2005-06-01

    Previous work by Motch et al. suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender later showed that the typical hard-state radio power law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward-extrapolated X-ray power law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This IR coincidence has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard-state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a parallel track for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data obtained with the Ryle radio telescope and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data from the All-Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of parallel tracks, and here they are associated with ``failed transitions,'' or the beginning of a transition, to the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard, rather than the

  5. Is the `IR Coincidence' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.

    2005-09-01

    Previous work by Motch (1985) suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power-law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender (2002) later showed that the typical hard state radio power-law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward extrapolated X-ray power-law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This `IR coincidence' has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a `parallel track' for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data, obtained with the Ryle radio telescope, and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, from the All Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of `parallel tracks', and here they are associated with `failed transitions' to, or the beginning of a transition to, the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard

  6. Direct decomposition of the experimental γ-γ coincidence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianov, B. A.; Kabina, L. P.; Kondurov, I. A.; Loginov, Yu. E.; Sushkov, P. A.

    1980-12-01

    Development here is the direct method of decomposition of the experimental matrix of γ-γ coincidences. Intensities of coincidences are calculated by an approximation of the total coincidence matrix within the framework of the chosen model of the coincidence spectra with the instrumental parameters and the a priori data on the scheme of the excited states of the nucleus under study. A two-dimensional Gaussian is used to describe an elementary coincidence peak. The volume value of the Gaussian is a measure of the γ-γ coincidence intensity in the given cascade. The method described was used for processing the experimental data in 104Rh, 108Ag, 122,124Sb and 134Cs studies via the (n, γ) reaction. The method is also valid in the analysis of any of two-parameter distributions which correspond to correlated events and which can be presented as two-dimensional matrices.

  7. Prospects for biological control of rodent populations*

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, Kazimierz

    1973-01-01

    Pathogens and predatory animals are the main agents used for the biological control of rodents. The pathogens that have been used are of the genus Salmonella; none is rodent-specific and all can cause severe infection in man and domestic animals. Furthermore, rodents frequently develop immunity to, and become carriers of, these organisms, and there is little to commend their use, except in lightly populated areas where control is infrequently applied. The relationships of five predator species with their rodent prey have been examined. The monitor lizard, mongoose, and ferret were for different reasons found to be unsatisfactory, and there is not yet sufficient evidence to warrant further releases of the Japanese weasel. Domestic and feral cats control rodents well in some situations but only after some other agent has removed a large part of the rodent population. PMID:4587482

  8. Experimental hepatocyte xenotransplantation--a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K C

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (Tx) is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for Tx. Hepatocytes from other species, for example, the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenoTx. The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species Tx of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the Tx of human (n = 23) or pig (n = 19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of Tx (n = 23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n = 6]) and peritoneal cavity (n = 19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenoTx of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenoTx.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL HEPATOCYTE XENOTRANSPLANTATION – A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for transplantation. Hepatocytes from other species, e.g., the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenotransplantation. Literature search and results The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species transplantation of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the transplantation of human (n=23) or pig (n=19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically-engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of transplantation (n=23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n=6]) and peritoneal cavity (n=19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. Conclusions The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenotransplantation of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically-engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenotransplantation. PMID:25950141

  10. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  12. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.

    1996-10-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Tactile learning in rodents: Neurobiology and neuropharmacology.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhsh, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Ayoobi, Fateme; Fatemi, Iman; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad

    2016-02-15

    Animal models of learning and memory have been the subject of considerable research. Rodents such as mice and rats are nocturnal animals with poor vision, and their survival depends on their sense of touch. Recent reports have shown that whisker somatosensation is the main channel through which rodents collect and process environmental information. This review describes tactile learning in rodents from a neurobiological and neuropharmacological perspective, and how this is involved in memory-related processes.

  14. Clifford algebra approach to the coincidence problem for planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; Aragón, J L; Verde-Star, L

    2005-03-01

    The problem of coincidences of planar lattices is analyzed using Clifford algebra. It is shown that an arbitrary coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of coincidence reflections and this allows planar coincidence lattices to be characterized algebraically. The cases of square, rectangular and rhombic lattices are worked out in detail. One of the aims of this work is to show the potential usefulness of Clifford algebra in crystallography. The power of Clifford algebra for expressing geometric ideas is exploited here and the procedure presented can be generalized to higher dimensions.

  15. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-09-18

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

  16. Auditing laboratory rodent biosecurity programs.

    PubMed

    Porter, William P; Horn, Mandy J; Cooper, Dale M; Klein, Hilton J

    2013-10-22

    A rodent biosecurity program that includes periodic evaluation of procedures used in an institution's vivarium can be used to ensure that best practices are in place to prevent a microbial pathogen outbreak. As a result of an ongoing comprehensive biosecurity review within their North American and European production facilities, the authors developed a novel biosecurity auditing process and worksheet that could be useful in other animal care and use operations. The authors encourage other institutions to consider initiating similar audits of their biosecurity programs to protect the health of their laboratory animals.

  17. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  18. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Curt; Ellis, Ewa; Abrahamsson, Anna; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Björkhem, Ingemar; Axelson, Magnus

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William’s E medium. The medium was collected and re newed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDC A was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addit ion of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium. PMID:11819640

  19. Hepatocyte xenotransplantation for treating liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, André Gustavo; Quaresma, Kátia; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of acute and chronic liver failure is still a challenge despite modern therapeutic innovations. While liver transplantation can restore liver function and improve patient survival, donor shortages limit this treatment to a small number of patients. Cellular xenotransplantation has emerged as an alternative for treating liver failure. Xenohepatocytes could be readily available in sufficient quantities to treat patients in critical condition and thereby reduce the donor shortage. The use of isolated encapsulated or non-encapsulated cells can reduce the immunorejection response. Several studies using animal models of acute or chronic liver failure have demonstrated improved survival and recovery of liver function after xenotransplantation of adult hepatocytes. Porcine liver cells are a potential source of xenohepatocytes due to similarities with human physiology and the great number of hepatocytes that can be obtained. The recent development of less immunogenic transgenic pigs, new immunosuppressive drugs, and cellular encapsulation systems represents important advances in the field of cellular xenotransplantation. In this study, we review the work carried out in animal models that deals with the advantages and limitations of hepatocyte xenotransplantation, and we propose new studies needed in this field.

  20. Parvovirus B19-Induced Apoptosis of Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Brian D.; Karetnyi, Yuory V.; Naides, Stanley J.

    2004-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19 virus) can persist in multiple tissues and has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including acute fulminant liver failure. The mechanism by which B19 virus induces liver failure remains unknown. Hepatocytes are nonpermissive for B19 virus replication. We previously reported that acute fulminant liver failure associated with B19 virus infection was characterized by hepatocellular dropout. We inoculated both primary hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2 with B19 virus and assayed for apoptosis by using annexin V staining. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis and immunofluorescence demonstrated that B19 virus was able to infect the cells and produce its nonstructural protein but little or no structural capsid protein. Infection with B19 virus induced means of 28% of Hep G2 cells and 10% of primary hepatocytes to undergo apoptosis, which were four- and threefold increases, respectively, over background levels. Analysis of caspase involvement showed that B19 virus-inoculated cultures had a significant increase in the number of cells with active caspase 3. Inhibition studies demonstrated that caspases 3 and 9, but not caspase 8, are required for B19 virus-induced apoptosis. PMID:15220451

  1. Evidence-Based Advances in Rodent Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2017-09-01

    The number of exotic companion pet rodents seen in veterinary practices is growing very rapidly. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association's surveys, more than 2,093,000 pet rodents were kept in US households in 2007 and in 2012 it was more than 2,349,000 animals. This article summarizes the most important evidence-based knowledge in exotic pet rodents (diagnostics of the hyperadrenocorticism in guinea pigs, pituitary tumors in rats, urolithiasis in guinea pigs, use of itopride as prokinetics, use of deslorelin acetate in rodents, cause of dental disease, and prevention of mammary gland tumors in rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mycobacteriosis in the rabbit and rodent.

    PubMed

    McClure, Diane E

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mycobacteriosis is rare in rabbits and rodents with the exception of the pygmy rabbit, and there are only a handful of reported cases involving other rodents. Mycobacterium avium complex was the most commonly identified organism in reports of spontaneous mycobacteriosis involving rabbits and rodents. The resistance of rabbits and rodents to mycobacterial disease has been useful in understanding the disease in humans and other animals. Preventing or controlling Mycobacterium sp transmission from wildlife to domestic animals will require collaboration between agriculture, wildlife, environmental, and political entities. Understanding the ecology and epidemiology of mycobacteria is needed for better worldwide management of tuberculosis.

  3. Fibrinogen-like protein 1, a hepatocyte derived protein is an acute phase reactant

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhilin; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2008-01-25

    Fibrinogen-like protein 1 (FGL1) is a hepatocyte derived protein that is upregulated in regenerating rodent livers following partial hepatectomy. It has been implicated as a mitogen for liver cell proliferation. In this study, we show that recombinant human IL-6 induces FGL1 expression in Hep G2 cells in a pattern similar to those of acute phase reactants. Following induction of acute inflammation in rats by subcutaneous injection of turpentine oil, serum FGL1 levels are also enhanced. Although, a recent report suggests that FGL1 associates almost exclusively with the fibrin matrix, we report here that approximately 20% of the total plasma FGL1 remains free. The enhancement of FGL1 levels in vitro by IL-6 and its induction after turpentine oil injection suggest that it is an acute phase reactant. Its presence in bound and free forms in the blood also implies biological roles that extend beyond the proposed autocrine effect it has on hepatocytes during regeneration.

  4. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  5. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  6. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  7. The Miocene rodents of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Z.

    2009-04-01

    During the Miocene period a group of shallow lakes was created in depressions at the territory of present-day Serbia. This caused the present wide distribution of lacustrine sediments, which occasionally alternate with the alluvial and marsh sediments. The remains of large mammals are relatively common, while the remains of small mammals used to be known only from two localities - Mala Miliva and Sibnica. The method of sediment sieving, used during the last decade, led to discovery of 6 new localities with remains of fossil vertebrates - Sibnica 1, Vračevići, village Lazarevac, Bele Vode, Brajkovac and Tavnik. Most of the fossil material is represented by osteological and odontological remains of small mammals. The best represented group of small mammals at each of the localities was the rodents. According to the odontological material presence was proven for 35 rodent species from 6 families. MN zonation was determined according to structure of associations. The geological age of fossil-bearing sediments was determined by using the method of correlation with the sites in Europe and Turkey.

  8. Rodent models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases.

  9. The role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha in perfluorooctanoic acid- and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid-induced hepatocellular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Kevin M; McGreal, Steven R; McCarthy, Alex; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Lampe, Jed N; Lau, Christoper; Apte, Udayan

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals present in a multitude of consumer products, are persistent organic pollutants. Both compounds induce hepatotoxic effects in rodents, including steatosis, hepatomegaly and liver cancer. The mechanisms of PFOA- and PFOS-induced hepatic dysfunction are not completely understood. We present evidence that PFOA and PFOS induce their hepatic effects via targeting hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α). Human hepatocytes treated with PFOA and PFOS at a concentration relevant to occupational exposure caused a decrease in HNF4α protein without affecting HNF4α mRNA or causing cell death. RNA sequencing analysis combined with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of global gene expression changes in human hepatocytes treated with PFOA or PFOS indicated alterations in the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis, several of which are regulated by HNF4α. Further investigation of specific HNF4α target gene expression revealed that PFOA and PFOS could promote cellular dedifferentiation and increase cell proliferation by down regulating positive targets (differentiation genes such as CYP7A1) and inducing negative targets of HNF4α (pro-mitogenic genes such as CCND1). Furthermore, in silico docking simulations indicated that PFOA and PFOS could directly interact with HNF4α in a similar manner to endogenous fatty acids. Collectively, these results highlight HNF4α degradation as novel mechanism of PFOA and PFOS-mediated steatosis and tumorigenesis in human livers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4-Alpha in Perfluorooctanoic Acid- and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid-Induced Hepatocellular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Kevin M.; McGreal, Steven R.; McCarthy, Alex; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Lampe, Jed N.; Lau, Christoper; Apte, Udayan

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals present in a multitude of consumer products, are persistent organic pollutants. Both compounds induce hepatotoxic effects in rodents, including steatosis, hepatomegaly and liver cancer. The mechanisms of PFOA- and PFOS-induced hepatic dysfunction are not completely understood. We present evidence that PFOA and PFOS induce their hepatic effects via targeting hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α). Human hepatocytes treated with PFOA and PFOS at a concentration relevant to occupational exposure caused a decrease in HNF4α protein without affecting HNF4α mRNA or causing cell death. RNA sequencing analysis combined with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of global gene expression changes in human hepatocytes treated with PFOA or PFOS indicated alterations in the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis, several of which are regulated by HNF4α. Further investigation of specific HNF4α target gene expression revealed that PFOA and PFOS could promote cellular dedifferentiation and increase cell proliferation by down regulating positive targets (differentiation genes such as CYP7A1) and inducing negative targets of HNF4α (pro-mitogenic genes such as CCND1). Furthermore, in silico docking simulations indicated that PFOA and PFOS could directly interact with HNF4α in a similar manner to endogenous fatty acids. Collectively, these results highlight HNF4α degradation as novel mechanism of PFOA and PFOS-mediated steatosis and tumorigenesis in human livers. PMID:27153767

  11. Coincidence technique to reduce geometry and matrix effects in assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Gozani, T.; Bernatowicz, H.

    1983-01-01

    Algebraic combinations of coincidence multiplicities can be formed which are relatively independent of detection efficiency, yet proportional to the amount of nuclear material being assayed. Considering these combinations, rather than the coincidence alone as signatures, has the demonstrable advantage that the assay results are comparatively independent of sample geometry or even matrix.

  12. A recent coincidence experiment of gravitational waves with long baseline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enke; Guan, Tongren; Yu, Bo; Tang, Mengxi; Chen, Shusen; Zheng, Qingzhang; P, F. Michelson; B, E. Moskowitz; M, S. McAshan; W, M. Fairbank; M, Bassan

    1986-12-01

    The results of coincidence experiment which was carried out in the whole month of April, 1985 by two gravitational wave detectors in stanford and in Guangzhou are presented. It is found that up to sensitivity of h cong 10-16 the number of coincident events did not excess the number expected statistically.

  13. Novel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Measurements Using Phoswich Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

    2003-09-30

    The PNNL has developed an Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) for the CTBT to measure four radio-xenon isotopes using a beta-gamma coincidence counting detector. A novel method to measure beta-gamma coincidences using a phoswich detector with state-of-the-art pulse shape discrimination techniqueses has been investigated.

  14. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  15. Shift-register coincidence electronics system for thermal neutron counters

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.

    1980-04-01

    An improved shift-register, coincidence-counting logic circuit, developed for use with thermal neutron well counters, is described in detail. A distinguishing feature of the circuit is its ability to operate usefully at neutron counting rates of several hundred kHz. A portable electronics package incorporating the new coincidence logic and support circuits is also described.

  16. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lage, Eduardo Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae; Udías, Jose M.; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  17. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-14

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used.

  18. Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gissen, Paul; Arias, Irwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes form a crucially important cell layer that separates sinusoidal blood from the canalicular bile. They have a uniquely organized polarity with a basal membrane facing liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, while one or more apical poles can contribute to several bile canaliculi jointly with the directly opposing hepatocytes. Establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity is essential for many functions of hepatocytes and requires carefully orchestrated cooperation between cell adhesion molecules, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking machinery. The process of hepatocyte polarization requires energy and, if abnormal, may result in severe liver disease. A number of inherited disorders affecting tight junction and intracellular trafficking proteins have been described and demonstrate clinical and pathophysiological features overlapping those of the genetic cholestatic liver diseases caused by defects in canalicular ABC transporters. Thus both structural and functional components contribute to the final hepatocyte polarity phenotype. Many acquired liver diseases target factors that determine hepatocyte polarity, such as junctional proteins. Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood. Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases. PMID:26116792

  19. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used. PMID:26811633

  20. A precise calculation of delayed coincidence selection efficiency and accidental coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Yi; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shao-Min

    2015-05-01

    A precise background evaluation model is proposed to address the complex data structure of the delayed coincidence method, which is widely used in reactor electron-antineutrino oscillation experiments. In this model, effects from the muon veto, uncorrelated random background, and background are all studied analytically, simplifying the estimation of the systematic uncertainties of signal efficiency and accidental background rate. The results of the calculations are validated numerically with a number of simulation studies and also applied and validated in the recent Daya Bay hydrogen-capture based oscillation measurement. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2013CB834302), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11235006, 11475093), Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program (2012Z02161), and Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education.

  1. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  2. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  3. Hantavirus Prevention: Cleanup of Rodent Contamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Hantaviruses in the Americas may cause human disease involving the lungs, hence the name " hantavirus pulmonary syndrome" (HPS). Since May 1993, a...humans are also found in other rodents, but the number of cases stemming from these hantaviruses is small when compared to SNV. Hantavirus is shed in... HANTAVIRUS PREVENTION: CLEANUP OF RODENT CONTAMINATION Technical Information Paper 18-001-0306

  4. Rodent-vegetation relationships in southeastern Montana

    Treesearch

    James G. MacCracken; Daniel W. Uresk; Hansen; Richard M.

    1985-01-01

    Plant communities of southeastern Montana were surveyed for rodents over a two year period. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were the most abundant rodent species found on the study area. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster), meadow voles (M. pennsylvanicus), sagebrush voles (Lagurus curtatus...

  5. [Encapsulating hepatocytes with chitosan in physiological conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhang; Zhang, Bao; Yan, Xiluan; Lao, Xuejun; Yu, Hanry

    2006-10-01

    Prepared from 15.3% N-acetylated chitosan (FNC), half N-acetylated chitosan (HNC) possesses a good solubility in a weak basic solution, guaranteeing the formation of microcapsules by the coacervating reaction between HNC and methacrylic acid (MAA)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-methyl methacrylate (MMA) (MAA-HEMA-MMA) terpolymer under physiological conditions. When hepatocytes were encapsulated in such 3-dimensional microenvironment, as compared to monolayer culture, cell functions, including P450 activity, urea production and albumin release, were well supported. The prepared microcapsules have good mechanical stability and permeability.

  6. Persistence and accumulation of micronucleated hepatocytes in liver of rats after repeated administration of diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Kazunori; Ashizawa, Koji; Fujiishi, Yohei; Tochinai, Ryota; Okada, Emiko; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Tatemoto, Hideki; Hamada, Shuichi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2013-08-15

    A repeat-dose micronucleus assay in adult rat liver was recently developed [Mutat. Res. 747 (2012) 234-239]. This assay demonstrated a high detectability of hepatocarcinogens at relatively low doses, as indicated by dose-dependent micronucleus induction. Because the adult rat liver is known to have a long life-span, this desirable property of the assay will be an advantage in detecting micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) that have persisted for long periods in the liver following repeated dosing. However, no data directly supporting the underlying mechanisms have been published to date. In the present study, we verified the mechanisms by means of pulse-labeling of micronucleated hepatocytes with the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The rodent hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was repeatedly administered orally to male Crl:CD (SD) rats (6 weeks old) for up to 2 weeks, and EdU was injected intraperitoneally on days 1, 7, or 14. Hepatocytes were isolated by use of a non-perfusion technique at 24h, 1 week, or 2 weeks after EdU injection and analyzed for EdU incorporation and micronucleus formation. The results of our study confirmed that MNHEPs labeled with EdU on the first day of DEN administration persisted until 2 weeks post-administration in the rat livers. However, the frequency of MHNEPs among EdU-labeled hepatocytes decreased over time. In addition, the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the liver tissue increased, suggesting selective removal of micronucleated cells. Theoretical calculation of the cumulative MNHEP frequency on each of the days on which DEN was administered, taking into account the rate of loss, came out closer to the actual value observed in the liver micronucleus test. Taken together, these results indicate that although micronucleated cells induced in rat livers by administration of the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen DEN undergo selective removal, they

  7. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

    PubMed

    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-09-06

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Age-dependent hepatocyte transplantation for functional liver tissue reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Stock, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    The transplantation of hepatocytes could be an alternative therapeutic option to the whole organ transplantation for the treatment of end-stage liver diseases. However, this cell-based therapy needs the understanding of the molecular mechanisms to improve efficacy. This chapter includes a detailed method of a rat model for liver regeneration studies after age-dependent hepatocyte transplantation.

  9. The Optimization of Short-Term Hepatocyte Preservation Before Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kengo; Inagaki, Akiko; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Matsumura, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Satoru; Imura, Takehiro; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Miyagi, Shigehito; Ohashi, Kazuo; Enosawa, Shin; Kamei, Takashi; Unno, Michiaki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Satomi, Susumu; Goto, Masafumi

    2017-07-01

    No optimal methods for short-term hepatocyte preservation have been established. We have recently developed a prominent oxygen-permeable bag (Tohoku Device [TD]) for pancreatic islet culture and transplantation. In this study, we investigated whether TD is also effective for hepatocyte preservation and tried to optimize other conditions. Hepatocytes were preserved in the following conditions, and their outcomes were observed. First, the effectiveness of TD was investigated. Second, hepatocyte medium (HM) and organ preservation solutions with or without fetal bovine serum (FBS) were compared. Third, as supplementations, FBS and human serum albumin (HSA) were compared. Fourth, low, room and high temperature were compared. And finally, hepatocytes preserved in various conditions were transplanted into the subrenal capsule space of nonalbumin rats and engrafted areas were assessed. The survival rate of hepatocytes preserved in TD tended to be higher and their viability and function were maintained significantly greater than those of non-TD group. Irrespective of FBS supplementation, the survival rate of HM group was significantly higher than those of organ preservation solution group while viabilities and plating efficiency were similar among them. Although survival rates of groups without FBS were extremely low, results of HSA supplemented group were not inferior to FBS supplemented group. Hepatocytes preserved at high temperature had the worst results. The engrafted area of TD group tended to be higher than those of other groups. TD is effective for short-term hepatocyte preservation. HSA is a useful substitute for FBS, and preserving in HM at low temperature is recommended.

  10. Hepatocyte membrane water permeability measured by silicone layer filtering centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Ochoa, J Elena; García, Fabiana; Larocca, M Cecilia; Pellegrino, José M; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2002-03-01

    We previously found that hepatocytes are able to control their osmotic membrane water permeability (P(f)) by regulating the number of surface aquaporin water channels. Hepatocyte P(f) has been assessed by phase-contrast microscopy and cell image analysis, an established but relatively laborious procedure. We report here an alternative method to assess hepatocyte P(f) based on a single silicone layer filtering centrifugation system. Isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated in hypotonic or isotonic buffers containing (3)H(2)O as a tracer and, then, were filtered by rapid centrifugation through a silicone layer down to a lysis layer. Osmotically driven radioactivity (i.e., (3)H(2)O) within hepatocytes was calculated as the difference between the dpm in lysis media measured under hypotonic and isotonic conditions. The P(f) calculated from the initial slope of the radioactivity-versus-time curve was 18 microm/s at 4 degrees C. Hepatocytes treated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, to increase P(f) through the plasma membrane insertion of aquaporins, showed an increased P(f) value of 37 microm/s. The aquaporin blocker dimethyl sulfoxide selectively prevented the agonist-induced hepatocyte P(f). These data are in good agreement with the corresponding values determined by quantitative phase-contrast microscopy; thus, the method developed allows the rapid and reliable measurement of hepatocyte P(f).

  11. Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Andrzej A.; Shepherd, Alexandra N.; Clarke, David V.; Sheridan, Alison J.; Fraser, Sheena; Bartosiewicz, László

    2016-01-01

    Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have formed a part of the recent diet. Here we compare the accumulation pattern of rodent remains from four locations within and adjacent to the renowned Neolithic site of Skara Brae, Orkney, showing that those within the settlement itself were the result of deliberate human activity. The accumulation and nature of burnt bones, incorporated over an extended period within deposits of household waste, indicate that rodents were used as a nutritional resource and may have been the subject of early pest control. We, therefore, provide the first evidence for the exploitation or control of rodents by the Neolithic inhabitants of Europe. PMID:27853568

  12. Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Andrzej A; Shepherd, Alexandra N; Clarke, David V; Sheridan, Alison J; Fraser, Sheena; Bartosiewicz, László; Herman, Jeremy S

    2016-10-01

    Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have formed a part of the recent diet. Here we compare the accumulation pattern of rodent remains from four locations within and adjacent to the renowned Neolithic site of Skara Brae, Orkney, showing that those within the settlement itself were the result of deliberate human activity. The accumulation and nature of burnt bones, incorporated over an extended period within deposits of household waste, indicate that rodents were used as a nutritional resource and may have been the subject of early pest control. We, therefore, provide the first evidence for the exploitation or control of rodents by the Neolithic inhabitants of Europe.

  13. Rodent Community Structure and Andes Virus Infection in Sylvan and Peridomestic Habitats in Northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Monteverde, Martin J.; Walker, R. Susan; Douglass, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modifications of natural habitat in peridomestic rural areas could affect original rodent community composition, diversity, and evenness. In zoonoses such as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the presence of a diverse community can dilute the impact of the principal reservoir, reducing risk to humans. The goal of this study was to examine rodent community composition, abundance of Andes virus (ANDV) host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus), ANDV prevalence, and temporal variability associated with rural peridomestic settings in Patagonia, Argentina. We trapped rodents in peridomestic settings and nearby sylvan areas for 2 years. The numerically dominant species differed between peridomestic and sylvan settings. O. longicaudatus was the most abundant species in peridomestic settings (>50% of individuals). Diversity and evenness in peridomestic settings fluctuated temporally, with an abrupt decline in evenness coinciding with peaks in ANDV prevalence. The probability of finding an ANDV-positive mouse in peridomestic settings was 2.44 times greater than in sylvan habitats. Changes in rodent communities in peridomestic settings may increase the probability for human exposure to ANDV because those settings promote the presence of O. longicaudatus with high ANDV antibody prevalence. High O. longicaudatus relative abundance in an unstable community associated with peridomestic settings may favor intraspecific contact, leading to a higher probability of virus transmission. PMID:21332352

  14. Insulin internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, J.; Trankina, M.; Noel, R.; Ward, W. )

    1990-02-26

    This project was designed to determine whether neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, has a significant effect upon the pathways of ligand endocytosis in isolated rat hepatocytes. The pathways studied include receptor-mediated endocytosis and fluid-phase endocytosis. Neomycin causes a dose-dependent acceleration of {sup 125}I-insulin internalization. Since fluid-phase endocytosis can also be a significant factor in {sup 125}I-insulin internalization, lucifer yellow (LY), a marker for fluid-phase endocytosis, was incorporated into an assay similar to the {sup 125}I-insulin internalization procedure. In the presence of 5 mM neomycin, a significant increase in LY uptake was evident at 0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml of LY. At 0.8 mg/ml, a decrease in LY uptake was observed. The increased rate of {sup 125}I-insulin internalization in the presence of neomycin was intriguing. Since one action of neomycin is to inhibit phosphoinositidase C, it suggests that the phosphotidylinositol cycle may be involved in ligand internalization by hepatocytes. At low insulin concentrations, receptor-mediated uptake predominates. Fluid-phase uptake can become an important uptake route as insulin concentrations are increased. Since neomycin stimulates fluid-phase endocytosis, it must also be taken into account when measuring ligand internalization.

  15. Mechanisms of the statins cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Narges; Heidari, Reza; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Statins are potent drugs, used as lipid-lowering agents in cardiovascular diseases. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse effects of statins, and the exact mechanism of hepatotoxicity is not yet clear. In this study, the cytotoxic effects of the most commonly used statins, that is, atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin toward isolated rat hepatocytes, were evaluated. Markers, such as cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the amount of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the statin-treated hepatocytes, were investigated. It was found that the statins caused cytotoxicity toward rat hepatocytes dose dependently. An elevation in ROS formation, accompanied by a significant amount of lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial depolarization, was observed. Cellular glutathione reservoirs were decreased, and a significant amount of oxidized glutathione was formed. This study suggests that the adverse effect of statins toward hepatocytes is mediated through oxidative stress and the hepatocytes mitochondria play an important role in the statin-induced toxicity.

  16. 48-channel coincidence counting system for multiphoton experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Wei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Tao; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a coincidence counting system with 48 input channels which is aimed to count all coincidence events, up to 531 441 kinds, in a multiphoton experiment. Using the dynamic delay adjusting inside the Field Programmable Gate Array, the alignment of photon signals of 48 channels is achieved. After the alignment, clock phase shifting is used to sample signal pulses. Logic constraints are used to stabilize the pulse width. The coincidence counting data stored in a 1G bit external random access memory will be sent to the computer to analyze the amount of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coincidence events. This system is designed for multiphoton entanglement experiments with multiple degrees of freedom of photons.

  17. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R.

    1997-11-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Glycinergic inhibition tunes coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Myoga, Michael H; Lehnert, Simon; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt

    2014-05-07

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) detect microsecond differences in the arrival time of sounds between the ears (interaural time differences or ITDs), a crucial binaural cue for sound localization. Synaptic inhibition has been implicated in tuning ITD sensitivity, but the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on coincidence detection are debated. Here we determine the impact of inhibition on coincidence detection in adult Mongolian gerbil MSO brain slices by testing precise temporal integration of measured synaptic responses using conductance-clamp. We find that inhibition dynamically shifts the peak timing of excitation, depending on its relative arrival time, which in turn modulates the timing of best coincidence detection. Inhibitory control of coincidence detection timing is consistent with the diversity of ITD functions observed in vivo and is robust under physiologically relevant conditions. Our results provide strong evidence that temporal interactions between excitation and inhibition on microsecond timescales are critical for binaural processing.

  19. Glycinergic inhibition tunes coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Myoga, Michael H.; Lehnert, Simon; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) detect microsecond differences in the arrival time of sounds between the ears (interaural time differences or ITDs), a crucial binaural cue for sound localization. Synaptic inhibition has been implicated in tuning ITD sensitivity, but the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on coincidence detection are debated. Here we determine the impact of inhibition on coincidence detection in adult Mongolian gerbil MSO brain slices by testing precise temporal integration of measured synaptic responses using conductance-clamp. We find that inhibition dynamically shifts the peak timing of excitation, depending on its relative arrival time, which in turn modulates the timing of best coincidence detection. Inhibitory control of coincidence detection timing is consistent with the diversity of ITD functions observed in vivo and is robust under physiologically relevant conditions. Our results provide strong evidence that temporal interactions between excitation and inhibition on microsecond timescales are critical for binaural processing. PMID:24804642

  20. On the structure of the set of coincidence points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, A. V.; Gel'man, B. D.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the set of coincidence points for two maps between metric spaces. Cardinality, metric and topological properties of the coincidence set are studied. We obtain conditions which guarantee that this set (a) consists of at least two points; (b) consists of at least n points; (c) contains a countable subset; (d) is uncountable. The results are applied to study the structure of the double point set and the fixed point set for multivalued contractions. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  1. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection.

  2. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  3. Property of hepatitis B virus replication in Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanada, Takahiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Murakami, Shuko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Tateno, Chise; Kohara, Michinori

    2016-01-08

    The northern treeshrew (Tupaia belangeri) has been reported to be an effective candidate for animal infection model with hepatitis B virus (HBV). The objective of our study was to analyze the growth characteristics of HBV in tupaia hepatocytes and the host response to HBV infection. We established primary tupaia hepatocytes (3–6-week old tupaia) and infected them with HBV genotypes A, B and C, and all the genotypes proliferated as well as those in human primary hepatocytes (>10{sup 5} copies/ml in culture supernatant). We next generated a chimeric mouse with tupaia liver by transplantation of tupaia primary hepatocytes to urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA (cDNA-uPA)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and the replacement ratio with tupaia hepatocytes was found to be more than 95%. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV (genotypes B, C, and D) resulted in HBV-DNA level of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} copies/ml after 8 weeks of infection, which were almost similar to that in humanized chimeric mouse. In contrast, serum HBV level in adult tupaia (1-year-old tupaia) was quite low (<10{sup 3} copies/ml). Understanding the differences in the response to HBV infection in primary tupaia hepatocytes, chimeric mouse, and adult tupaia will contribute to elucidating the mechanism of persistent HBV infection and viral eradication. Thus, T. belangeri was found to be efficient for studying the host response to HBV infection, thereby providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of HBV. - Highlights: • Primary hepatocytes were established from tupaia that is a novel HBV infection model. • Tupaia primary hepatocytes were susceptible for HBV infection. • The immunodeficient chimeric mice with tupaia hepatocytes were established. • The chimeric mice with tupaia hepatocytes were susceptible for HBV infection.

  4. Neutron coincidence imaging for active and passive neutron assays

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R. J.; Brunson, G. S.; Melton, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity assay algorithms for {sup 240}Pu assume a point source of fission neutrons that are detected in a single detector channel. The {sup 240}Pu in real waste, however, is more likely to be distributed throughout the container in some random way. For different reasons, this leads to significant errors when using either multiplicity or simpler coincidence analyses. Reduction of these errors can be achieved using tomographic imaging. In this talk we report on our results from using neutron singles and coincidence data between tagged detector pairs to provide enhanced tomographic imaging capabilities to a crate nondestructive assay system. Only simulated passive coincidence data is examined here, although the higher signal rates from active coincidence counting hold more promise for waste management. The active coincidence approach has significantly better sensitivity than the passive and is not significantly perturbed by (alpha,n) contributions. Our study was based primarily on simulated neutron pulse trains derived from the Los Alamos SIM3D software, which were subjected to analysis using the Los Alamos CTEN-FIT and TGS-FIT software. We found significantly improved imaging capability using the coincidence and singles rate data than could be obtained using the singles rate alone.

  5. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  6. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-06-06

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane.

  7. Modeling panic disorder in rodents.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabrício A; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thércia G; Vicente, Maria A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-10-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a subtype of anxiety disorder in which the core phenomenon is the spontaneous occurrence of panic attacks. Although studies with laboratory animals have been instrumental for the understanding of its neurobiology and treatment, few review articles have focused on the validity of the currently used animal models for studying this psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of the present paper is to discuss the strengths and limits of these models in terms of face, construct and predictive validity. Based on the hypothesis that panic attacks are related to defensive responses elicited by proximal threat, most animal models measure the escape responses induced by specific stimuli. Some apply electrical or chemical stimulation to brain regions proposed to modulate fear and panic responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal grey or the medial hypothalamus. Other models focus on the behavioural consequences caused by the exposure of rodents to ultrasound or natural predators. Finally, the elevated T-maze associates a one-way escape response from an open arm with panic attacks. Despite some limitations, animal models are essential for a better understanding of the neurobiology and pharmacology of PD and for discovering more effective treatments.

  8. Emergency and critical care of rodents.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle G; Graham, Jennifer E

    2007-05-01

    Rodents may be presented on an emergency basis with various conditions causing debilitation and disease. Common causes of emergent presentations include trauma, respiratory disease, dental disease, gastrointestinal disease, reproductive disorders, and urinary tract obstruction. Emergency treatment should always include immediate stabilization of the patient until the patient is able to tolerate diagnostic testing and additional therapeutics. Rodent patients benefit from supportive care, including thermal, fluid, and nutritional support. Administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, antibiotics, and analgesics through various routes is also appropriate. This article presents an overview of emergency medicine in rodents, including emergency procedures, handling and restraint, triage and patient assessment, sample collection, and supportive care procedures. The most common emergency presentations for rodents are also discussed.

  9. HIV increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F.; Brockman, Mark A.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. Methods We analyzed the effect of HIV on JFH1-infected Huh 7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blot for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4) and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. Results We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, Caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Conclusions Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. They provide an additional mechanism for the observed accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV coinfection. PMID:21146890

  10. a Reflection (electron, 2ELECTRON) Coincidence Experiment for Solid Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong

    A state-of-the-art reflection (e,2e) coincidence experiment for solid surfaces has been designed, constructed, and implemented. Single crystal silicon reconstructed surfaces were studied to establish the feasibility of applying the coincidence spectroscopy technique to solid surfaces. The ultra high vacuum system necessary for clean surface studies has achieved a base pressure of 3 times 10^{-11} Torr. A narrow angle electron gun with a LaB_6 offset-cathode was designed to meet the specifications of the experiment. In order to improve the time resolution of the apparatus, so as to enhance the true-to-accidental coincidence ratio, a compensation method utilizing lens -coupled spectrometers was developed for the electron energy analyzers used in the experiment. The components of the apparatus were characterized, and the surface conditions of the sample were monitored by the spectrometer systems used in the (e,2e) experiment: energy loss spectra, silicon Auger peaks, and a limited angular range of the electron diffraction pattern from silicon have been measured. Computer control of voltage supplies to the gun and the spectrometer systems, and automatic data acquisition have been achieved for total automation of the experiment. For the first time true coincidences have been searched for on solid surfaces, using the configuration for the determination of electron momentum distributions. In the experiment, surface contamination has been found and verified. Although the observation of true coincidences was hindered due to the contamination, the accidental coincidence count rates were measured. This measurement has led to an estimate of the lower limit of the triple differential cross section for the (e,2e) reaction, which is needed to observe true coincidences. The result suggests that the experiment is feasible only if the contamination problem is overcome.

  11. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control.

  12. New method of hepatocyte transplantation and extracorporeal liver support.

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, A A; Whiting, J; Levenson, S M; Chowdhury, N R; Schechner, R; Michalski, S; Feldman, D; Chowdhury, J R

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed by the authors that allows hepatocyte attachment on collagen-coated microcarriers resulting in prolonged hepatocyte viability and function both in vivo and in vitro. Rat hepatocytes were obtained by portal vein collagenase perfusion. Intraperitoneally transplanted microcarrier-attached normal hepatocytes into congeneic Gunn rats were functioning 3-4 weeks later, as shown by the presence and persistence of conjugated bilirubin in recipient bile, sustained decrease in serum bilirubin, uptake of Tc99m-DESIDA, and morphologic criteria. Intraperitoneal transplantation of normal microcarrier-attached hepatocytes into genetically albumin deficient rats (NAR) resulted in marked increase in plasma albumin levels (6 days without and 21 days with Cyclosporin A immunosuppression). Microcarrier-attached hepatocytes transplanted after 2 weeks of storage at -80 C into congeneic Gunn rats were viable and functional as assessed by criteria outlined above. An extracorporeal liver perfusion system was developed using the microcarrier-attached hepatocytes that was capable of synthesizing and conjugating bilirubin and synthesizing liver-specific proteins. Images FIGS. 5A and B. FIG. 7. FIG. 8. FIG. 9. FIG. 12. PMID:3530153

  13. In vitro cultivation and cryopreservation of duck embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Schacke, M; Glück, B; Wutzler, P; Sauerbrei, A

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis B-virucidal testing of biocides in quantitative suspension tests using duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) requires primary duck embryonic hepatocytes for viral propagation. To improve the test system and availability of these cells, commercial culture plates with different growth surfaces were tested for cell cultivation and different approaches for cryopreservation of hepatocyte suspension were examined. After 12 days of culture, the largest amounts of hepatocytes were grown in CellBIND and TTP plates and CellBIND surface showed the lowest tendency of monolayer detachment nearly comparable with collagen 1-coated CELLCOAT plates. For cryopreservation of hepatocyte suspension, the use of growth medium supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (ME(2)SO), FCS supplemented with ME(2)SO or cryosafe-1 as cryoprotective agents provided the highest rates of surviving cells after thawing. The freezing-thawing process did not significantly reduce the susceptibility of hepatocytes to infection with DHBV. In conclusion, plates without collagen 1 such as CellBIND are recommended for cultivation of primary duck embryonic hepatocytes in infectivity experiments of DHBV for virucidal testing of biocides. The use of cryopreserved hepatocytes is possible when freshly isolated cells from the liver of duck embryos are not available.

  14. Isolation of centrolobular and perilobular hepatocytes after phenobarbital treatment

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Daily phenobarbital (PB) injections, on 3-7 consecutive days, induce an intense proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associated with a decrease of the glucose-6-phosphatase activity. This situation first affects the centrolobular hepatocytes, enhancing the degree of liver lobule heterogeneity. This experimental model was used for isolation and further subfractionation of hepatocytes on Ficoll density gradients, as described in the preceding paper. Profiles of protein, DNA, RNA, glycogen, phosphorylase, and glucose-6-phosphatase were determined all along the gradient. Two liver cell populations were distinguished: (a) light hepatocytes (mean density 1.10) present the same morphological characteristics as centrolobular cells, i.e., an abundant smooth ER composed of tubular elements, numerous small mitochondria, and few glycogen particles; (b) heavy hepatocytes (mean density 1.14) are characterized by large and compact glycogen areas and prominent rough endoplasmic cisternae, as are the perilobular cells. After incubation in the Wachstein-Meisel medium, Centrolobular hepatocytes exhibit dispersed reaction sites of glucose-6-phosphatase activity, whereas perilobular cells present a continuous and intense reaction. Morphometric determinations were carried out for both cell populations. Centrolobular PB hepatocytes are considerably enlarged (mean diameter: 23.7 mum); perilobular hepatocytes have a significantly smaller mean diameter of 19.2 mum, which is close to the values of control liver cells. PMID:167029

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes as an alternative to human adult hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Takeshi; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research have attracted much attention. The ability to generate such cells from somatic cells has implications for overcoming both immunological rejection and the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells. Hepatocytes derived from patient-specific iPS cells offer a possible solution to the shortage of cell sources in cell replacement therapy, drug screening, and disease model. Despite such great promise, however, recent articles have questioned the viability of the therapeutic applications of iPS cells. These cells must, therefore, satisfy stringent criteria prior to practical use. The main focus of this review is a description of the current status of hepatic differentiation technology of iPS cells and a discussion of the concerns regarding the practical use of these techniques in cell replacement therapy, drug screening, and disease model. The current status of strategies for generating iPS cells and the accumulated knowledge on strategies for differentiating ES cells into hepatocytes will be summarized. We also refer to the possibility of direct conversion of adult somatic cells into functional hepatocytes.

  16. Toxicogenomics directory of chemically exposed human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Marianna; Stöber, Regina M; Edlund, Karolina; Rempel, Eugen; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Widera, Agata; Madjar, Katrin; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Marchan, Rosemarie; Sachinidis, Agapios; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carmo, Helena; Arbo, Marcelo D; van de Water, Bob; Wink, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Escher, Sylvia; Hardy, Barry; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Waldmann, Tanja; Mardinoglu, Adil; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfons; Schaap, Mirjam M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; Leist, Marcel; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap, we used the Open TG-GATES database with Affymetrix files of cultivated human hepatocytes incubated with chemicals, further sets of gene array data with hepatocytes from human donors generated in this study, and publicly available genome-wide datasets of human liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). After a curation procedure, expression data of 143 chemicals were included into a comprehensive biostatistical analysis. The results are summarized in the publicly available toxicotranscriptomics directory ( http://wiki.toxbank.net/toxicogenomics-map/ ) which provides information for all genes whether they are up- or downregulated by chemicals and, if yes, by which compounds. The directory also informs about the following key features of chemically influenced genes: (1) Stereotypical stress response. When chemicals induce strong expression alterations, this usually includes a complex but highly reproducible pattern named 'stereotypical response.' On the other hand, more specific expression responses exist that are induced only by individual compounds or small numbers of compounds. The directory differentiates if the gene is part of the stereotypical stress response or if it represents a more specific reaction. (2) Liver disease-associated genes. Approximately 20 % of the genes influenced by chemicals are up- or downregulated, also in liver disease. Liver disease genes deregulated in cirrhosis, HCC, and NASH that overlap with genes of the aforementioned stereotypical chemical stress response include CYP3A7, normally expressed in fetal liver; the

  17. The contribution of N-oxidation to the metabolism of the food-borne carcinogen 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Turesky, R J; Bracco-Hammer, I; Markovic, J; Richli, U; Kappeler, A M; Welti, D H

    1990-01-01

    The metabolism of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, a potent bacterial mutagen and rodent carcinogen formed in low quantities in cooked meat and fish, was studied in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Ten metabolites were characterized by various spectroscopic methods. Sulfamate formation was the major route of metabolism in hepatocytes of untreated rats whereas ring-hydroxylated sulfuric and glucuronic acid conjugates were major metabolites in animals pretreated with the enzyme inducers Aroclor-1254, beta-naphthoflavone, or isosafrole. The formation of a mutagenic metabolite through N-oxidation, 2-(hydroxyamino)-3,8- dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (HNOH-MeIQx), was an important route of metabolism in hepatocytes of pretreated animals. Its metastable derivative, the N-hydroxy-N-glucuronide, also was detected. The nitro derivative of MeIQx, a direct-acting bacterial mutagen, was readily detoxified by glutathione transferase, forming a conjugate where the thiol group of glutathione displaced the nitro moiety. Low but detectable levels of N-acetyltransferase activity were observed for MeIQx and sulfamethazine in hepatocytes. HNOH-MeIQx and 4-(hydroxyamino)biphenyl (HNOH-ABP), a recognized human carcinogen, displayed acetyl coenzyme A dependent DNA binding in hepatic cytosol assays. Sulfamethazine decreased the DNA binding of HNOH-MeIQx in hepatocytes, suggesting a competition for acetyltransferase. However, the binding of HNOH-MeIQx to DNA in hepatocytes was independent of sulfotransferase since inhibitors of this enzyme, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP), did not diminish DNA binding. In contrast, binding of HNOH-ABP to DNA was not decreased by sulfamethazine, but binding was diminished by both sulfotransferase inhibitors. From these inhibition experiments it appears that a major route of binding of HNOH-MeIQx to DNA in hepatocytes is mediated through O-acetyltransferase while a significant portion of HNOH-ABP bound to DNA

  18. Xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation associated with constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is enhanced by pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Benoki, Satoshi; Numakura, Yuki; Kodama, Susumu; Miyata, Masaaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    Xenobiotic-responsive nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) play pivotal roles in the metabolic functions of the liver such as xenobiotics detoxification and energy metabolism. While CAR or PPARα activation induces hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocarcinogenesis in rodent models, it remains unclear whether PXR activation also shows such effects. In the present study, we have investigated the role of PXR in the xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation with or without CAR activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) and phenobarbital, or PPARα activation by Wy-14643 in mice. Treatment with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital increased the percentage of Ki-67-positive nuclei as well as mRNA levels of cell proliferation-related genes in livers as expected. On the other hand, treatment with the PXR activator pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) alone showed no such effects. Surprisingly, PCN co-treatment significantly augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by CAR activation with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital in wild-type mice but not in PXR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, PXR activation also augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by Wy-14643 treatment. Moreover, PCN treatment increased the RNA content of hepatocytes, suggesting the induction of G0/G1 transition, and reduced mRNA levels of Cdkn1b and Rbl2, encoding suppressors of cell cycle initiation. Our present findings indicate that xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation mediated by CAR or PPARα is enhanced by PXR co-activation despite that PXR activation alone does not cause the cell proliferation in mouse livers. Thus PXR may play a novel and unique role in the hepatocyte/liver hyperplasia upon exposure to xenobiotics.

  19. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsley, J.R., Hurley, J.P., Trainham, R., Keegan, R.P.

    2008-11-14

    In an extension of the Associated Particle Imaging technique that is used for the detection and imaging of hidden explosives, the present measurements use a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons in coincidence with two or more gammas to probe for the presence of fissionable materials. We have measured neutron-gamma-gamma coincidences with targets of depleted uranium, tungsten, lead, iron, and carbon and will present results that show the multiple-coincidence counting rate for the depleted uranium is substantially higher than any of the non-fissionable materials. In addition, the presence of coincidences involving delayed particle spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from that for non-fissionable ones. Information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence event is used to compute the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is compact and portable, and produces relatively low levels of background radiation. Simultaneous measurements on packages of interest for both explosives and fissionable materials are now feasible.

  20. Development of coincidence-anticipation timing in a catching task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robyn; Nauhaus, Genevieve; Glazek, Kuba; Young, Douglas; Lin, Sherry

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the effects of age, target location, and stimulus speed on coincidence-anticipation timing in a catching task. Males aged 11 to 18 years made simulated catching movements toward a light stimulus that rapidly approached the head or chest at various speeds. Coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy, movement onset times, and movement times did not differ by age. However, 17- to 18-year-olds exhibited significantly faster movement speeds than 14- to 16-year-olds. Target location (head or chest) did not affect coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy or movement speed. However, movements toward the head were initiated earlier and took longer than movements to the chest. Finally, stimulus speed had statistically significant effects on all measures: faster stimuli were associated with longer delays in coincidence-anticipation timing responses, earlier movement onset times, shorter movement times, and faster movement speeds. These results underscore the adaptability of coincidence-anticipation timing abilities for responding to stimuli under varying temporal and spatial constraints.

  1. Hepatocytic parental progenitor cells of rat small hepatocytes maintain self-renewal capability after long-term culture

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    The liver has a variety of functions for maintaining homeostasis, and hepatocytes play a major role. In contrast with the high regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes (MHs) in vivo, they have not been successfully expanded ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that CD44-positive cells sorted from small hepatocyte (SH) colonies derived from a healthy adult rat liver can proliferate on a Matrigel-coated dish in serum-free chemically defined medium; in addition, a subpopulation of the cells can divide more than 50 times in a period of 17 weeks every 4-week-passage. The passage cells retained the capability to recover highly differentiated functions, such as glycogen storage, CYP activity and bile secretion. When Matrigel-treated cells from the third passage were transplanted into retrorsine/partial hepatectomy-treated rat livers, the cells engrafted to differentiate into MHs and cholangiocytes. These results suggest that long-term cultured CD44+ SHs retain hepatocytic characteristics in vitro and the capability to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in vivo. Thus, a newly identified subpopulation of MHs possessing the attributes of hepatocytic stem/progenitor cells can be passaged several times without losing hepatocytic characteristics. PMID:28397810

  2. Implications on the cosmic coincidence by a dynamical extrinsic curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Cabral, Luis A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we apply the smooth deformation concept in order to obtain a modification of Friedmann’s equations. It is shown that the cosmic coincidence can be at least alleviated using the dynamical properties of the extrinsic curvature. We investigate the transition from nucleosynthesis to the coincidence era obtaining a very small variation of the ratio r=\\tfrac{{ρ }{{m}}}{{ρ }{{ext}}} that compares the matter energy density to extrinsic energy density, compatible with the known behavior of the deceleration parameter. We also show that the calculated ‘equivalence’ redshift matches the transition redshift from a deceleration to accelerated phase and the coincidence ceases to be. The dynamics on r is also studied based on Hubble parameter observations as the latest Baryons Acoustic Oscillations/Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (BAO/CMBR) + SNIa.

  3. Exposure of small rodents to plague during epizootics in black-tailed prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Stapp, Paul; Salkeld, Daniel J; Eisen, Rebecca J; Pappert, Ryan; Young, John; Carter, Leon G; Gage, Kenneth L; Tripp, Daniel W; Antolin, Michael F

    2008-07-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, causes die-offs of colonies of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). It has been argued that other small rodents are reservoirs for plague, spreading disease during epizootics and maintaining the pathogen in the absence of prairie dogs; yet there is little empirical support for distinct enzootic and epizootic cycles. Between 2004 and 2006, we collected blood from small rodents captured in colonies in northern Colorado before, during, and for up to 2 yr after prairie dog epizootics. We screened 1,603 blood samples for antibodies to Y. pestis, using passive hemagglutination and inhibition tests, and for a subset of samples we cultured blood for the bacterium itself. Of the four species of rodents that were common in colonies, the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) was the only species with consistent evidence of plague infection during epizootics, with 11.1-23.1% of mice seropositive for antibody to Y. pestis during these events. Seropositive grasshopper mice, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were captured the year following epizootics. The appearance of antibodies to Y. pestis in grasshopper mice coincided with periods of high prairie dog mortality; subsequently, antibody prevalence rates declined, with no seropositive individuals captured 2 yr after epizootics. We did not detect plague in any rodents off of colonies, or on colonies prior to epizootics, and found no evidence of persistent Y. pestis infection in blood cultures. Our results suggest that grasshopper mice could be involved in epizootic spread of Y. pestis, and possibly, serve as a short-term reservoir for plague, but provide no evidence that the grasshopper mouse or any small rodent acts as a long-term, enzootic host for Y. pestis in prairie dog colonies.

  4. Instrument for determining coincidence and elapse time between independent sources of random sequential events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that receives pulses from a primary external source and one or more secondary external sources and determines when there is coincidence between the primary and one of the secondary sources is described. The instrument generates a finite time window (coincidence aperture) during which coincidence is defined to have occurred. The time intervals between coincidence apertures in which coincidences occur are measured.

  5. Orthopox virus infections in Eurasian wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Paula M; Henttonen, Heikki; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kallio, Eva R; Korthase, Christian; Laakkonen, Juha; Niemimaa, Jukka; Palva, Airi; Schlegel, Mathias; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Suominen, Paula; Ulrich, Rainer G; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2011-08-01

    The genus Orthopoxvirus includes variola (smallpox) virus and zoonotic cowpox virus (CPXV). All orthopoxviruses (OPV) are serologically cross-reactive and cross-protective, and after the cessation of smallpox vaccination, CPXV and other OPV infections represent an emerging threat to human health. In this respect CPXV, with its reservoir in asymptomatically infected wild rodents, is of special importance. In Europe, clinical cowpox has been diagnosed in both humans and animals. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of OPV infections in wild rodents in different parts of Eurasia and to compare the performance of three real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in detecting OPV DNA in wildlife samples. We investigated 962 wild rodents from Northern Europe (Finland), Central Europe (Germany), and Northern Asia (Siberia, Russia) for the presence of OPV antibodies. According to a CPXV antigen-based immunofluorescence assay, animals from 13 of the 17 locations (76%) showed antibodies. Mean seroprevalence was 33% in Finland (variation between locations 0%-69%), 32% in Germany (0%-43%), and 3.2% (0%-15%) in Siberia. We further screened tissue samples from 513 of the rodents for OPV DNA using up to three real-time PCRs. Three rodents from two German and one Finnish location were OPV DNA positive. The amplicons were 96% to 100% identical to available CPXV sequences. Further, we demonstrated OPV infections as far east as the Baikal region and occurring in hamster and two other rodent species, ones previously unnoticed as possible reservoir hosts. Based on serological and PCR findings, Eurasian wild rodents are frequently but nonpersistently infected with OPVs. Results from three real-time PCR methods were highly concordant. This study extends the geographic range and wildlife species diversity in which OPV (or CPXV) viruses are naturally circulating.

  6. On the structure of the set of coincidence points

    SciTech Connect

    Arutyunov, A V; Gel'man, B D

    2015-03-31

    We consider the set of coincidence points for two maps between metric spaces. Cardinality, metric and topological properties of the coincidence set are studied. We obtain conditions which guarantee that this set (a) consists of at least two points; (b) consists of at least n points; (c) contains a countable subset; (d) is uncountable. The results are applied to study the structure of the double point set and the fixed point set for multivalued contractions. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  7. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  8. Engineering of human hepatocyte lines for cell therapies in humans: prospects and remaining hurdles.

    PubMed

    Kobayashit, Naoya; Tanaka, Noriaki

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocyte-based biological therapies are increasingly envisioned for temporary support in acute liver failure and provision of specific-liver functions in liver-based metabolic deficiency. One of the hurdles to develop such therapies is severe shortage of human livers for hepatocyte isolation. To address the issue, we have focused on reversible immortalization of human hepatocytes. Such technology can allow rapid preparation of functional and uniform human hepatocytes. Here we present our strategy to construct transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines.

  9. Engineering of Human Hepatocyte Lines for Cell Therapies in Humans: Prospects and Remaining Hurdles.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Tanaka, Noriaki

    2002-07-01

    Hepatocyte-based biological therapies are increasingly envisioned for temporary support in acute liver failure and provision of specific-liver functions in liver-based metabolic deficiency. One of the hurdles to develop such therapies is severe shortage of human livers for hepatocyte isolation. To address the issue, we have focused on reversible immortalization of human hepatocytes. Such technology can allow rapid preparation of functional and uniform human hepatocytes. Here we present our strategy to construct transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines.

  10. Population cycles in small rodents.

    PubMed

    Krebs, C J; Gaines, M S; Keller, B L; Myers, J H; Tamarin, R H

    1973-01-05

    We conclude that population fluctuations in Microtus in southern Indiana are produced by a syndrome of changes in birth and death rates similar to that found in other species of voles and lemmings. The mechanisms which cause the changes in birth and death rates are demolished by fencing the population so that no dispersal can occur. Dispersal thus seems critical for population regulation in Microtus. Because most dispersal occurs during the increase phase of the population cycle and there is little dispersal during the decline phase, dispersal is not directly related to population density. Hence the quality of dispersing animals must be important, and we have found one case of increased dispersal tendency by one genotype. The failure of population regulation of Microtus in enclosed areas requires an explanation by any hypothesis attempting to explain population cycles in small rodents. It might be suggested that the fence changed the predation pressure on the enclosed populations. However, the fence was only 2 feet (0.6 meter) high and did not stop the entrance of foxes, weasels, shrews, or avian predators. A striking feature was that the habitat in the enclosures quickly recovered from complete devastation by the start of the spring growing season. Obviously the habitat and food quality were sufficient to support Microtus populations of abnormally high densities, and recovery of the habitat was sufficiently quick that the introduction of new animals to these enclosed areas resulted in another population explosion. Finally, hypotheses of population regulation by social stress must account for the finding that Microtus can exist at densities several times greater than normal without "stress" taking an obvious toll. We hypothesize that the prevention of dispersal changes the quality of the populations in the enclosures in comparison to those outside the fence. Voles forced to remain in an overcrowded fenced population do not suffer high mortality rates and continue

  11. Toxicity of ethacrynic acid in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2002-04-01

    Ethacrynic acid, a loop diuretic drug, caused lipid peroxidation in isolated rat hepatocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation showed a good correlation with the leakage of glutamic-oxaloacetic acid transaminase (GOT) from the hepatocytes. The addition of antioxidants such as N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) and promethazine to the isolated rat hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid prevented the lipid peroxidation and decreased the GOT leakage to some extent. SKF-525A inhibited the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid and decreased the TBARS formation, suggesting that the lipid peroxidation was caused by the oxidative metabolism. The intracellular reduced glutathione markedly decreased in the hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid and the hepatocellular protein sulfhydryls were decreased, which was negatively correlated with the GOT leakage. Thus the ethacrynic acid-induced hepatotoxicity was found to be related to the lipid peroxidation and the decrease of cellular protein sulfhydryls.

  12. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts to functional and expandable hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengyu; Zhang, Ludi; Gao, Yimeng; He, Zhiying; Yao, Dan; Wu, Zhitao; Cen, Jin; Chen, Xiaotao; Liu, Changcheng; Hu, Yiping; Lai, Dongmei; Hu, Zhenlei; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Xiaojun; Pan, Guoyu; Wang, Xin; Hui, Lijian

    2014-03-06

    The generation of large numbers of functional human hepatocytes for cell-based approaches to liver disease is an important and unmet goal. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to hepatic lineages could offer a solution to this problem but so far has only been achieved with mouse cells. Here, we generated human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) from fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of FOXA3, HNF1A, and HNF4A. hiHeps express hepatic gene programs, can be expanded in vitro, and display functions characteristic of mature hepatocytes, including cytochrome P450 enzyme activity and biliary drug clearance. Upon transplantation into mice with concanavalin-A-induced acute liver failure and fatal metabolic liver disease due to fumarylacetoacetate dehydrolase (Fah) deficiency, hiHeps restore the liver function and prolong survival. Collectively, our results demonstrate successful lineage conversion of nonhepatic human cells into mature hepatocytes with potential for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Coculture and Long-Term Maintenance of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Merav; Levy, Gahl; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals, serving a wide spectrum of vital functions. Loss of liver function due to drug toxicity, progressive fatty liver disease, or viral infection is a major cause of death in the United States of America. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic toxicity screening, basic research and the development of bioartificial liver devices require long-term hepatocyte culture techniques that sustain hepatocyte morphology and function. In recent years, several techniques have been developed that can support high levels of liver-specific gene expression, metabolic function, and synthetic activity for several weeks in culture. These include the collagen double gel configuration, hepatocyte spheroids, coculture with nonparenchymal cells, and micropatterned cocultures. This chapter will cover the current status of hepatocyte culture techniques, including media formulation, oxygen supply, and heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  14. Intracytoplasmic Crystalline Inclusions in the Hepatocytes of an Antelope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hepatocytes of a 13-year-old female Thomson’s gazelle . Histologically, multifocal to coalescing areas of many hepatocytes contained large cytoplasmic...hepatocellular crystalline inclusions in a gazelle . 2. Case Description A 13-year-old female Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsoni) from a zoo was presented to...dead and had a history of severe parasitism. Postmortem examination revealed sparse body fat store in the gazelle . There was bilateral enlargement of

  15. Detection of Dichlorvos Adducts in a Hepatocyte Cell Line

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    modified targets in lysed human hepatocyte- like cells (HepaRG) using a direct liquid chromatography−mass spectrometry (LC−MS) assay of cell lysates...parasympathetic autonomic nervous system5 and the neuromuscular systems.3 Recent studies also suggest that DDVP affects non-neuronal targets in human ... human hepatocyte-like cell line (HepaRG) with DDVP. Then, we identified DDVP-modified targets in these lysates either with shotgun proteomics or with a

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone up-regulates the Adrenoleukodystrophy-related gene (ABCD2) independently of PPARalpha in rodents.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, F; Gondcaille, C; Leclercq, S; Bellenger, J; Bellenger, S; Narce, M; Pineau, T; Bonnetain, F; Savary, S

    2007-11-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal ABC transporter, ALDP, supposed to participate in the transport of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The adrenoleukodystrophy-related protein (ALDRP), which is encoded by the ABCD2 gene, is the closest homolog of ALDP and is considered as a potential therapeutic target since functional redundancy has been demonstrated between the two proteins. Pharmacological induction of Abcd2 by fibrates through the activation of PPARalpha has been demonstrated in rodent liver. DHEA, the most abundant steroid in human, is described as a PPARalpha activator and also as a prohormone able to mediate induction of several genes. Here, we explored the in vitro and in vivo effects of DHEA on the expression of peroxisomal ABC transporters. We show that Abcd2 and Abcd3 but not Abcd4 are induced in primary culture of rat hepatocytes by DHEA-S. We also demonstrate that Abcd2 and Abcd3 but not Abcd4 are inducible by an 11-day treatment with DHEA in the liver of male rodents but not in brain, testes and adrenals. Finally and contrary to Abcd3, we show that the mechanism of induction of Abcd2 is independent of PPARalpha.

  17. Ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials using disturbed coincidence conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, F.; Olfert, S.; Schröder, A.; Rautenberg, J.; Henning, B.; Moritzer, E.

    2012-05-01

    In this contribution we present a new method detecting changes in the composite material's acoustic behavior by analyzing disturbed coincidence conditions on plate-like test samples. The coincidence condition for an undamaged GFRP test sample has been experimentally identified using Schlieren measurements. Disturbances of this condition follow from a disturbed acoustic behavior of the test sample which is an indicator for local damages in the region inspected. An experimental probe has been realized consisting of two piezoceramic elements adhered to the nonparallel sides of an isosceles trapezoidal body made of silicone. The base angles of the trapezoidal body have been chosen such that the incident wave meets pre-measured condition of coincidence. The receiving element receives the geometric reflection of the acoustic wave scattered at the test sample's surface which corresponds to the non-coupled part of the incident wave as send by the sending element. Analyzing the transfer function or impulse response of the electro-acoustic system (transmitter, scattering at test sample, receiver), it is possible to detect local disturbances with respect to Cramer's coincidence rule. Thus, it is possible to realize a very simple probe for local ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials (as well as non-composite material) which can be integrated in a small practical device and is good for small size inspection areas.

  18. Study of inner-shell vacancy cascades by coincidence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, T.; Arp, U.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    An inner-shell vacancy in an atom decays by an intricate combination of Auger and fluorescence processes. The interrelation between these processes is not well understood because traditional studies of core-excited atoms focus on only one of the many particles that participate in the relaxation - largely ignoring the other components and the correlations between them. To understand these correlations we developed a coincidence technique that uses coincident detection of X-rays and electrons to select decay pathways that involve emission of both an X-ray photon and electrons. In the first application of this technique, the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum was recorded selectively in coincidence with X-ray fluorescence to eliminate the asymmetric broadening and shifting of the energy distribution which results due to post-collision interaction with K-Auger electrons. This allowed the direct observation of the interaction between the photoelectron and the decay of core holes created after the initial photoionization event. We have also applied this technique to the much more complex problem of understanding Auger-electron spectra produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell excitation. For example, we previously recorded non-coincident electron spectra of L{sub 2,3}MM Auger transitions following K-shell excitation of argon. Interpretation of these spectra is difficult because they are complicated and consist of many overlapping or unresolved Auger transitions between different ionic states.

  19. Multiple channel coincidence detector and controller for microseismic data analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-11-16

    A multiple channel coincidence detector circuit is provided for analyzing data either in real time or recorded data on a magnetic tape during an experiment for determining location and progression of fractures in an oil field or the like while water is being injected at high pressure in wells located in the field. The circuit is based upon the utilization of a set of parity generator trees combined with monostable multivibrators to detect the occurrence of two events at any pair of channel input terminals that are within a preselected time frame and have an amplitude above a preselected magnitude. The parity generators perform an exclusive OR function in a timing circuit composed of monostable multivibrators that serve to yield an output when two events are present in the preselected time frame. Any coincidences falling outside this time frame are considered either noise or not otherwise useful in the analysis of the recorded data. Input pulses of absolute magnitude below the low-level threshold setting of a bipolar low-level threshold detector are unwanted and therefore rejected. A control output is provided for a utilization device from a coincidence hold circuit that may be used to halt a tape search unit at the time of coincidence or perform other useful control functions.

  20. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  1. The Galileo/Mars Observer/Ulysses Coincidence Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    From March 21 to April 11, 1993 the Galileo, Mars Observer and Ulysses spacecraft were tracked in a coincidence experiment, searching for low-frequency (millihertz) gravitational radiation. In the spacecraft Doppler technique, the earth and a distant spacecraft act as separated test masses.

  2. Coincidence doppler broadening study in electron-irradiated polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D. J.; Zhang, J. D.; Leung, J. K. C.; Beling, C. D.; Liu, L. B.

    2007-06-01

    Coincidence doppler broadening measurements on electron-irradiated polyurethanes were performed in the presence of air. It is shown that, after a certain electron irradiation, the momentum density distributions of annihilation electrons have obvious changes for the high crosslinking polyurethane, but no significant changes have been observed for the low crosslinking polyurethane. The results were performed to analyse by irradiation crosslinking and degradation principles.

  3. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Rogers, Jeremy L.; Schweppe, John E.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-07-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in a configuration typically used for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. The specific application selected for boron-lined tube replacement in this project was one of the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) designs. This report, providing results for model development of a UNCL, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project. The current UNCL instruments utilize 3He tubes. As the first step in developing and optimizing a boron-lined proportional counter based version of the UNCL, models of eight different 3He-based UNCL detectors currently in use were developed and evaluated. A comparison was made between the simulated results and measured efficiencies for those systems with values reported in the literature. The reported experimental measurements for efficiencies and die-away times agree to within 10%.

  4. Biomechanics and functionality of hepatocytes in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shan; Song, Zhenyuan; Cotler, Scott J; Cho, Michael

    2014-06-27

    Cirrhosis is a life-threatening condition that is generally attributed to overproduction of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix that mechanically stiffens the liver. Chronic liver injury due to causes including viral hepatitis, inherited and metabolic liver diseases and external factors such as alcohol abuse can result in the development of cirrhosis. Progression of cirrhosis leads to hepatocellular dysfunction. While extensive studies to understand the complexity underlying liver fibrosis have led to potential application of anti-fibrotic drugs, no such FDA-approved drugs are currently available. Additional studies of hepatic fibrogenesis and cirrhosis primarily have focused on the extracellular matrix, while hepatocyte biomechanics has received limited attention. The role of hepatocyte biomechanics in liver cirrhosis remains elusive, and how the cell stiffness is correlated with biological functions of hepatocytes is also unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the biomechanical properties of hepatocytes are correlated with their functions (e.g., glucose metabolism), and that hepatic dysfunction can be restored through modulation of the cellular biomechanics. Furthermore, our results indicate the hepatocyte functionality appears to be regulated through a crosstalk between the Rho and Akt signaling. These novel findings may lead to biomechanical intervention of hepatocytes and the development of innovative tissue engineering for clinical treatment to target liver cells rather than exclusively focusing on the extracellular matrix alone in liver cirrhosis.

  5. General review on in vitro hepatocyte models and their applications.

    PubMed

    Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-01-01

    In vitro hepatocyte models represent very useful systems in both fundamental research and various application areas. Primary hepatocytes appear as the closest model for the liver in vivo. However, they are phenotypically unstable, have a limited life span and in addition, exhibit large interdonor variability when of human origin. Hepatoma cell lines appear as an alternative but only the HepaRG cell line exhibits various functions, including major cytochrome P450 activities, at levels close to those found in primary hepatocytes. In vitro hepatocyte models have brought a substantial contribution to the understanding of the biochemistry, physiology, and cell biology of the normal and diseased liver and in various application domains such as xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, virology, parasitology, and more generally cell therapies. In the future, new well-differentiated hepatocyte cell lines derived from tumors or from either embryonic or adult stem cells might be expected and although hepatocytes will continue to be used in various fields, these in vitro liver models should allow marked advances, especially in cell-based therapies and predictive and mechanistic hepatotoxicity of new drugs and other chemicals. All models will benefit from new developments in throughput screening based on cell chips coupled with high-content imaging and in toxicogenomics technologies.

  6. Salvianolate Protects Hepatocytes from Oxidative Stress by Attenuating Mitochondrial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Yuan; Huang, Kai; Lei, Yang; Liu, Hong-Liang; Tao, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolate is widely used to treat angiocardiopathy in clinic in China, but its application in liver diseases remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Salvianolate on rat hepatic injury by protecting hepatocyte mitochondria. To evaluate the effects of Salvianolate on injured hepatocytes, alpha mouse liver 12 (AML-12) cells were induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and treated with Salvianolate. Cell viability and MitoTracker Green for mitochondria and 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazole-carbocyanide iodine (JC-1) levels and cytochrome C (Cyto-C) expressions were detected in vitro. To identify the effect of Salvianolate on protecting against mitochondria injury, male Wistar rats were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and treated with Salvianolate (40 mg·kg−1). Serum liver function, parameters for peroxidative damage, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) of hepatocyte mitochondria were assayed. Our results showed that Salvianolate effectively protected hepatocytes, increased mitochondria vitality, and decreased Cyto-C expressions in vitro. Besides, Salvianolate alleviated the liver function, attenuated the indicators of peroxidation, and relieved the mitochondria injury in vivo. In conclusion, Salvianolate is effective in protecting hepatocytes from injury in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism might be related to its protective effect on hepatocyte mitochondria against oxidative stress. PMID:27340417

  7. Salvianolate Protects Hepatocytes from Oxidative Stress by Attenuating Mitochondrial Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Yuan; Huang, Kai; Lei, Yang; Liu, Hong-Liang; Tao, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolate is widely used to treat angiocardiopathy in clinic in China, but its application in liver diseases remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Salvianolate on rat hepatic injury by protecting hepatocyte mitochondria. To evaluate the effects of Salvianolate on injured hepatocytes, alpha mouse liver 12 (AML-12) cells were induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and treated with Salvianolate. Cell viability and MitoTracker Green for mitochondria and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole-carbocyanide iodine (JC-1) levels and cytochrome C (Cyto-C) expressions were detected in vitro. To identify the effect of Salvianolate on protecting against mitochondria injury, male Wistar rats were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and treated with Salvianolate (40 mg·kg(-1)). Serum liver function, parameters for peroxidative damage, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) of hepatocyte mitochondria were assayed. Our results showed that Salvianolate effectively protected hepatocytes, increased mitochondria vitality, and decreased Cyto-C expressions in vitro. Besides, Salvianolate alleviated the liver function, attenuated the indicators of peroxidation, and relieved the mitochondria injury in vivo. In conclusion, Salvianolate is effective in protecting hepatocytes from injury in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism might be related to its protective effect on hepatocyte mitochondria against oxidative stress.

  8. A Hedgehog Survival Pathway in ‘Undead’ Lipotoxic Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Razumilava, Nataliya; Mertens, Joachim C.; Bronk, Steve F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Ballooned hepatocytes in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) generate sonic hedgehog (SHH). This observation is consistent with a cellular phenotype in which the cell death program has been initiated but cannot be executed. Our aim was to determine if ballooned hepatocytes have potentially disabled the cell death execution machinery, and if so, can their functional biology be modeled in vitro. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on human NASH specimens. In vitro studies were performed using Huh-7 cells with shRNA targeted knockdown of caspase 9 (shC9 cells) or primary hepatocytes from caspase 3−/− mice. Results Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH display diminished expression of the caspase 9. This phenotype was modeled using shC9 cells; these cells were resistant to lipoapoptosis by palmitate (PA) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) despite lipid droplet formation. During lipid loading by either PA or LPC, shC9 cells activate JNK which via AP-1 induces SHH expression. An autocrine hedgehog survival signaling pathway was further delineated in both shC9 and caspase 3−/− cells during lipotoxic stress. Conclusion Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH downregulate caspase 9, a pivotal caspase executing the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Hepatocytes engineered to reduce caspase 9 expression are resistant to lipoapoptosis, in part, due to a hedgehog autocrine survival signaling pathway. PMID:22641094

  9. A hedgehog survival pathway in 'undead' lipotoxic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C; Werneburg, Nathan W; Razumilava, Nataliya; Mertens, Joachim C; Bronk, Steve F; Gores, Gregory J

    2012-10-01

    Ballooned hepatocytes in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) generate sonic hedgehog (SHH). This observation is consistent with a cellular phenotype in which the cell death program has been initiated but cannot be executed. Our aim was to determine whether ballooned hepatocytes have potentially disabled the cell death execution machinery, and if so, can their functional biology be modeled in vitro. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human NASH specimens. In vitro studies were performed using HuH-7 cells with shRNA targeted knockdown of caspase 9 (shC9 cells) or primary hepatocytes from caspase 3(-/-) mice. Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH display diminished expression of caspase 9. This phenotype was modeled using shC9 cells; these cells were resistant to lipoapoptosis by palmitate (PA) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) despite lipid droplet formation. During lipid loading by either PA or LPC, shC9 cells activate JNK which induces SHH expression via AP-1. An autocrine hedgehog survival signaling pathway was further delineated in both shC9 and caspase 3(-/-) cells during lipotoxic stress. Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH downregulate caspase 9, a pivotal caspase executing the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Hepatocytes engineered to reduce caspase 9 expression are resistant to lipoapoptosis, in part, due to a hedgehog autocrine survival signaling pathway. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cattle during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Takamizawa, Aya; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Endoh, Daiji; Oikawa, Shin

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cows during the transition period. Four clinically healthy, pregnant dairy cattle were used. The cows had no clinical diseases throughout this study. Blood samples were collected and livers were biopsied from the cows at 3 different times: 3 weeks before expected partition (wk -3); during parturition (wk 0), and 3 weeks (wk +3) after parturition. The damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) caused by hepatocytes was evaluated by comet assay. The apoptotic features of hepatocytes were examined by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic analyses. The hepatic triglyceride content markedly increased at wk 0 and wk +3 compared with the values at wk -3. The results of the comet assay showed increases in the mean tail moment values of hepatic cells after parturition in all cows, which suggested increased DNA damage. Histopathologically, the hepatocytes began to contain lipid droplets at wk 0 and were severely opacified at wk +3. Caspase-3-positive and single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA)-positive cells were first detected in the liver after parturition. Condensation of nuclear chromatin, a typical sign of apoptosis, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy after parturition. These results suggest that apoptosis is induced in hepatocytes of dairy cows around parturition and may result from lipotoxicity in hepatocytes.

  11. Hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cattle during the transition period

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Takamizawa, Aya; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z.; Endoh, Daiji; Oikawa, Shin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cows during the transition period. Four clinically healthy, pregnant dairy cattle were used. The cows had no clinical diseases throughout this study. Blood samples were collected and livers were biopsied from the cows at 3 different times: 3 weeks before expected partition (wk −3); during parturition (wk 0), and 3 weeks (wk +3) after parturition. The damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) caused by hepatocytes was evaluated by comet assay. The apoptotic features of hepatocytes were examined by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic analyses. The hepatic triglyceride content markedly increased at wk 0 and wk +3 compared with the values at wk −3. The results of the comet assay showed increases in the mean tail moment values of hepatic cells after parturition in all cows, which suggested increased DNA damage. Histopathologically, the hepatocytes began to contain lipid droplets at wk 0 and were severely opacified at wk +3. Caspase-3-positive and single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA)-positive cells were first detected in the liver after parturition. Condensation of nuclear chromatin, a typical sign of apoptosis, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy after parturition. These results suggest that apoptosis is induced in hepatocytes of dairy cows around parturition and may result from lipotoxicity in hepatocytes. PMID:23543948

  12. Induction of hepatocyte proliferation by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ledda-Columbano, G M; Pibiri, M; Molotzu, F; Cossu, C; Sanna, L; Simbula, G; Perra, A; Columbano, A

    2004-11-01

    Retinoids have been shown to exert an anticarcinogenic effect through suppression of the cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and/or differentiation. In rat liver, in particular, retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit regeneration after partial hepatectomy, most probably through repression of the expression of c-fos and c-jun. Surprisingly enough, in spite of the proposed therapeutic effects of all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) no data are available on its effect on normal adult liver. Here, we show that tRA administration in the diet (150 mg/kg) increased DNA synthesis in mouse liver, at 1 and 2 weeks, with a return to control values at 4 weeks (labelling index was 16.5, 8.3 and 3.3%, respectively, versus control values of 1.4, 1.3 and 2.5%). Increase in mitotic index paralleled that of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Kinetic studies showed that entry into S phase began between 24 and 48 h, with a peak between 96 and 120 h. Histological observation of the liver and biochemical evaluation of the levels of serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminases did not reveal any evidence of cell death demonstrating that increased DNA synthesis was not due to tRA-induced liver damage and regeneration, but rather the consequence of a direct mitogenic effect. In addition, analysis of total hepatic DNA content after a 7-day treatment showed a significant increase in tRA-fed mice compared with controls (21.11 mg/100 g body wt in tRA-fed mice versus 15.67 mg/100 g body wt of controls). Hepatocyte proliferation in tRA-fed mice was associated with increased hepatic levels of cyclin D1, E and A, and enhanced expression of the member of pRb family, p107. In conclusion, the results showed that tRA induces hepatocyte proliferation in the absence of cell death, similarly to other ligands of steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily. The mitogenic effect of tRA cautions about its possible use for antitumoral purposes in liver carcinogenesis.

  13. Behavioral and mechanistic insight into rodent empathy.

    PubMed

    Sivaselvachandran, Sivaani; Acland, Erinn L; Abdallah, Salsabil; Martin, Loren J

    2016-06-14

    Empathy is a psychological construct that allows individuals to understand and share the emotions of others. The ability to share emotional states relies on basic social mechanisms, such as mimicry and emotional contagion, which are considered building blocks for empathy. Mimicking another's emotional or physical state is essential for successful social interactions and is found in a number of animal species. For the current review we focus on emotional state sharing in rodents, a core feature of empathy that is often measured using pain and fear as proxies; we also discuss prosociality in rodents. The evidence for empathy in rodents shows that rats and mice consistently imitate arousal states and behaviors of conspecifics and will even sacrifice personal gain to relieve the distress of a conspecific. These behaviors support basic processes that are crucial for the survival of individual animals and give us insight into the neural mechanisms that govern empathy-related behaviors.

  14. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  15. The MAM rodent model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent models of human disease are essential to obtain a better understanding of disease pathology, the mechanism of action underlying conventional treatments, as well as for the generation of novel therapeutic approaches. There are a number of rodent models of schizophrenia based on either genetic manipulations, acute or sub-chronic drug administration, or developmental disturbances. The prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model is a developmental disruption model gaining increased attention because it displays a number of histological, neurophysiological and behavioral deficits analogous to those observed in schizophrenia patients. This unit describes the procedures required to safely induce the MAM phenotype in rats. In addition, we describe a simple behavioral procedure, amphetamine-induced hyper-locomotion, which can be utilized to verify the MAM phenotype. PMID:23559309

  16. [Application of genetic diversity in the researches on rodents].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Yang, Chun-Wen; Xu, Yan-Chun; Jin, Zhi-Min; Ma, Jian-Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Genetic diversity is the base of the species diversity and ecosystem diversity, and also the foundation for biological evolution and species differentiation. Furthermore, genetic diversity is important evidence for evaluation of biological resources of nature. The genetic diversity data from a wide variety of rodents have many complex applications. We summarized the application of rodent prevention, the origin and differentiation including evolutionary history of rodents, the potential adaptation of rodents, the dynamics of population and regulatory mechanisms, and the conservation biology of rodents. Researches in the future should focus on the systematic study on the relationships between population dynamics and genetic diversity, and long-term monitoring of genetic diversity of rodents.

  17. Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent middens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    American rodent middens have made a more dramatic contribution to understanding past environments and the development of ecological theory than Australian rodent middens. This relates to differences in the natural environment, the landscape histories, the scale and scientific approaches of the researchers. The comparison demonstrates: the power of synoptic perspectives; the value of thorough macrofossil identification in midden analysis and its potential advance in Australia where pollen has dominated analyses, the value of herbaria and reference collections; the potential of environmental databases; the importance of scientific history and 'critical research mass' and; finally, the opportunistic nature of palaeoecological research. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Denk, H.; Lackinger, E.; Zatloukal, K. ); Franke, W.W. )

    1987-11-01

    The turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides A (equivalent to No. 8 of the human cytokeratin catalog) and D (equivalent to human cytokeratin No. 18) of mouse hepatocytes was studied by pulse-labeling of mouse liver proteins after intraperitoneal injection of L-(guanido{sup 14}C)arginine and ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate. With L-(guanido-{sup 14}C)arginine a rapid increase in the specific radioactivity of both cytokeratins was observed which reached a plateau between 12 and 24 h. With ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate maximal specific radioactivity was obtained at 6 h followed by a rapid decrease to half maximum values within the subsequent 6 h and then a slower decrease. Half-lives were determined from the decrease of specific radioactivities after pulse-labeling by least-squares plots and found to be 84 h (for cytokeratin component A) and 104 h (component D) for arginine labeling . Values obtained after bicarbonate labeling were similar (95 h for A and 98 h for D). These results show that liver cytokeratins are relatively stable proteins and suggest that components A and D are synthesized and degraded at similar rates, probably in a coordinate way.

  19. Nonalcoholic Lipid Accumulation and Hepatocyte Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Juanjuan; Yao, Min; Yao, Dengbing; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuli; Yao, Dengfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is steadily increasing, highlighting its status as a public health concern, particularly due to its significant association with other comorbidities, such as diabetes. However, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a primary risk factor, with its own prevalence increasing in recent years, and it has gradually caught up with the historical primary etiological factors of infection with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, exposure to aflatoxin, or alcohol liver disease. The deeply worrisome aspects of all of these high risk factors, however, are their remarkable presence within populations. Systemic and genetic mechanisms involved in the malignant transformation of liver cells, as well as useful biomarkers of early stage HCC are being investigated. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the interrelation of NAFLD and HCC remain largely unknown. In this review, some of the recent advances in our understanding of liver lipid accumulation are summarized and discussed to provide insights into the relationship between NAFLD and hepatocyte malignant transformation. PMID:27350942

  20. HEMETβ: improvement of hepatocyte metabolism mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Orsi, G; De Maria, C; Guzzardi, M; Vozzi, F; Vozzi, G

    2011-10-01

    This article describes hepatocyte metabolism mathematical model (HEMETβ), which is an improved version of HEMET, an effective and versatile virtual cell model based on hepatic cell metabolism. HEMET is based on a set of non-linear differential equations, implemented in Simulink®, which describes the biochemical reactions and energetic cell state, and completely mimics the principal metabolic pathways in hepatic cells. The cell energy function and modular structure are the core of this model. HEMETβ as HEMET model describes hepatic cellular metabolism in standard conditions (cell culture in a plastic multi-well placed in an incubator at 37° C with 5% of CO2) and with excess substrates concentration. The main improvements in HEMETβ are the introductions of Michaelis-Menten models for reversible reactions and enzymatic inhibition. In addition, we eliminated hard non-linearities and modelled cell proliferation and every single aminoacid degradation pathway. All these innovations, combined with a user-friendly aspect, allow researchers to create new cell types and validate new experimental protocols just varying 'peripheral' pathways or model inputs.

  1. In vitro culture of isolated primary hepatocytes and stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-08-01

    Various liver diseases result in terminal hepatic failure, and liver transplantation, cell transplantation and artificial liver support systems are emerging as effective therapies for severe hepatic disease. However, all of these treatments are limited by organ or cell resources, so developing a sufficient number of functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration is a priority. Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by growth factors (GFs), cytokines, transcription factors (TFs), hormones, oxidative stress products, metabolic networks, and microRNA. It is well-known that the function of isolated primary hepatocytes is hard to maintain; when cultured in vitro, these cells readily undergo dedifferentiation, causing them to lose hepatocyte function. For this reason, most studies focus on inducing stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. In this review, we mainly focus on the nature of the liver regeneration process and discuss how to maintain and enhance in vitro hepatic function of isolated primary hepatocytes or stem cell-derived HLCs for liver regeneration. In this way, hepatocytes or HLCs may be applied for clinical use for the treatment of terminal liver diseases and may prolong the survival time of patients in the near future.

  2. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  3. Zinc Deprivation Mediates Alcohol-Induced Hepatocyte IL-8 Analog Expression in Rodents via an Epigenetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xiuhua; Song, Zhenyuan; Clemens, Dahn L.; Kang, Y. James; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil infiltration caused by IL-8 production is a central mechanism in alcohol-induced hepatitis. This study was performed to examine if an epigenetic mechanism is involved in alcohol-induced IL-8 production. Mice were pair-fed an alcohol-containing liquid diet for 4 weeks. Alcohol exposure induced hepatitis as indicated by increased expression of keratinocyte-derived cytokine (mouse IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration. Alcohol exposure induced histone 3 hyperacetylation owing to inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in association with NF-κB activation. Cell culture studies showed that alcohol exposure induced IL-8 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1, rat IL-8) production in human VL-17A cells and rat H4IIEC3 cells, respectively, dependent on acetaldehyde production, oxidative stress, and zinc release. Zinc deprivation alone induced CINC-1 production and acted synergistically with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor-α on CINC-1 production. Zinc deprivation induced histone 3 hyperacetylation at lysine 9 through suppression of HDAC activity. Zinc deprivation caused nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and reduced HDAC binding to NF-κB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that zinc deprivation caused histone 3 hyperacetylation as well as increased NF-κB binding to the CINC-1 promoter. In conclusion, inactivation of HDAC caused by zinc deprivation is a novel mechanism underlying IL-8 up-regulation in alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:21708112

  4. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  5. Water and nonelectrolyte permeability of isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Alpini, G.; Garrick, R.A.; Jones, M.J.; Nunes, R.; Tavoloni, N.

    1986-12-01

    We have measured the diffusive permeability coefficients of isolated rat hepatocytes to /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, (/sup 14/C)urea, (/sup 14/C)erythritol, (/sup 14/C)mannitol, (/sup 3/H)sucrose, and (/sup 3/H)inulin, employing a technique previously developed for erythrocytes (Redwood et al., J. Gen. Physiol 64:706-729, 1974). Diffusion coefficients for the tracer molecules were measured in packed hepatocytes, supernatant fluid, and intracellular medium (lysed hepatocytes) and were calculated assuming one-dimensional semi-infinite diffusion through a homogeneous medium. By applying the series-parallel pathway model, the following permeability coefficients (10(-5) cm/sec) for the hepatocyte plasma membrane were obtained. /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, 98.6 +/- 18.4; (/sup 14/C)urea, 18.2 +/- 5.3; (/sup 14/C)erythritol, 4.8 +/- 1.6; (/sup 14/C)mannitol, 3.1 +/- 1.4; (/sup 3/H)sucrose, 0; (/sup 3/H)inulin, 0. These results indicate that isolated rat hepatocytes are highly permeable to water and polar nonelectrolytes, when compared with other transporting epithelia. This relatively high cellular permeability is consistent with a model in which nonelectrolyte permeation is via an aqueous pathway of equivalent pore diameter of 8-12 A. The finding that (/sup 14/C)erythritol and (/sup 14/C)mannitol cross the hepatocyte plasma membrane indicates that these molecules enter the bile canaliculus through the transcellular route. Conversely, the failure of (/sup 3/H)sucrose and (/sup 3/H)inulin to permeate the hepatocyte in the isolated condition supports the concept that biliary entry of these large carbohydrates, at least that fraction which cannot be accounted for by a vesicular mechanism, must occur via the transjunctional shunt pathway.

  6. Role of macrophages in the immune response to hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, G.L.; Chen, S.; Almond, S.P.; Ascher, N.L.; Payne, W.D.; Matas, A.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of host macrophages in the development of allospecific cytolytic T cells (allo-CTLs) in response to purified allogeneic MHC Class I+, Class II- hepatocytes in vivo in hepatocyte sponge matrix allografts (HC-SMA). Depletion of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from responder splenocytes in mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte culture (MLHC) inhibits the development of allo-CTLs in response to purified hepatocytes. First the ability of sponge macrophages to function as accessory cells in indirect presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen was tested in MLHC. We found that addition of irradiated sponge cells (a source of sponge macrophages) restored the development of allo-CTLs in MLHC depleted of responder APCs. Therefore, radioresistant sponge macrophages can function as accessory cells in MLHC. We next employed silica as an immunotherapy targeted against host macrophages and assessed the effect on development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. We found that local (intrasponge) silica treatment completely inhibited the development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. Combined local and systemic silica treatment resulted in inhibition of allocytotoxicity comparable to local silica treatment alone in the doses tested. We conclude that host macrophages which infiltrate HC-SMA can function as accessory cells in vitro in MLHC and that both infiltrating host macrophages and lymphocytes participate in the development of an alloimmune response to purified hepatocytes in vivo. This interaction may involve indirect antigen presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen by macrophages to host lymphocytes which accumulate in HC-SMA.

  7. Differentiated properties of hepatocytes induced from pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Tosh, David; Shen, Chia-Ning; Slack, Jonathan M W

    2002-09-01

    Transdifferentiation of pancreas to liver is a well-recognized phenomenon and has been described in animal experiments and human pathology. We recently produced an in vitro model for the transdifferentiation (or conversion) of the pancreatic cell line AR42J-B13 to hepatocytes based on culture with dexamethasone (Dex). To determine whether the hepatocytes express markers of hepatic intermediary metabolism and detoxification, we investigated the patterns of expression of glucokinase, cytochrome P450s CYP3A1 and CYP2B1/2, testosterone/4-nitrophenol uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT), and aryl sulfotransferase. All were expressed. We also determined the expression of 2 enzymes involved in ammonia detoxification: carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CPS I) and glutamine synthetase (GS). These enzymes are normally strictly compartmentalized in liver in a wide periportal pattern and the last downstream perivenous hepatocytes, respectively. Following culture with Dex, CPS I and GS are expressed in 2 different cell populations, suggesting that both periportal and perivenous hepatocytes are induced. We also produced a reporter assay based on the activation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by the transthyretin (TTR) promoter or glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) promoter. After culture with Dex, transfected cells begin to express GFP, showing that hepatic promoters are activated in concert with the induction of the hepatocyte phenotype. Lastly, we examined the stability of the hepatic phenotype and found that some cells still express liver markers (transferrin or albumin) up to 14 days after removal of Dex. In conclusion, these results suggest that pancreatic hepatocytes produced by this method may offer an alternative model to primary cultures of hepatocytes for the study of liver function.

  8. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism in cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, A P; Rasmussen, A; Xu, L; Kaminski, D L

    1995-08-01

    In our laboratory, cultured human hepatocytes are being evaluated as an experimental system to study drug interactions. We report the effect of a known cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducer, rifampicin, on the metabolism of lidocaine by primary human hepatocytes. Rifampicin has been shown to induce CYP3A4, a major human hepatic CYP isozyme that is known to metabolize lidocaine to its primary metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. Human hepatocytes were cultured on collagen-coated plates in serum-free, hormone-supplemented Waymouth medium for a 3-day period before they were treated with rifampicin at 50 microM for 1 to 3 days. Hepatocytes isolated from five individuals were studied, and, in all cases, lidocaine metabolism was found to be induced by rifampicin, as demonstrated by a higher rate of monoethylglycinexylidide formation than concurrent controls. For three of the hepatocyte cultures, lidocaine metabolism was evaluated at various times after treatment. Induction was observed at 1 day after treatment, and reached higher levels at day 2 or 3. The level of induction was found to be approximately 100% for two hepatocyte isolations and approximately 600% for one isolation. In a separate experiment, hepatocytes were treated with rifampicin for a 2-day period. Rate of lidocaine metabolism at multiple substrate concentrations (10-120 microM) were then studied. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism (approximately 100%) was observed at all the lidocaine concentrations studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the data showed an increase in Vmax and a less significant change in Km. Induction of lidocaine metabolism by rifampicin (concentrations of 0.1-50 microM) was found to be dose-dependent, with significant induction observed at 1 microM and higher concentrations. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Search for gamma ray bursts with coincident balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A search was conducted for cosmic gamma ray bursts of small size and of sufficient frequency of occurrence to be detected during a one day observation program. Two similar detectors, successfully balloon-borne from launch sites in South Dakota and Texas, achieved about 20 hours of simultaneous operation at several millibars atmospheric depth, with continuous separation of over 1,500 km. Fluctuations of the counting rates of less than 150 keV photons with temporal structures from microseconds to several minutes were compared in order to detect coincident or associated responses from the two instruments. No coincident gamma-ray burst events were detected. The resulting integral size spectrum of small bursts, from this and from all other searches, remains a spectrum of upper limits, consistent with an extrapolation of the size spectrum of the largest known bursts, fitting a power low of index -1.5.

  10. Using CHIMERA detector at LNS for gamma-particle coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Luca, S.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Francalanza, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evaluated the quality of γ-ray angular distributions that can be extracted in particle-gamma coincidence measurements using the CHIMERA detector at LNS. γ-rays have been detected using the CsI(Tl) detectors of the spherical part of the CHIMERA array. Very clean γ-rays angular distributions were extracted in reactions induced by different stable beams impinging on 12C thin targets. The results evidenced an effect of projectile spin flip on the γ-rays angular distributions. γ-particle coincidence measurements were also performed in reactions induced by neutron rich exotic beams produced through in-flight fragmentation at LNS. In recent experiments also the Farcos array was used to improve energy and angular resolution measurements of the detected charged particles. Results obtained with both stable and radioactive beams are reported.

  11. A new opportunity: coincident spectroscopy in neutron-deficient actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Baartman, B.; Fallon, P.; Esker, N. E.; Kwarsick, J.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Pang, G.; Rissanen, J.; Nitsche, H.

    2014-09-01

    Due to high γ-ray background rates heavy element production facilities are usually not sensitive to the electron capture decay of neutron deficient actinides. We have developed new capabilities at the Berkeley Gas Filled Separator (BGS) that allow us to study these isotopes. The highly selective and efficient separation of compound nucleus evaporation residue products using the BGS couple with a rapid delivery to a low-background detector facility, opens up many new possibilities for nuclear decay and structure studies in the neutron deficient actinides. The decay of these actinides produces vacancies in the K-shell resulting in x-rays uniquely identifying the Z of the decay products. We present the first results of this new methodology in studying the nuclear structure of fermium-254 by observing the gamma rays in coincidence with fermium x-rays. Coincident gamma-decay spectroscopy gives us a new tool to study the nuclear structure of previously inaccessible systems.

  12. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Yu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Tao

    2005-12-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown.

  13. System for monitoring non-coincident, nonstationary process signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    2005-01-04

    An improved system for monitoring non-coincident, non-stationary, process signals. The mean, variance, and length of a reference signal is defined by an automated system, followed by the identification of the leading and falling edges of a monitored signal and the length of the monitored signal. The monitored signal is compared to the reference signal, and the monitored signal is resampled in accordance with the reference signal. The reference signal is then correlated with the resampled monitored signal such that the reference signal and the resampled monitored signal are coincident in time with each other. The resampled monitored signal is then compared to the reference signal to determine whether the resampled monitored signal is within a set of predesignated operating conditions.

  14. Spatial coincidence modulates interaction between visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Martin; Kolev, Vasil; Menzel, Kristina; Yordanova, Juliana

    2002-05-07

    The time course of interaction between concurrently applied visual and somatosensory stimulation with respect to evoked potentials (EPs) was studied. Visual stimuli, either in the left or right hemifield, and electric stimuli to the left wrist were delivered either alone or simultaneously. Visual and somatosensory EPs were summed and compared to bimodal EPs (BiEP, response to actual combination of both modalities). Temporal coincidence of stimuli lead to sub-additive or over-additive amplitudes in BiEPs in several time windows between 75 and 275 ms. Additional effects of spatial coincidence (left wrist with left hemifield) were found between 75 and 300 ms and beyond 450 ms. These interaction effects hint at a temporo-spatial pattern of multiple brain areas participating in the process of multimodal integration.

  15. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schoeffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Schmidt-Boecking, Horst; Doerner, Reinhard; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt and others

    2012-10-15

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 {pi} solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  16. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  17. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  18. Characteristic evaluation of a Lithium-6 loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Kaku, D; Watanabe, Y; Sagara, K

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of a (6)Li-loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer were investigated from both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The spectrometer consists of three (6)Li-glass scintillators embedded in a liquid organic scintillator BC-501A, which can detect selectively neutrons that deposit the total energy in the BC-501A using a coincidence signal generated from the capture event of thermalised neutrons in the (6)Li-glass scintillators. The relative efficiency and the energy response were measured using 4.7, 7.2 and 9.0 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. The measured ones were compared with the Monte Carlo calculations performed by combining the neutron transport code PHITS and the scintillator response calculation code SCINFUL. The experimental light output spectra were in good agreement with the calculated ones in shape. The energy dependence of the detection efficiency was reproduced by the calculation. The response matrices for 1-10 MeV neutrons were finally obtained.

  19. Quality of Coincidence Detection and Itd Tuning: a Theoretical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempter, Richard; Gerstner, Wulfram; Wagner, Hermann; van Hemmed, J. Leo

    Coincidence detector neurons increase their firing rate significantly if the input changes from random to coherent. Similarly, neurons in the avian nucleus laminaris vary their firing rate as a function of the interaural time difference (ITD). In both cases, neurons transform temporally coded input into a rate-coded output. To characterize the quality of this transformation we define a new measure, which explicitly takes noisy spike output of neurons into account. As an application, we investigate the coincidence detection properties of an integrate-and-fire (I&F) neuron in dependence on internal parameters and input statistics. We show that there is an optimal threshold and, furthermore, that there is a broad range of near-optimal threshold values. The theoretical results are applied to ITD-tuning of neurons in the laminar nucleus of the barn owl.

  20. Coincidence probabilities for spacecraft gravitational wave experiments - Massive coalescing binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Massive coalescing binary systems are candidate sources of gravitational radiation in the millihertz frequency band accessible to spacecraft Doppler tracking experiments. This paper discusses signal processing and detection probability for waves from coalescing binaries in the regime where the signal frequency increases linearly with time, i.e., 'chirp' signals. Using known noise statistics, thresholds with given false alarm probabilities are established for one- and two-spacecraft experiments. Given the threshold, the detection probability is calculated as a function of gravitational wave amplitude for both one- and two-spacecraft experiments, assuming random polarization states and under various assumptions about wave directions. This allows quantitative statements about the detection efficiency of these experiments and the utility of coincidence experiments. In particular, coincidence probabilities for two-spacecraft experiments are insensitive to the angle between the directions to the two spacecraft, indicating that near-optical experiments can be done without constraints on spacecraft trajectories.

  1. Anti-anthropic solutions to the cosmic coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrow, Joseph M.; Griest, Kim E-mail: kgriest@ucsd.edu

    2014-01-01

    A cosmological constant fits all current dark energy data, but requires two extreme fine tunings, both of which are currently explained by anthropic arguments. Here we discuss anti-anthropic solutions to one of these problems: the cosmic coincidence problem- that today the dark energy density is nearly equal to the matter density. We replace the ensemble of Universes used in the anthropic solution with an ensemble of tracking scalar fields that do not require fine-tuning. This not only does away with the coincidence problem, but also allows for a Universe that has a very different future than the one currently predicted by a cosmological constant. These models also allow for transient periods of significant scalar field energy (SSFE) over the history of the Universe that can give very different observational signatures as compared with a cosmological constant, and so can be confirmed or disproved in current and upcoming experiments.

  2. Dead time correction in coincidence counting of photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M. S.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Choi, S.-K.; Park, H. S.

    2008-08-01

    We describe two methods for evaluating the dead time of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). The dead time is obtained by measuring either the corresponding time interval in an oscilloscope trace or the relation between the single count rate and the coincidence count rate. Values for the TAC dead time are obtained in the range from 3.4 µs to 14.3 µs for the two methods with respective standard uncertainties of 2.9 × 10-8 s and 3.3 × 10-9 s. The TAC dead time is applied to the calibration of coincidence-counting measurements of optical transmission and photon-heralding efficiency.

  3. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  4. Options for Dealing With Rodent Infestations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    After removing sources of food and water and shelter, your next options are rodent traps and poisons (rodenticides). Rat or mouse traps may be lethal (snap traps) or live (cage-type), and poison baits must be placed in tamper-resistant bait stations.

  5. Rodent Depredation -- A Direct Seeding Problem

    Treesearch

    O. Gordon Langdon; William P. LeGrande

    1965-01-01

    Foresters have known for a long time that seed-eating rodents, birds, and insects must be circumvented before direct seeding can be successful. Advances have been made in reducing losses in the direct seeding of pine by the use of chemical repellents, and in several areas of the South recommended concentrations have been satisfactory. Direct seeding is now on an...

  6. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  7. Conjunctival lymphoid follicles in new world rodents.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Chodosh, James; Caire, William; Wilson, Gregory M

    2007-09-01

    We report for the first time, the detection of conjunctival lymphoid follicles (CLF) in the eyes of New World rodents. CLF were found in 7 of the 15 species examined, 6 of the 10 genera, and in at least one individual in four families of rodents. These follicles are dense collections of leukocytes in the conjunctival substantia propria with a thinned overlying epithelium lacking in goblet cells. Although the precise location of CLF within the conjunctiva varied from species to species, all CLF were found in the fornix of the conjunctival sac. In general, size and complexity of CLF varied with the size of the eye; the larger the eye, the larger and more complex the CLF. Our findings also reveal that some species of New World rodents, like the majority of Old World rodents examined in this and previous studies might lack CLF. However, until larger samples are examined, this is difficult to state with certainty. Consequently, the presence/absence of CLF at this point might not be informative for phylogenetic comparisons. Our findings also suggest the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, might serve as a useful model species for studying ocular infections and immunology of the eye.

  8. Rodent Cage Allocation | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    CCR Animal Cage Allocation Principles - 2017 Rodent cage allocations for each principal investigator (PI) are based on: Animal study design and justification BSC Recommendations Package for new tenure track or tenured investigator Average cage usage in previous fiscal years Note: The allocations largely reflect PI requirements for standard mouse caging.

  9. Methods for measuring populations of arboreal rodents.

    Treesearch

    Andrew B. Carey; Brian L. Biswell; Joseph W. Witt

    1991-01-01

    Three arboreal rodents are sensitive indicators of forest ecosystem function in the Pacific Northwest. The northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) is mycophagous, cavity-nesting, and a major prey of the spotted owl (Strix occidentalis). The red tree vole (Phenacomys longicaudus) is restricted to trees...

  10. Neutron depth profiling by large angle coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Cervena, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Havranek, V.; Fink, D.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely low concentrations of several technologically important elements (mainly lithium and boron) have been studied by a modified neutron depth profiling technique. Large angle coincidence spectroscopy using neutrons to probe solids with a thickness not exceeding several micrometers has proved to be a powerful analytical method with an excellent detection sensitivity. Depth profiles in the ppb atomic range are accessible for any solid material. A depth resolution of about 20 nanometers can be achieved.

  11. Beta-gated gamma coincidence counting with a phoswich detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.H.; Warner, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A special type of phoswich detector system has been evaluated for measurement of radionuclides which decay with emission of time coincident beta and gamma radiation. Background reductions of more than two orders of magnitude have been obtained for the energy region from 500 to 950 keV. Both NE 102 plastic scintillators and anthracene were evaluated. Advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  12. Coincidence of cerebrovascular accident and silent myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Estañol, B; Garcia-Rubi, D

    1982-11-01

    Although it is well known that a myocardial and a cerebral infarction may be coincident, the nature of this association is not clear. The problem is further complicated because the myocardial infarction may be silent. This is a report of 3 patients with cerebral infarct in whom a silent recent myocardial infarction was found. All patients with cerebrovascular disease should be screened for a possible myocardial lesion.

  13. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Al-Griw, M.A.; Alghazeer, R.O.; Al-Azreg, S.A.; Bennour, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market. PMID:27800299

  14. Liver-enriched transcription factors are critical for the expression of hepatocyte marker genes in mES-derived hepatocyte-lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Dickson, Alan J

    2009-04-23

    Induction of stem cell differentiation toward functional hepatocytes is hampered by lack of knowledge of the hepatocyte differentiation processes. The overall objective of this project is to characterize key stages in the hepatocyte differentiation process. We established a mouse embryonic stem (mES) cell culture system which exhibited changes in gene expression profiles similar to those observed in the development of endodermal and hepatocyte-lineage cells previously described in the normal mouse embryo. Transgenic mES cells were established that permitted isolation of enriched hepatocyte-lineage populations. This approach has isolated mES-derived hepatocyte-lineage cells that express several markers of mature hepatocytes including albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, tyrosine aminotransferase, cytochrome P450-3a, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. In addition, our results show that the up-regulation of the expression levels of hepatocyte nuclear factor-3alpha, -4alpha, -6, and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-beta might be critical for passage into late-stage differentiation towards functional hepatocytes. These data present important steps for definition of regulatory phenomena that direct specific cell fate determination. The mES cell culture system generated in this study provides a model for studying transition between stages of the hepatocyte development and has significant potential value for studying the molecular basis of hepatocyte differentiation in vitro.

  15. Glyphosate applications on arable fields considerably coincide with migrating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gert; Graef, Frieder; Pfeffer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate usage is increasing worldwide and the application schemes of this herbicide are currently changing. Amphibians migrating through arable fields may be harmed by Glyphosate applied to field crops. We investigated the population-based temporal coincidence of four amphibian species with Glyphosate from 2006 to 2008. Depending on a) age- and species-specific main migration periods, b) crop species, c) Glyphosate application mode for crops, and d) the presumed DT50 value (12 days or 47 days) of Glyphosate, we calculated up to 100% coincidence with Glyphosate. The amphibians regularly co-occur with pre-sowing/pre-emerging Glyphosate applications to maize in spring and with stubble management prior to crop sowing in late summer and autumn. Siccation treatment in summer coincides only with early pond-leaving juveniles. We suggest in-depth investigations of both acute and long-term effects of Glyphosate applications on amphibian populations not only focussed on exposure during aquatic periods but also terrestrial life stages.

  16. Volcanism, impact and mass extinctions: incredible or credible coincidences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rosalind V.; Saunders, Andrew D.

    2005-02-01

    Massive continental volcanism and/or bolide impacts are considered by many authors to have caused three major mass extinction events during the last 300 million years: the end-Permian, end-Cretaceous and end-Triassic extinctions. However, re-evaluation of the frequency of bolide impacts and plume-related flood basalt provinces indicates that both types of event occur much more frequently than mass extinctions, and so, in isolation, may not be responsible for the largest extinctions. Furthermore, the kill mechanisms associated with either flood basalts or impacts do not appear to be sufficiently powerful to cause worldwide collapse of ecosystems leading to the largest mass extinctions. Contemporaneous flood basalts and bolide impact may be prerequisites for the largest mass extinctions. We present a statistical analysis of the probability of coincidence between volcanism and impact, and show that three random coincidences of these events in the last 300 m.y. are likely. No causal relationship between impact and volcanism is necessary. The lesser mass extinctions, on the other hand, may not require juxtaposition of two such catastrophic events; such coincidences occurring on more than three occasions during the last 300 m.y. become increasingly unlikely.

  17. Particle-Gamma Coincidence Studies of Uranium Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Ross, T. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Burke, J. T.; Scielzo, N. D.; Basunia, M. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Casperson, R. J.; Crawford, H. L.; Munson, J.; Phair, L.; Ressler, J. J.; Stars-Liberace Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The STARS/LIBERACE array at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is proving to be an extremely versatile device for probing nuclear structure via (charged) particle- γ coincidence spectroscopy. The technique enables the properties of low- and medium-spin states up to and beyond the neutron separation energy to be probed and give rare insights into the high-level density nuclear continuum well above the pair gap. Recently, 234U, 235U, 236U and 237U were studied via (p,d) and (p,t) reactions on 236U and 238U targets. The exit channel and excitation energy of the residual nucleus are selected by measuring the outgoing charged particle using the STARS silicon telescope array, while coincident gamma rays are detected with the LIBERACE clover array. The subsequent particle spectra show the ensemble of states that were directly populated by the reaction while γ-ray coincidences reveal the decay path from a given level. Results from our recent experiment will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-06 NA26206 and DE-FG02-05 ER41379.

  18. Continuum studies in Gd nuclei by particle- γ coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Allmond, J. M.; Burke, J. T.; Phair, L. W.; Scielzo, N.; Angell, C. T.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Casperson, R. J.; Fallon, P.; Hatarik, R.; Munson, J.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Ressler, J. J.

    2011-04-01

    An experiment was carried out at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study Gd isotopes in the vicinity of the N=90 transitional region. A 25 MeV proton beam was incident on 158 / 155 / 154Gd targets and used to populate states in 152-158Gd by (p,p'), (p,d) and (p,t) reactions. The exit channel is selected by gating on charged particles using the STARS Si-Telescope array, which also gives the excitation energy of the residual nucleus. Coincident γ information is obtained using the LIBERACE Clover array. Particle- γ coincidences provide a powerful tool for probing the residual nucleus [1]. For example, particles in coincidence with a specific γ ray produce a spectrum representing all levels populated in the nucleus that subsequently decay into the state from which the γ ray originates. Results will be presented that give an insight into the population distribution of the high level density region above the pair gap in the even-even Gd nuclei via light ion reactions.

  19. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria. PMID:26982388

  20. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria.

  1. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  2. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  3. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  4. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  5. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  6. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  7. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  8. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  9. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  10. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  11. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  12. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  13. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  14. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  15. Morphology and function of isolated hepatocytes transplanted into rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Mito, M; Ebata, H; Kusano, M; Onishi, T; Saito, T; Sakamoto, S

    1979-12-01

    Hepatocytes isolated by the collagenase digestive method were transplanted into the spleens of syngeneic rats. Morphology and function of the hepatocytes in the spleen were investigated for 12 to 17 months after transplantation. The transplanted hepatocytes proliferated and reconfigured in the spleen without direct perfusion of portal venous blood and with the presence of an intact host liver. Fourteen to 17 months after transplantation, the hepatocytes which had formed a demarcated nodule occupied approximately 40% of the area of the splenic parenchyma without undifferentiation on microscopic examination. However, the weight of the hepatized spleen did not increase beyond the weight of a normal spleen and the weight of the host liver that had normal morphology also did not differ from a normal liver. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrated differentiated cord structure and normal architecture for each heptocyte. Furthermore, the hepatized spleen synthesized albumin and glycogen as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and histochemical studies. Ammonia tolerance and indocyanine green clearance tests revealed functioning hepatocytes in the spleen proper. These results indicate that our experimental model lends itself well to investigations in cell growth mechanism and that hepatocellular transplantation has potential clinical application to compensate for impaired hepatic function.

  16. Molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of chlorpromazine in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Stephanie L; Young, Cheryl; Guzdek, Anna; Zhidkov, Nickholas; O'Brien, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a member of the largest class of first-generation antipsychotic agents, is known to cause hepatotoxicity in the form of cholestasis and hepatocellular necrosis in some patients. The mechanism of CPZ hepatotoxicity is unclear, but is thought to result from reactive metabolite formation. The goal of this research was to assess potential cytotoxic mechanisms of CPZ using the accelerated cytotoxicity mechanism screening (ACMS) technique with freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. This study identified CPZ cytotoxicity and inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) to be concentration-dependent. Furthermore, inhibition of cytochrome P450s (CYPs), including CYP2D1 and 1A2, delayed CPZ cytotoxicity, suggesting a role for CYP activation of CPZ to a toxic metabolite(s) in this model. Metabolism studies also demonstrated glucuronide and glutathione (GSH) requirement for CPZ detoxification in hepatocytes. Inactivating the 2-electron reduction pathway, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), caused a significant increase in hepatocyte susceptibility to CPZ, indicating quinoneimine contribution to CPZ cytotoxicity. Nontoxic concentrations of peroxidase/H(2)O(2) (inflammatory model) increased cytotoxicity in CPZ-treated hepatocytes and caused additional mitochondrial toxicity. Inflammation further depleted GSH and increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels. Results suggest activation of CPZ to reactive metabolites by 2 pathways in hepatocytes: (i) a CYP-catalyzed quinoneimine pathway, and (ii) a peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of CPZ to CPZ radicals.

  17. Hepatitis B antigen in hepatocytes of chronic active liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, H

    1979-04-01

    To study the morphologic interrelation of hepatocytes with the replication of hepatitis B vius (HBV) and immunocompetent cells in chronic active liver disease(CALD), organ cultures were prepared from liver biopsy specimens. Replication of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) appears to occur in the nucleus of the hepatocyte in close association with intranuclear electron-dense strands and sometimes intranucleolar matrixes (likely HBcAg genomes), and cytoplasmic maturation of the HBcAg takes place in the preautolytic condition of host hepatocytes. Immunocompetent cells became progressively autolyzed in the early period of cultures. No difference in progression of hepatocyte injury in tissues from normal subjects and from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive and HBsAg-negative patients with CALD may suggest that intracellular synthesis of HBV alone is not cytopathic to host hepatocytes. This model is promising for the study of HBV replication and development, and also for testing the efficacy of new antiviral agents against the virus.

  18. Hepatocytes in collagen sandwich: evidence for transcriptional and translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The influence of extracellular matrix configuration on the tissue- specific function of cultured hepatocytes was investigated. Adult rat hepatocytes sandwiched between two layers of collagen gel were compared to cells cultured on a single layer of collagen gel for differences in the total RNA content, the level of albumin-specific mRNA, the rate of albumin gene transcription, and the rate of albumin mRNA translation. Adult hepatocytes in the sandwich system maintained the level of albumin mRNA similar to that found in the normal liver for at least six weeks, whereas the level of albumin mRNA declined rapidly in the single gel system. After one week of culture, hepatocytes in the single gel system could be induced to recover the high level of albumin mRNA and albumin production when a second layer of collagen gel was overlaid at that time. Furthermore, sandwiched hepatocytes maintained significantly higher transcriptional activity compared to cells in the single gel system. In addition to transcriptional control, the ultimate rate of albumin production was shown to depend on the rate of translation, which increased with culture time and reached a plateau in one to two weeks. This increase in translational activity over time in culture was observed in both the sandwich and the single gel systems and, thus, appeared to be independent of the configuration of extracellular matrix. PMID:1734019

  19. Strategies for short-term storage of hepatocytes for repeated clinical infusions.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Carl; Gramignoli, Roberto; Saliem, Mohammed; Zemack, Helen; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Isaksson, Bengt; Nowak, Greg; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Strom, Stephen; Ellis, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is an upcoming treatment for patients with metabolic liver diseases. Repeated cell infusions over 1-2 days improve clinical outcome. Isolated hepatocytes are usually cold stored in preservation solutions between repeated infusions. However, during cold storage isolated hepatocytes undergo cell death. We investigated if tissue preservation and repeated isolations are better than storage of isolated hepatocytes when cold preserving human hepatocytes. Liver tissue obtained from liver surgery or organ donors was divided into two pieces. Hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were analyzed directly after isolation (fresh) or after storage for 48 h at 4°C in University of Wisconsin solution (UW cells). Liver tissue from the same donor was stored at 4°C in UW and hepatocytes were isolated after 48 h (UW tissue cells). Hepatocyte viability and function was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion, plating efficiency, ammonia metabolism, CYP 1A1/2, 2C9, 3A7, and 3A4 activities, phase II conjugation, and apoptosis evaluation by TUNEL assay and caspase-3/7 activities. Hepatocytes stored in UW showed a significantly lower viability compared to fresh cells or hepatocytes isolated from tissue stored for 48 h (54% vs. 71% vs. 79%). Plating efficiency was significantly decreased for cells stored in UW (40%) compared to fresh and UW tissue cells (63% vs. 55%). No significant differences between UW cells and UW tissue cells could be shown for CYP activities or ammonia metabolism. Hepatocytes stored in UW showed a strong increase in TUNEL-positive cells, whereas TUNEL staining in cold-stored liver tissue and hepatocytes isolated after 48 h was unchanged. This observation was confirmed by increased caspase-3/7 activities in UW cells. Although preservation of isolated hepatocytes in UW maintains function, cold storage of liver tissue and repeated hepatocyte isolations is superior to cold storage of isolated hepatocytes in preserving

  20. Chemokine Receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, Differentially Regulate Exosome Release in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takanori; Freeman, Christopher M.; Schuster, Rebecca M.; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J.; Gulbins, Erich; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles released by different cell types, including hepatocytes, that play important roles in intercellular communication. We have previously demonstrated that hepatocyte-derived exosomes contain the synthetic machinery to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in target hepatocytes resulting in proliferation and liver regeneration after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We also demonstrated that the chemokine receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, regulate liver recovery and regeneration after I/R injury. In the current study, we sought to determine if the regulatory effects of CXCR1 and CXCR2 on liver recovery and regeneration might occur via altered release of hepatocyte exosomes. We found that hepatocyte release of exosomes was dependent upon CXCR1 and CXCR2. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes produced fewer exosomes, whereas CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes produced more exosomes compared to their wild-type controls. In CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes, there was increased activity of neutral sphingomyelinase (Nsm) and intracellular ceramide. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no alterations in Nsm activity or ceramide production. Interestingly, exosomes from CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no effect on hepatocyte proliferation, due to a lack of neutral ceramidase and sphingosine kinase. The data demonstrate that CXCR1 and CXCR2 regulate hepatocyte exosome release. The mechanism utilized by CXCR1 remains elusive, but CXCR2 appears to modulate Nsm activity and resultant production of ceramide to control exosome release. CXCR1 is required for packaging of enzymes into exosomes that mediate their hepatocyte proliferative effect. PMID:27551720

  1. A novel strategy for ADME screening of prodrugs: combined use of serum and hepatocytes to integrate bioactivation and clearance, and predict exposure to both active and prodrug to the systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Edmund; Hewitt, Nicola J; Buchstaller, Hans-Peter; Eggenweiler, Hans-Michael; Sirrenberg, Christian; Zimmermann, Astrid; März, Joachim; Schwartz, Harry; Saal, Christoph; Meyring, Michael; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Common strategies to optimize prodrugs use either in vitro or rodent in vivo approaches, which do not consider elimination pathways that do not result in the generation of the desired product or might be misleading because of species differences, respectively. As a step forward, we have incorporated a novel application of hepatocytes into our prodrug optimization strategy to increase the bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug candidate by attaching a charged ester linker. The model involves the incubation of hepatocytes from multiple species in serum-containing medium to mimic formation as well as simultaneous metabolism of both prodrug and active drug. Using this strategy, a correlation between the in vitro AUC and the AUC after intravenous administration was obtained for active drug formation in several species. Moreover, hepatocytes correctly predicted the likelihood of undesired exposure with nonhydrolyzed prodrug. This novel approach enabled us to identify several prodrugs, which showed improved exposure over a wide dose range. Furthermore, a strategy was developed resulting in a decision tree that can be used to determine the applicability of the hepatocyte model in the screening process.

  2. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  3. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  4. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  5. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of cytokeratin in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiromu; Cadrin, M.; French, S.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of ethanol on the phosphorylation of cytokeratins (CKs) in cultured hepatocytes since CK filaments are resulted by phosphorylation and they are abnormal in alcoholic liver disease. Hepatocytes were obtained from 14-day-old rats and cultured for 48 hrs. The hepatocytes were exposed to ethanol for 30 min. The residual insoluble cytoskeletons were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. 2D gel electrophoresis showed CK 55 and CK 49 or 8 and 18 and actin. The CKs had several isoelectric variants. The most basic spot was the dominant protein which was not phosphorylated. The more acidic spots were phosphorylated. After ethanol treatment, the phosphorylation of CK 55 and CK 49 were markedly increased over controls. They compared these results, with the effect of vasopressin, TPA and db-cAMP on the phosphorylation of CKs. Vasopressin and TPA caused the phosphorylation of CK 55 and 49 but db-cAMP did not.

  6. Loofa sponge as a scaffold for culture of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Lin, Tsung-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The dried fruit from Luffa cylindrica (loofa sponge, LS), which represents a new chitinous source material, was used as a 3-D scaffold for the culture of rat hepatocytes. With the macroporous structure and large pore size (ca. 800 microm) of LS, cell loading to the scaffold should be carried out by dynamic seeding with continuous shaking throughout the seeding period. Hepatocytes attach well to the surface of loofa fibers after seeding and maintain their round shapes. The initial ammonia removal and urea-N synthesis rates of hepatocytes immobilized within LS slightly decreased with increasing cell densities, but their metabolic activities were comparable to or better than those in monolayer culture on tissue culture polystyrene control surfaces. Both urea-N synthesis and albumin secretion rates could be maintained up to 7 days for cells immobilized within LS and spheroid-like cell aggregates could be found after the second day.

  7. Early membrane depressions in hepatocytes cultured on Primaria supports.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, B J; Evans, P J

    2001-01-01

    The topography of spreading hepatocytes on positively charged Primaria plates was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The cells acquired a uniform morphology within 2 h. The spreading was rapid and the surface of the cells showed early prominent depressions or dips. The hepatocytes had either one or two of these structures which corresponded to the frequency of mononuclear and binuclear cells, respectively. The nuclear origin of the dips was strengthened after 6 h. They contained solid structures, whose number, size and shape were the same as nucleoli. The membrane dipping was independent of cell density and took place under conditions where phenotypic changes can occur. Kidney proximal tubule cells had no dips. Co-cultures of hepatocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells showed that the cell types behave differently.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment improves hepatocyte ultrastructure in rat liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Nuket; Tasci, Ilker; Comert, Bilgin; Ocal, Ramazan; Mas, Mehmet Refik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the ultrastructural changes after ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment in hepatocytes from experimentally induced fibrotic livers. METHODS: Liver fibrosis was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with CCl4 for 12 wk, and the rats were divided into two groups. Group I was treated with saline and group II with UDCA (25 mg/kg per day) for 4 wk. All the rats were killed at wk 16. Mitochondria, nuclei, rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) of hepatocytes were evaluated according to a scoring system. RESULTS: Mitochondria, nuclei, RER and SER injury scores in group II were significantly lower than those in groupI(P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: UDCA alleviates hepatocyte organelle injury in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. PMID:18286695

  9. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-18

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro.

  10. Cytokine and chemokine expression associated with steatohepatitis and hepatocyte proliferation in rats fed ethanol via total enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Butura, Angelica; Korourian, Soheila; Shankar, Kartik; Simpson, Pippa; Badeaux, Jamie; Albano, Emanuele; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Badger, Thomas M

    2008-03-01

    To determine the temporal relationship between alcohol-induced changes in cytokines and chemokines, development of liver pathology and stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intragastrically fed low carbohydrate-containing ethanol (EtOH) diets via total enteral nutrition (TEN) for up to 49 d. Induction of EtOH metabolism and appearance of steatosis preceded development of oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death. A transitory peak of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and interferon gamma (IFN gamma) was observed at 14 d followed by reduced expression of TNFalpha, IFN gamma and another Th1 cytokine IL-12 accompanied by reduced expression of the Th1 regulators T-bet and STAT4. After 35-49 d of EtOH, at a time when hepatocyte proliferation was stimulated, IL-12 returned to control values and a second peak of TNFalpha occurred. The Th2 cytokine IL-4 remained suppressed throughout the study and was accompanied by reductions in the Th2 regulator GATA3. There was no temporal effect of EtOH on expression of IL-6 or TGFbeta. IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA were undetectable. Chemokine CXCL-2 expression increased progressively up to 35 d and preceded the appearance of inflammatory infiltrates. These data suggest that steatosis, increased ethanol metabolism, a transient induction of the innate immune response and suppression of Th2 responses were acute consequences of ethanol treatment and were followed by suppression of Th1 responses. However, the majority of necrosis, apoptosis and a late peak of TNFalpha only occurred after 6-7 weeks of ethanol, coincided with the appearance of inflammatory infiltrates and were associated with stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation.

  11. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes for transplantation: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D

    2006-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from unused donor livers are being used for transplantation in patients with acute liver failure and liver-based metabolic defects. As large numbers of hepatocytes can be prepared from a single liver and hepatocytes need to be available for emergency and repeated treatment of patients it is essential to be able to cryopreserve and store cells with good thawed cell function. This review considers the current status of cryopreservation of human hepatocytes discussing the different stages involved in the process. These include pre-treatment of cells, freezing solution, cryoprotectants and freezing and thawing protocols. There are detrimental effects of cryopreservation on hepatocyte structure and metabolic function, including cell attachment, which is important to the engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes have been successfully used in clinical transplantation, with evidence of replacement of missing function. Further optimisation of hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols is important for their use in hepatocyte transplantation.

  12. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  13. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  14. Intrasplenic transplantation of allogeneic hepatocytes prolongs survival in anhepatic rats.

    PubMed

    Arkadopoulos, N; Lilja, H; Suh, K S; Demetriou, A A; Rozga, J

    1998-11-01

    To examine whether hepatocytes transplanted in the spleen can function as an ectopic liver, we performed hepatocyte transplantation in rats that were rendered anhepatic. Total hepatectomy was performed by using a novel single-stage technique. Following hepatectomy, Group 1 rats (n = 16) were monitored until death to determine survival time without prior intervention. Group 2 anhepatic rats (n = 20) were sacrificed at various times to measure blood hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) levels. Group 3 (n = 16) rats received intrasplenic injection of isolated hepatocytes (2.5 x 10(7) cells/rat) followed by total hepatectomy after 3 days. Group 4 (n = 12) sham-transplanted rats received intrasplenic saline infusion, and after 3 days they were rendered anhepatic. Group 2, 3, and 4 rats were maintained on daily Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg; intramuscularly). Group 1 anhepatic rats survived for 22.4 +/- 5.2 hours (standard deviation). The anhepatic state was associated with a progressive and statistically significant rise in blood HGF and TGF-beta1 levels. Rats that received hepatocyte transplantation before total hepatectomy had a significantly longer survival time than sham-transplanted anhepatic controls (34.1 +/- 8.5 vs. 15.5 +/- 4.8 hrs, P < .01). Additionally, at 12 hours post-hepatectomy, transplanted rats had significantly lower blood ammonia, prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and TGF-beta1 levels when compared with sham-transplanted controls. In conclusion, intrasplenic transplantation of allogeneic hepatocytes prolonged survival, improved blood chemistry, and lowered blood TGF-beta1 levels in rats rendered anhepatic.

  15. In vivo hepatocyte MR imaging using lactose functionalized magnetoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ketkar-Atre, Ashwini; Struys, Tom; Dresselaers, Tom; Hodenius, Michael; Mannaerts, Inge; Ni, Yicheng; Lambrichts, Ivo; Van Grunsven, Leo A; De Cuyper, Marcel; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel lactose functionalized magnetoliposomes (MLs) as an MR contrast agent to target hepatocytes as well as to evaluate the targeting ability of MLs for in vivo applications. In the present work, 17 nm sized iron oxide cores functionalized with anionic MLs bearing lactose moieties were used for targeting the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-r), which is highly expressed in hepatocytes. Non-functionalized anionic MLs were tested as negative controls. The size distribution of lactose and anionic MLs was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). After intravenous administration of both MLs, contrast enhancement in the liver was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Label retention was monitored non-invasively by MRI and validated with Prussian blue staining and TEM for up to eight days post MLs administration. Although the MRI signal intensity did not show significant differences between functionalized and non-functionalized particles, iron-specific Prussian blue staining and TEM analysis confirmed the uptake of lactose MLs mainly in hepatocytes. In contrast, non-functionalized anionic MLs were mainly taken up by Kupffer and sinusoidal cells. Target specificity was further confirmed by high-resolution MR imaging of phantoms containing isolated hepatocytes, Kupffer cell (KCs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) fractions. Hypointense signal was observed for hepatocytes isolated from animals which received lactose MLs but not from animals which received anionic MLs. These data demonstrate that galactose-functionalized MLs can be used as a hepatocyte targeting MR contrast agent to potentially aid in the diagnosis of hepatic diseases if the non-specific uptake by KCs is taken into account. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  17. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  18. Evidence for two Ca2(+)-mobilizing purinoceptors on rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, C J; Woods, N M; Cuthbertson, K S; Cobbold, P H

    1990-01-01

    Aequorin measurements of cytosolic free Ca2+ in single rat hepatocytes show that ADP and ATP, thought to act through the same P2Y purinoceptor, elicited very different responses in the majority of cells tested. ADP invariably induced transients of short duration (approx. 9 s), whereas ATP induced either similar transients or transients with a much longer duration (approx. 49 s). We explain this variability in terms of two separate purinoceptors on rat hepatocytes, one of which responds to either ATP or ADP to generate free-Ca2+ transients of short duration, and the other responds to ATP only, with transients of longer duration. PMID:2386488

  19. Epigenetic Modifications as Antidedifferentiation Strategy for Primary Hepatocytes in Culture.

    PubMed

    Bolleyn, Jennifer; Fraczek, Joanna; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    A well-known problem of cultured primary hepatocytes is their rapid dedifferentiation. During the last years, several strategies to counteract this phenomenon have been developed, of which changing the in vitro environment is the most popular one. However, mimicking the in vivo setting in vitro by adding soluble media additives or the restoration of both cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is not sufficient and only delays the dedifferentiation process instead of counteracting it. In this chapter, new strategies to prevent the deterioration of the liver-specific phenotype of primary hepatocytes in culture by targeting the (epi)genetic mechanisms that drive hepatocellular gene expression are described.

  20. Coculture with mesenchymal stem cells results in improved viability and function of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Emer; Wu, Yue; Dhadda, Paramjeet; Hughes, Robin D; Mitry, Ragai R; Qin, Hong; Lehec, Sharon C; Heaton, Nigel D; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is becoming an accepted therapy for acute liver failure, either as a bridge to liver regeneration or to organ transplantation. Hepatocytes provide liver function in place of the failing organ. The maintenance of sufficient viability and function of the transplanted hepatocytes is a concern. There is a lot of recent interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the provision of structural and trophic support to hepatocytes, but few studies currently use primary human hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate if coculture of human MSCs with cryopreserved human hepatocytes may improve their function and viability, thus with potential for cellular therapy of liver disease. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord or adipose tissue. Hepatocytes were isolated from donor organs unsuitable for transplantation. MSCs and hepatocytes were cocultured in both direct and indirect contact. Conditioned medium (CM) from cocultured MSCs and hepatocytes was also used on hepatocytes. Viability and liver-specific function were compared between test and controls. Human hepatocytes that were cocultured directly with MSCs demonstrated improved production of albumin from day 5 to day 25 of culture. This effect was most prominent at day 15. Likewise, urea production was improved in coculture from day 5 to 25. Indirect coculture demonstrated improved albumin production by day 4 (1,107 ng/ml) versus hepatocyte monoculture (940 ng/ml). Hepatocytes in CM demonstrated a nonsignificant improvement in function. The viability of cocultured hepatocytes was superior to that of monocultured cells with up to a 16% improvement. Thus, coculture of human hepatocytes with MSCs demonstrates both improved function and viability. The effect is seen mainly with direct coculture but can also be seen in indirect culture and with CM. Such coculture conditions may convey major advantages in hepatocyte survival and function for cell transplantation.

  1. The ZEPLIN-III anti-coincidence veto detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Araújo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; Edwards, B.; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lüscher, R.; Lyons, K.; Majewski, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neves, F.; Paling, S. M.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Preece, R.; Quenby, J. J.; Reichhart, L.; Scovell, P. R.; Solovov, V. N.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ≃0.4 to ≃0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for γ-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 10 -8 pb to be probed.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of paramyxoviruses in Zambian wild rodents and shrews.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michihito; Muleya, Walter; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Moonga, Ladslav; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-01

    Rodents and shrews are known to harbour various viruses. Paramyxoviruses have been isolated from Asian and Australian rodents, but little is known about them in African rodents. Recently, previously unknown paramyxovirus sequences were found in South African rodents. To date, there have been no reports related to the presence and prevalence of paramyxoviruses in shrews. We found a high prevalence of paramyxoviruses in wild rodents and shrews from Zambia. Semi-nested reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to detect paramyxovirus RNA in 21 % (96/462) of specimens analysed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these viruses were novel paramyxoviruses and could be classified as morbillivirus- and henipavirus-related viruses, and previously identified rodent paramyxovirus-related viruses. Our findings suggest the circulation of previously unknown paramyxoviruses in African rodents and shrews, and provide new information regarding the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of paramyxoviruses.

  3. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany Y; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    2014-10-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models.

  4. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  5. Data acquisition and analysis software for gamma coincidence spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Martin; Şahin, Dağıstan

    2016-01-01

    Coincidence counting in neutron activation analysis has well-known advantages, most importantly improvement of detection limits. One obstacle to the wider use of this technique is the complexity of the data acquisition and reduction systems that it requires. The usual approaches to multi-detector data acquisition incur significant dead-time, involve redundant work in repeatedly developing limited tools and risk potential errors in low-level code. The paper describes progress made in developing a software framework to address these shortcomings. PMID:27325905

  6. Enhanced Photofission-based, Coincidence/Multiplicity Inspection Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; D.R. Norman; K.J. Haskell; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W.H. Geist; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman

    2010-07-01

    An enhanced active interrogation system has been developed that integrates a transportable Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system, using a pulsed bremsstrahlung source and a reconfigurable neutron detection system, with a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) list-mode data acquisition system. A series of active interrogation experiments have shown enhanced nuclear material detection and identification utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator. This paper describes the integrated inspection system and presents some key shielded and unshielded nuclear material inspection results. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security and possible nuclear weapon dismantlement treaties.

  7. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aucott, Timothy; Brand, Alexander; DiPrete, David

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  8. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  9. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  10. Coincidence problem in YM field dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    The coincidence problem is studied in the effective Yang Mills condensate dark energy model. As the effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by quantum field theory, there is no adjustable parameter in this model except the energy scale, and the cosmic evolution only depends on the initial conditions. For generic initial conditions with the YM condensate subdominant to the radiation and matter, the model always has a tracking solution, the Universe transits from matter-dominated into the dark energy dominated stage only recently z˜0.3, and evolve to the present state with Ω˜0.73 and Ω˜0.27.

  11. Correlated multiphoton holes: absence of multiphoton coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Afek, I; Ambar, O; Silberberg, Y

    2010-08-27

    We generate bipartite states of light which exhibit an absence of multiphoton coincidence events between two modes amid a constant background flux. These "correlated photon holes" are produced by mixing a coherent state and relatively weak spontaneous parametric down-conversion by using a balanced beam splitter. Correlated holes with arbitrarily high photon numbers may be obtained by adjusting the relative phase and amplitude of the inputs. We measure states of up to five photons and verify their nonclassicality. The scheme provides a route for observation of high-photon-number nonclassical correlations without requiring intense quantum resources.

  12. Enhanced PET resolution by combining pinhole collimation and coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFilippo, Frank P.

    2015-10-01

    Spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is limited by detector design and photon non-colinearity. Although dedicated small animal PET scanners using specialized high-resolution detectors have been developed, enhancing the spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is of interest as a more available alternative. Multi-pinhole 511 keV SPECT is capable of high spatial resolution but requires heavily shielded collimators to avoid significant background counts. A practical approach with clinical PET detectors is to combine multi-pinhole collimation with coincidence detection. In this new hybrid modality, there are three locations associated with each event, namely those of the two detected photons and the pinhole aperture. These three locations over-determine the line of response and provide redundant information that is superior to coincidence detection or pinhole collimation alone. Multi-pinhole collimation provides high resolution and avoids non-colinearity error but is subject to collimator penetration and artifacts from overlapping projections. However the coincidence information, though at lower resolution, is valuable for determining whether the photon passed near a pinhole within the cone acceptance angle and for identifying through which pinhole the photon passed. This information allows most photons penetrating through the collimator to be rejected and avoids overlapping projections. With much improved event rejection, a collimator with minimal shielding may be used, and a lightweight add-on collimator for high resolution imaging is feasible for use with a clinical PET scanner. Monte Carlo simulations were performed of a 18F hot rods phantom and a 54-pinhole unfocused whole-body mouse collimator with a clinical PET scanner. Based on coincidence information and pinhole geometry, events were accepted or rejected, and pinhole-specific crystal-map projections were generated. Tomographic images then were reconstructed using a conventional pinhole SPECT

  13. Slow earthquakes coincident with episodic tremors and slow slip events.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiro; Obara, Kazushige; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Sekine, Shutaro; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2007-01-26

    We report on the very-low-frequency earthquakes occurring in the transition zone of the subducting plate interface along the Nankai subduction zone in southwest Japan. Seismic waves generated by very-low-frequency earthquakes with seismic moment magnitudes of 3.1 to 3.5 predominantly show a long period of about 20 seconds. The seismicity of very-low-frequency earthquakes accompanies and migrates with the activity of deep low-frequency tremors and slow slip events. The coincidence of these three phenomena improves the detection and characterization of slow earthquakes, which are thought to increase the stress on updip megathrust earthquake rupture zones.

  14. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  15. Rodent models of TDP-43: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, William; Jeong, Yun Ha; Lin, Sophie; Ling, Jonathan; Price, Donald L.; Chiang, Po-Min; Wong, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, missense mutations in the gene TARDBP encoding TDP-43 have been linked to familial ALS. The discovery of genes encoding these RNA binding proteins, such as TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, raised the notion that altered RNA metabolism is a major factor underlying the pathogenesis of ALS. To begin to unravel how mutations in TDP-43 cause dysfunction and death of motor neurons, investigators have employed both gain- and loss-of-function studies in rodent model systems. Here, we will summarize major findings from the initial sets of TDP-43 transgenic and knockout rodent models, identify their limitations, and point to future directions toward clarification of disease mechanism(s) and testing of therapeutic strategies that ultimately may lead to novel therapy for this devastating disease. PMID:22608070

  16. REVIEW: GENETIC MANIPULATION OF THE RODENT PLACENTA

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Stephen J.; Rumi, M.A. Karim; Soares, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The principal role of the placenta is the maintenance of pregnancy and promotion of fetal growth and viability. The use of transgenic rodents has greatly enhanced our understanding of placental development and function. However, embryonic lethality is often a confounding variable in determining whether a genetic modification adversely affected placental development. In these cases, it is beneficial to specifically manipulate the placental genome. The purpose of this review is to summarize available methodologies for specific genetic modification of the rodent placenta. By restricting genetic alterations to the trophoblast lineage, it is possible to gain a deeper understanding of placental development that perhaps will lead to gene-targeted therapies to rescue irregular placentation in transgenic animals or in women at high-risk for placenta-associated pregnancy complications. PMID:21256588

  17. Learning in the Rodent Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andrew J; Liu, Haixin; Komiyama, Takaki

    2017-03-31

    The motor cortex is far from a stable conduit for motor commands and instead undergoes significant changes during learning. An understanding of motor cortex plasticity has been advanced greatly using rodents as experimental animals. Two major focuses of this research have been on the connectivity and activity of the motor cortex. The motor cortex exhibits structural changes in response to learning, and substantial evidence has implicated the local formation and maintenance of new synapses as crucial substrates of motor learning. This synaptic reorganization translates into changes in spiking activity, which appear to result in a modification and refinement of the relationship between motor cortical activity and movement. This review presents the progress that has been made using rodents to establish the motor cortex as an adaptive structure that supports motor learning. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 40 is July 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  18. Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Agnes M.; Lagakos, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments are discussed and presented with the goal of avoiding dosage group biases related to cage location. Considerations in selecting a cage design are first discussed in general terms. Specific designs are presented for use in experiments involving three, four, and five dose groups and with one, four, and five rodents per cage. Priorities for balancing treatment groups include horizontal position on shelf and shelf of rack, nearest neighbor balance, and male–female balance. It is proposed that these balance criteria be considered together with practical issues, such as the ability to accurately conform to a design and to determine a sensible and efficient design for each experiment. PMID:17539183

  19. Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, A M; Lagakos, S W

    1992-01-01

    Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments are discussed and presented with the goal of avoiding dosage group biases related to cage location. Considerations in selecting a cage design are first discussed in general terms. Specific designs are presented for use in experiments involving three, four, and five dose groups and with one, four, and five rodents per cage. Priorities for balancing treatment groups include horizontal position on shelf and shelf of rack, nearest neighbor balance, and male-female balance. It is proposed that these balance criteria be considered together with practical issues, such as the ability to accurately conform to a design and to determine a sensible and efficient design for each experiment. PMID:1295494

  20. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Barbara A; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E; Drake, John M

    2015-06-02

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States.

  1. Genetic detection of hantaviruses in rodents, Albania.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Rogozi, Elton; Velo, Enkelejda; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Bino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In order to have a first insight into the epidemiology of hantaviruses in Albania, 263 small mammals (248 rodents, 15 insectivores) were captured in 352 locations in 29 districts and tested for hantavirus infection. Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) was detected in 10 of 148 (6.7%) Apodemus flavicollis rodents. DOBV-positive A. flavicollis were detected in six districts (Diber, Korce, Kolonje, Librazhd, Pogradec, and Vlore). The obtained nucleotide sequences were highly similar to each other and to DOBV sequences from northwestern Greece. Understanding the epidemiology of hantaviruses and identifying the endemic foci enables the public health strategies to minimize the risk of human infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1309-1313, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Lin; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Yun-Xi; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Pan-He; Bian, Chang-Ling; Dumler, J. Stephen; Yang, Hong; Zuo, Shu-Qing; Chu, Chen-Yi; Liu, Wei; Richardus, Jan H.; Habbema, J. Dik F.

    2010-01-01

    To characterize the strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in wild and domestic animals in China, we isolated the organism from rodents and sheep in northeastern China. We isolated 3 strains (2 from rodents and 1 from sick sheep) through propagation in BALB/c mice and then cell culture in HL60 cells. The 3 isolates were identified by Wright-Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence, and electronic microscopy and were characterized by sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, partial citrate synthase gene, major surface protein 4 gene, and heat shock protein gene. The multiple sequences of the 3 isolates were identical to each other but different from all known strains from other countries. The public health and veterinary relevance of the isolates deserves further investigation. PMID:20409364

  3. MRI of neuronal plasticity in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Galit

    2011-01-01

    Modifications in the behavior and architecture of neuronal networks are well documented to occur in association with learning and memory, as well as following injury. These plasticity mechanisms are crucial to ensure adequate processing of stimuli, and they also dictate the degree of recovery following peripheral or central nervous system injury. Nevertheless, the underlying neuronal mechanisms that determine the degree of plasticity of neuronal pathways are not fully understood. Recent developments in animal-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and related hardware afford a high spatial and temporal resolution, making functional MRI and manganese-enhanced MRI emerging tools for studying reorganization of neuronal pathways in rodent models. Many of the observed changes in neuronal functions in rodent's brains following injury discussed here agree with clinical human fMRI findings. This demonstrates that animal model imaging can have a significant clinical impact in the neuronal plasticity and rehabilitation arenas.

  4. Leptospira interrogans in Rodents from Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Plata-Luis, Josué; Foronda, Pilar; Martín-Alonso, Aaron; Feliu, Carlos; Alves, Joana; Gil, Horacio; Valladares, Basilio

    2016-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that can infect both animals and humans. In most cases, leptospirosis is a nonspecific self-limiting illness, but some patients can develop a severe form with a high mortality. This study was carried out in Santiago Island, Cape Verde, in 2012-2013. A total of 62 wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus domesticus) were analyzed. The lipL32 gene, present only in pathogenic Leptospira spp., was amplified by PCR, and 16 samples were positive (25.8%). In both rodent species, Leptospira interrogans was identified. The results show the presence of pathogenic Leptospira in the three localities analyzed in Santiago. The presence of L. interrogans demonstrates a serious health risk for the population, since this species has been associated with the most severe form of leptospirosis, the Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage.

  5. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  6. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    50,000) 88 3.4 Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus in Anopheles stephensi. Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPV) are identified by the production of...microsporidia or viruses , the presence of CPV was detected. Since this virus interferes radically with the transmission of rodent malaria, it was...80 28. SPN strain 83 29. P.y.niqeriensis NIG strain 86 30. P.y.yoelii 17X strain 87 3.4 Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus in A.stephensi 89 4

  7. Evidence for Novel Hepaciviruses in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly; Coutard, Bruno; Adam, Alexander; Ritz, Daniel; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van Riel, Debby; Kallies, Rene; Klose, Stefan M.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Rupp, Daniel; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schlegel, Mathias; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Krüger, Detlev H.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Hemachudha, Thiravat; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Osterrieder, Klaus; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Matthee, Sonja; Beer, Martin; Kuiken, Thijs; Reusken, Chantal; Leroy, Eric M.; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species); and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species). Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8%) of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and 10 (1.9%) of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio). Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%). Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage efforts to

  8. Non-viral FoxM1 gene delivery to hepatocytes enhances liver repopulation.

    PubMed

    Xiang, D; Liu, C-C; Wang, M-J; Li, J-X; Chen, F; Yao, H; Yu, B; Lu, L; Borjigin, U; Chen, Y-X; Zhong, L; Wangensteen, K J; He, Z-Y; Wang, X; Hu, Y-P

    2014-05-22

    Hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute strategy of orthotopic liver transplantation is being studied for treating end-stage liver diseases. Several technical hurdles must be overcome in order to achieve the therapeutic liver repopulation, such as the problem of insufficient expansion of the transplanted hepatocytes in recipient livers. In this study, we analyzed the application of FoxM1, a cell-cycle regulator, to enhance the proliferation capacity of hepatocytes. The non-viral sleeping beauty (SB) transposon vector carrying FoxM1 gene was constructed for delivering FoxM1 into the hepatocytes. The proliferation capacities of hepatocytes with FoxM1 expression were examined both in vivo and in vitro. Results indicated that the hepatocytes with FoxM1 expression had a higher proliferation rate than wild-type (WT) hepatocytes in vitro. In comparison with WT hepatocytes, the hepatocytes with FoxM1 expression had an enhanced level of liver repopulation in the recipient livers at both sub-acute injury (fumaryl acetoacetate hydrolase (Fah)(-/-) mice model) and acute injury (2/3 partial hepatectomy mice model). Importantly, there was no increased risk of tumorigenicity with FoxM1 expression in recipients even after serial transplantation. In conclusion, expression of FoxM1 in hepatocytes enhanced the capacity of liver repopulation without inducing tumorigenesis. FoxM1 gene delivered by non-viral SB vector into hepatocytes may be a viable approach to promote therapeutic repopulation after hepatocyte transplantation.

  9. Fate tracing of mature hepatocytes in mouse liver homeostasis and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Malato, Yann; Naqvi, Syed; Schürmann, Nina; Ng, Raymond; Wang, Bruce; Zape, Joan; Kay, Mark A.; Grimm, Dirk; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence has contradicted the prevailing view that homeostasis and regeneration of the adult liver are mediated by self duplication of lineage-restricted hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells. These new data suggest that liver progenitor cells do not function solely as a backup system in chronic liver injury; rather, they also produce hepatocytes after acute injury and are in fact the main source of new hepatocytes during normal hepatocyte turnover. In addition, other evidence suggests that hepatocytes are capable of lineage conversion, acting as precursors of biliary epithelial cells during biliary injury. To test these concepts, we generated a hepatocyte fate-tracing model based on timed and specific Cre recombinase expression and marker gene activation in all hepatocytes of adult Rosa26 reporter mice with an adenoassociated viral vector. We found that newly formed hepatocytes derived from preexisting hepatocytes in the normal liver and that liver progenitor cells contributed minimally to acute hepatocyte regeneration. Further, we found no evidence that biliary injury induced conversion of hepatocytes into biliary epithelial cells. These results therefore restore the previously prevailing paradigms of liver homeostasis and regeneration. In addition, our new vector system will be a valuable tool for timed, efficient, and specific loop out of floxed sequences in hepatocytes. PMID:22105172

  10. Gene expression analysis of a porcine hepatocyte/bile duct in vitro differentiaion model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A serum-free, feeder-cell-dependent, inductive differentiation culture system of porcine hepatocytes and bile ductules was analyzed for differential gene expression on a porcine genome microarray. Primary cultures of baby pig hepatocytes (BPH) were matured in culture as a monolayer of hepatocytes w...

  11. Hepatobiliary disposition of 17-OHPC and taurocholate in fetal human hepatocytes: a comparison with adult human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C S; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R; Caritis, Steve N; Hines, Ronald N; Venkataramanan, Raman; Strom, Stephen C

    2013-02-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [(3)H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults.

  12. Hepatobiliary Disposition of 17-OHPC and Taurocholate in Fetal Human Hepatocytes: A Comparison with Adult Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C. S.; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Hines, Ronald N.; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [3H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults. PMID:23129211

  13. Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-wei; Sun, Guang-dong; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shu-jun; Wang, Ji; Xu, Xiao-hong; Miao, Li-ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM), is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23671868

  14. Geometric Morphometrics of Rodent Sperm Head Shape

    PubMed Central

    Varea Sánchez, María; Bastir, Markus; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa, particularly those of rodent species, are extremely complex cells and differ greatly in form and dimensions. Thus, characterization of sperm size and, particularly, sperm shape represents a major challenge. No consensus exists on a method to objectively assess size and shape of spermatozoa. In this study we apply the principles of geometric morphometrics to analyze rodent sperm head morphology and compare them with two traditional morphometry methods, that is, measurements of linear dimensions and dimensions-derived parameters calculated using formulae employed in sperm morphometry assessments. Our results show that geometric morphometrics clearly identifies shape differences among rodent spermatozoa. It is also capable of discriminating between size and shape and to analyze these two variables separately. Thus, it provides an accurate method to assess sperm head shape. Furthermore, it can identify which sperm morphology traits differ between species, such as the protrusion or retraction of the base of the head, the orientation and relative position of the site of flagellum insertion, the degree of curvature of the hook, and other distinct anatomical features and appendices. We envisage that the use of geometric morphometrics may have a major impact on future studies focused on the characterization of sperm head formation, diversity of sperm head shape among species (and underlying evolutionary forces), the effects of reprotoxicants on changes in cell shape, and phenotyping of genetically-modified individuals. PMID:24312234

  15. Rodent models for compulsive alcohol intake

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, F. Woodward; Lesscher, Heidi M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Continued seeking and drinking of alcohol despite adverse legal, health, economic, and societal consequences is a central hallmark of human alcohol use disorders. This compulsive drive for alcohol, defined by resistance to adverse and deleterious consequences, represents a major challenge when attempting to treat alcoholism clinically. Thus, there has long been interest in developing pre-clinical rodent models for the compulsive drug use that characterizes drug addiction. Here, we review recent studies that have attempted to model compulsive aspects of alcohol and cocaine intake in rodents, and consider technical and conceptual issues that need to be addressed when trying to recapitulate compulsive aspects of human addiction. Aversion-resistant alcohol intake has been examined by pairing intake or seeking with the bitter tastant quinine or with footshock, and exciting recent work has used these models to identify neuroadaptations in the amygdala, cortex, and striatal regions that promote compulsive intake. Thus, rodent models do seem to reflect important aspects of compulsive drives that sustain human addiction, and will likely provide critical insights into the molecular and circuit underpinnings of aversion-resistant intake as well as novel therapeutic interventions for compulsive aspects of addiction. PMID:24731992

  16. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  17. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  18. Cross-correlation in the auditory coincidence detectors of owls.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Brian J; Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2008-08-06

    Interaural time difference (ITD) plays a central role in many auditory functions, most importantly in sound localization. The classic model for how ITD is computed was put forth by Jeffress (1948). One of the predictions of the Jeffress model is that the neurons that compute ITD should behave as cross-correlators. Whereas cross-correlation-like properties of the ITD-computing neurons have been reported, attempts to show that the shape of the ITD response function is determined by the spectral tuning of the neuron, a core prediction of cross-correlation, have been unsuccessful. Using reverse correlation analysis, we demonstrate in the barn owl that the relationship between the spectral tuning and the ITD response of the ITD-computing neurons is that predicted by cross-correlation. Moreover, we show that a model of coincidence detector responses derived from responses to binaurally uncorrelated noise is consistent with binaural interaction based on cross-correlation. These results are thus consistent with one of the key tenets of the Jeffress model. Our work sets forth both the methodology to answer whether cross-correlation describes coincidence detector responses and a demonstration that in the barn owl, the result is that expected by theory.

  19. Cross-Correlation in the Auditory Coincidence Detectors of Owls

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Brian J.; Christianson, G.Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD) plays a central role in many auditory functions, most importantly in sound localization. The classic model for how ITD is computed was put forth by Jeffress (1948). One of the predictions of the Jeffress model is that the neurons that compute ITD should behave as cross-correlators. Whereas cross-correlation-like properties of the ITD-computing neurons have been reported, attempts to show that the shape of the ITD response function is determined by the spectral tuning of the neuron, a core prediction of cross-correlation, have been unsuccessful. Using reverse correlation analysis, we demonstrate in the barn owl that the relationship between the spectral tuning and the ITD response of the ITD-computing neurons is that predicted by cross-correlation. Moreover, we show that a model of coincidence detector responses derived from responses to binaurally uncorrelated noise is consistent with binaural interaction based on cross-correlation. These results are thus consistent with one of the key tenets of the Jeffress model. Our work sets forth both the methodology to answer whether cross-correlation describes coincidence detector responses and a demonstration that in the barn owl, the result is that expected by theory. PMID:18685035

  20. Interacting quintessence, the coincidence problem, and cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huey, Greg; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2006-07-01

    Faced by recent evidence for a flat universe dominated by dark energy, cosmologists grapple with deep cosmic enigmas such as the cosmological constant problem, extreme fine-tuning and the cosmic coincidence problem. The extent to which we observe the dimming of distant supernovae suggests that the cosmic acceleration is as least as severe as in cosmological constant models. Extrapolating this to our cosmic future implies terrifying visions of either a cold and empty universe or an explosive demise in a “Big Rip.” We construct a class of dynamical scalar field models of dark energy and dark matter. Within this class we can explain why supernovae imply a cosmic equation of state w≲-1, address fine-tuning issues, protect the universe from premature acceleration and predict a constant fraction of dark energy to dark matter in the future (thus solving the coincidence problem), satisfy the dominant energy condition, and ensure that gravitationally bound objects remain so forever (avoid a Big Rip). This is achieved with a string theory inspired Lagrangian containing standard kinetic terms, exponential potentials and couplings, and parameters of order unity.

  1. Coincidence-anticipation timing requirements are different in racket sports.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Selçuk; Devrilmez, Erhan; Kirazci, Sadettin

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy of athletes of different racket sports with various stimulus velocity requirements. Ninety players (15 girls, 15 boys for each sport) from tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.4), badminton (M age = 12.5 yr., SD = 1.4), and table tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.2) participated in this study. Three different stimulus velocities, low, moderate, and high, were used to simulate the velocity requirements of these racket sports. Tennis players had higher accuracy when they performed under the low stimulus velocity compared to badminton and table tennis players. Badminton players performed better under the moderate speed comparing to tennis and table tennis players. Table tennis players had better performance than tennis and badminton players under the high stimulus velocity. Therefore, visual and motor systems of players from different racket sports may adapt to a stimulus velocity in coincidence-anticipation timing, which is specific to each type of racket sports.

  2. X-ray spectroscopy to determine line coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy in the 12-15 A region of L-shell lines from selected transition elements was performed in a joint Naval Research Laboratory - KMS Fusion, Inc. experiment. The accurate wavelengths determined in this work will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future X-ray lasing schemes. Specifically, high-resolution X-ray spectra were collected under controlled geometric and target conditions using both red and green light laser excitation in the KMS Chroma laser. Three groups of X-ray spectra were collected with highly-dispersive X-ray crystals at wavelengths centered at 12.543, 13.781 and 14.458 A corresponding to He- and H-like lines from fluorine. Two specially-designed flat crystal spectrographs employing film shutters were used with pairs of beryl and TAP crystals. The spectra from potential lasant and pump candidates could be recorded on the same spectrogram to aid in identifying X-ray line coincidences. In cases where wavelengths were measured in both the red and green laser work, agreement within 1-3 mA was obtained for the L-series X-ray lines. Within this accuracy range, five L series X-ray lines, mostly 2p-3d transitions from the metals Cr, Mn, and Ni, had wavelength values coincident to K-series lines in fluorine.

  3. Alpha Coincidence Detection for the Assay of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha

    2013-11-15

    Abstract – Interferences in both decay counting and mass counting techniques limit their application for some environmental monitoring applications. For example, 238U interferes with 238Pu in mass spectrometry measurements, while in conventional alpha spectroscopy measurements it is nearly impossible to separate 238Pu from 241Am and 239Pu from 240Pu. These interferences are typically resolved by using chemical separation and/or different measurement techniques for different isotopes. We are investigating radiation detector concepts to simultaneously assay these four isotopes with minimal sample preparation by exploiting radiation signatures measured in coincidence with the typical alpha decays of these isotopes. Particles in coincidence with the alpha decay include conversion electrons, gamma rays, x-rays, and Auger electrons. Each decay has a unique energy distribution enabling the separation of the isotopes. We are exploring two basic detector concepts to achieve these goals: a silicon-based design and a gas-detector design. The silicon system provides the potential for higher energy resolution at the cost of lower efficiency compared to a gas detector. In this paper, we will describe our evaluation of the different detector concepts, which will include detection efficiency, ability to resolve the isotopes, sample preparation and equipment requirements.

  4. Improved β-γ Coincidence Detector For Radioxenon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W; Carman, April J; Hayes, James C; Heimbigner, Tom R; Hubbard, Charles W; Litke, Kevin E; McIntyre, Justin I; Morris, Scott J; Ripplinger, Michael D; Suarez, Reynold

    2005-08-31

    The Automated Radio-xenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes. ARSA is very sensitive to 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe due to the compact high efficiency coincidence detector it uses. For this reason it is an excellent treaty monitoring and environmental sampling device. Although the system is shown to be both robust and reliable, based on several field tests, it is also complex due to a detailed photomultiplier tube gain matching regime. This complexity is a problem from a maintenance and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) standpoint. To reduce these issues a simplified coincident detector has been developed. A comparison of three different well detectors has been completed. In addition, a new plastic scintillator gas cell was constructed. The new simplified detector system has been demonstrated to equal or better performance compared with the original ARSA design in spectral resolution and efficiency and significantly easier to setup and calibrate.

  5. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per {mu}Ci/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 {mu}s, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for {sup 18}F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  6. CSF biomarkers cutoffs: the importance of coincident neuropathological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Brettschneider, Johannes; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E.; Hu, William T.; Xie, Sharon X.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of applying clinical versus neuropathological diagnosis and the inclusion of cases with coincident neuropathological diagnoses have not been assessed specifically when studying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker classification cutoffs for patients with neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. Thus, 142 neuropathologically diagnosed neurodegenerative dementia patients [71 Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 29 frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 3 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 dementia with Lewy bodies, 32 of which cases also had coincident diagnoses] were studied. 96 % had enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) CSF data and 77 % had Luminex CSF data, with 43 and 46 controls for comparison, respectively. Aβ42, total, and phosphorylated tau181 were measured. Clinical and neuropathological diagnoses showed an 81.4 % overall agreement. Both assays showed high sensitivity and specificity to classify AD subjects against FTLD subjects and controls, and moderate sensitivity and specificity for classifying FTLD subjects against controls. However, among the cases with neuropathological diagnoses of AD plus another pathology (26.8 % of the sample), 69.4 % (ELISA) and 96.4 % (Luminex) were classified as AD according to their biomarker profiles. Use of clinical diagnosis instead of neuropathological diagnosis led to a 14–17 % underestimation of the biomarker accuracy. These results show that while CSF Aβ and tau assays are useful for diagnosis of AD and neurodegenerative diseases even at MCI stages, CSF diagnostic analyte panels that establish a positive diagnosis of Lewy body disease and FTLD are also needed, and must be established based on neuropathological rather than clinical diagnoses. PMID:22526019

  7. Instrumentation for coincidence imaging with multihead scintillation cameras.

    PubMed

    Patton, J A

    2000-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used as a tool by investigators for many years to study metabolic processes in the body primarily with the radiopharmaceutical 18-fluordeoxyglucose. However, use of this technology has not been widespread because of the high expense of the equipment and its limitation to the imaging of positron emitters only. Recent improvements in scintillation camera technology have now made it possible to produce hybrid multihead cameras that can function in a coincidence mode for the detection of the annihilation radiation from positron emitters and in the normal mode for routine single-photon imaging. Although still limited in sensitivity, these camera systems continue to be improved and the recent addition of iterative reconstruction algorithms and attenuation correction capability have resulted in significant improvements in image quality. The integration of a low resolution computed tomography (CT) scanner with a dualhead camera by 1 manufacturer now makes it possible to perform attenuation correction and image fusion of anatomy and function into 1 image to improve the anatomic localization of abnormalities detected with coincidence imaging. Investigators continue to work on improved electronics and new types of detectors to further improve the sensitivity of these systems. These developments coupled with continued improvements in PET technology have resulted in the availability of a broad spectrum of systems for the investigator to consider when purchasing a system with positron imaging capability.

  8. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  9. Investigating Coincidence Techniques in Biomedical Applications of Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Gramer, R.; Tandel, S. K.; Reinhardt, C. J.

    2004-05-01

    While neutron activation analysis has been widely used in biomedical applications for some time, the use of non-radioactive tracer techniques, to monitor, for example, organ blood flow, is more recent. In these studies, pre-clinical animal models are injected with micro-spheres labeled with stable isotopes of elements that have a high neutron absorption cross-section. Subsequently, samples of blood and/or tissue from different locations in the body are subjected to neutron activation analysis to measure the propagation of the labeled micro-spheres through the body. Following irradiation, the counting (with high-resolution Ge detectors) is typically delayed by a few days to dissipate short-lived activity in the samples and improve signal-to-noise for the peaks of interest in the activation spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coincidence techniques (for isotopes which decay via two-photon cascades) could improve signal-to-noise and turn-around times. The samples were irradiated at the 1 MW research reactor at the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory. The analysis of the multi-parameter coincidence data recorded in event-mode will be presented and compared with the standard method of recording singles spectra.

  10. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  11. Neonatal lead exposure impairs development of rodent barrel field cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.; Goldstein, Gary W.; Blue, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    Childhood exposure to low-level lead can permanently reduce intelligence, but the neurobiologic mechanism for this effect is unknown. We examined the impact of lead exposure on the development of cortical columns, using the rodent barrel field as a model. In all areas of mammalian neocortex, cortical columns constitute a fundamental structural unit subserving information processing. Barrel field cortex contains columnar processing units with distinct clusters of layer IV neurons that receive sensory input from individual whiskers. In this study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 0.2, 1, 1.5, or 2 g/liter lead acetate in their dam's drinking water from birth through postnatal day 10. This treatment, which coincides with the development of segregated columns in the barrel field, produced blood lead concentrations from 1 to 31 μg/dl. On postnatal day 10, the area of the barrel field and of individual barrels was measured. A dose-related reduction in barrel field area was observed (Pearson correlation = −0.740; P < 0.001); mean barrel field area in the highest exposure group was decreased 12% versus controls. Individual barrels in the physiologically more active caudoventral group were affected preferentially. Total cortical area measured in the same sections was not altered significantly by lead exposure. These data support the hypothesis that lead exposure may impair the development of columnar processing units in immature neocortex. We demonstrate that low levels of blood lead, in the range seen in many impoverished inner-city children, cause structural alterations in a neocortical somatosensory map. PMID:10805810

  12. Reprogramming the Cell Cycle for Endoreduplication in Rodent Trophoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    MacAuley, Alasdair; Cross, James C.; Werb, Zena

    1998-01-01

    Differentiation of trophoblast giant cells in the rodent placenta is accompanied by exit from the mitotic cell cycle and onset of endoreduplication. Commitment to giant cell differentiation is under developmental control, involving down-regulation of Id1 and Id2, concomitant with up-regulation of the basic helix-loop-helix factor Hxt and acquisition of increased adhesiveness. Endoreduplication disrupts the alternation of DNA synthesis and mitosis that maintains euploid DNA content during proliferation. To determine how the mammalian endocycle is regulated, we examined the expression of the cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases during the transition from replication to endoreduplication in the Rcho-1 rat choriocarcinoma cell line. We cultured these cells under conditions that gave relatively synchronous endoreduplication. This allowed us to study the events that occur during the transition from the mitotic cycle to the first endocycle. With giant cell differentiation, the cells switched cyclin D isoform expression from D3 to D1 and altered several checkpoint functions, acquiring a relative insensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and a coincident serum independence. The initiation of S phase during endocycles appeared to involve cycles of synthesis of cyclins E and A, and termination of S was associated with abrupt loss of cyclin A and E. Both cyclins were absent from gap phase cells, suggesting that their degradation may be necessary to allow reinitiation of the endocycle. The arrest of the mitotic cycle at the onset of endoreduplication was associated with a failure to assemble cyclin B/p34cdk1 complexes during the first endocycle. In subsequent endocycles, cyclin B expression was suppressed. Together these data suggest several points at which cell cycle regulation could be targeted to shift cells from a mitotic to an endoreduplicative cycle. PMID:9529378

  13. Pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile inhibits rodent liver fibrogenesis via PXR (pregnane X receptor)-dependent and PXR-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Carylyn J.; Tucker, Steven J.; Konstantinou, Dimitrios K.; Elrick, Lucy J.; Haefner, Dee; Sigalas, Charalambos; Murray, Graeme I.; Goodwin, Bryan; Wright, Matthew C.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of liver growth stimulation [using the rodent PXR (pregnane X receptor) activator PCN (pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile)] in rats chronically treated with carbon tetrachloride to cause repeated hepatocyte necrosis and liver fibrogenesis was examined. PCN did not inhibit the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride. However, transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells and the extent of fibrosis caused by carbon tetrachloride treatment was significantly inhibited by PCN in vivo. In vitro, PCN directly inhibited hepatic stellate cell transdifferentiation to a profibrogenic phenotype, although the cells did not express the PXR (in contrast with hepatocytes), suggesting that PCN acts independently of the PXR. Mice with a functionally disrupted PXR gene (PXR−/−) did not respond to the antifibrogenic effects of PCN, in contrast with wild-type (PXR+/+) mice, demonstrating an antifibrogenic role for the PXR in vivo. However, PCN inhibited the transdifferentiation of PXR−/−-derived mouse hepatic stellate cells in vitro, confirming that there is also a PXR-independent antifibrogenic effect of PCN through a direct interaction with hepatic stellate cells. These data suggest that the PXR is antifibrogenic in rodents in vivo and that a PXR-independent target for PXR activators exists in hepatic stellate cells that also functions to inhibit fibrosis. PMID:15595924

  14. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  15. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  16. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device. PMID:27600213

  17. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  18. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  19. Application of multivariate analysis to optimize function of cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christina; Hwang, Daehee; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N; Yarmush, Martin L; Stephanopoulos, George

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the metabolic and regulatory pathways of hepatocytes is important for biotechnological applications involving liver cells, including the development of bioartificial liver (BAL) devices. To characterize intermediary metabolism in the hepatocytes, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was applied to elucidate the changes in intracellular pathway fluxes of primary rat hepatocytes exposed to human plasma and to provide a comprehensive snapshot of the hepatic metabolic profile. In the current study, the combination of preconditioning and plasma supplementation produced distinct metabolic states. Combining the metabolic flux distribution obtained by MFA with methodologies such as Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) and partial least squares or projection to latent structures (PLS) provided insights into the underlying structure and causal relationship within the data. With the aid of these analyses, patterns in the cellular response of the hepatocytes that contributed to the separation of the different hepatic states were identified. Of particular interest was the recognition of distal pathways that strongly correlated with a particular hepatic function. The hepatic functions investigated were intracellular triglyceride accumulation and urea production. This study illustrates a framework for optimizing hepatic function and a possibility of identifying potential targets for improving hepatic functions.

  20. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  1. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  2. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  3. A Microfabricated Platform for Generating Physiologically-Relevant Hepatocyte Zonation

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, William J.; Usta, O. Berk; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver models have been important tools for more than 40 years for academic research and preclinical toxicity screening by the pharmaceutical industry. Hepatocytes, the highly metabolic parenchymal cells of the liver, are efficient at different metabolic chemistries depending on their relative spatial location along the sinusoid from the portal triad to the central vein. Although replicating hepatocyte metabolic zonation is vitally important for physiologically-relevant in vitro liver tissue and organ models, it is most often completely overlooked. Here, we demonstrate the creation of spatially-controlled zonation across multiple hepatocyte metabolism levels through the application of precise concentration gradients of exogenous hormone (insulin and glucagon) and chemical (3-methylcholanthrene) induction agents in a microfluidic device. Observed gradients in glycogen storage via periodic acid-Schiff staining, urea production via carbamoyl phosphatase synthetase I staining, and cell viability after exposure to allyl alcohol and acetaminophen demonstrated the in vitro creation of hepatocyte carbohydrate, nitrogen, alcohol degradation, and drug conjugation metabolic zonation. This type of advanced control system will be crucial for studies evaluating drug metabolism and toxicology using in vitro constructs. PMID:27240736

  4. Cryopreservation of rat hepatocytes with disaccharides for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Liana Monteiro da Fonseca; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Henriques Pons, Andrea; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2017-10-01

    Cryopreservation of hepatocytes is a crucial step in the implementation of cell therapy for treating certain liver diseases. In the present study we investigated the effect of the some disaccharides on the cryopreservation of rat hepatocytes. Liver cells were frozen in media in the presence or absence of low concentrations of Me2SO (5% Me2SO) supplemented with varying concentrations of disaccharides (sucrose, glucose and trehalose). After 7 days of cryopreservation, the hepatocytes were thawed and viability was measure by exclusion of trypan blue and by the MTT technique, as well as by determining albumin production. Among the investigated disaccharides and concentrations, 0.2 M trehalose showed the best overall outcome. Compared to the use of Me2SO alone, significant improvement in post-thaw cell viability was observed. The new solution may reduce Me2SO side effects on patients and improve the viability and quality of cryopreserved hepatocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-11-30

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  6. DIFFERENTIATING MECHANISMS OF REACTIVE CHEMICAL TOXICITY IN ISOLATED TROUT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of four quinones, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMONQ), 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ ),1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), and 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), which redox cycle or arlyate in mammalian cells, was determined in isolated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. Mor...

  7. Preservation of hepatocyte suspensions at 4 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Lund, P; Wiggins, D

    1988-10-01

    Suspensions of rat hepatocytes are resistant to hypoxia for at least 24 hr at 4 degrees C. After storage for 24 hr with xylitol, sorbitol, or glycerol, their subsequent capacity for glucogenesis from these substrates is increased. Even storage under N2/CO2 as the gas phase has little deleterious effect.

  8. DIFFERENTIATING MECHANISMS OF REACTIVE CHEMICAL TOXICITY IN ISOLATED TROUT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of four quinones, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMONQ), 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ ),1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), and 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), which redox cycle or arlyate in mammalian cells, was determined in isolated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. Mor...

  9. [Action of a herbicide (paraquat) on hepatocytes in histiotypic culture].

    PubMed

    Verne, J; Fournier, E; Hebert, S; Richshoffer, N

    1975-01-01

    The toxicant action on hepatocytes of "paraquat" introduced at very low concentrations in an in vitro culture of such cells is here established. Mitoses are slowed down and moreover, the lysosomial system is impaired, thus inducing a decrease in its enzymic reactions and the proliferation of very large vesicles.

  10. Cellular toxicity of hydrazine in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saber M; Frazier, John M

    2002-10-01

    Hydrazine (HzN) is an aircraft fuel and propellant used by the U.S. Air Force. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the acute toxicity of HzN in primary rat hepatocytes in vitro with reference to oxidative stress. The effects of short-term exposure (4 h) of hepatocytes to HzN were investigated with reference to viability, mitochondrial function, and biomarkers of oxidative stress. The viability data showed an increase in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and a decrease in mitochondrial activity with increasing concentration of HzN. The results of studies of oxidative stress biomarkers showed a depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and an increase in oxidized GSH, increased reactive oxygen species generation, lipid peroxidation, and reduced catalase activity. Furthermore, depletion of GSH and catalase activity in hepatocytes by buthionine sulfoximine and 3-amino triazole, respectively, prior to exposure to HzN, increased its toxicity. The results suggest that acute HzN-induced cytotoxicity in rat hepatocytes is likely to be mediated through oxidative stress.

  11. Liver glycogen bodies: ground-glass hepatocytes in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Pablo A; Garcia, Monica T; Rodriguez, Maria M; Ruiz, Phillip; Tzakis, Andreas G

    2006-11-01

    Ground-glass hepatocytes have been described in Lafora's disease, fibrinogen deposition, hepatitis B, type IV glycogenosis, and alcohol aversion (cyanamide) therapy. We encountered ground-glass hepatocytes with intracytoplasmic inclusions in four liver biopsies from three transplanted patients who had none of the above-mentioned underlying diseases. One patient was a 4-year-old boy who had a kidney transplant for severe ureterovesical reflux. Patient 2 was a 52-year-old man who had two liver transplants because of hepatitis C. The third patient was a 7-month-old girl who underwent a multivisceral transplant because of necrotizing enterocolitis and liver failure induced by total parenteral nutrition. The patients developed liver abnormalities from 45 days to 4 years after their transplants. The livers showed conspicuous ground-glass hepatocytes in 90% of the children's samples and 30% of the adult liver cells. The cytoplasmic bodies stained strongly for Gomori methenamine-silver; they were positive for periodic acid-Schiff without diastase, but negative after diastase digestion. They were negative for colloidal iron and hepatitis B core and surface antigens. Electron microscopy revealed non-membrane bound aggregates of glycogen. Idiopathic ground-glass hepatocytes occur in transplanted patients and represent accumulation of altered glycogen. However, their clinical significance and cause are not entirely elucidated.

  12. A Microfabricated Platform for Generating Physiologically-Relevant Hepatocyte Zonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, William J.; Usta, O. Berk; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-05-01

    In vitro liver models have been important tools for more than 40 years for academic research and preclinical toxicity screening by the pharmaceutical industry. Hepatocytes, the highly metabolic parenchymal cells of the liver, are efficient at different metabolic chemistries depending on their relative spatial location along the sinusoid from the portal triad to the central vein. Although replicating hepatocyte metabolic zonation is vitally important for physiologically-relevant in vitro liver tissue and organ models, it is most often completely overlooked. Here, we demonstrate the creation of spatially-controlled zonation across multiple hepatocyte metabolism levels through the application of precise concentration gradients of exogenous hormone (insulin and glucagon) and chemical (3-methylcholanthrene) induction agents in a microfluidic device. Observed gradients in glycogen storage via periodic acid-Schiff staining, urea production via carbamoyl phosphatase synthetase I staining, and cell viability after exposure to allyl alcohol and acetaminophen demonstrated the in vitro creation of hepatocyte carbohydrate, nitrogen, alcohol degradation, and drug conjugation metabolic zonation. This type of advanced control system will be crucial for studies evaluating drug metabolism and toxicology using in vitro constructs.

  13. Hepatocytes: a key cell type for innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Gao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the major parenchymal cells in the liver, play pivotal roles in metabolism, detoxification, and protein synthesis. Hepatocytes also activate innate immunity against invading microorganisms by secreting innate immunity proteins. These proteins include bactericidal proteins that directly kill bacteria, opsonins that assist in the phagocytosis of foreign bacteria, iron-sequestering proteins that block iron uptake by bacteria, several soluble factors that regulate lipopolysaccharide signaling, and the coagulation factor fibrinogen that activates innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the wide variety of innate immunity proteins produced by hepatocytes and discuss liver-enriched transcription factors (e.g. hepatocyte nuclear factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins), pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin (IL)-6, IL-22, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and downstream signaling pathways (e.g. signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 and nuclear factor-κB) that regulate the expression of these innate immunity proteins. We also briefly discuss the dysregulation of these innate immunity proteins in chronic liver disease, which may contribute to an increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26685902

  14. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes. PMID:27916916

  15. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  16. [Use of xenogenic lyophilized hepatocytes in the treatment of acute and chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Musselius, S G; Vasina, N V; Gladskikh, L V

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic effect of lyophilized xenogenic hepatocytes was demonstrated on 30 dogs with acute hepatic failure and on white mice. The major biochemical values were corrected and the yeast fermentation test showed biological activity of isolated hepatocytes. Clinically, lyophilized hepatocytes were used in the treatment of patients with acute hepatic failure: orally in 47 and for extracorporeal dialysis in 8. The therapeutic effect of lyophilized hepatocytes is based on active detoxication and hemostasis correction. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental studies showed improvement of the clinical status, decreased encephalopathy, and accelerated repair processes in the liver. Addition of lyophilized hepatocytes to combined therapy decreased the mortality by 2.5 times.

  17. 2012 DA14 and Chelyabinsk: Same Day Coincidence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2013-10-01

    A long anticipated near-miss by near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2012 DA14 on 15 February 2013 was upstaged 16 hours earlier by the impact and atmospheric explosion of a ~20 m NEA over Chelyabinsk, Russia. DA14 was earlier estimated to be 45 m across and passage at a distance under geosynchronous satellites was considered to be a record close approach by an object of that size, a once-in-40-years event. Actual Earth impact by a 20 m NEA had been estimated to be a once-in-200-years event. A simplistic calculation gives a probability of these happening on the same day of 1-in-a-billion. Within hours of the Chelyabinsk impact, it was recognized and widely reported that the two asteroids were in very different orbits and could not, at least in any readily understandable way, be physically related to each other (e.g. fragments of the same precursor body). Also, some early reports suggested that the two asteroids had very different compositions, further undermining the possibility they were pieces of the same body. (It seems unlikely, though certainly conceivable, that the two NEAs could have different compositions yet have some kind of causal connection resulting in the same-day events.) Nevertheless, incredibly tiny probabilities beg for an explanation. Here, with the benefit of hindsight, I re-examine issues that affect the probabilities, such as size, albedo, probable composition, and numbers of NEAs of these sizes. I also consider difficult issues of framing the apparent coincidence, which dominate other uncertainties. Updated information about the physical nature of the two asteroids somewhat modifies the original estimates of probabilities. Moreover, more proper ways of framing elements of the coincidence considerably reduce the improbability of the same-day events, but not nearly to the level (e.g. 1-in-1000 or perhaps 1-in-10,000) where we could rationalize dismissing the events as “just a coincidence.” The events of 15 February 2013 deserve more sophisticated

  18. IXO-XMS LVSID Anti-Coincidence Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Scott F.; Kilbourne, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This document describes a high-TRL backup implementation of the anti-coincidence detector for the IXO/XMS instrument. The backup detector, hereafter referred to as the low-voltage silicon ionization detector (LVSID), has been successfully flown on Astro-E2 (Suzaku)/XRS and is currently being implemented, without significant changes, on the Astro-H/SXS instrument. The LVSID anti-coincidence detector on Astro-E2/XRS operated successfully for almost 2 years, and was not affected by the loss of liquid helium in that instrument. The LVSID continues to operate after almost 5 years on-orbit (LEO, 550 km) but with slightly increased noise following the expected depletion of solid Neon after 22 months. The noise of the device is increased after the loss of sNe due to thermally induced bias and readout noise. No radiation damage, or off-nominal affects have been observed with the LVSID on-orbit during the Astro-E2/XRS program. A detector die from the same fabrication run will be used on the Astro-H/SXS mission. The LVSID technology and cryogenic JFET readout system is thus TRL 9. The technology is described in detail in section 2. The IXO/XMS "backup-up" anti-coincidence detector is a small array of LVSID detectors that are almost identical to those employed for Astro -E2/XRS as described in this document. The readout system is identical and, infact would use the same design as the Astro -E2/XRS JFET amplifier module (19 channels) essentially without changes except for its mechanical mount. The changes required for the IXO/XMS LVSID array are limited to the mounting of the LVSID detectors, and the mechanical mounting of the JFET amplifier sub-assembly. There is no technical development needed for the IXO/XMS implementation and the technology is ready for detailed design-work leading to PDR. The TRL level is thus at least 6, and possibly higher. Characteristics of an IXO/XMS LVSID anti-co detector are given in Table 1 and described in detail in section 3.

  19. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shan-Bo; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Shan; Gao, Bin; Lu, Yang; Hui, Sen; Li, Long; Shi, Xiao-Peng; Wen, Ai-Dong

    2017-04-07

    Hyperglycemia is a typical pathogenic factor in a series of complications among patients with type II diabetes. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol extracted from green tea and is reported to be an antioxidant. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of EGCG on insulin resistance in human HepG2 cells pretreated with high concentrations of glucose. The protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) pathways were analyzed using western blot analysis in HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes treated with high glucose and/or EGCG. Cellular glycogen content was determined using a glycogen assay kit. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using dihydroethidium staining and flow cytometry. c‑JUN N‑terminal kinase (JNK)/insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1)/AKT/GSK signaling was explored using western blot analysis in HepG2 cells treated with high glucose and/or EGCG or N-acetyl-cysteine. High glucose significantly decreased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK in HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. Pretreatment with EGCG significantly restored the activation of AKT and GSK in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes exposed to high glucose. In HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes, glycogen synthesis was improved by EGCG treatment in a dose‑dependent manner. High glucose significantly stimulated the production of ROS while EGCG protected high glucose‑induced ROS production. ROS is known to serve a major role in high glucose induced‑insulin resistance by increasing JNK and IRS1 serine phosphorylation. In the present study, EGCG was observed to enhance the insulin‑signaling pathway. EGCG ameliorated high glucose‑induced insulin resistance in the hepatocytes by potentially decreasing ROS‑induced JNK/IRS1/AKT/GSK signaling.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol metabolism in rat hepatocytes stimulated by vasopressin.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, C J; Michell, R H; Hems, D A

    1981-01-01

    In isolated rat hepatocytes, vasopressin evoked a large increase in the incorporation of [32P]Pi into phosphatidylinositol, accompanied by smaller increases in the incorporation of [1-14C]oleate and [U-14C]glycerol. Incorporation of these precursors into the other major phospholipids was unchanged during vasopressin treatment. Vasopressin also promoted phosphatidylinositol breakdown in hepatocytes. Half-maximum effects on phosphatidylinositol breakdown and on phosphatidylinositol labelling occurred at about 5 nM-vasopressin, a concentration at which approximately half of the hepatic vasopressin receptors are occupied but which is much greater than is needed to produce half-maximal activation of glycogen phosphorylase. Insulin did not change the incorporation of [32P]Pi into the phospholipids of hepatocytes and it had no effect on the response to vasopressin. Although the incorporation of [32P]Pi into hepatocyte lipids was decreased when cells were incubated in a Ca2+-free medium, vasopressin still provoked a substantial stimulation of phosphatidylinositol labelling under these conditions. Studies with the antagonist [1-(beta-mercapto-beta, beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionic acid),8-arginine]vasopressin indicated that the hepatic vasopressin receptors that control phosphatidylinositol metabolism are similar to those that mediate the vasopressor response in vivo. When prelabelled hepatocytes were stimulated for 5 min and then subjected to subcellular fractionation. The decrease in [3H]phosphatidylinositol content in each cell fraction with approximately in proportion to its original phosphatidylinositol content. This may be a consequence of phosphatidylinositol breakdown at a single site, followed by rapid phosphatidylinositol exchange between membranes leading to re-establishment of an equilibrium distribution. PMID:7030316

  2. Enzymatic antioxidant defense in isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Skrzycki, M; Czeczot, H; Majewska, M; Podsiad, M; Karlik, W; Grono, D; Wiechetek, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of cadmium effects on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rat hepatocytes. The studies were conducted with isolated rat hepatocytes incubated for 1 or 2 hours in a modified (deprived of carbonates with phosphates) Williams' E medium (MWE) in the presence of cadmium chloride (25, 50 and 200 microM). Hepatocytes incubated in the MWE medium without cadmium chloride were used as a control. The application of the modified Williams' E medium allowed for the appearance of cadmium compounds in a soluble form that is indispensable for suitable estimation of its toxic action. There were evaluated markers of the oxidative stress such as: concentration of thiobarbiturate reactive substances (TBARS)--proportional to the level of lipid peroxidation, concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and SOD2), catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), selenium--dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHPx), glutathione transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GSHR). Alterations of antioxidant enzymes activity, the level of TBARS and GSH in isolated rat hepatocytes caused by cadmium in vitro, were shown to depend on the concentration and time of exposure of cells to this metal. The increased level of TBARS and GSH was observed as well as changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The activity of SOD isoenzymes and CAT was increased, whereas GSHPx and GST were decreased. These results indicate that cadmium induces oxidative stress followed by alterations in the cellular antioxidant enzyme system in isolated rat hepatocytes.

  3. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  4. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  5. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  6. Caveolin-1-dependent activation of the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 by TGF-β in hepatocytes requires activation of Src and the NADPH oxidase NOX1.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Mainez, Jèssica; Mayoral, Rafael; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Egea, Gustavo; Fabregat, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a dual role in hepatocytes, inducing both pro- and anti-apoptotic responses, the balance between which decides cell fate. Survival signals are mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, which is activated by TGF-β. We have previously shown that caveolin-1 (CAV1) is required for activation of the metalloprotease tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-converting enzyme/a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (TACE/ADAM17), and hence transactivation of the EGFR pathway. The specific mechanism by which TACE/ADAM17 is activated has not yet been determined. Here we show that TGF-β induces phosphorylation of sarcoma kinase (Src) in hepatocytes, a process that is impaired in Cav1(-/-) hepatocytes, coincident with a decrease in phosphorylated Src in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. TGF-β-induced activation of TACE/ADAM17 and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked using the Src inhibitor PP2. Cav1(+/+) hepatocytes showed early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by TGF-β, which was not seen in Cav1(-/-) cells. Production of ROS was inhibited by both the NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) inhibitor STK301831 and NOX1 knock-down, which also impaired TACE/ADAM17 activation and thus EGFR phosphorylation. Finally, neither STK301831 nor NOX1 silencing impaired Src phosphorylation, but PP2 blocked early ROS production, showing that Src is involved in NOX1 activation. As expected, inhibition of Src or NOX1 increased TGF-β-induced cell death in Cav1(+/+) cells. In conclusion, CAV1 is required for TGF-β-mediated activation of TACE/ADAM17 through a mechanism that involves phosphorylation of Src and NOX1-mediated ROS production.

  7. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  8. Geometric origin of coincidences and hierarchies in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Freivogel, Ben

    2011-10-15

    We show that the geometry of cutoffs on eternal inflation strongly constrains predictions for the time scales of vacuum domination, curvature domination, and observation. We consider three measure proposals: the causal patch, the fat geodesic, and the apparent horizon cutoff, which is introduced here for the first time. We impose neither anthropic requirements nor restrictions on landscape vacua. For vacua with positive cosmological constant, all three measures predict the double coincidence that most observers live at the onset of vacuum domination and just before the onset of curvature domination. The hierarchy between the Planck scale and the cosmological constant is related to the number of vacua in the landscape. These results require only mild assumptions about the distribution of vacua (somewhat stronger assumptions are required by the fat geodesic measure). At this level of generality, none of the three measures are successful for vacua with negative cosmological constant. Their applicability in this regime is ruled out unless much stronger anthropic requirements are imposed.

  9. Coincident-site lattice matching during van der Waals epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Boschker, Jos E.; Galves, Lauren A.; Flissikowski, Timur; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy is an attractive method for the fabrication of vdW heterostructures. Here Sb2Te3 films grown on three different kind of graphene substrates (monolayer epitaxial graphene, quasi freestanding bilayer graphene and the SiC (6√3 × 6√3)R30° buffer layer) are used to study the vdW epitaxy between two 2-dimensionally (2D) bonded materials. It is shown that the Sb2Te3 /graphene interface is stable and that coincidence lattices are formed between the epilayers and substrate that depend on the size of the surface unit cell. This demonstrates that there is a significant, although relatively weak, interfacial interaction between the two materials. Lattice matching is thus relevant for vdW epitaxy with two 2D bonded materials and a fundamental design parameter for vdW heterostructures. PMID:26658715

  10. Coincidence-Summing Corrections for Close Geometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueray, R. Taygun

    2008-11-11

    For a given stellar temperature, nuclear reactions take place in the energy range of the Gamow window with the relatively low energies of the astrophysical interest for charged particle induced reactions. In order to measure the nuclear reaction cross sections with the activation method at projectile energies as low as possible, a gamma counting system that consists of Ge detectors and the irradiated target in close geometry is required. The presence of cascade transitions requires coincidence summing corrections that can not be ignored because of the very large solid angle. In this study, the determination of the summing correction factor and photopeak efficiency for a gamma spectrometer, as an example, composed of two Ge clover detectors in close geometry is briefly described.

  11. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  12. Coincidence landscapes for three-channel linear optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guise, Hubert; Tan, Si-Hui; Poulin, Isaac P.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-06-01

    We use permutation-group methods plus SU(3) group-theoretic methods to determine the action of a three-channel passive optical interferometer on controllably delayed single-photon pulse inputs to each channel. Permutation-group techniques allow us to relate directly expressions for rates and, in particular, investigate symmetries in the coincidence landscape. These techniques extend the traditional Hong-Ou-Mandel effect analysis for two-channel interferometry to valleys and plateaus in three-channel interferometry. Our group-theoretic approach is intuitively appealing because the calculus of Wigner D functions partially accounts for permutational symmetries and directly reveals the connections among D functions, partial distinguishability, and immanants.

  13. Coincident vortices in Antarctic wind fields and sea ice motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, S.; Schmitt, C.; Kottmeier, C.; Simmonds, I.

    2006-08-01

    This study introduces a method to examine the coincidence of rotational ice drift and winds caused by the forcing of ice motion by Antarctic cyclones. Vortices are automatically detected using the algorithm of Murray and Simmonds (1991) from both ECMWF surface pressures and SSM/I sea ice motions. For compatibility with this algorithm sea ice motion vectors are transformed to a scalar stream function. During a seven-day test period positions of pressure minima and stream function maxima (SFM) of ice drift are within 300 km in 96% of the cases. Lowest pressure minima are related to highest stream function maxima. The results promise the method to provide a complementary tool of detecting and localizing low-pressure systems over sea ice, adding to numerical pressure analyses.

  14. Pattern Recognition in Gamma-Gamma Coincidence Data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manatt, D. R.; Barnes, F. L.; Becker, J. A.; Candy, J. V.; Henry, E. A.; Brinkman, M. J.

    1991-10-01

    Considerable amounts of tedious labor are required to manually scan high-resolution 1D slices of two dimensional γ-γ coincident matrices for relevant and exciting structures. This is particularly true when the interesting structures are of weak intensity. We are working on automated search methods for the detection of rotational band structures in the full 2D space using pattern recognition techniques. For nominal sized data sets (1024×1024), however, these techniques only become computationally feasible through the use of Fourier Transform methods. Furthermore the presentation of data matrices as images rather than series of 1D spectra has been shown to be useful. In this paper we will present the data manipulation techniques we have developed.

  15. Coincidence of GIST and pancreatic endocrine neoplasm in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Comesaña, Elias; Tome-Espiñeiro, Catherine; Ulla-Rocha, Jose L; Lorenzo-Lorenzo, Isabel; Lede-Fernandez, Angel; Portela-Serra, Jose L

    2011-09-01

    Carcinoids of the ampulla of Vater are infrequent tumors of which a quarter of cases have been detected in patients with type I neurofibromatosis. This hereditary disease is also associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). However, the coincidence of these three entities together have only been formerly detected in five cases. A 53 year-old female patient, diagnosed with type I neurofibromatosis, with a malignant carcinoid of ampulla of Vater and multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the duodenum and jejunum, was treated with total pancreatectomy and the excision of her intestinal tumors. Five-years on, a follow-up showed the patient to be well, and free from tumor recurrence. The coexistence of an ampullary carcinoid tumor, GIST and neurofibramatosis is very rare. Radical curative surgical resection is a good treatment option, but the optimal management of this is not yet well established.

  16. Gamma Efficiency Simulations towards Coincidence Measurements for Fusion Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Jenkins, D. G.; Montanari, D.; Morris, L.; Regan, P. H.; Rudigier, M.; Symochko, D.

    2016-10-01

    With the experimental station STELLA (STELlar LAboratory) we will measure fusion cross sections of astrophysical relevance making use of the coincident detection of charged particles and gamma rays for background reduction. For the measurement of gamma rays from the de-excitation of fusion products a compact array of 36 UK FATIMA LaBr3 detectors is designed based on efficiency studies with Geant4. The photo peak efficiency in the region of interest compares to other gamma detection systems used in this field. The features of the internal decay of 138La is used in a background study to obtain an online calibration of the gamma detectors. Background data are fit to the Monte Carlo model of the self activity assuming crude exponential behavior of external background. Accuracy in the region of interest is of the order of some keV in this first study.

  17. Observations of ionospheric magnetospheric coupling - DE and Chatanika coincidences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Brace, L. H.; Waite, J. H.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Doupnik, J. R.; Richards, P. G.; Heelis, R.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Observations from several experiments on board the Dynamics Explorer 1 and 2 (DE 1 and 2) spacecraft and ground-based radar measurements from the Chatanika radar are combined in order to examine the details of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling in the local evening sector. DE 1 and DE 2 were in coplanar polar orbits that provided measurements almost simultaneously in time and magnetically coincident with the Chatanika radar from L = 3 to L = 17. The coupling processes are inferred from the density, temperature, composition, and angular distributions of the low-energy plasma observed from the E region of the ionosphere to magnetospheric altitudes of 2.5 earth radii. Plasma characteristics of the plasmasphere, main trough, auroral zone, and polar cap can be studied in this data set. The observations imply that as L increases, the dominant coupling mechanism between the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the measured energy range changes from equilibrium diffusion to perpendicular acceleration and finally to parallel acceleration.

  18. Blood-Compatible Polymer for Hepatocyte Culture with High Hepatocyte-Specific Functions toward Bioartificial Liver Development.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Otaki, Takayuki; Nemoto, Eri; Maruyama, Hiroka; Tanaka, Masaru

    2015-08-19

    The development of bioartificial liver (BAL) is expected because of the shortage of donor liver for transplantation. The substrates for BAL require the following criteria: (a) blood compatibility, (b) hepatocyte adhesiveness, and (c) the ability to maintain hepatocyte-specific functions. Here, we examined blood-compatible poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate) (PTHFA) (PTHFA) as the substrates for BAL. HepG2, a human hepatocyte model, could adhere on PMEA and PTHFA substrates. The spreading of HepG2 cells was suppressed on PMEA substrates because integrin contribution to cell adhesion on PMEA substrate was low and integrin signaling was not sufficiently activated. Hepatocyte-specific gene expression in HepG2 cells increased on PMEA substrate, whereas the expression decreased on PTHFA substrates due to the nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that blood-compatible PMEA is suitable for BAL substrate. Also, PMEA is expected to be used to regulate cell functions for blood-contacting tissue engineering.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of an alternate rodent host in the dynamics of introduced plague in prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Stapp, Paul; Salkeld, Daniel J; Franklin, Heather A; Kraft, John P; Tripp, Daniel W; Antolin, Michael F; Gage, Kenneth L

    2009-07-01

    1. The introduction of plague to North America is a significant threat to colonies of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), a species of conservation concern in the Great Plains. Other small rodents are exposed to the causative agent, Yersinia pestis, during or after epizootics; yet, its effect on these rodents is not known, and their role in transmitting and maintaining plague in the absence of prairie dogs remains unclear. 2. We live-trapped small rodents and collected their fleas on 11 colonies before, during and after plague epizootics in Colorado, USA, from 2004 to 2006. Molecular genetic (polymerase chain reaction) assays were used to identify Y. pestis in fleas. 3. Abundance of northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster) was low on sites following epizootics in 2004, and declined markedly following plague onset on other colonies in 2005. These changes coincided with exposure of grasshopper mice to plague, and with periods when mice became infested with large numbers of prairie dog fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta), including some that were infected with Y. pestis. Additionally, several Pleochaetis exilis, fleas restricted to grasshopper mice and never found on prairie dogs on our site, were polymerase chain reaction-positive for Y. pestis, indicating that grasshopper mice can infect their own fleas. No changes in abundance of other rodent species could be attributed to plague, and no other rodents hosted O. hirsuta during epizootics, or harboured Y. pestis-infected fleas. 4. In spring 2004, grasshopper mice were most numerous in colonies that suffered plague the following year, and the pattern of colony extinctions over a 12-year period mirrored patterns of grasshopper mouse abundance in our study area, suggesting that colonies with high densities of grasshopper mice may be more susceptible to outbreaks. We speculate that grasshopper mice help spread Y. pestis during epizootics through their ability to survive infection, harbour prairie dog fleas and, during

  20. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-02-15

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, {Lambda}, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of {Lambda}{approx_equal}(9.3 Gyrs){sup -2}[{approx_equal}10{sup -120} in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of {Omega}{sub k0}=-0.0056({zeta}{sub b}/0.5), where {zeta}{sub b}{approx}1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given {Lambda}. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t{sub {Lambda}={Lambda}}{sup -1/2} and the age of the Universe, t{sub U}, is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different {Lambda} values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  1. Rodents and risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: seroprevalence of selected zoonotic viruses in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Bryant, Juliet E

    2015-01-01

    In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade.

  2. Leptospira and Rodents in Cambodia: Environmental Determinants of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Svilena; Herbreteau, Vincent; Blasdell, Kim; Chaval, Yannick; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    We investigated infection of rodents and shrews by Leptospira spp. in two localities of Cambodia (Veal Renh, Kaev Seima) and in four types of habitat (forests, non-flooded lands, lowland rain-fed paddy fields, houses) during the wet and the dry seasons. Habitat preference was common, and rodent and shrew species were found only in houses or in rain-fed paddy fields or in forests. Among 649 small mammals trapped belonging to 12 rodent species and 1 shrew species, 71 of 642 animals tested were carriers of Leptospira according to the 16S ribosomal RNA marker used. Rodent infection was higher in low-slope locations, corresponding to rain-fed paddy fields, especially in the rainy season and in Kaev Seima. Rodents (Rattus exulans) and shrews (Suncus murinus) inhabiting households showed significantly low levels of infections, whereas rodents living in and near to forests (shrubby wasteland, orchards) showed high levels of infection. PMID:22665613

  3. Bartonella infection in rodents and their flea ectoparasites: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella-rodent-flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized.

  4. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, Joseph T.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-05-01

    L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  5. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: potential roles in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dever, Joseph T; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2009-05-01

    L-methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 degrees C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-d-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-dl-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  6. Expectations for transgenic rodent cancer bioassay models.

    PubMed

    Ashby, J

    2001-01-01

    The results of the present study have advanced dramatically the database on transgenic mouse abbreviated carcinogenicity bioassay models. As such, it will provide a secure foundation for future evaluations of these assays and for their eventual validation as models for the prediction of possible human carcinogens. Based upon the results derived from the present study, it is suggested that 5 areas require discussion as a prelude to the further evaluation of existing models and the future evaluation of new models. First, there is the need to agree a standard list of calibration chemicals to be studied and to derive agreement on optimal bioassay group sizes, statistical methods, and exposure periods. Second, general agreement must be reached regarding the classes/types of known rodent carcinogens so that it is acceptable for the new models to find negative, by implication, those rodent carcinogens considered not to pose a carcinogenic hazard to humans. Third, current understanding of mechanisms of carcinogenesis should be integrated into the evaluation of new bioassay models. Fourth, any changes made to the standard rodent carcinogenicity bioassay protocol will require compromises being made, and these should be commonly owned between interested parties in order to reduce the number of regional/agency-specific carcinogenicity testing schemes. Fifth, a mechanism needs to be developed by which assays can be adopted or rejected for use in the routine bioassay of chemicals. In the absence of such initiatives the increasing number of new bioassay models will come to exist along side of the standard 2-species bioassay, and this may potentially lead to confusion regarding the true future role of these assays.

  7. Retinal image quality in the rodent eye.

    PubMed

    Artal, P; Herreros de Tejada, P; Muñoz Tedó, C; Green, D G

    1998-01-01

    Many rodents do not see well. For a target to be resolved by a rat or a mouse, it must subtend a visual angle of a degree or more. It is commonly assumed that this poor spatial resolving capacity is due to neural rather than optical limitations, but the quality of the retinal image has not been well characterized in these animals. We have modified a double-pass apparatus, initially designed for the human eye, so it could be used with rodents to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye's optics. That is, the double-pass retinal image of a monochromatic (lambda = 632.8 nm) point source was digitized with a CCD camera. From these double-pass measurements, the single-pass MTF was computed under a variety of conditions of focus and with different pupil sizes. Even with the eye in best focus, the image quality in both rats and mice is exceedingly poor. With a 1-mm pupil, for example, the MTF in the rat had an upper limit of about 2.5 cycles/deg, rather than the 28 cycles/deg one would obtain if the eye were a diffraction-limited system. These images are about 10 times worse than the comparable retinal images in the human eye. Using our measurements of the optics and the published behavioral and electrophysiological contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of rats, we have calculated the CSF that the rat would have if it had perfect rather than poor optics. We find, interestingly, that diffraction-limited optics would produce only slight improvement overall. That is, in spite of retinal images which are of very low quality, the upper limit of visual resolution in rodents is neurally determined. Rats and mice seem to have eyes in which the optics and retina/brain are well matched.

  8. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  9. Klebsiella oxytoca: opportunistic infections in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Andre; Kirsch, Petra; Sahly, Hany; Fahey, Jim; Smoczek, Anna; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Sundberg, John P

    2008-07-01

    Opportunistic pathogens have become increasingly relevant as the causative agents of clinical disease and pathological lesions in laboratory animals. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of Klebsiella oxytoca as an opportunistic pathogen in laboratory rodents. Therefore, K. oxytoca-induced lesions were studied from 2004 to early 2006 in naturally infected rodent colonies maintained at The Jackson Laboratory (TJL), Bar Harbor, USA, the Animal Research Centre (Tierforschungszentrum, TFZ) of the University of Ulm, Germany and the Central Animal Facility (ZTM) of the Hannover Medical School, Germany. K. oxytoca infections were observed in substrains of C3H/HeJ mice, which carry the Tlr4(Lps-d) allele; in LEW.1AR1-iddm rats, the latter being prone to diabetes mellitus; in immunodeficient NMRI-Foxn1(nu) mice; and in mole voles, Ellobius lutescens. The main lesions observed were severe suppurative otitis media, urogenital tract infections and pneumonia. Bacteriological examination revealed K. oxytoca as monocultures in all cases. Clonality analysis performed on strains isolated at the ZTM and TFZ (serotyping, pulse field gel electrophoresis [PFGE], enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) polymerase chain reaction, sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes) revealed that the majority of bacteria belonged to two clones, one in each facility, expressing the capsule type K55 (ZTM) or K72 (TFZ). Two strains, one isolated at the ZTM and one at the TFZ, showed different PFGE and ERIC pattern than all other isolates and both expressed capsule type K35. In conclusion, K. oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen capable of inducing pathological lesions in different rodent species.

  10. Chemically induced hepatotoxicity in human stem cell-induced hepatocytes compared with primary hepatocytes and HepG2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Jin; Lee, Hyuk-Mi; Park, Young-Il; Yi, Hee; Lee, Hunjoo; So, ByungJae; Song, Jae-Young; Kang, Hwan-Goo

    2016-10-01

    Stem cell-induced hepatocytes (SC-iHeps) have been suggested as a valuable model for evaluating drug toxicology. Here, human-induced pluripotent stem cells (QIA7) and embryonic stem cells (WA01) were differentiated into hepatocytes, and the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen (AAP) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were compared with primary hepatocytes (p-Heps) and HepG2. In a cytotoxicity assay, the IC50 of SC-iHeps was similar to that in p-Heps and HepG2 in the AAP groups but different from that in p-Heps of the AFB1 groups. In a multi-parameter assay, phenotypic changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium influx and oxidative stress were similar between QIA7-iHeps and p-Heps following AAP and AFB1 treatment but relatively low in WA01-iHeps and HepG2. Most hepatic functional markers (hepatocyte-specific genes, albumin/urea secretion, and the CYP450 enzyme activity) were decreased in a dose-dependent manner following AAP and AFB1 treatment in SC-iHeps and p-Heps but not in HepG2. Regarding CYP450 inhibition, the cell viability of SC-iHeps and p-Heps was increased by ketoconazole, a CYP3A4 inhibitor. Collectively, SC-iHeps and p-Heps showed similar cytotoxicity and hepatocyte functional effects for AAP and AFB1 compared with HepG2. Therefore, SC-iHeps have phenotypic characteristics and sensitivity to cytotoxic chemicals that are more similar to p-Heps than to HepG2 cells.

  11. Gustatory and homeostatic functions of the rodent parabrachial nucleus.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Ivan E

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that lesions to the rodent parabrachial nucleus (PBN) disrupt the formation of gustatory-postingestive associations, while preserving gustatory and viscerosensory functions. This suggests that the rodent PBN functions essentially as an integrative circuit, supporting the conditioning of tastants to postingestive factors. In the case of primates, however, anatomical studies have failed to demonstrate gustatory projections from medullary nuclei to PBN. It should therefore be inferred that the primate PBN lacks the associative functions assigned to its rodent counterpart. Moreover, the ability of rodent midbrain dopaminergic systems to respond to the activation of palatable tastants depends on the integrity of the gustatory PBN. However, recent studies demonstrate that caloric palatable compounds do not require taste signaling to produce elevated brain dopamine levels. This raises the possibility that, in rodents, PBN neurons are important for the detection of postingestive effects of nutrients that occur independently of gustatory input. If confirmed, such function would assign non-associative roles to the rodent PBN, approximating its functional organization to its primate counterpart. We are currently testing this possibility by monitoring the behavioral responses to caloric glucose solutions in sweet-blind mice having sustained bilateral lesions to the PBN. Preliminary results indicate that the rodent PBN regulates nutrient intake even when no gustatory inputs are involved. This favors the assignment of non-gustatory, homeostatic functions to the rodent PBN during feeding, a concept that brings an additional perspective on the rodent versus primate functional discrepancy associated with the anatomy of this pontine nucleus.

  12. The Traditional Chinese Herbal Remedy Tian Xian Activates Pregnane X Receptor and Induces CYP3A Gene Expression in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; Staudinger, Jeff L.

    2008-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is activated by a myriad of clinically used compounds and natural products. Activation of PXR in liver regulates the expression genes encoding proteins that are intimately involved in the hepatic uptake, metabolism, and elimination of toxic compounds from our bodies. PXR-mediated herb-drug interactions can have undesirable effects in patients on combination therapy. This can be especially important in cancer patients that self-administer over-the-counter herbal remedies together with conventional anti-cancer chemotherapeutics. Tian xian is a traditional Chinese herbal anti-cancer remedy that activates human PXR in cell-based reporter gene assays. Moreover, tian xian alters the strength of interaction between the human PXR protein and transcriptional cofactor proteins. A novel line of humanized PXR mice are described and used here to show that tian xian increases expression of Cyp3a11 in primary cultures of rodent hepatocytes. Tian xian also induces expression of CYP3A4 in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Taken together, these data indicate that co-administration of tian xian is likely contraindicated in patients undergoing anti-cancer therapy with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These data are of particular importance due to the fact that this herbal remedy is currently marketed as an adjunct therapy that reduces the side-effects of conventional chemotherapy and is available without a prescription. Future studies should be conducted to determine the extent to which co-administration of this Chinese herbal remedy alters the pharmacokinetic and pharmocodynamic properties of conventional anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18474680

  13. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  14. Hepatocyte growth factor stimulates root growth during the development of mouse molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, H; Fujiwara, N; Sasaki-Oikawa, A; Sakano, M; Tabata, Y; Otsu, K; Ishizeki, K; Harada, H

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that tooth root formation is initiated by the development of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in root development. As hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in rodent tooth, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of HGF on the root development of mouse molars. The HERS of mouse molars and HERS01a, a cell line originated from HERS, were used in this study. For detection of HGF receptors in vivo and in vitro, we used immunochemical procedures. Root development was assessed by implanting molar tooth germs along with HGF-soaked beads into kidney capsules, by counting cell numbers in HERS01a cell cultures and by performing a 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay in an organ-culture system. HGF receptors were expressed in the enamel epithelium of molar germs as well as in HERS cells. HGF stimulated root development in the transplanted tooth germs, the proliferation of HERS01a cells in culture and HERS elongation in the organ-culture system. Examination using BrdU revealed that cell proliferation in HERS was increased by treatment with HGF, especially that in the outer layer of HERS. This effect was down-regulated when antibody against HGF receptor was present in the culture medium. Our results raise the possibility that HGF signaling controls root formation via the development of HERS. This study is the first to show that HGF is one of the stimulators of root development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Changes in tau phosphorylation in hibernating rodents.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; Defelipe, Javier; Avila, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Tau is a cytoskeletal protein present mainly in the neurons of vertebrates. By comparing the sequence of tau molecule among different vertebrates, it was found that the variability of the N-terminal sequence in tau protein is higher than that of the C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is involved mainly in the binding of tau to cellular membranes, whereas the C-terminal region of the tau molecule contains the microtubule-binding sites. We have compared the sequence of Syrian hamster tau with the sequences of other hibernating and nonhibernating rodents and investigated how differences in the N-terminal region of tau could affect the phosphorylation level and tau binding to cell membranes. We also describe a change, in tau phosphorylation, on a casein kinase 1 (ck1)-dependent site that is found only in hibernating rodents. This ck1 site seems to play an important role in the regulation of tau binding to membranes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  17. [An experimental study on the protective effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) for the primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from iron-loaded rats].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, J

    1995-01-01

    Pathological iron deposition in liver is often found in various liver diseases. The deposited iron is thought to be one of the most important factor of liver cell injury, not only in hemochromotosis but also in cirrhosis following hepatitis virus B or C infection. To investigate the influence of the deposited iron on damage and regeneration of hepatocyte, primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from carbonyl iron-loaded rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in the presence or absence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Although the section of liver from carbonyl iron-loaded rats showed no necrosis and fibrosis, iron-loaded hepatocytes contained about twofold more iron than control. The damage of iron-loaded hepatocytes induced by CCl4 was more serious than that of control, and HGF decreased this injury only in iron-loaded hepatocytes but not in control. There is no difference in DNA synthesis stimulated by HGF between iron-loaded hepatocytes and control. These findings suggest that the pathological iron deposition induces the fragility of hepatocyte and that cytoprotective effect of HGF is induced by this pathological iron.

  18. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S.; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  20. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts.

  1. Liver tissue engineering utilizing hepatocytes propagated in mouse livers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Tateno, Chise; Kataoka, Miho; Utoh, Rie; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Okano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering technologies have highlighted the ability to create functional liver systems using isolated hepatocytes in vivo. Considering the serious shortage of donor livers that can be used for hepatocyte isolation, it has remained imperative to establish a hepatocyte propagation protocol to provide highly efficient cell recovery allowing for subsequent tissue engineering procedures. Donor primary hepatocytes were isolated from human α-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) transgenic mice and were transplanted into the recipient liver of urokinase-type plasminogen activator-severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice. Transplanted donor hepatocytes actively proliferated within the recipient liver of the uPA/SCID mice. At week 8 or later, full repopulation of the uPA/SCID livers with the transplanted hA1AT hepatocytes were confirmed by blood examination and histological assessment. Proliferated hA1AT hepatocytes were recovered from the recipient uPA/SCID mice, and we generated hepatocyte sheets using these recovered hepatocytes for subsequent transplantation into the subcutaneous space of mice. Stable persistency of the subcutaneously engineered liver tissues was confirmed for up to 90 days, which was the length of our present study. These new data demonstrate the feasibility in propagating murine hepatocytes prior to the development of hepatic cells and bioengineered liver systems. The ability to regenerate and expand hepatocytes has potential clinical value whereby procurement of small amounts of tissue could be expanded to sufficient quantities prior to their use in hepatocyte transplantation or other hepatocyte-based therapies.

  2. Evaluation of chronic toxicity and carcinogenesis in rodents with the synthetic analgesic, tilidine fumarate.

    PubMed

    McGuire, E J; DiFonzo, C J; Martin, R A; de la Iglesia, F A

    1986-05-01

    The carcinogenic potential of tilidine fumarate, a synthetic analgesic, was studied for 80 and 104 weeks in mice and rats, respectively. Groups of 50 albino CF1 mice and 65 albino Wistar rats of each sex received tilidine fumarate-lactose blend (1:1) at doses of 100, 40 and 16 mg/kg. The control groups consisted of 100 mice and 115 rats of each sex and received the lactose vehicle only. Treatment-related non-neoplastic changes consisted of reversible, increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia of hepatocytes in high and mid dose rats corresponding to areas of proliferating smooth endoplasmic reticulum; and an increased incidence in high dose rats of proliferative or cystic lesions of the biliary epithelium. Adequate survival rates allowed stringent statistical analysis of neoplasia. Tilidine did not evoke increased tumor incidences or changes in the average latency or onset of tumors in either species. The most frequent tumors represented spontaneous neoplasia characteristic of historical background incidence in these strains. In mice, the only statistically significant (P less than 0.01) variation in tumor incidence was an increased rate of lung alveologenic adenocarcinomas in females at 100 mg/kg (24%), compared with the concurrent untreated controls (10%), but without a statistically significant difference from historical control data (27%). Female rats given 100 mg/kg showed statistically significant (P less than 0.01) decreased incidences of mammary fibroadenoma and pituitary adenoma. From these data, it was concluded that the synthetic analgesic tilidine does not possess tumorigenic potential in rodents.

  3. [Current status and future perspectives of hepatocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Maupoey, Javier; San Juan, Fernando; López, Rafael; Mir, Jose

    2014-02-01

    The imbalance between the number of potential beneficiaries and available organs, originates the search for new therapeutic alternatives, such as Hepatocyte transplantation (HT).Even though this is a treatment option for these patients, the lack of unanimity of criteria regarding indications and technique, different cryopreservation protocols, as well as the different methodology to assess the response to this therapy, highlights the need of a Consensus Conference to standardize criteria and consider future strategies to improve the technique and optimize the results.Our aim is to review and update the current state of hepatocyte transplantation, emphasizing the future research attempting to solve the problems and improve the results of this treatment. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The cytoskeleton of digitonin-treated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fiskum, G; Craig, S W; Decker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of isolated rat hepatocptes with low concentrations of digitonin increases the permeability of the plsma membrane to cytosolic proteins without causing release of organelles such as mitochondria into the surrounding medium. Electron microscopy showed that treatment of the cells with increasing concentations of digitonin results in a progressive loss in the continuity of the plasma membrane, while most other aspects of cellular morphology remain normal. Depletion of background staining material from the cytosol by digitonin treatment of the cells greatly enhances the visualization of the cytoskeleton. The use of this technique, together with immunofluorescent light microscopy, has verified the presence of an actin-containing filamentous network at the hepatocyte cortex as well as intermediate filaments distributed throughout the cell. Digitonin is thus useful both for selectively permeabilizing the plasma membrane and for intensifying the appearance of intracellular structures such as microfilaments that are normally difficult to observe in cells such as hepatocytes. Images PMID:6997878

  5. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum.

  6. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-17

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  7. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  8. Intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruonan; Sen, Pratik; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2017-02-20

    An intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter is demonstrated by using strain-aligned polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb certain polarized states of incident light. The photovoltaic-based polarimeter is capable of measuring four Stokes parameters by cascading four semitransparent OPVs in series along the same optical axis. This in-line polarimeter concept potentially ensures high temporal and spatial resolution with higher radiometric efficiency as compared to the existing polarimeter architecture. Two wave plates were incorporated into the system to modulate the S3 Stokes parameter so as to reduce the condition number of the measurement matrix and maximize the measured signal-to-noise ratio. Radiometric calibration was carried out to determine the measurement matrix. The polarimeter presented in this paper demonstrated an average RMS error of 0.84% for reconstructed Stokes vectors after normalized to S0. A theoretical analysis of the minimum condition number of the four-cell OPV design showed that for individually optimized OPV cells, a condition number of 2.4 is possible.

  9. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, H; Thon, A; Dey, T; Khanin, V; Rodnyi, P

    2016-06-21

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom.

  10. Coincidence ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Cudry, Fadia; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Fan, Lin; Li, Wen

    2014-12-15

    A new time- and position-sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) camera is developed for coincidence ion imaging. The system is composed of four major components: a conventional microchannel plate/phosphor screen ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera, a single anode photomultiplier tube (PMT), and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of a PMT processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum of a PMT. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide.

  11. Coincidence and awareness of oral parafunctions in college students.

    PubMed

    Panek, H; Nawrot, P; Mazan, M; Bielicka, B; Sumisławska, M; Pomianowski, R

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and awareness of particular types of oral parafunctions in young healthy students and any association with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study was performed in a randomly selected group of 303 healthy students (mean age 18.8 years) from the vocational technical school in Wrocław, Poland, who underwent a routine clinical examination and functional analysis of the mouth. On taking the history all subjects were asked about their awareness of various forms of parafunctional activity in their mouth. Almost all subjects revealed various oral parafunctions such as: bruxism, nail and pen biting, chewing gum, and biting the mucosa of lip or cheek. These habits were present singly or as double, triple or even fourfold coincidences in a single person. The most frequent oral parafunctions were habitual gum chewing and bruxism. Subjects were very seldom aware of the last parafunction. TMDs were more prevalent in the presence of bruxism than in other oral parafunctions. The studied students revealed various types of oral parafunctions, however most of them were not aware of clenching and grinding their teeth.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Neuronal Excitability, Oscillations, and Coincidence Detection

    PubMed Central

    RINZEL, JOHN; HUGUET, GEMMA

    2014-01-01

    We review some widely studied models and firing dynamics for neuronal systems, both at the single cell and network level, and dynamical systems techniques to study them. In particular, we focus on two topics in mathematical neuroscience that have attracted the attention of mathematicians for decades: single-cell excitability and bursting. We review the mathematical framework for three types of excitability and onset of repetitive firing behavior in single-neuron models and their relation with Hodgkin’s classification in 1948 of repetitive firing properties. We discuss the mathematical dissection of bursting oscillations using fast/slow analysis and demonstrate the approach using single-cell and mean-field network models. Finally, we illustrate the properties of Type III excitability in which case repetitive firing for constant or slow inputs is absent. Rather, firing is in response only to rapid enough changes in the stimulus. Our case study involves neuronal computations for sound localization for which neurons in the auditory brain stem perform extraordinarily precise coincidence detection with submillisecond temporal resolution. PMID:25392560

  13. A high-efficiency HPGe coincidence system for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Britton, R; Davies, A V; Burnett, J L; Jackson, M J

    2015-08-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a network of certified laboratories which must meet certain sensitivity requirements for CTBT relevant radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a high-efficiency, dual-detector gamma spectroscopy system has been developed to improve the sensitivity of measurements for treaty compliance, greatly reducing the time required for each sample. Utilising list-mode acquisition, each sample can be counted once, and processed multiple times to further improve sensitivity. For the 8 key radionuclides considered, Minimum Detectable Activities (MDA's) were improved by up to 37% in standard mode (when compared to a typical CTBT detector system), with the acquisition time required to achieve the CTBT sensitivity requirements reduced from 6 days to only 3. When utilising the system in coincidence mode, the MDA for (60) Co in a high-activity source was improved by a factor of 34 when compared to a standard CTBT detector, and a factor of 17 when compared to the dual-detector system operating in standard mode. These MDA improvements will allow the accurate and timely quantification of radionuclides that decay via both singular and cascade γ emission, greatly enhancing the effectiveness of CTBT laboratories. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coincident Phosphatidic Acid Interaction Restrains Drp1 in Mitochondrial Division.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Kie; Yamada, Tatsuya; Cerveny, Kara L; Suzuki, Takamichi L; Macdonald, Patrick; Frohman, Michael A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-09-15

    Mitochondria divide to control their size, distribution, turnover, and function. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is a critical mechanochemical GTPase that drives constriction during mitochondrial division. It is generally believed that mitochondrial division is regulated during recruitment of Drp1 to mitochondria and its oligomerization into a division apparatus. Here, we report an unforeseen mechanism that regulates mitochondrial division by coincident interactions of Drp1 with the head group and acyl chains of phospholipids. Drp1 recognizes the head group of phosphatidic acid (PA) and two saturated acyl chains of another phospholipid by penetrating into the hydrophobic core of the membrane. The dual phospholipid interactions restrain Drp1 via inhibition of oligomerization-stimulated GTP hydrolysis that promotes membrane constriction. Moreover, a PA-producing phospholipase, MitoPLD, binds Drp1, creating a PA-rich microenvironment in the vicinity of a division apparatus. Thus, PA controls the activation of Drp1 after the formation of the division apparatus.

  15. The alpha-gamma coincidence spectrometer and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Shengzhong Qiao )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the structure and properties of the high-resolution {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrometer and its applications in determining heavy nuclides qualitatively and quantitatively. The energy resolution of the spectrometer is 0.25% (full-width at half-maximum is 13.8 keV for 5.486-MeV alpha particles); the energy shift of the peak is 0.05% in 8 h; non-linearity is < 0.2% for the 4- to 8-MeV energy region. the uncertainty in the quantitative measurement is better than {plus minus}1%. The spectrometer is being applied to some important measurements of specific cases. It can resolve some complex and difficult measurements problems because of its high accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity, and ability to remove interferences. The paper describes results with determination of {sup 242}Pu in plutonium samples; determination of the {sup 241}Am content in the presence of {sup 242}Cm and fission products; determination of the {sup 241}Am in plutonium samples; determination of the {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Cm in irradiated plutonium solutions; and other applications.

  16. Coincident loss of consciousness and ventricular tachycardia during +GZ stress.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E; Laughlin, M H; Uhl, G S

    1980-08-01

    The environment of the advanced fighter aircraft represents a unique combination of stressful factors. Each of the individual stresses is hazardous, with the summation of these factors possibly resulting in an additional risk for sudden in-flight incapacitation. Advanced fighter aircraft are capabble of producing both rapid onset and high sustained +GZ forces which, on occasion, can exceed the tolerance limits of the pilot. The +GZ forces encountered during aerial combat maneuvering are physiologically stressful and have a profound effect on the regulatory mechanisms of the body. The influence of these stresses, including +GZ stress, on the autonomic nervous system is complex. The overall normal regulation of the cardiovascular system depends on a balance between both branches of the autonomic nervous system. An imbalance between sympathetic and parasympathetic tone can result in cardiac dysrhythmias and symptoms not conducive to safe and effective flight. An episode of ventricular tachycardia, coincident with an episode of loss of consciousness, was observed in an apparently healthy aircrewman during +GZ stress on the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine human centrifuge. The implications of autonomic imbalance in the production of similar potentially hazardous dysrhythmias and symptoms in the multistress environment deserve more in-depth investigation.

  17. Performance of Down syndrome subjects during a coincident timing task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The time synchronization is a very important ability for the acquisition and performance of motor skills that generate the need to adapt the actions of body segments to external events of the environment that are changing their position in space. Down Syndrome (DS) individuals may present some deficits to perform tasks with synchronization demand. We aimed to investigate the performance of individuals with DS in a simple Coincident Timing task. Method 32 individuals were divided into 2 groups: the Down syndrome group (DSG) comprised of 16 individuals with average age of 20 (+/− 5 years old), and a control group (CG) comprised of 16 individuals of the same age. All individuals performed the Simple Timing (ST) task and their performance was measured in milliseconds. The study was conducted in a single phase with the execution of 20 consecutive trials for each participant. Results There was a significant difference in the intergroup analysis for the accuracy adjustment - Absolute Error (Z = 3.656, p = 0.001); and for the performance consistence - Variable Error (Z = 2.939, p = 0.003). Conclusion DS individuals have more difficulty in integrating the motor action to an external stimulus and they also present more inconsistence in performance. Both groups presented the same tendency to delay their motor responses. PMID:23618314

  18. Dubin-Johnson syndrome coinciding with colon cancer and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sticova, Eva; Elleder, Milan; Hulkova, Helena; Luksan, Ondrej; Sauer, Martin; Wunschova-Moudra, Irena; Novotny, Jan; Jirsa, Milan

    2013-02-14

    Hyperbilirubinemia has been presumed to prevent the process of atherogenesis and cancerogenesis mainly by decreasing oxidative stress. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, inherited disorder characterized by biphasic, predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia with no progression to end-stage liver disease. The molecular basis in Dubin-Johnson syndrome is absence or deficiency of human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter MRP2/cMOAT caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation(s) in ABCC2 located on chromosome 10q24. Clinical onset of the syndrome is most often seen in the late teens or early adulthood. In this report, we describe a case of previously unrecognized Dubin-Johnson syndrome caused by two novel pathogenic mutations (c.2360_2366delCCCTGTC and c.3258+1G>A), coinciding with cholestatic liver disease in an 82-year-old male patient. The patient, suffering from advanced atherosclerosis with serious involvement of coronary arteries, developed colorectal cancer with nodal metastases. The subsequent findings do not support the protective role of Dubin-Johnson type hyperbilirubinemia.

  19. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, H.; Thon, A.; Dey, T.; Khanin, V.; Rodnyi, P.

    2016-06-01

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom.

  20. The Structure of the Cubic Coincident Site Lattice Rotation Group

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Minich, R W; Rudd, R E; Kumar, M

    2004-01-13

    This work is intended to be a mathematical underpinning for the field of grain boundary engineering and its relatives. The interrelationships within the set of rotations producing coincident site lattices in cubic crystals are examined in detail. Besides combining previously established but widely scattered results into a unified context, the present work details newly developed representations of the group structure in terms of strings of generators (based on quaternionic number theory, and including uniqueness proofs and rules for algebraic manipulation) as well as an easily visualized topological network model. Important results that were previously obscure or not universally understood (e.g. the {Sigma} combination rule governing triple junctions) are clarified in these frameworks. The methods also facilitate several general observations, including the very different natures of twin-limited structures in two and three dimensions, the inadequacy of the {Sigma} combination rule to determine valid quadruple nodes, and a curious link between allowable grain boundary assignments and the four-color map theorem. This kind of understanding is essential to the generation of realistic statistical models of grain boundary networks (particularly in twin-dominated systems) and is especially applicable to the field of grain boundary engineering.