Science.gov

Sample records for rodent hepatocytes coinciding

  1. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Masafumi; Kojima, Takashi . E-mail: ktakashi@sapmed.ac.jp; Lan, Mengdong; Son, Seiichi; Murata, Masaki; Osanai, Makoto; Chiba, Hideki; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2007-05-15

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi.

  2. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Measurement of unscheduled DNA synthesis and S-phase synthesis in rodent hepatocytes following in vivo treatment: Testing of 24 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsalis, J.C.; Tyson, C.K.; Steinmetz, K.L.; Loh, E.K.; Hamilton, C.M.; Bakke, J.P. ); Spalding, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been shown to be useful for studying genotoxic hepatocarcinogens. In addition, measurement of S-phase synthesis (SPS) provides an indirect indicator of hepatocellular proliferation, which may be an important mechanism in rodent carcinogenesis. This assay was used to examine 24 chemicals for their ability to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) or SPS in Fischer-344 rats or B6C3F1 mice following in vivo treatment. Hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and incubated with {sup 3}H-thymidine following in vivo treatment by gavage. Chemicals chosen for testing were from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) genetic toxicology testing program and most were also evaluated in long-term animal studies conducted by the NTP. Dinitrotoluene and Michler's Ketone induced positive UDS response in rat, while N-nitrosodiethanolamine and selenium sulfide induced equivocal UDS results in mouse and rat, respectively. BCMEE, bromoform, chloroform, PBB, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene were all potent inducers of SPS in mouse liver, while C.I. Solvent Yellow 14, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane yielded equivocal SPS results in rat and mouse, respectively. These results indicate that most of the test compounds do not induced UDS in the liver; however, the significant S-phase response induced by many of these compounds, especially the halogenated solvents, may be an important mechanism in their hepatocarinogenicity.

  4. The current status of primary hepatocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Mitaka, Toshihiro

    1998-01-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances toward the development of culture conditions that promote proliferation of primary rodent hepatocytes. There are two major methods for the multiplication of hepatocytes in vitro: one is the use of nicotinamide, the other is the use of a nutrient-rich medium. In the medium containing a high concentration of nicotinamide and a growth factor, primary hepatocytes can proliferate well. In this culture condition small mononucleate cells, which are named small hepatocytes, appear and form colonies. Small hepatocytes have a high potential to proliferate while maintaining hepatic characteristics, and can differentiate into mature ones. On the other hand, combining the nutrient-rich medium with 2% DMSO, the proliferated hepatocytes can recover the hepatic differentiated functions and maintain them for a long time. In this review I describe the culture conditions for the proliferation and differentiation of primary hepatocytes and discuss the small hepatocytes, especially their roles in liver growth. PMID:10319020

  5. Hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olsavsky Goyak, Katy M; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, research suggests that for certain systems, animal models are insufficient for human toxicology testing. The development of robust, in vitro models of human toxicity is required to decrease our dependence on potentially misleading in vivo animal studies. A critical development in human toxicology testing is the use of human primary hepatocytes to model processes that occur in the intact liver. However, in order to serve as an appropriate model, primary hepatocytes must be maintained in such a way that they persist in their differentiated state. While many hepatocyte culture methods exist, the two-dimensional collagen "sandwich" system combined with a serum-free medium, supplemented with physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, appears to robustly maintain hepatocyte character. Studies in rat and human hepatocytes have shown that when cultured under these conditions, hepatocytes maintain many markers of differentiation including morphology, expression of plasma proteins, hepatic nuclear factors, phase I and II metabolic enzymes. Functionally, these culture conditions also preserve hepatic stress response pathways, such as the SAPK and MAPK pathways, as well as prototypical xenobiotic induction responses. This chapter will briefly review culture methodologies but will primarily focus on hallmark hepatocyte structural, expression and functional markers that characterize the differentiation status of the hepatocyte.

  6. Current status of hepatocyte xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Meier, Raphael P H; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Morel, Philippe; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Strom, Stephen; Bühler, Leo H

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of acute liver failure, a condition with high mortality, comprises optimal clinical care, and in severe cases liver transplantation. However, there are limitations in availability of organ donors. Hepatocyte transplantation is a promising alternative that could fill the medical need, in particular as the bridge to liver transplantation. Encapsulated porcine hepatocytes represent an unlimited source that could function as a bioreactor requiring minimal immunosuppression. Besides patients with acute liver failure, patients with alcoholic hepatitis who are unresponsive to a short course of corticosteroids are a target for hepatocyte transplantation. In this review we present an overview of the innate immune barriers in hepatocyte xenotransplantation, including the role of complement and natural antibodies; the role of phagocytic cells and ligands like CD47 in the regulation of phagocytic cells; and the role of Natural Killer cells. We present also some illustrations of physiological species incompatibilities in hepatocyte xenotransplantation, such as incompatibilities in the coagulation system. An overview of the methodology for cell microencapsulation is presented, followed by proof-of-concept studies in rodent and nonhuman primate models of fulminant liver failure: these studies document the efficacy of microencapsulated porcine hepatocytes which warrants progress towards clinical application. Lastly, we present an outline of a provisional clinical trial, that upon completion of preclinical work could start within the upcoming 2-3 years.

  7. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  8. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  9. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  10. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  11. Coincidence Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J H

    1950-11-21

    A coincidence proportional counter having a plurality of collecting electrodes so disposed as to measure the range or energy spectrum of an ionizing particle-emitting source such as an alpha source, is disclosed.

  12. Triple Coincidence Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2004-09-22

    The Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is on e of the world’s most sensitive systems for monitoring the four radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 133mXE, 131mXe and 135Xe. However, due to size, weight and power specifications appropriate to meet treaty-monitoring requirements; the ARSA is unsuitable for rapid deployment using modest transportation means. To transition this technology to a portable unit can be easily and rapidly deployed can be achieved by significant reductions in size, weight and power consumption if concentration were not required. As part of an exploratory effort to reduce both the size of the air sample and the gas processing requirement PNNL has developed an experimental nuclear detector to test and qualify the use of triple coincidence signatures (beta, conversion electron, x-ray) from two of the radioxenon isotopes (135Xe and 133Xe) as well as the more traditional beta-gamma coincidence signatures used by the ARSA system. The additional coincidence requirement allows for reduced passive shielding, and makes it possible for unambiguous detection of 133Xe and 153Xe in the presence of high 222Rn backgrounds. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the results obtained for a 133Xe sample with and without 222Rn as an interference signature.

  13. Hepatocyte transplantation in children with liver cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamooda, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatic failure and liver-based metabolic disorders require management which is both costly and complex. Hepatocyte transplantation has been very encouraging as an alternative to organ transplantation for liver disease treatment, and studies in rodents, show that transplants involving isolated liver cells can reverse hepatic failure, and correct various metabolic deficiencies of the liver. This 2016 review is based on a literature search using PubMed including original articles, reviews, cases and clinical guidelines. The search terms were “hepatocyte transplantation”, “liver transplantation”, “liver cell failure”, “metabolic liver disorders”, “orthotropic liver transplantation”, “hepatocytes” and “stem cell transplantation”. The goal of this review is to summarize the significance of hepatocyte transplantation, the sources of hepatocytes and the barriers of hepatocyte transplantation using a detailed review of literature. Our review shows that treatment of patients with liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation has expanded exponentially, especially for patients suffering from liver-based metabolic disorders. Once hepatocyte transplantation has been shown to effectively replace organ transplantation for a portion of patients with life-threatening liver metabolic diseases and those with liver failure it will make cell therapy effective and available for a broad population of patients with liver disorders. PMID:27957309

  14. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  15. Mechanism of Hepatocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Quan, Xi-Bing; Zeng, Wen-Jiao; Yang, Xiao-Ou; Wang, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte apoptosis plays important roles in both the removal of external microorganisms and the occurrence and development of liver diseases. Different conditions, such as virus infection, fatty liver disease, hepatic ischemia reperfusion, and drug-induced liver injury, are accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. This review summarizes recent research on the mechanism of hepatocyte apoptosis involving the classical extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. We emphasized the major causes of apoptosis according to the characteristics of different liver diseases. Several concerns regarding future research and clinical application are also raised. PMID:28058033

  16. TEMPORAL CHANGE IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TEMPORAL CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY *

    The objective of this study was to examine the reduction in gap junction communication (GJC) in primary hepatocytes due to coincident melatonin and magnetic field treatments to determine if these conditions could prov...

  17. Development of a chemically defined medium and discovery of new mitogenic growth factors for mouse hepatocytes: mitogenic effects of FGF1/2 and PDGF.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William C; Michalopoulos, Amantha W; Orr, Anne; Ding, Michael Q; Stolz, Donna B; Michalopoulos, George K

    2014-01-01

    Chemically defined serum-free media for rat hepatocytes have been useful in identifying EGFR ligands and HGF/MET signaling as direct mitogenic factors for rat hepatocytes. The absence of such media for mouse hepatocytes has prevented screening for discovery of such mitogens for mouse hepatocytes. We present results obtained by designing such a chemically defined medium for mouse hepatocytes and demonstrate that in addition to EGFR ligands and HGF, the growth factors FGF1 and FGF2 are also important mitogenic factors for mouse hepatocytes. Smaller mitogenic response was also noticed for PDGF AB. Mouse hepatocytes are more likely to enter into spontaneous proliferation in primary culture due to activation of cell cycle pathways resulting from collagenase perfusion. These results demonstrate unanticipated fundamental differences in growth biology of hepatocytes between the two rodent species.

  18. Susceptibility to Plasmodium liver stage infection is altered by hepatocyte polyploidy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Laura S.; Kaushansky, Alexis; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium parasites infect hepatocytes of their mammalian hosts and within undergo obligate liver stage development. The specific host cell attributes that are important for liver infection remain largely unknown. Several host signaling pathways are perturbed in infected hepatocytes, some of which are important in the generation of hepatocyte polyploidy. To test the functional consequence of polyploidy in liver infection, we infected hepatocytes with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii both in vitro and in vivo and examined the ploidy of infected and uninfected hepatocytes by flow cytometry. In both hepatoma cell lines and in the mouse liver, the fraction of polyploid cells was higher in the infected cell population than in the uninfected cell population. When the data were reanalyzed by comparing the extent of Plasmodium infection within each ploidy subset, we found that infection rates were elevated in more highly polyploid cells and lower in diploid cells. Furthermore, we found that the parasite’s preference for host cells with high ploidy is conserved among rodent malaria species and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This parasite preference for host cells of high ploidy cannot be explained by differences in hepatocyte size or DNA replication. We conclude that Plasmodium preferentially infects and develops in polyploid hepatocytes. PMID:24612025

  19. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  20. Characterization of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa) -Independent Effects of PPARa Activators in the Rodent Liver: Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Also Activates the Constitutive Activated Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor alpha (PPARa). Recent studies indicate that one such PPC, the plasticizer di2- et...

  1. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  2. Disappearance of GFP-Positive Hepatocytes Transplanted into the Liver of Syngeneic Wild-Type Rats Pretreated with Retrorsine

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiromichi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Wang, Yongchun; Fu, Yingxin; Wesson, Russell N.; Lin, Qing; Montgomery, Robert A.; Enzan, Hideaki; Sun, Zhaoli

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a widely used molecular tag to trace transplanted cells in rodent liver injury models. The differing results from various previously reported studies using GFP could be attributed to the immunogenicity of GFP. Methods Hepatocytes were obtained from GFP-expressing transgenic (Tg) Lewis rats and were transplanted into the livers of wild-type Lewis rats after they had undergone a partial hepatectomy. The proliferation of endogenous hepatocytes in recipient rats was inhibited by pretreatment with retrorsine to enhance the proliferation of the transplanted hepatocytes. Transplantation of wild-type hepatocytes into GFP-Tg rat liver was also performed for comparison. Results All biopsy specimens taken seven days after transplantation showed engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes, with the numbers of transplanted hepatocytes increasing until day 14. GFP-positive hepatocytes in wild-type rat livers were decreased by day 28 and could not be detected on day 42, whereas the number of wild-type hepatocytes steadily increased in GFP-Tg rat liver. Histological examination showed degenerative change of GFP-positive hepatocytes and the accumulation of infiltrating cells on day 28. PCR analysis for the GFP transgene suggested that transplanted hepatocytes were eliminated rather than being retained along with the loss of GFP expression. Both modification of the immunological response using tacrolimus and bone marrow transplantation prolonged the survival of GFP-positive hepatocytes. In contrast, host immunization with GFP-positive hepatocytes led to complete loss of GFP-positive hepatocytes by day 14. Conclusion GFP-positive hepatocytes isolated from GFP-Tg Lewis rats did not survive long term in the livers of retrorsine-pretreated wild-type Lewis rats. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon most likely involves an immunological reaction against GFP. The influence of GFP immunogenicity on cell transplantation models should be

  3. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  4. The ploidy conveyor of mature hepatocytes as a source of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Andrew W; Taylor, Matthew H; Hickey, Raymond D; Hanlon Newell, Amy E; Lenzi, Michelle L; Olson, Susan B; Finegold, Milton J; Grompe, Markus

    2010-10-07

    Mononucleated and binucleated polyploid hepatocytes (4n, 8n, 16n and higher) are found in all mammalian species, but the functional significance of this conserved phenomenon remains unknown. Polyploidization occurs through failed cytokinesis, begins at weaning in rodents and increases with age. Previously, we demonstrated that the opposite event, ploidy reversal, also occurs in polyploid hepatocytes generated by artificial cell fusion. This raised the possibility that somatic 'reductive mitoses' can also happen in normal hepatocytes. Here we show that multipolar mitotic spindles form frequently in mouse polyploid hepatocytes and can result in one-step ploidy reversal to generate offspring with halved chromosome content. Proliferating hepatocytes produce a highly diverse population of daughter cells with multiple numerical chromosome imbalances as well as uniparental origins. Our findings support a dynamic model of hepatocyte polyploidization, ploidy reversal and aneuploidy, a phenomenon that we term the 'ploidy conveyor'. We propose that this mechanism evolved to generate genetic diversity and permits adaptation of hepatocytes to xenobiotic or nutritional injury.

  5. Multiple channel programmable coincidence counter

    DOEpatents

    Arnone, Gaetano J.

    1990-01-01

    A programmable digital coincidence counter having multiple channels and featuring minimal dead time. Neutron detectors supply electrical pulses to a synchronizing circuit which in turn inputs derandomized pulses to an adding circuit. A random access memory circuit connected as a programmable length shift register receives and shifts the sum of the pulses, and outputs to a serializer. A counter is input by the adding circuit and downcounted by the seralizer, one pulse at a time. The decoded contents of the counter after each decrement is output to scalers.

  6. Soft coincidence in late acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2005-06-15

    We study the coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration by assuming that the present ratio between dark matter and dark energy is a slowly varying function of the scale factor. As the dark energy component we consider two different candidates, first a quintessence scalar field, and then a tachyon field. In either case analytical solutions for the scale factor, the field, and the potential are derived. Both models show a good fit to the recent magnitude-redshift supernovae data. However, the likelihood contours disfavor the tachyon field model as it seems to prefer a excessively high value for the matter component.

  7. Coincidence/Multiplicity Photofission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W. H. Geist; D.R. Norman; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman; K. J. Haskell

    2009-09-01

    An series of experiments using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system and a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-supplied, list-mode data acquisition method have shown enhanced performance utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator for nuclear material detection and identification. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security, treaty-related support, and weapon dismantlement applications. For the latter, this technology can directly support of Department of Energy/NA241 programmatic mission objectives relative to future Rocky Ridge-type testing campaigns for active inspection systems.

  8. Susceptibility to Plasmodium yoelii Preerythrocytic Infection in BALB/c Substrains Is Determined at the Point of Hepatocyte Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Austin, Laura S.; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Lo, Fang Y.; Miller, Jessica L.; Douglass, Alyse N.; Arang, Nadia; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Gardner, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    After transmission by Anopheles mosquitoes, Plasmodium sporozoites travel to the liver, infect hepatocytes, and rapidly develop as intrahepatocytic liver stages (LS). Rodent models of malaria exhibit large differences in the magnitude of liver infection, both between parasite species and between strains of mice. This has been mainly attributed to differences in innate immune responses and parasite infectivity. Here, we report that BALB/cByJ mice are more susceptible to Plasmodium yoelii preerythrocytic infection than BALB/cJ mice. This difference occurs at the level of early hepatocyte infection, but expression levels of reported host factors that are involved in infection do not correlate with susceptibility. Interestingly, BALB/cByJ hepatocytes are more frequently polyploid; thus, their susceptibility converges on the previously observed preference of sporozoites to infect polyploid hepatocytes. Gene expression analysis demonstrates hepatocyte-specific differences in mRNA abundance for numerous genes between BALB/cByJ and BALB/cJ mice, some of which encode hepatocyte surface molecules. These data suggest that a yet-unknown receptor for sporozoite infection, present at elevated levels on BALB/cByJ hepatocytes and also polyploid hepatocytes, might facilitate Plasmodium liver infection. PMID:25312960

  9. Digital coincidence counting - initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, K. S. A.; Watt, G. C.; Alexiev, D.; van der Gaast, H.; Davies, J.; Mo, Li; Wyllie, H. A.; Keightley, J. D.; Smith, D.; Woods, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique in radiation metrology, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) of the United Kingdom, as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue-to-digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4π beta detector and an NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high-speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software-based algorithms. In this letter we describe some recent results obtained with the new acquistion hardware being tested at ANSTO. The system is fully operational and is now in routine use. Results for 60Co and 22Na radiation activity calibrations are presented, initial results with 153Sm are also briefly mentioned.

  10. Malaria parasite liver stages render host hepatocytes susceptible to mitochondria-initiated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, A; Metzger, P G; Douglass, A N; Mikolajczak, S A; Lakshmanan, V; Kain, H S; Kappe, S HI

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular eukaryotic parasites and their host cells constitute complex, coevolved cellular interaction systems that frequently cause disease. Among them, Plasmodium parasites cause a significant health burden in humans, killing up to one million people annually. To succeed in the mammalian host after transmission by mosquitoes, Plasmodium parasites must complete intracellular replication within hepatocytes and then release new infectious forms into the blood. Using Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites, we show that some liver stage (LS)-infected hepatocytes undergo apoptosis without external triggers, but the majority of infected cells do not, and can also resist Fas-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, apoptosis is dramatically increased in hepatocytes infected with attenuated parasites. Furthermore, we find that blocking total or mitochondria-initiated host cell apoptosis increases LS parasite burden in mice, suggesting that an anti-apoptotic host environment fosters parasite survival. Strikingly, although LS infection confers strong resistance to extrinsic host hepatocyte apoptosis, infected hepatocytes lose their ability to resist apoptosis when anti-apoptotic mitochondrial proteins are inhibited. This is demonstrated by our finding that B-cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors preferentially induce apoptosis in LS-infected hepatocytes and significantly reduce LS parasite burden in mice. Thus, targeting critical points of susceptibility in the LS-infected host cell might provide new avenues for malaria prophylaxis. PMID:23928701

  11. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  12. Human hepatocyte and kidney cell metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene and comparison to the respective rat cells.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, R; Rudo, K

    1988-12-01

    The metabolism and mutagenic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene by human and rat hepatocytes and kidney cells were measured. High performance liquid chromatography was used to separate the 2-acetylaminofluorene metabolites, and a cell-mediated Salmonella typhimurium mutagenesis assay was used to detect mutagenic intermediates. Rat and human differences were observed with cells from both organs and levels of metabolism and mutagenesis were higher in human cells. Within a species, liver and kidney cell differences were also evident, with levels of hepatocyte-mediated metabolism and mutagenesis being greater than kidney cells. Human inter-individual variation was apparent with cells from both organs, but the variation observed was significantly greater in hepatocytes than kidney cells. A knowledge of such differences, including an understanding that they may vary with the chemical being studied, should be useful in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to humans.

  13. Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert E.; Reyes, Morayma; Koodie, Lisa; Jiang, Yuehua; Blackstad, Mark; Lund, Troy; Lenvik, Todd; Johnson, Sandra; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived from normal human, mouse, and rat postnatal bone marrow primitive, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) that can differentiate into most mesodermal cells and neuroectodermal cells in vitro and into all embryonic lineages in vivo. Here, we show that MAPCs can also differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rat MAPCs, cultured on Matrigel with FGF-4 and HGF, differentiated into epithelioid cells that expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β (HNF-3β), GATA4, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), transthyretin, and α-fetoprotein by day 7, and expressed CK18, HNF-4, and HNF-1α on days 14–28. Virtually all human, as well as a majority of rodent cells stained positive for albumin and CK18 on day 21; 5% (rodent) to 25% (human) cells were binucleated by day 21. These cells also acquired functional characteristics of hepatocytes: they secreted urea and albumin, had phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome p450, could take up LDL, and stored glycogen. MAPCs, which can be expanded in vitro and maintained in an undifferentiated state for more than 100 population doublings, can thus differentiate into cells with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. MAPCs may therefore be an ideal cell for in vivo therapies for liver disorders or for use in bioartificial liver devices. PMID:12021244

  14. Bioactivation of fluorotelomer alcohols in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jonathan W; Chan, Katie; Mabury, Scott A; O'Brien, Peter J

    2009-02-12

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs; C(x)F(2x+1)C(2)H(4)OH) are intermediates in the production of specialty surfactants and stain-repellent polymers. The magnitude and pathways of human exposure to FTOHs are not understood, but FTOHs are present in ambient air and house dust, and FTOH-derivatives are used in food-contact applications. Previously, electrophilic FTOH biotransformation products were detected in rat hepatocytes, and liver lesions were found in FTOH exposed rodents. To begin elucidating the mechanism(s) of action, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated with FTOHs, or FTOH biotransformation products, and toxicity was followed in the presence or absence of carbonyl scavengers and metabolic enzyme modulators. The LC(50) depended on perfluorinated chain length, with the shortest (4:2 FTOH; x=4) and longest (8:2 FTOH; x=8) FTOHs tested being more toxic than the medium chain length FTOH (6:2 FTOH; x=6); a structure-toxicity relationship that is consistent with that for 2-alkenals. For hepatocytes treated with 8:2 FTOH, cytotoxicity corresponded to depletion of glutathione (GSH), increased protein carbonylation, and lipid peroxidation. Aminobenzotriazole, a P450 inhibitor, diminished cytotoxicity for all FTOHs tested, and decreased protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation for 8:2 FTOH, indicating that a biotransformation product was responsible for FTOH cytotoxicity. Preincubation of hepatocytes with hydralazine or aminoguanidine decreased the cytotoxicity of 8:2 FTOH, suggesting that reactive aldehyde intermediates contributed to the cytotoxicity. A GSH-reactive alpha/beta-unsaturated acid metabolite was also more toxic than the corresponding FTOH, and may have contributed to the observed effects. Overall, these results suggested that FTOH toxicity was related to electrophilic aldehydes or acids through GSH depletion and protein carbonylation. Further research into the nature of protein modification is warranted for these current-use fluorochemicals.

  15. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  16. Artifacts in Digital Coincidence Timing

    PubMed Central

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e., the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the “optimal” method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  17. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2009-09-15

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  18. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  19. The largest fossil rodent.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2008-04-22

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene-Pleistocene (4-2Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities.

  20. Kupffer cells induce Notch-mediated hepatocyte conversion in a common mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Maiko; Horisawa, Kenichi; Miura, Shizuka; Takashima, Yasuo; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sekiya, Sayaka; Matsuda-Ito, Kanae; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of cells resembling cholangiocytes that line the intrahepatic bile ducts in portal areas of the hepatic lobule. Although ICC has been defined as a tumor arising from cholangiocyte transformation, recent evidence from genetic lineage-tracing experiments has indicated that hepatocytes can be a cellular origin of ICC by directly changing their fate to that of biliary lineage cells. Notch signaling has been identified as an essential factor for hepatocyte conversion into biliary lineage cells at the onset of ICC. However, the mechanisms underlying Notch signal activation in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here, using a mouse model of ICC, we found that hepatic macrophages called Kupffer cells transiently congregate around the central veins in the liver and express the Notch ligand Jagged-1 coincident with Notch activation in pericentral hepatocytes. Depletion of Kupffer cells prevents the Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion of hepatocytes to biliary lineage cells, inducing hepatocyte apoptosis and increasing mortality in mice. These findings will be useful for uncovering the pathogenic mechanism of ICC and developing prevenient and therapeutic strategies for this refractory disease. PMID:27698452

  1. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE PAGES

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  2. Electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hweiyan; Tsai, Shang-heng; Ting, Wei-Jen; Hu, Chao-Chin; Fuh, C Bor

    2014-05-21

    We investigated the use of amperometric and chronoamperometric methods with a double mediator system and screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the electrochemical sensing of hepatocyte viability. Cell counts were determined based on measuring cellular respiration via interaction of electroactive redox mediators. The oxidation currents of chronoamperometric measurement were proportional to the concentrations of ferrocyanide which was produced via interaction of cellular respiration, succinate and ferricyanide. The integrated oxidation charges increased linearly with the density of the cultured primary rat hepatocytes over a range of 1 × 10(5) to 5 × 10(5) cells per well (slope = 1.98 (±0.08) μC per 10(5) cells; R(2) = 0.9969), and the detection limit was 7600 (±300) cells per well based on S/N = 3. Each density of cells was cultured in triple replicates and individual cell samples were evaluated. The results of the cytotoxic effect of the chronoamperometric method are comparable to those of the tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay. The chronoamperometric method with ferricyanide and succinate mediators is an efficient, alternative method for assessing the viability of primary hepatocytes which can be completed in 20 min. Succinate did not provide an efficient electron shuttle between cytosolic respiratory redox activity of cancer cells and extracellular ferricyanide, an effect that may be useful for distinguishing hepatocarcinoma cells from healthy hepatocytes.

  3. The biosynthesis of ascorbate protects isolated rat hepatocytes from cumene hydroperoxide-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tom S; Shangari, Nandita; Wilson, John X; Chan, Helen; Butterworth, Roger F; O'Brien, Peter J

    2005-04-01

    Most animals synthesize ascorbate. It is an essential enzymatic cofactor for the synthesis of a variety of biological molecules and also a powerful antioxidant. There is, however, little direct evidence supporting an antioxidant role for endogenously produced ascorbate. Recently, we demonstrated that incubation of rat hepatocytes with 1-bromoheptane or phorone simultaneously depleted glutathione (GSH) and triggered rapid ascorbate synthesis. The present study investigates the hypothesis that endogenous ascorbate synthesis can confer protection against oxidative stress. Rat and guinea pig hepatocytes were depleted of GSH with 1-bromoheptane and subsequently treated with the oxidative stressor cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the presence or absence of the ascorbate synthesis inhibitor sorbinil. In rat hepatocytes, ascorbate content increased linearly (from 15.1 to 35.8 nmol/10(6) cells) over a 105-min incubation. Prior depletion of GSH increased CHP-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and cell death in rat and guinea pig hepatocytes. Inhibiting ascorbate synthesis, however, further elevated ROS production (2-fold), lipid peroxidation (1.5-fold), and cell death (2-fold) in rat hepatocytes only. This is the first time that endogenous ascorbate synthesis has been shown to decrease cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress. Protection by endogenously produced ascorbate may therefore need to be addressed when extrapolating data to humans from experiments using rodents capable of synthesizing ascorbate.

  4. Reduced expression of mature TGF beta 1 correlates with the suppression of rat hepatocyte apoptosis by the peroxisome proliferator, nafenopin.

    PubMed

    Strange, J; Roberts, R A

    1996-11-11

    Non-genotoxic carcinogens cause cancer without damaging the DNA. Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) are a class of potent rodent non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that may act by perturbing hepatocyte growth regulation. Previously, we have shown that although cultured rat hepatocytes degenerate rapidly in culture, their survival can be reversibly maintained by the PP nafenopin. This prolonged survival is associated with a decrease in the number of hepatocytes displaying the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. The addition of the negative growth regulator TGF beta-1 induced high levels of hepatocyte apoptosis but nafenopin was able to suppress this TGF beta-1 induced apoptosis. These data suggested that increased levels of mature TGF beta-1 may be involved in the signalling of the apoptosis seen in degenerating hepatocyte cultures. To test this hypothesis, we carried out Western blot analyses using a anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. There was an increase (p = 0.014) in expression of mature TGF beta 1 in degenerating rat hepatocyte cultures compared with hepatocyte cultures surviving in the presence of nafenopin. However, there was a concomitant decrease (p = 0.024) in TGF beta 1-latency activated protein (TGF beta 1-LAP), the precursor of the active, mature form. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that TGF beta 1/TGF beta 1-LAP expression was predominantly in the hepatocytes displaying apoptotic morphology although expression was detected also in non-parenchymal liver cells. The immunocytochemistry data indicate that TGF beta 1 is involved during the onset of hepatocyte apoptosis and that the PP nafenopin can impinge on this cell death pathway. TGF beta 1-LAP, probably produced mainly by the non-parenchymal liver cells, may be processed less efficiently to the mature, active form in the presence of nafenopin, although more data are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. From Mere Coincidences to Meaningful Discoveries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2007-01-01

    People's reactions to coincidences are often cited as an illustration of the irrationality of human reasoning about chance. We argue that coincidences may be better understood in terms of rational statistical inference, based on their functional role in processes of causal discovery and theory revision. We present a formal definition of…

  6. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  7. Sensitivity to coincidences and paranormal belief.

    PubMed

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim

    2011-12-01

    Often it is difficult to find a natural explanation as to why a surprising coincidence occurs. In attempting to find one, people may be inclined to accept paranormal explanations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether people with a lower threshold for being surprised by coincidences have a greater propensity to become believers compared to those with a higher threshold. Participants were exposed to artificial coincidences, which were formally defined as less or more probable, and were asked to provide remarkability ratings. Paranormal belief was measured by the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale. An analysis of the remarkability ratings revealed a significant interaction effect between Sheep-Goat score and type of coincidence, suggesting that people with lower thresholds of surprise, when experiencing coincidences, harbor higher paranormal belief than those with a higher threshold. The theoretical aspects of these findings were discussed.

  8. Hepatocytes: critical for glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Klover, Peter J; Mooney, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Maintaining blood glucose levels within a narrow range is a critical physiological function requiring multiple metabolic pathways and involving several cell types, including a prominent role for hepatocytes. Under hormonal control, hepatocytes can respond to either feeding or fasting conditions by storing or producing glucose as necessary. In the fasting state, the effects of glucagon avoid hypoglycemia by stimulating glucogenesis and glycogenolysis and initiating hepatic glucose release. Postprandially, insulin prevents hyperglycemia, in part, by suppressing hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and facilitating hepatic glycogen synthesis. Both transcriptional regulation of rate limiting enzymes and modulation of enzyme activity through phosphorylation and allosteric regulation are involved. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common serious metabolic condition in the world, and results from a subnormal response of tissues to insulin (insulin resistance) and a failure of the insulin-secreting beta cells to compensate. In type 2 diabetes, glucose is overproduced by the hepatocyte and is ineffectively metabolized by other organs. Impairments in the insulin signal transduction pathway appear to be critical lesions contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  9. The MAPK MEK1/2-ERK1/2 Pathway and Its Implication in Hepatocyte Cell Cycle Control

    PubMed Central

    Guégan, Jean-Philippe; Frémin, Christophe; Baffet, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of hepatocytes are powerful models in studying the sequence of events that are necessary for cell progression from a G0-like state to S phase. The models mimic the physiological process of hepatic regeneration after liver injury or partial hepatectomy. Many reports suggest that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2 can support hepatocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo and the MEK/ERK cascade acts as an essential element in hepatocyte responses induced by the EGF. Moreover, its disregulation has been associated with the promotion of tumor cell growth of a variety of tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Whereas the strict specificity of action of ERK1 and ERK2 is still debated, the MAPKs may have specific biological functions under certain contexts and according to the differentiation status of the cells, notably hepatocytes. In this paper, we will focus on MEK1/2-ERK1/2 activations and roles in normal rodent hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo after partial hepatectomy and in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The possible specificity of ERK1 and ERK2 in normal and transformed hepatocyte will be discussed in regard to other differentiated and undifferentiated cellular models. PMID:23133759

  10. Strategies for immortalization of primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eva, Ramboer; Bram, De Craene; Joery, De Kock; Tamara, Vanhaecke; Geert, Berx; Vera, Rogiers; Mathieu, Vinken

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the unique capacity to regenerate in response to a damaging event. Liver regeneration is hereby largely driven by hepatocyte proliferation, which in turn relies on cell cycling. The hepatocyte cell cycle is a complex process that is tightly regulated by several well-established mechanisms. In vitro, isolated hepatocytes do not longer retain this proliferative capacity. However, in vitro cell growth can be boosted by immortalization of hepatocytes. Well-defined immortalization genes can be artificially overexpressed in hepatocytes or the cells can be conditionally immortalized leading to controlled cell proliferation. This paper discusses the current immortalization techniques and provides a state-of-the-art overview of the actually available immortalized hepatocyte-derived cell lines and their applications. PMID:24911463

  11. Redesign of the GATE PET coincidence sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Buvat, Irène

    2016-09-01

    The GATE software platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit for simulating particle interactions with matter, enables simulation of, among other medical imaging and treatment systems, positron emission tomography. However, at least one publication (Moraes et al 2015 Phys. Med. 31 43-8) has reported discrepancies between the expected results and those obtained using GATE simulations, specifically with respect to the coincidence sorter which processes single events detected by the scanner to find coincidence pairs. In particular, the current software appears to overestimate the number of ‘true’ coincidence pairs when in multi-window mode, while the delayed coincidence window, used to estimate the randoms present in the prompt coincidence window, underestimates the randoms. Both effects are particularly evident at high count rates. We have investigated this discrepancy and reproduced the reported problems. We have also rewritten the relevant portion of the GATE code to correct the issue. In this note we describe the modifications to the coincidence sorter and repeat the simulations which previously showed unexpected results. Some discrepancies remain in the estimation of the randoms with the single-window mode which are a consequence of the algorithm itself. In multi-window mode however, the simulation agrees exactly with the expected results. The modifications to the coincidence sorter code will be incorporated into the next release of GATE (> version 7.2).

  12. Coincidence lattices in the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Andrade, M A; Aragón-González, G; Aragón, J L; Gómez-Rodríguez, A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of coincidences of lattices in the space R(p,q), with p + q = 2, is analyzed using Clifford algebra. We show that, as in R(n), any coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of at most two reflections by vectors of the lattice. Bases and coincidence indices are constructed explicitly for several interesting lattices. Our procedure is metric-independent and, in particular, the hyperbolic plane is obtained when p = q = 1. Additionally, we provide a proof of the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem for R(p,q), with p + q = 2, that includes an algorithm to decompose an orthogonal transformation into a product of reflections.

  13. Rodent models of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Rodent models of sleep apnea have long been used to provide novel insight into the generation and predisposition to apneas as well as to characterize the impact of sleep apnea on cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychological health in humans. Given the significant body of work utilizing rodent models in the field of sleep apnea, the aims of this review are three-fold: first, to review the use of rodents as natural models of sleep apnea; second, to provide an overview of the experimental interventions employed in rodents to simulate sleep apnea; third, to discuss the refinement of rodent models to further our understanding of breathing abnormalities that occur during sleep. Given mounting evidence that sleep apnea impairs cognitive function, reduces quality of life, and exacerbates the course of multiple chronic diseases, rodent models will remain a high priority as a tool to interrogate both the pathophysiology and sequelae of breathing related abnormalities during sleep and to improve approaches to diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  15. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    15 ML W_____ 1 .5 1.25 1-4 1. j . .. .... AD CHEMOTHERAPY OF RODENT MALARIA /I ’ IFINAL REPORT 00 WALLACE PETERS MD DSc I!JULY 1985 Supported by US...Table 15 and detailed report sheets are appended as Tables 16 through 21. 3.1.1 WR 251855 AA This lepidine, an analogue of primaquine, is very active...in our 15 preliminary test. The remaining three compounds also exhibited toxicity in varying degrees at this dose and, consequently, even the low level

  16. Determining activities of radionuclides from coincidence signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, L. Eric; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, Edward; Hossbach, Todd W.; Valsan, Andrei B.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral analysis of simultaneously observed photons in separate detectors may provide an invaluable tool for radioisotope identification applications. A general recursive method to determine the activity of an isotope from the observed coincidence signature rate is discussed. The method coherently accounts for effects of true coincidence summing within a single detector and detection efficiencies. A verification of the approach with computer simulations is also discussed.

  17. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α in adult mice results in increased hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Walesky, Chad; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Edwards, Genea; Borude, Prachi; Apte, Udayan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) is known as the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. Recent studies indicate that HNF4α may inhibit hepatocyte proliferation via mechanisms that have yet to be identified. Using a HNF4α knockdown mouse model based on delivery of inducible Cre recombinase via an adeno-associated virus 8 viral vector, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of HNF4α resulted in increased hepatocyte proliferation. Global gene expression analysis showed that a majority of the downregulated genes were previously known HNF4α target genes involved in hepatic differentiation. Interestingly, ≥500 upregulated genes were associated with cell proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, we identified potential negative target genes of HNF4α, many of which are involved in the stimulation of proliferation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed binding of HNF4α at three of these genes. Furthermore, overexpression of HNF4α in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells resulted in a decrease in promitogenic gene expression and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these data indicate that, apart from its role in hepatocyte differentiation, HNF4α actively inhibits hepatocyte proliferation by repression of specific promitogenic genes.

  18. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α in adult mice results in increased hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Walesky, Chad; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Edwards, Genea; Borude, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) is known as the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. Recent studies indicate that HNF4α may inhibit hepatocyte proliferation via mechanisms that have yet to be identified. Using a HNF4α knockdown mouse model based on delivery of inducible Cre recombinase via an adeno-associated virus 8 viral vector, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of HNF4α resulted in increased hepatocyte proliferation. Global gene expression analysis showed that a majority of the downregulated genes were previously known HNF4α target genes involved in hepatic differentiation. Interestingly, ≥500 upregulated genes were associated with cell proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, we identified potential negative target genes of HNF4α, many of which are involved in the stimulation of proliferation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed binding of HNF4α at three of these genes. Furthermore, overexpression of HNF4α in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells resulted in a decrease in promitogenic gene expression and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these data indicate that, apart from its role in hepatocyte differentiation, HNF4α actively inhibits hepatocyte proliferation by repression of specific promitogenic genes. PMID:23104559

  19. Rodent carcinogens: Setting priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Stern, B.R.; Manley, N.B.; Ames, B.N. )

    1992-10-09

    The human diet contains an enormous background of natural chemicals, such as plant pesticides and the products of cooking, that have not been a focus of carcinogenicity testing. A broadened perspective that includes these natural chemicals is necessary. A comparison of possible hazards for 80 daily exposures to rodent carcinogens from a variety of sources is presented, using an index (HERP) that relates human exposure to carcinogenic potency in rodents. A similar ordering would be expected with the use of standard risk assessment methodology for the same human exposure values. Results indicate that, when viewed against the large background of naturally occurring carcinogens in typical portions of common foods, the residues of synthetic pesticides or environmental pollutants rank low. A similar result is obtained in a separate comparison of 32 average daily exposures to natural pesticides and synthetic pesticides residues in the diet. Although the findings do not indicate that these natural dietary carcinogens are important in human cancer, they cast doubt on the relative importance for human cancer of low-dose exposures to synthetic chemicals.

  20. Hepatocyte Death: A Clear and Present Danger

    PubMed Central

    MALHI, HARMEET; GUICCIARDI, MARIA EUGENIA; GORES, GREGORY J.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatocyte is especially vulnerable to injury due to its central role in xenobiotic metabolism including drugs and alcohol, participation in lipid and fatty acid metabolism, its unique role in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, the widespread prevalence of hepatotropic viruses, and its existence within a milieu of innate immune responding cells. Apoptosis and necrosis are the most widely recognized forms of hepatocyte cell death. The hepatocyte displays many unique features regarding cell death by apoptosis. It is quite susceptible to death receptor-mediated injury, and its death receptor signaling pathways involve the mitochondrial pathway for efficient cell killing. Also, death receptors can trigger lysosomal disruption in hepatocytes which further promote cell and tissue injury. Interestingly, hepatocytes are protected from cell death by only two anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, which have nonredundant functions. Endoplasmic reticulum stress or the unfolded protein response contributes to hepatocyte cell death during alterations of lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Finally, the current information implicating RIP kinases in necrosis provides an approach to more fully address this mode of cell death in hepatocyte injury. All of these processes contributing to hepatocyte injury are discussed in the context of potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:20664081

  1. Aquaporins in desert rodent physiology.

    PubMed

    Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-01

    Desert rodents face a sizeable challenge in maintaining salt and water homeostasis due to their life in an arid environment. A number of their organ systems exhibit functional characteristics that limit water loss above that which occurs in non-desert species under similar conditions. These systems include renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, nasal, and skin epithelia. The desert rodent kidney preserves body water by producing a highly concentrated urine that reaches a maximum osmolality nearly three times that of the common laboratory rat. The precise mechanism by which urine is concentrated in any mammal is unknown. Insights into the process may be more apparent in species that produce highly concentrated urine. Aquaporin water channels play a fundamental role in water transport in several desert rodent organ systems. The role of aquaporins in facilitating highly effective water preservation in desert rodents is only beginning to be explored. The organ systems of desert rodents and their associated AQPs are described.

  2. A light- and electron-microscope study of hepatocytes of rats fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Douglas A; Chapman, George B

    2007-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are used in the treatment of epilepsy in children refractory to drug therapy. This study identifies changes in liver morphology in rats fed four different diets: a normal rodent chow diet, a calorie-restricted high-fat (ketogenic) diet and each diet supplemented with clofibric acid. Hepatocytes of rats fed the ketogenic diet show many lipid droplets and these are reduced to control levels when clofibrate is present in the diet. Mitochondria are enlarged in the livers of rats fed the ketogenic diet and further enlarged if clofibrate is present. Alterations in the appearance or numbers of other organelles are also found.

  3. WNT5A Inhibits Hepatocyte Proliferation and Concludes β-Catenin Signaling in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Cusimano, Antonella; Monga, Jappmann K.; Preziosi, Morgan E.; Pullara, Filippo; Calero, Guillermo; Lang, Richard; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Nejak-Bowen, Kari N.; Monga, Satdarshan P.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during liver regeneration (LR) after partial hepatectomy (PH) is observed in several species. However, how this pathway is turned off when hepatocyte proliferation is no longer required is unknown. We assessed LR in liver-specific knockouts of Wntless (Wls-LKO), a protein required for Wnt secretion from a cell. When subjected to PH, Wls-LKO showed prolongation of hepatocyte proliferation for up to 4 days compared with littermate controls. This coincided with increased β-catenin–T-cell factor 4 interaction and cyclin-D1 expression. Wls-LKO showed decreased expression and secretion of inhibitory Wnt5a during LR. Wnt5a expression increased between 24 and 48 hours, and Frizzled-2 between 24 and 72 hours, after PH in normal mice. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes and liver tumor cells with Wnt5a led to a notable decrease in β-catenin–T-cell factor activity, cyclin-D1 expression, and cell proliferation. Intriguingly, Wnt5a-LKO did not display any prolongation of LR because of compensation by other cells. In addition, Wnt5a-LKO hepatocytes failed to respond to exogenous Wnt5a treatment in culture because of a compensatory decrease in Frizzled-2 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate Wnt5a to be, by default, a negative regulator of β-catenin signaling and hepatocyte proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide evidence that the Wnt5a/Frizzled-2 axis suppresses β-catenin signaling in hepatocytes in an autocrine manner, thereby contributing to timely conclusion of the LR process. PMID:26100214

  4. WNT5A inhibits hepatocyte proliferation and concludes β-catenin signaling in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Cusimano, Antonella; Monga, Jappmann K; Preziosi, Morgan E; Pullara, Filippo; Calero, Guillermo; Lang, Richard; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Nejak-Bowen, Kari N; Monga, Satdarshan P

    2015-08-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during liver regeneration (LR) after partial hepatectomy (PH) is observed in several species. However, how this pathway is turned off when hepatocyte proliferation is no longer required is unknown. We assessed LR in liver-specific knockouts of Wntless (Wls-LKO), a protein required for Wnt secretion from a cell. When subjected to PH, Wls-LKO showed prolongation of hepatocyte proliferation for up to 4 days compared with littermate controls. This coincided with increased β-catenin-T-cell factor 4 interaction and cyclin-D1 expression. Wls-LKO showed decreased expression and secretion of inhibitory Wnt5a during LR. Wnt5a expression increased between 24 and 48 hours, and Frizzled-2 between 24 and 72 hours, after PH in normal mice. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes and liver tumor cells with Wnt5a led to a notable decrease in β-catenin-T-cell factor activity, cyclin-D1 expression, and cell proliferation. Intriguingly, Wnt5a-LKO did not display any prolongation of LR because of compensation by other cells. In addition, Wnt5a-LKO hepatocytes failed to respond to exogenous Wnt5a treatment in culture because of a compensatory decrease in Frizzled-2 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate Wnt5a to be, by default, a negative regulator of β-catenin signaling and hepatocyte proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide evidence that the Wnt5a/Frizzled-2 axis suppresses β-catenin signaling in hepatocytes in an autocrine manner, thereby contributing to timely conclusion of the LR process.

  5. Coincidence imaging system with electron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Jakubek, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Zemlicka, J.; Horacek, M.; Radlicka, T.; Vlcek, I.

    2011-05-01

    As a part of multiple-detector system for coincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis (CINAA) a new method which includes a devoted electron optic unit has been built. In order to achieve higher sensitivity, enhanced contrast and higher spatial resolution the new coincidence imaging arrangement newly incorporates to electron optic unit, source, the gamma detector and the Timepix electron detector. The electron optic unit can be configured for different electron energies. The description of the assembled apparatus, calibration and performance for different electron energies are presented.

  6. On Points of Coincidence of Two Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidjan, V. R.

    1981-02-01

    This paper is devoted to the coincidence theory of two continuous mappings.A definition is given, in cohomological terms, of the coincidence index I_{f, g} of two continuous mappings f, g \\colon M \\to N, where M and N are connected (not necessarily compact), orientable, n-dimensional topological manifolds without boundary, f is a compact mapping and g is a proper mapping.Invariance of the index I_{f, g} under compact homotopies of f and proper homotopies of g is proved. It is shown that I_{f, g} \

  7. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans.

  8. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  9. Hepatocyte transplantation-biology and application.

    PubMed

    Gewartowska, M; Olszewski, Waldemar L

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation of liver has been remarkably effective in the treatment of liver failure and liver-based inherited metabolic diseases and has revolutionized the care of patients with end-stage liver disease. Unfortunately demand for transplantable livers is progressively outpacing the supply of donated cadaver organs, resulting in longer waiting times and increased mortality for prospective transplant recipients. Hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed as a method to support patients with liver insufficiency. The current knowledge on this method has been review in this article. Now the two-step collagenase perfusion technique is widely used for isolation of hepatocytes. Liver has been considered as an optimal site for hepatocyte transplantation, however, even in this organ the survival rate of transplanted hepatocytes in extremely low. The main obstacle for wider usage of hepatocyte transplantation is their rapid elimination by recipient macrophages. We tried in animal experiments to downregulate the innate process of recipient cellular attack on implanted hepatocytes by irradiation of recipient and elimination of NK cells. Ligation of bile duct and partial hepatectomies facilitated proliferation of accepted donor hepatocytes and formation of bile canaliculi. The described method is now adjusted to clinical conditions.

  10. Progressive induction of hepatocyte progenitor cells in chronically injured liver

    PubMed Central

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Yuji; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated epithelial cells show substantial lineage plasticity upon severe tissue injuries. In chronically injured mouse livers, part of hepatocytes become Sry-HMG box containing 9 (Sox9) (+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule (−) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (+) biphenotypic hepatocytes. However, it is not clear whether all Sox9+ hepatocytes uniformly possess cellular properties as hepatocyte progenitors. Here, we examined the microarray data comparing Sox9+ hepatocytes with mature hepatocytes and identified CD24 as a novel marker for biphenotypic hepatocytes. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that part of Sox9+ hepatocytes near expanded ductular structures expressed CD24 in the liver injured by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-collidine (DDC) diet and by bile duct ligation. Indeed, Sox9+ hepatocytes could be separated into CD24− and CD24+ cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The ratio of CD24+ cells against CD24− ones in Sox9+ hepatocytes gradually increased while DDC-injury progressed and colony-forming capability mostly attributed to CD24+ cells. Although hepatocyte markers were remarkably downregulated in of Sox9+ CD24+ hepatocytes, they re-differentiated into mature hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Our current results demonstrate that the emergence of biphenotypic hepatocytes is a sequential event including the transition from CD24− and CD24+ status, which may be a crucial step for hepatocytes to acquire progenitor properties. PMID:28051157

  11. A generalized model for coincidence counting

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.

    1993-12-31

    A generalized model for coincidence counting has been developed based on the dual probability generating function introduced. The model accounts explicitly and simultaneously the effects of multiplication, absorption by poison and instrument detection and is applicable for a wide class of NDA including Pu in waste.

  12. Parallel Memory Addressing Using Coincident Optical Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-15

    diodes, and NEC NDL2102 avalanche photodiodes, are specified to operate in excess of I GHz. 2) The percentage of overlap for coincident pulses must be...Donald M. Chiarulli is an assistant professor of Rami G. Melhem has been with the faculty of Steven P. Levitan is the Wellington C. Carl computer

  13. Oculoscopy in Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2015-09-01

    Ophthalmic diseases are common in rabbits and rodents. Fast and definitive diagnosis is imperative for successful treatment of ocular diseases. Ophthalmic examination in rabbits and rodents can be challenging. Oculoscopy offers great magnification for the examination of the ocular structures in such animals, including the evaluation of cornea, anterior eye chamber, limbus, iris, lens, and retina. To date, oculoscopy has been described only sporadically and/or under experimental conditions. This article describes the oculoscopy technique, normal and abnormal ocular findings, and the most common eye disorders diagnosed with the aid of endoscopy in rabbits and rodents.

  14. Using Compton scattering for random coincidence rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) project presents a new approach for the design of nuclear medicine imaging devices by using highly segmented pixel CdTe sensors. CdTe detectors can achieve an energy resolution of ≈ 1% FWHM at 511 keV and can be easily segmented into submillimeter sized voxels for optimal spatial resolution. These features help in rejecting a large part of the scattered events from the PET coincidence sample in order to obtain high quality images. Another contribution to the background are random events, i.e., hits caused by two independent gammas without a common origin. Given that 60% of 511 keV photons undergo Compton scattering in CdTe (i.e. 84% of all coincidence events have at least one Compton scattering gamma), we present a simulation study on the possibility to use the Compton scattering information of at least one of the coincident gammas within the detector to reject random coincidences. The idea uses the fact that if a gamma undergoes Compton scattering in the detector, it will cause two hits in the pixel detectors. The first hit corresponds to the Compton scattering process. The second hit shall correspond to the photoelectric absorption of the remaining energy of the gamma. With the energy deposition of the first hit, one can calculate the Compton scattering angle. By measuring the hit location of the coincident gamma, we can construct the geometric angle, under the assumption that both gammas come from the same origin. Using the difference between the Compton scattering angle and the geometric angle, random events can be rejected.

  15. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePlus

    ... rodent food sources and nesting sites... Diseases from rodents Diseases directly transmitted by rodents Diseases indirectly transmitted by rodents Cleaning up after rodents Take precautions before and during clean up of ...

  16. In utero Transplanted Human Hepatocytes Allows for Postnatal Engraftment of Human Hepatocytes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James E; Lillegard, Joseph B; Mckenzie, Travis J; Rodysill, Brian R; Wettstein, Peter J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2012-01-01

    In utero cell transplantation (IUCT) can lead to postnatal engraftment of human cells in the xenogeneic recipient. Most reports of IUCTs have involved hematopoietic stem cells. It is unknown if human hepatocytes used for IUCT in fetal pigs will lead to engraftment of these same cells in the postnatal environment. In this study, fetal pigs received direct liver injections of 1×107 human hepatocytes in utero and were delivered by cesarean-section at term. Piglets received a second direct liver injection of 5×107 human hepatocytes 1 week postnatally. Serum was analyzed for human albumin at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-engraftment. Piglet livers were harvested 6 weeks after transplantation and examined by immunohistochemistry, PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization for human specific sequences. Piglets receiving IUCT with human hepatocytes that were postnatally engrafted with human hepatocytes showed significant levels of human albumin production in their serum at all post-engraftment time points. Human albumin gene expression, the presence of human hepatocytes and the presence of human beta-2 microglobulin were all confirmed 6 weeks post-engraftment. IUCT in fetal pigs using human hepatocytes early in gestation allowed for engraftment of human hepatocytes, which remained viable and functional for weeks after transplantation. IUCT followed by postnatal engraftment may provide a future means for large scale expansion of human hepatocytes in genetically-engineered pigs. PMID:23280879

  17. Rodent empathy and affective neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, Jules B; Lahvis, Garet P

    2011-10-01

    In the past few years, several experimental studies have suggested that empathy occurs in the social lives of rodents. Thus, rodent behavioral models can now be developed to elucidate the mechanistic substrates of empathy at levels that have heretofore been unavailable. For example, the finding that mice from certain inbred strains express behavioral and physiological responses to conspecific distress, while others do not, underscores that the genetic underpinnings of empathy are specifiable and that they could be harnessed to develop new therapies for human psychosocial impairments. However, the advent of rodent models of empathy is met at the outset with a number of theoretical and semantic problems that are similar to those previously confronted by studies of empathy in humans. The distinct underlying components of empathy must be differentiated from one another and from lay usage of the term. The primary goal of this paper is to review a set of seminal studies that are directly relevant to developing a concept of empathy in rodents. We first consider some of the psychological phenomena that have been associated with empathy, and within this context, we consider the component processes, or endophenotypes of rodent empathy. We then review a series of recent experimental studies that demonstrate the capability of rodents to detect and respond to the affective state of their social partners. We focus primarily on experiments that examine how rodents share affective experiences of fear, but we also highlight how similar types of experimental paradigms can be utilized to evaluate the possibility that rodents share positive affective experiences. Taken together, these studies were inspired by Jaak Panksepp's theory that all mammals are capable of felt affective experiences.

  18. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron-ion coincidence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztáray, Bálint

    2016-10-01

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ˜103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. This advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  19. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztaray, Balint

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  20. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; ...

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity atmore » every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.« less

  1. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  2. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  3. Toward a solution of the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2008-07-15

    The coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration constitutes a serious riddle with regard to our understanding of the evolution of the Universe. Here we argue that this problem may someday be solved - or better understood - by expressing the Hubble expansion rate as a function of the ratio of densities (dark matter/dark energy) and observationally determining the said rate in terms of the redshift.

  4. Optimality in the zonation of ammonia detoxification in rodent liver.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Pfaff, Michael; Ghallab, Ahmed; Driesch, Dominik; Henkel, Sebastian G; Hengstler, Jan G; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zellmer, Sebastian; Li, Pu

    2015-11-01

    The rodent liver eliminates toxic ammonia. In mammals, three enzymes (or enzyme systems) are involved in this process: glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and the urea cycle enzymes, represented by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The distribution of these enzymes for optimal ammonia detoxification was determined by numerical optimization. This in silico approach predicted that the enzymes have to be zonated in order to achieve maximal removal of toxic ammonia and minimal changes in glutamine concentration. Using 13 compartments, representing hepatocytes, the following predictions were generated: glutamine synthetase is active only within a narrow pericentral zone. Glutaminase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase are located in the periportal zone in a non-homogeneous distribution. This correlates well with the paradoxical observation that in a first step glutamine-bound ammonia is released (by glutaminase) although one of the functions of the liver is detoxification by ammonia fixation. The in silico approach correctly predicted the in vivo enzyme distributions also for non-physiological conditions (e.g. starvation) and during regeneration after tetrachloromethane (CCl4) intoxication. Metabolite concentrations of glutamine, ammonia and urea in each compartment, representing individual hepatocytes, were predicted. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed a striking robustness of the results. These bioinformatics predictions were validated experimentally by immunohistochemistry and are supported by the literature. In summary, optimization approaches like the one applied can provide valuable explanations and high-quality predictions for in vivo enzyme and metabolite distributions in tissues and can reveal unknown metabolic functions.

  5. [Use of hepatocytes in primary cultures to predict potential hepatocarcinogenicity of compounds

    PubMed

    Bieri, F.; Muakkassah-Kelly, S.; Bentley, P.

    1990-01-01

    Short-term tests for genotoxic activity will detect a variety of potential carcinogens. However, experience over the last few years has shown that many chemical carcinogens are not detected in these tests. A large proportion of these non-mutagenic (non-genotoxic) carcinogens induce tumors in the rodent liver after life-long feeding. One class of such carcinogens are the hypolipidemic drugs many of which induce a characteristic hepatomegaly upon subchronic treatment. Typically this liver enlargement is accompanied by increased mitotic activity and a proliferation of the hepatic peroxisome compartment. Results also suggest a correlation between the degree and the nature of the hepatomegalic response to a compound, and its hepatocarcinogenic potency, but it remains unclear whether the growth stimulation and/or the peroxisome proliferation is correlated with the carcinogenicity. Both, the induction of peroxisomal enzyme and of replicative DMA synthesis may be measured in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes following in vitro exposition. Moreover, the ability of the compounds tested to induce in vitro replicative DNA synthesis in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes correlated well with the potency of the hepatomegalic response induced in vivo in treated rodents. Consequently, studies using such cultures might be useful to characterize and possibly predict in vitro the hepatocarcinogenic potency of some new compounds. The early recognition of the possible carcinogenic property of a new substance might accordingly contribute to the reduction of a number of life-long studies.

  6. Organic anion uptake by hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Allan W

    2014-10-01

    Many of the compounds taken up by the liver are organic anions that circulate tightly bound to protein carriers such as albumin. The fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver permits these compounds to have access to hepatocytes. Studies to characterize hepatic uptake of organic anions through kinetic analyses, suggested that it was carrier-mediated. Attempts to identify specific transporters by biochemical approaches were largely unsuccessful and were replaced by studies that utilized expression cloning. These studies led to identification of the organic anion transport proteins (oatps), a family of 12 transmembrane domain glycoproteins that have broad and often overlapping substrate specificities. The oatps mediate Na(+)-independent organic anion uptake. Other studies identified a seven transmembrane domain glycoprotein, Na(+)/taurocholate transporting protein (ntcp) as mediating Na(+)-dependent uptake of bile acids as well as other organic anions. Although mutations or deficiencies of specific members of the oatp family have been associated with transport abnormalities, there have been no such reports for ntcp, and its physiologic role remains to be determined, although expression of ntcp in vitro recapitulates the characteristics of Na(+)-dependent bile acid transport that is seen in vivo. Both ntcp and oatps traffic between the cell surface and intracellular vesicular pools. These vesicles move through the cell on microtubules, using the microtubule based motors dynein and kinesins. Factors that regulate this motility are under study and may provide a unique mechanism that can alter the plasma membrane content of these transporters and consequently their accessibility to circulating ligands.

  7. Differentiation-Promoting Medium Additives for Hepatocyte Cultivation and Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Gouliarmou, Varvara; Pelkonen, Olavi; Coecke, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Isolated primary hepatocytes are considered as the reference system for in vitro hepatic methods. Following the isolation of primary hepatocytes from liver tissue, an unfavorable process named dedifferentiation is initiated leading to the attenuation of the hepatocellular phenotype both at the morphological and functional level. Freshly isolated hepatocytes can be used immediately or can be cryopreserved for future purposes. Currently, a number of antidedifferentiation strategies exist to extend the life span of isolated hepatocytes. The addition of differentiation-promoting compounds to the hepatocyte culture medium is the oldest and simplest antidedifferentiation approach applied. In the present chapter, the most commonly used medium additives for cultivation and cryopreservation of primary hepatocytes are reviewed.

  8. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background. PMID:27110457

  9. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig R

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background.

  10. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  11. A coincidence detection system based on real-time software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, Sindulfo; José Blanco, Juan; Medina, José; Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; García-Población, Oscar; García Tejedor, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Conventional real-time coincidence systems use electronic circuitry to detect coincident pulses (hardware coincidence). In this work, a new concept of coincidence system based on real-time software (software coincidence) is presented. This system is based on the recurrent supervision of the analogue-to-digital converters status, which is described in detail. A prototype has been designed and built using a low-cost development platform. It has been applied to two different experimental sets for cosmic ray muon detection. Experimental muon measurements recorded simultaneously using conventional hardware coincidence and our software coincidence system have been compared, yielding identical results. These measurements have also been validated using simultaneous neutron monitor observations. This new software coincidence system provides remarkable advantages such as higher simplicity of interconnection and adjusting. Thus, our system replaces, at least, three Nuclear Instrument Modules (NIMs) required by conventional coincidence systems, reducing its cost by a factor of 40 and eliminating pulse delay adjustments.

  12. Interrogation of infected hepatocyte signaling reveals that suppression of host p53 is critical for Plasmodium liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Ye, Albert S.; Austin, Laura S.; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Camargo, Nelly; Metzger, Peter G.; Douglass, Alyse N.; MacBeath, Gavin; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium parasites infect the liver and replicate inside hepatocytes before they invade erythrocytes and trigger clinical malaria. Analysis of host signaling pathways affected by liver stage infection could provide critical insights into host-pathogen interactions and reveal targets for intervention. Using protein lysate microarrays we found that Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites perturb hepatocyte regulatory pathways involved in cell survival, proliferation and autophagy. Notably, the pro-death protein p53 was substantially decreased in infected hepatocytes, suggesting it could be targeted by the parasite to foster survival. Indeed, mice that express increased levels of p53 showed reduced liver stage parasite burden whereas p53 knockout mice suffered increased liver stage burden. Furthermore, boosting p53 levels using the small molecule Nutlin-3 dramatically reduced liver stage burden in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that perturbation of the hepatocyte p53 pathway critically impacts parasite survival. Thus, host pathways might constitute potential targets for host-based antimalarial prophylaxis. PMID:23478020

  13. Cholangiocarcinomas can originate from hepatocytes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Biao; Malato, Yann; Calvisi, Diego F.; Naqvi, Syed; Razumilava, Nataliya; Ribback, Silvia; Gores, Gregory J.; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) are primary liver tumors with a poor prognosis. The development of effective therapies has been hampered by a limited understanding of the biology of ICCs. Although ICCs exhibit heterogeneity in location, histology, and marker expression, they are currently thought to derive invariably from the cells lining the bile ducts, biliary epithelial cells (BECs), or liver progenitor cells (LPCs). Despite lack of experimental evidence establishing BECs or LPCs as the origin of ICCs, other liver cell types have not been considered. Here we show that ICCs can originate from fully differentiated hepatocytes. Using a mouse model of hepatocyte fate tracing, we found that activated NOTCH and AKT signaling cooperate to convert normal hepatocytes into biliary cells that act as precursors of rapidly progressing, lethal ICCs. Our findings suggest a previously overlooked mechanism of human ICC formation that may be targetable for anti-ICC therapy. PMID:22797301

  14. Guide to Commensal Rodent Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    slaughterhouses. Pigs have been shown to contract trichinosis from infected rat feces in their food. i. Tapeworms - Hymenolepis nana and H. dimanuta...are two of the intestinal parasites transmitted to man by food that has been contaminated with tapeworm - bearing rodent feces. j. Tetanus - The wound

  15. Allometric disparity in rodent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, allometric trajectories for 51 rodent species, comprising equal representatives from each of the major clades (Ctenohystrica, Muroidea, Sciuridae), are compared in a multivariate morphospace (=allometric space) to quantify magnitudes of disparity in cranial growth. Variability in allometric trajectory patterns was compared to measures of adult disparity in each clade, and dietary habit among the examined species, which together encapsulated an ecomorphological breadth. Results indicate that the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents is characterized by different features in sciurids compared with muroids and Ctenohystrica. Sciuridae was found to have a reduced magnitude of inter-trajectory change and growth patterns with less variation in allometric coefficient values among members. In contrast, a greater magnitude of difference between trajectories and an increased variation in allometric coefficient values was evident for both Ctenohystrica and muroids. Ctenohystrica and muroids achieved considerably higher adult disparities than sciurids, suggesting that conservatism in allometric trajectory modification may constrain morphological diversity in rodents. The results provide support for a role of ecology (dietary habit) in the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents. PMID:23610638

  16. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  17. Rodent Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Samuel E; Eshar, David; Wouda, Raelene M

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence in rodent species varies dramatically from a common occurrence in mice and rats to just a limited number of documented cases in chinchillas and degus. This article summarizes common tumors, both benign and malignant, that have been reported to occur in rodents. Outlined are clinical signs, diagnostics, and treatments that have been described for rodents presenting with specific neoplasms.

  18. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  19. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  20. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  1. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  2. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  3. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pérez, Mayra; Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Luna-López, Armando; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Miranda, Roxana U; Muñoz, Linda; Gomez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system.

  4. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Pérez, Mayra; Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Luna-López, Armando; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Miranda, Roxana U.; Muñoz, Linda; Gomez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system. PMID:27143995

  5. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  6. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  7. Targeted transplantation of mitochondria to hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Catherine H; Wu, George Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial defects in hepatocytes can result in liver dysfunction and death. Hepatocytes have cell-surface asialoglycoprotein receptors (AsGRs) which internalize AsGs within endosomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondria could be targeted to hepatocytes by AsGR-mediated endocytosis. Materials and methods An AsG, AsOR, was linked to polylysine to create a conjugate, AsOR-PL, and complexed with healthy and functional mitochondria (defined by normal morphology, cytochrome c assays, and oxygen-consumption rates). Huh7 (AsGR+) and SK Hep1 (AsGR−) cells were treated with a mitochondrial toxin to form Huh7-Mito− and SK Hep1-Mito− cells, lacking detectable mitochondrial DNA. An endosomolytic peptide, LLO, was coupled to AsOR to form AsOR-LLO. A lysosomal inhibitor, amantadine, was used in mitochondria-uptake studies as a control for nonspecific endosomal release. Results Coincubation of complexed mitochondria and AsOR-LLO with Huh7-Mito− cells increased mitochondrial DNA to >9,700-fold over control at 7 days (P<0.001), and increased mitochondrial oxygen-consumption rates to >90% of control by 10 days. Conclusion Rescue of mitochondria-damaged hepatocytes can be achieved by targeted uptake of normal mitochondria through receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27942238

  8. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  9. Coincidence avoidance principle in surface haptic interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Steven G.; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Peshkin, Michael A.; Colgate, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    When multiple fingertips experience force sensations, how does the brain interpret the combined sensation? In particular, under what conditions are the sensations perceived as separate or, alternatively, as an integrated whole? In this work, we used a custom force-feedback device to display force signals to two fingertips (index finger and thumb) as they traveled along collinear paths. Each finger experienced a pattern of forces that, taken individually, produced illusory virtual bumps, and subjects reported whether they felt zero, one, or two bumps. We varied the spatial separation between these bump-like force-feedback regions, from being much greater than the finger span to nearly exactly the finger span. When the bump spacing was the same as the finger span, subjects tended to report only one bump. We found that the results are consistent with a quantitative model of perception in which the brain selects a structural interpretation of force signals that relies on minimizing coincidence stemming from accidental alignments between fingertips and inferred surface structures. PMID:25675477

  10. Broadband Electromagnetic Pulses Coinciding with Sprite Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Symbalisty, E.; Chanrion, O.; van der Velde, O. A.; Odzimek, A.; Whitley, T.; Neubert, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study reports novel optical sprite observations in southern France during the summer months 2009 and the associated electromagnetic radiation emitted in the frequency range >50 kHz. About 10% of the observed sprites are associated with consecutive pulses of >50 kHz electromagnetic radiation. Some of these broadband pulses occur simultaneously with the sprite luminosity. In particular, the electromagnetic radiation of the sprite itself can coincide with a broadband pulse. This behaviour is predicted by the relativistic runaway breakdown theory, in which the lightning electromagnetic field accelerates free electrons to form a narrow particle beam shooting upward into near-Earth space. This vertical relativistic runaway breakdown describes a novel physical process within the Earth's atmosphere, even though it may occur only on extremely rare occasions, i.e., ~100 upward particle beams per day around the globe. The wealth of currently planned future space missions in this research area will greatly enhance the detection likelihood of the predicted particle beams.

  11. K-chameleon and the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we present a hybrid model of k-essence and chameleon, named as k-chameleon. In this model, due to the chameleon mechanism, the directly strong coupling between the k-chameleon field and matters (cold dark matters and baryons) is allowed. In the radiation-dominated epoch, the interaction between the k-chameleon field and background matters can be neglected; the behavior of the k-chameleon therefore is the same as that of the ordinary k-essence. After the onset of matter domination, the strong coupling between the k-chameleon and matters dramatically changes the result of the ordinary k-essence. We find that during the matter-dominated epoch, only two kinds of attractors may exist: one is the familiar K attractor and the other is a completely new, dubbed C attractor. Once the Universe is attracted into the C attractor, the fraction energy densities of the k-chameleon {omega}{sub {phi}} and dust matter {omega}{sub m} are fixed and comparable, and the Universe will undergo a power-law accelerated expansion. One can adjust the model so that the K attractor does not appear. Thus, the k-chameleon model provides a natural solution to the cosmological coincidence problem.

  12. Extensive Epigenetic Changes Accompany Terminal Differentiation of Mouse Hepatocytes After Birth

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Matthew V.; Pilarowski, Genay; Liu, Xiuli; Serre, David

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is traditionally thought to be established during early development and to remain mostly unchanged thereafter in healthy tissues, although recent studies have shown that this epigenetic mark can be more dynamic. Epigenetic changes occur in the liver after birth, but the timing and underlying biological processes leading to DNA methylation changes are not well understood. We hypothesized that this epigenetic reprogramming was the result of terminal differentiation of hepatocyte precursors. Using genomic approaches, we characterized the DNA methylation patterns in mouse liver from E18.5 until adulthood to determine if the timing of the DNA methylation change overlaps with hepatocyte terminal differentiation, and to examine the genomic context of these changes and identify the regulatory elements involved. Out of 271,325 CpGs analyzed throughout the genome, 214,709 CpGs changed DNA methylation by more than 5% (e.g., from 5 to 10% methylation) between E18.5 and 9 wk of age, and 18,863 CpGs changed DNA methylation by more than 30%. Genome-scale data from six time points between E18.5 and P20 show that DNA methylation changes coincided with the terminal differentiation of hepatoblasts into hepatocytes. We also showed that epigenetic reprogramming occurred primarily in intergenic enhancer regions while gene promoters were less affected. Our data suggest that normal postnatal hepatic development and maturation involves extensive epigenetic remodeling of the genome, and that enhancers play a key role in controlling the transition from hepatoblasts to fully differentiated hepatocytes. Our study provides a solid foundation to support future research aimed at further revealing the role of epigenetics in stem cell biology. PMID:27652892

  13. Preclinical imaging anesthesia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vesce, Giancarlo; Micieli, Fabiana; Chiavaccini, Ludovica

    2017-03-01

    Despite the outstanding progress achieved by preclinical imaging science, laboratory animal anesthesia remains quite stationary. Ninety percent of preclinical imaging studies are carried on small rodents (mice and rats) anesthetized by outdated injectable and/or inhalation agents. A need for imaging awake (conscious) animals is questionably registered mainly for brain research, for phMRI and for accomplishing pain and analgesia studies. A need for improving current rodent anesthesia protocols and for enforcing the 3Rs paradigm is sought. Patient monitoring throughout the procedure and recovery phases, as well as vital parameter's data must be recorded in basic consciousness states and during imaging sessions. A multidrug approach is suggested to overcome the limits of monoanesthesia and well-timed physiological data are required to ground findings and to interpret imaging data.

  14. Identifying Rodent Hantavirus Reservoirs, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bisordi, Ivani; Levis, Silvana; Garcia, Jorge; Pereira, Luiz E.; Souza, Renato P.; Sugahara, Teresa K.N.; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Souza, Luiza T.M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the genetic analysis of samples from hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) patients from southern and southeastern states of Brazil and rodents captured at the presumed site of infection of these patients. A total of 65 samples that were antibody-positive for Sin Nombre or Laguna Negra virus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were processed by nested reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) by using several primer combinations in the M and S genome segments. PCR products were amplified and sequenced from samples from 11 HPS patient and 7 rodent samples. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequence differences showed the cocirculation of Araraquara and Juquitiba-like viruses, previously characterized from humans. Our genetic data indicate that Araraquara virus is associated with Bolomys lasiurus (hairy-tailed Bolo mouse) and the Juquitiba-like virus is associated with Oligoryzomys nigripes (black-footed pigmy rice rat). PMID:15663849

  15. Human hepatocytes support the hypertrophic but not the hyperplastic response to the murine nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen sodium phenobarbital in an in vivo study using a chimeric mouse with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Takeuchi, Hayato; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takako; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    High doses of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator, have been shown to produce hepatocellular tumors in rodents by a mitogenic mode of action (MOA) involving CAR activation. The effect of 1-week dietary treatment with NaPB on liver weight and histopathology, hepatic CYP2B enzyme activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA expression, replicative DNA synthesis and selected genes related to cell proliferation, and functional transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses was studied in male CD-1 mice, Wistar Hannover (WH) rats, and chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. The treatment of chimeric mice with 1000-1500-ppm NaPB resulted in plasma levels around 3-5-fold higher than those observed in human subjects given therapeutic doses of NaPB. NaPB produced dose-dependent increases in hepatic CYP2B activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA levels in all animal models. Integrated functional metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the responses to NaPB in the human liver were clearly different from those in rodents. Although NaPB produced a dose-dependent increase in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CD-1 mice and WH rats, no increase in replicative DNA synthesis was observed in human hepatocyte-originated areas of chimeric mice. In addition, treatment with NaPB had no effect on Ki-67, PCNA, GADD45β, and MDM2 mRNA expression in chimeric mice, whereas significant increases were observed in CD-1 mice and/or WH rats. However, increases in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis were observed in chimeric mice both in vivo and in vitro after treatment epidermal growth factor. Thus, although NaPB could activate CAR in both rodent and human hepatocytes, NaPB did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice, whereas it was mitogenic to rat and mouse hepatocytes. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of NaPB, the MOA for NaPB-induced rodent liver tumor formation is thus not relevant for humans.

  16. The Higgs and top mass coincidence problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrente-Lujan, E.

    2015-05-01

    On the light of the recent LHC boson discovery, we present a phenomenological evaluation of the ratio ρt = mZmt/m2H, from the LHC combined mH value, we get ((1σ)) {ρ _t}(exp) = 0.9956 ± 0.0081. This value is close to one with a precision of the order ˜ 1%. Similarly we evaluate the ratio ρWt = (mW + mt)/(2mH). From the up-to-date mass values we get ρ(exp)wt = 1.0066 ± 0.0035 (1σ). The Higgs mass is numerically close (at the 1% level) to the mH ˜ (mW + mt)/2. From these relations we can write any two mass ratios as a function of, exclusively, the Weinberg angle (with a precision of the order of 1% or better): {{{m_i}} over {{m_j}}} ≃ {fij}({θ _W}), i, j = W,Z, H, t. For example: mH/mZ ≃ 1 + √2s2θW/2, mH/mtcθW ≃ 1 - √2s2θW/2. In the limit cos θW → 1 all the masses would become equal mZ = mW = mt = mH. It is tempting to think that such a value, it is not a mere coincidence but, on naturalness grounds, a signal of some more deeper symmetry. In a model independent way, ρt can be viewed as the ratio of the highest massive representatives of the spin (0, 1/2, 1) SM and, to a very good precision the LHC evidence tell us that ms=1ms=1/2/m2s=0 ≃ 1. Somehow the "lowest" scalar particle mass is the geometric mean of the highest spin 1, 1/2 masses. We review the theoretical situation of this ratio in the SM and beyond. In the SM these relations are rather stable under RGE pointing out to some underlying UV symmetry. In the SM such a ratio hints for a non-casual relation of the type λ ≃ κ(g2 + g'2) with κ ≃ 1 + o(g/gt). Moreover the existence of relations mi/mj ≃ fij(θW) could be interpreted as a hint for a role of the SU(2)c custodial symmetry, together with other unknown mechanism. Without a symmetry at hand to explain then in the SM, it arises a Higgs mass coincidence problem, why the ratios ρt, ρWt are so close to one, can we find a mechanism that naturally

  17. Advances in coincidence time resolution for PET.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2016-03-21

    Coincidence time resolution (CTR), an important parameter for time-of-flight (TOF) PET performance, is determined mainly by properties of the scintillation crystal and photodetector used. Stable production techniques for LGSO:Ce (Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce) with decay times varying from ∼ 30-40 ns have been established over the past decade, and the decay time can be accurately controlled with varying cerium concentration (0.025-0.075 mol%). This material is promising for TOF-PET, as it has similar light output and equivalent stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons compared to industry standard LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce, and the decay time is improved by more than 30% with proper Ce concentration. This work investigates the achievable CTR with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%) when coupled to new silicon photomultipliers. Crystal element dimension is another important parameter for achieving fast timing. 20 mm length crystal elements achieve higher 511 keV photon detection efficiency, but also introduce higher scintillation photon transit time variance. 3 mm length crystals are not practical for PET, but have reduced scintillation transit time spread. The CTR between pairs of 2.9 × 2.9 × 3 mm(3) and 2.9 × 2.9 × 20 mm(3) LGSO:Ce crystals was measured to be 80 ± 4 and 122 ± 4 ps FWHM, respectively. Measurements of light yield and intrinsic decay time are also presented for a thorough investigation into the timing performance with LGSO:Ce (0.025 mol%).

  18. Autocrine expression of hepatocyte growth factor and its cytoprotective effect on hepatocyte poisoning

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Zhou, Jun; Dou, Ke-Feng; Chen, Yong; Yan, Qing-Guo; Li, Hai-Min

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct pEGFP-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression vector, the to detect its expression in transfected human hepatocytes, and to investigate the influence of autocrine HGF expression on the proliferative potential and cytoprotective effects in human hepatocytes. METHODS: Human HGF cDNA was ligated to the pEGFP vector. Recombinant plasmid was transfected into human hepatocyte line QZG with liposome. Expression of HGF protein was observed by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Hepatic cells were collected 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection to detect the number of [3H]-TdR uptake in DNA. DNA synthesis was observed by using PCNA stain immunohistochemistry. Acute liver cell damage was induced by carbon tetrachloride. Cytoprotective effect was observed by examining the survival rate of hepatocytes and leakage of intracellular alanine transaminase (ALT) and potassium ions. RESULTS: HGF identification of pEGFP-HGF by enzyme digestion showed that HGF fragment was cloned into BamH I and Sal I sites of pEGFP-N3. Expression of GFP in transfected hepatocytes was observed with fluorescence microscopy. The [3H]-TdR uptake became 7 times as many as in the control group 96 h after transfection. After HGF transfection, the survival rate of hepatocytes poisoned by CCl4 significantly increased (83% vs 61%, P < 0.05), and the leakage of intracellular alanine transaminase and potassium ions decreased (586 nkat/L vs 1089 nkat/L, P < 0.01; and 5.59 mmol/L vs 6.02 mmol/L, P < 0.01 respectively). Culture of transfected hepatic cells promoted the proliferation of other non-transfected cells. CONCLUSION: Transfected HGF is expressed in hepatic cells and has the activity of promoting cell division and protecting hepatic cells against poisoning. PMID:15334679

  19. Hepatocyte Culture in Autologous Decellularized Spleen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Wu, Wanquan; Xiang, Junxi; Lv, Yi; Zheng, Xinglong; Chen, Qian; Wang, Haohua; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhengwen; Ma, Feng

    2015-01-01

    abstract Background and Aims: Using decellularized scaffold to reengineer liver tissue is a promising alternative therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Though the decellularized human liver matrix is the ideal scaffold for reconstruction of the liver theoretically, the shortage of liver donors is still an obstacle for potential clinical application. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In the present study, we used a tissue engineering approach to prepare a rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) and evaluate the effectiveness of this DSM for primary rat hepatocytes culture. Methods: Rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) was prepared by perfusion of a series of detergents through spleen vasculature. DSM was characterized by residual DNA and specific extracellular matrix distribution. Thereafter, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in the DSM in a 3-dimensional dynamic culture system, and liver cell survival and biological functions were evaluated by comparison with 3-dimensional sandwich culture and also with cultured in decellularized liver matrix (DLM). Results: Our research found that DSM did not exhibit any cellular components, but preserved the main extracellular matrix and the intact vasculature evaluated by DNA detection, histology, immunohistochemical staining, vessel corrosion cast and upright metallurgical microscope. Moreover, the method of DSM preparation procedure was relatively simple with high success rate (100%). After seeding primary hepatocytes in DSM, the cultured hepatocytes survived inside DSM with albumin synthesis and urea secretion within 10 d. Additionally, hepatocytes in dynamic culture medium had better biological functions at day 10 than that in sandwich culture. Albumin synthesis was 85.67 ± 6.34 μg/107cell/24h in dynamic culture in DSM compared to 62.43 ± 4.59 μg/107cell/24h in sandwich culture (P < 0.01) and to 87.54 ± 5.25 μg/107cell/24h in DLM culture (P > 0.05); urea release was 32.14 ± 8.62

  20. Rodent consumption in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S

    2014-09-01

    Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne infections worldwide, including Southeast Asia and Northeast Thailand (Isaan), where rodent consumption may be a source of rodent-borne diseases. The behavior of consuming rodents is related to a population's traditions, knowledge, cultural, and household contexts, among other factors. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand during November-December 2011. It aimed to elicit information about rodent consumption among residents of this province, and to identify factors associated with rodent consumption there. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that male gender, large family size, and use of rainwater as the main source of drinking water were positively associated with reported rodent consumption in this province, while having proper knowledge/attitudes towards animal-borne disease was negatively associated. These results provide evidence-base information for further studies, such as participatory ac- tion research, to further explore how people interact with rodents in different contexts. Further research is also needed to characterize risk of zoonotic diseases in relation to rodent consumption.

  1. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294).

  2. Experimental hepatocyte xenotransplantation--a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K C

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (Tx) is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for Tx. Hepatocytes from other species, for example, the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenoTx. The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species Tx of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the Tx of human (n = 23) or pig (n = 19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of Tx (n = 23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n = 6]) and peritoneal cavity (n = 19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenoTx of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenoTx.

  3. Neutron coincidence counting with digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagi, Janos; Dechamp, Luc; Dransart, Pascal; Dzbikowicz, Zdzislaw; Dufour, Jean-Luc; Holzleitner, Ludwig; Huszti, Joseph; Looman, Marc; Marin Ferrer, Montserrat; Lambert, Thierry; Peerani, Paolo; Rackham, Jamie; Swinhoe, Martyn; Tobin, Steve; Weber, Anne-Laure; Wilson, Mark

    2009-09-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is a widely adopted nondestructive assay (NDA) technique used in nuclear safeguards to measure the mass of nuclear material in samples. Nowadays, most neutron-counting systems are based on the original-shift-register technology, like the (ordinary or multiplicity) Shift-Register Analyser. The analogue signal from the He-3 tubes is processed by an amplifier/single channel analyser (SCA) producing a train of TTL pulses that are fed into an electronic unit that performs the time- correlation analysis. Following the suggestion of the main inspection authorities (IAEA, Euratom and the French Ministry of Industry), several research laboratories have started to study and develop prototypes of neutron-counting systems with PC-based processing. Collaboration in this field among JRC, IRSN and LANL has been established within the framework of the ESARDA-NDA working group. Joint testing campaigns have been performed in the JRC PERLA laboratory, using different equipment provided by the three partners. One area of development is the use of high-speed PCs and pulse acquisition electronics that provide a time stamp (LIST-Mode Acquisition) for every digital pulse. The time stamp data can be processed directly during acquisition or saved on a hard disk. The latter method has the advantage that measurement data can be analysed with different values for parameters like predelay and gate width, without repeating the acquisition. Other useful diagnostic information, such as die-away time and dead time, can also be extracted from this stored data. A second area is the development of "virtual instruments." These devices, in which the pulse-processing system can be embedded in the neutron counter itself and sends counting data to a PC, can give increased data-acquisition speeds. Either or both of these developments could give rise to the next generation of instrumentation for improved practical neutron-correlation measurements. The paper will describe the

  4. Is the ``IR Coincidence'' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Jörn; Heinz, Sebastian; Pooley, Guy; Pottschmidt, Katja; Corbel, Stephane

    2005-06-01

    Previous work by Motch et al. suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender later showed that the typical hard-state radio power law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward-extrapolated X-ray power law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This IR coincidence has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard-state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a parallel track for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data obtained with the Ryle radio telescope and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data from the All-Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of parallel tracks, and here they are associated with ``failed transitions,'' or the beginning of a transition, to the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard, rather than the

  5. Is the `IR Coincidence' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.

    2005-09-01

    Previous work by Motch (1985) suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power-law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender (2002) later showed that the typical hard state radio power-law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward extrapolated X-ray power-law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This `IR coincidence' has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a `parallel track' for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data, obtained with the Ryle radio telescope, and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, from the All Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of `parallel tracks', and here they are associated with `failed transitions' to, or the beginning of a transition to, the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard

  6. Prospects for biological control of rodent populations*

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, Kazimierz

    1973-01-01

    Pathogens and predatory animals are the main agents used for the biological control of rodents. The pathogens that have been used are of the genus Salmonella; none is rodent-specific and all can cause severe infection in man and domestic animals. Furthermore, rodents frequently develop immunity to, and become carriers of, these organisms, and there is little to commend their use, except in lightly populated areas where control is infrequently applied. The relationships of five predator species with their rodent prey have been examined. The monitor lizard, mongoose, and ferret were for different reasons found to be unsatisfactory, and there is not yet sufficient evidence to warrant further releases of the Japanese weasel. Domestic and feral cats control rodents well in some situations but only after some other agent has removed a large part of the rodent population. PMID:4587482

  7. Hepatocyte xenotransplantation for treating liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, André Gustavo; Quaresma, Kátia; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of acute and chronic liver failure is still a challenge despite modern therapeutic innovations. While liver transplantation can restore liver function and improve patient survival, donor shortages limit this treatment to a small number of patients. Cellular xenotransplantation has emerged as an alternative for treating liver failure. Xenohepatocytes could be readily available in sufficient quantities to treat patients in critical condition and thereby reduce the donor shortage. The use of isolated encapsulated or non-encapsulated cells can reduce the immunorejection response. Several studies using animal models of acute or chronic liver failure have demonstrated improved survival and recovery of liver function after xenotransplantation of adult hepatocytes. Porcine liver cells are a potential source of xenohepatocytes due to similarities with human physiology and the great number of hepatocytes that can be obtained. The recent development of less immunogenic transgenic pigs, new immunosuppressive drugs, and cellular encapsulation systems represents important advances in the field of cellular xenotransplantation. In this study, we review the work carried out in animal models that deals with the advantages and limitations of hepatocyte xenotransplantation, and we propose new studies needed in this field.

  8. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  9. Fibrinogen-like protein 1, a hepatocyte derived protein is an acute phase reactant

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhilin; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2008-01-25

    Fibrinogen-like protein 1 (FGL1) is a hepatocyte derived protein that is upregulated in regenerating rodent livers following partial hepatectomy. It has been implicated as a mitogen for liver cell proliferation. In this study, we show that recombinant human IL-6 induces FGL1 expression in Hep G2 cells in a pattern similar to those of acute phase reactants. Following induction of acute inflammation in rats by subcutaneous injection of turpentine oil, serum FGL1 levels are also enhanced. Although, a recent report suggests that FGL1 associates almost exclusively with the fibrin matrix, we report here that approximately 20% of the total plasma FGL1 remains free. The enhancement of FGL1 levels in vitro by IL-6 and its induction after turpentine oil injection suggest that it is an acute phase reactant. Its presence in bound and free forms in the blood also implies biological roles that extend beyond the proposed autocrine effect it has on hepatocytes during regeneration.

  10. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  11. Tactile learning in rodents: Neurobiology and neuropharmacology.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhsh, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Ayoobi, Fateme; Fatemi, Iman; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad

    2016-02-15

    Animal models of learning and memory have been the subject of considerable research. Rodents such as mice and rats are nocturnal animals with poor vision, and their survival depends on their sense of touch. Recent reports have shown that whisker somatosensation is the main channel through which rodents collect and process environmental information. This review describes tactile learning in rodents from a neurobiological and neuropharmacological perspective, and how this is involved in memory-related processes.

  12. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.

    1996-10-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Clifford algebra approach to the coincidence problem for planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; Aragón, J L; Verde-Star, L

    2005-03-01

    The problem of coincidences of planar lattices is analyzed using Clifford algebra. It is shown that an arbitrary coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of coincidence reflections and this allows planar coincidence lattices to be characterized algebraically. The cases of square, rectangular and rhombic lattices are worked out in detail. One of the aims of this work is to show the potential usefulness of Clifford algebra in crystallography. The power of Clifford algebra for expressing geometric ideas is exploited here and the procedure presented can be generalized to higher dimensions.

  14. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  15. Rodent models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases.

  16. Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gissen, Paul; Arias, Irwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes form a crucially important cell layer that separates sinusoidal blood from the canalicular bile. They have a uniquely organized polarity with a basal membrane facing liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, while one or more apical poles can contribute to several bile canaliculi jointly with the directly opposing hepatocytes. Establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity is essential for many functions of hepatocytes and requires carefully orchestrated cooperation between cell adhesion molecules, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking machinery. The process of hepatocyte polarization requires energy and, if abnormal, may result in severe liver disease. A number of inherited disorders affecting tight junction and intracellular trafficking proteins have been described and demonstrate clinical and pathophysiological features overlapping those of the genetic cholestatic liver diseases caused by defects in canalicular ABC transporters. Thus both structural and functional components contribute to the final hepatocyte polarity phenotype. Many acquired liver diseases target factors that determine hepatocyte polarity, such as junctional proteins. Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood. Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases. PMID:26116792

  17. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used. PMID:26811633

  18. Novel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Measurements Using Phoswich Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

    2003-09-30

    The PNNL has developed an Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) for the CTBT to measure four radio-xenon isotopes using a beta-gamma coincidence counting detector. A novel method to measure beta-gamma coincidences using a phoswich detector with state-of-the-art pulse shape discrimination techniqueses has been investigated.

  19. Shift-register coincidence electronics system for thermal neutron counters

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.

    1980-04-01

    An improved shift-register, coincidence-counting logic circuit, developed for use with thermal neutron well counters, is described in detail. A distinguishing feature of the circuit is its ability to operate usefully at neutron counting rates of several hundred kHz. A portable electronics package incorporating the new coincidence logic and support circuits is also described.

  20. Coincidence technique to reduce geometry and matrix effects in assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Gozani, T.; Bernatowicz, H.

    1983-01-01

    Algebraic combinations of coincidence multiplicities can be formed which are relatively independent of detection efficiency, yet proportional to the amount of nuclear material being assayed. Considering these combinations, rather than the coincidence alone as signatures, has the demonstrable advantage that the assay results are comparatively independent of sample geometry or even matrix.

  1. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  2. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lage, Eduardo Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae; Udías, Jose M.; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  3. A precise calculation of delayed coincidence selection efficiency and accidental coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Yi; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shao-Min

    2015-05-01

    A precise background evaluation model is proposed to address the complex data structure of the delayed coincidence method, which is widely used in reactor electron-antineutrino oscillation experiments. In this model, effects from the muon veto, uncorrelated random background, and background are all studied analytically, simplifying the estimation of the systematic uncertainties of signal efficiency and accidental background rate. The results of the calculations are validated numerically with a number of simulation studies and also applied and validated in the recent Daya Bay hydrogen-capture based oscillation measurement. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2013CB834302), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11235006, 11475093), Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program (2012Z02161), and Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education.

  4. Hantavirus Prevention: Cleanup of Rodent Contamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Hantaviruses in the Americas may cause human disease involving the lungs, hence the name " hantavirus pulmonary syndrome" (HPS). Since May 1993, a...humans are also found in other rodents, but the number of cases stemming from these hantaviruses is small when compared to SNV. Hantavirus is shed in... HANTAVIRUS PREVENTION: CLEANUP OF RODENT CONTAMINATION Technical Information Paper 18-001-0306

  5. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  6. [Encapsulating hepatocytes with chitosan in physiological conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhang; Zhang, Bao; Yan, Xiluan; Lao, Xuejun; Yu, Hanry

    2006-10-01

    Prepared from 15.3% N-acetylated chitosan (FNC), half N-acetylated chitosan (HNC) possesses a good solubility in a weak basic solution, guaranteeing the formation of microcapsules by the coacervating reaction between HNC and methacrylic acid (MAA)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-methyl methacrylate (MMA) (MAA-HEMA-MMA) terpolymer under physiological conditions. When hepatocytes were encapsulated in such 3-dimensional microenvironment, as compared to monolayer culture, cell functions, including P450 activity, urea production and albumin release, were well supported. The prepared microcapsules have good mechanical stability and permeability.

  7. Persistence and accumulation of micronucleated hepatocytes in liver of rats after repeated administration of diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Kazunori; Ashizawa, Koji; Fujiishi, Yohei; Tochinai, Ryota; Okada, Emiko; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Tatemoto, Hideki; Hamada, Shuichi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2013-08-15

    A repeat-dose micronucleus assay in adult rat liver was recently developed [Mutat. Res. 747 (2012) 234-239]. This assay demonstrated a high detectability of hepatocarcinogens at relatively low doses, as indicated by dose-dependent micronucleus induction. Because the adult rat liver is known to have a long life-span, this desirable property of the assay will be an advantage in detecting micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) that have persisted for long periods in the liver following repeated dosing. However, no data directly supporting the underlying mechanisms have been published to date. In the present study, we verified the mechanisms by means of pulse-labeling of micronucleated hepatocytes with the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The rodent hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was repeatedly administered orally to male Crl:CD (SD) rats (6 weeks old) for up to 2 weeks, and EdU was injected intraperitoneally on days 1, 7, or 14. Hepatocytes were isolated by use of a non-perfusion technique at 24h, 1 week, or 2 weeks after EdU injection and analyzed for EdU incorporation and micronucleus formation. The results of our study confirmed that MNHEPs labeled with EdU on the first day of DEN administration persisted until 2 weeks post-administration in the rat livers. However, the frequency of MHNEPs among EdU-labeled hepatocytes decreased over time. In addition, the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the liver tissue increased, suggesting selective removal of micronucleated cells. Theoretical calculation of the cumulative MNHEP frequency on each of the days on which DEN was administered, taking into account the rate of loss, came out closer to the actual value observed in the liver micronucleus test. Taken together, these results indicate that although micronucleated cells induced in rat livers by administration of the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen DEN undergo selective removal, they

  8. Hepatocyte membrane water permeability measured by silicone layer filtering centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Ochoa, J Elena; García, Fabiana; Larocca, M Cecilia; Pellegrino, José M; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2002-03-01

    We previously found that hepatocytes are able to control their osmotic membrane water permeability (P(f)) by regulating the number of surface aquaporin water channels. Hepatocyte P(f) has been assessed by phase-contrast microscopy and cell image analysis, an established but relatively laborious procedure. We report here an alternative method to assess hepatocyte P(f) based on a single silicone layer filtering centrifugation system. Isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated in hypotonic or isotonic buffers containing (3)H(2)O as a tracer and, then, were filtered by rapid centrifugation through a silicone layer down to a lysis layer. Osmotically driven radioactivity (i.e., (3)H(2)O) within hepatocytes was calculated as the difference between the dpm in lysis media measured under hypotonic and isotonic conditions. The P(f) calculated from the initial slope of the radioactivity-versus-time curve was 18 microm/s at 4 degrees C. Hepatocytes treated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, to increase P(f) through the plasma membrane insertion of aquaporins, showed an increased P(f) value of 37 microm/s. The aquaporin blocker dimethyl sulfoxide selectively prevented the agonist-induced hepatocyte P(f). These data are in good agreement with the corresponding values determined by quantitative phase-contrast microscopy; thus, the method developed allows the rapid and reliable measurement of hepatocyte P(f).

  9. Insulin internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, J.; Trankina, M.; Noel, R.; Ward, W. )

    1990-02-26

    This project was designed to determine whether neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, has a significant effect upon the pathways of ligand endocytosis in isolated rat hepatocytes. The pathways studied include receptor-mediated endocytosis and fluid-phase endocytosis. Neomycin causes a dose-dependent acceleration of {sup 125}I-insulin internalization. Since fluid-phase endocytosis can also be a significant factor in {sup 125}I-insulin internalization, lucifer yellow (LY), a marker for fluid-phase endocytosis, was incorporated into an assay similar to the {sup 125}I-insulin internalization procedure. In the presence of 5 mM neomycin, a significant increase in LY uptake was evident at 0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml of LY. At 0.8 mg/ml, a decrease in LY uptake was observed. The increased rate of {sup 125}I-insulin internalization in the presence of neomycin was intriguing. Since one action of neomycin is to inhibit phosphoinositidase C, it suggests that the phosphotidylinositol cycle may be involved in ligand internalization by hepatocytes. At low insulin concentrations, receptor-mediated uptake predominates. Fluid-phase uptake can become an important uptake route as insulin concentrations are increased. Since neomycin stimulates fluid-phase endocytosis, it must also be taken into account when measuring ligand internalization.

  10. Mechanisms of the statins cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Narges; Heidari, Reza; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Statins are potent drugs, used as lipid-lowering agents in cardiovascular diseases. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse effects of statins, and the exact mechanism of hepatotoxicity is not yet clear. In this study, the cytotoxic effects of the most commonly used statins, that is, atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin toward isolated rat hepatocytes, were evaluated. Markers, such as cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the amount of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the statin-treated hepatocytes, were investigated. It was found that the statins caused cytotoxicity toward rat hepatocytes dose dependently. An elevation in ROS formation, accompanied by a significant amount of lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial depolarization, was observed. Cellular glutathione reservoirs were decreased, and a significant amount of oxidized glutathione was formed. This study suggests that the adverse effect of statins toward hepatocytes is mediated through oxidative stress and the hepatocytes mitochondria play an important role in the statin-induced toxicity.

  11. Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Andrzej A; Shepherd, Alexandra N; Clarke, David V; Sheridan, Alison J; Fraser, Sheena; Bartosiewicz, László; Herman, Jeremy S

    2016-10-01

    Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have formed a part of the recent diet. Here we compare the accumulation pattern of rodent remains from four locations within and adjacent to the renowned Neolithic site of Skara Brae, Orkney, showing that those within the settlement itself were the result of deliberate human activity. The accumulation and nature of burnt bones, incorporated over an extended period within deposits of household waste, indicate that rodents were used as a nutritional resource and may have been the subject of early pest control. We, therefore, provide the first evidence for the exploitation or control of rodents by the Neolithic inhabitants of Europe.

  12. Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Andrzej A.; Shepherd, Alexandra N.; Clarke, David V.; Sheridan, Alison J.; Fraser, Sheena; Bartosiewicz, László

    2016-01-01

    Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have formed a part of the recent diet. Here we compare the accumulation pattern of rodent remains from four locations within and adjacent to the renowned Neolithic site of Skara Brae, Orkney, showing that those within the settlement itself were the result of deliberate human activity. The accumulation and nature of burnt bones, incorporated over an extended period within deposits of household waste, indicate that rodents were used as a nutritional resource and may have been the subject of early pest control. We, therefore, provide the first evidence for the exploitation or control of rodents by the Neolithic inhabitants of Europe. PMID:27853568

  13. 48-channel coincidence counting system for multiphoton experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Wei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Tao; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a coincidence counting system with 48 input channels which is aimed to count all coincidence events, up to 531 441 kinds, in a multiphoton experiment. Using the dynamic delay adjusting inside the Field Programmable Gate Array, the alignment of photon signals of 48 channels is achieved. After the alignment, clock phase shifting is used to sample signal pulses. Logic constraints are used to stabilize the pulse width. The coincidence counting data stored in a 1G bit external random access memory will be sent to the computer to analyze the amount of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coincidence events. This system is designed for multiphoton entanglement experiments with multiple degrees of freedom of photons.

  14. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R.

    1997-11-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Glycinergic inhibition tunes coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Myoga, Michael H; Lehnert, Simon; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt

    2014-05-07

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) detect microsecond differences in the arrival time of sounds between the ears (interaural time differences or ITDs), a crucial binaural cue for sound localization. Synaptic inhibition has been implicated in tuning ITD sensitivity, but the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on coincidence detection are debated. Here we determine the impact of inhibition on coincidence detection in adult Mongolian gerbil MSO brain slices by testing precise temporal integration of measured synaptic responses using conductance-clamp. We find that inhibition dynamically shifts the peak timing of excitation, depending on its relative arrival time, which in turn modulates the timing of best coincidence detection. Inhibitory control of coincidence detection timing is consistent with the diversity of ITD functions observed in vivo and is robust under physiologically relevant conditions. Our results provide strong evidence that temporal interactions between excitation and inhibition on microsecond timescales are critical for binaural processing.

  16. Glycinergic inhibition tunes coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Myoga, Michael H.; Lehnert, Simon; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) detect microsecond differences in the arrival time of sounds between the ears (interaural time differences or ITDs), a crucial binaural cue for sound localization. Synaptic inhibition has been implicated in tuning ITD sensitivity, but the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on coincidence detection are debated. Here we determine the impact of inhibition on coincidence detection in adult Mongolian gerbil MSO brain slices by testing precise temporal integration of measured synaptic responses using conductance-clamp. We find that inhibition dynamically shifts the peak timing of excitation, depending on its relative arrival time, which in turn modulates the timing of best coincidence detection. Inhibitory control of coincidence detection timing is consistent with the diversity of ITD functions observed in vivo and is robust under physiologically relevant conditions. Our results provide strong evidence that temporal interactions between excitation and inhibition on microsecond timescales are critical for binaural processing. PMID:24804642

  17. On the structure of the set of coincidence points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, A. V.; Gel'man, B. D.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the set of coincidence points for two maps between metric spaces. Cardinality, metric and topological properties of the coincidence set are studied. We obtain conditions which guarantee that this set (a) consists of at least two points; (b) consists of at least n points; (c) contains a countable subset; (d) is uncountable. The results are applied to study the structure of the double point set and the fixed point set for multivalued contractions. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  18. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-06-06

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane.

  19. Modeling panic disorder in rodents.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabrício A; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thércia G; Vicente, Maria A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-10-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a subtype of anxiety disorder in which the core phenomenon is the spontaneous occurrence of panic attacks. Although studies with laboratory animals have been instrumental for the understanding of its neurobiology and treatment, few review articles have focused on the validity of the currently used animal models for studying this psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of the present paper is to discuss the strengths and limits of these models in terms of face, construct and predictive validity. Based on the hypothesis that panic attacks are related to defensive responses elicited by proximal threat, most animal models measure the escape responses induced by specific stimuli. Some apply electrical or chemical stimulation to brain regions proposed to modulate fear and panic responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal grey or the medial hypothalamus. Other models focus on the behavioural consequences caused by the exposure of rodents to ultrasound or natural predators. Finally, the elevated T-maze associates a one-way escape response from an open arm with panic attacks. Despite some limitations, animal models are essential for a better understanding of the neurobiology and pharmacology of PD and for discovering more effective treatments.

  20. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  1. In vitro cultivation and cryopreservation of duck embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Schacke, M; Glück, B; Wutzler, P; Sauerbrei, A

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis B-virucidal testing of biocides in quantitative suspension tests using duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) requires primary duck embryonic hepatocytes for viral propagation. To improve the test system and availability of these cells, commercial culture plates with different growth surfaces were tested for cell cultivation and different approaches for cryopreservation of hepatocyte suspension were examined. After 12 days of culture, the largest amounts of hepatocytes were grown in CellBIND and TTP plates and CellBIND surface showed the lowest tendency of monolayer detachment nearly comparable with collagen 1-coated CELLCOAT plates. For cryopreservation of hepatocyte suspension, the use of growth medium supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (ME(2)SO), FCS supplemented with ME(2)SO or cryosafe-1 as cryoprotective agents provided the highest rates of surviving cells after thawing. The freezing-thawing process did not significantly reduce the susceptibility of hepatocytes to infection with DHBV. In conclusion, plates without collagen 1 such as CellBIND are recommended for cultivation of primary duck embryonic hepatocytes in infectivity experiments of DHBV for virucidal testing of biocides. The use of cryopreserved hepatocytes is possible when freshly isolated cells from the liver of duck embryos are not available.

  2. New method of hepatocyte transplantation and extracorporeal liver support.

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, A A; Whiting, J; Levenson, S M; Chowdhury, N R; Schechner, R; Michalski, S; Feldman, D; Chowdhury, J R

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed by the authors that allows hepatocyte attachment on collagen-coated microcarriers resulting in prolonged hepatocyte viability and function both in vivo and in vitro. Rat hepatocytes were obtained by portal vein collagenase perfusion. Intraperitoneally transplanted microcarrier-attached normal hepatocytes into congeneic Gunn rats were functioning 3-4 weeks later, as shown by the presence and persistence of conjugated bilirubin in recipient bile, sustained decrease in serum bilirubin, uptake of Tc99m-DESIDA, and morphologic criteria. Intraperitoneal transplantation of normal microcarrier-attached hepatocytes into genetically albumin deficient rats (NAR) resulted in marked increase in plasma albumin levels (6 days without and 21 days with Cyclosporin A immunosuppression). Microcarrier-attached hepatocytes transplanted after 2 weeks of storage at -80 C into congeneic Gunn rats were viable and functional as assessed by criteria outlined above. An extracorporeal liver perfusion system was developed using the microcarrier-attached hepatocytes that was capable of synthesizing and conjugating bilirubin and synthesizing liver-specific proteins. Images FIGS. 5A and B. FIG. 7. FIG. 8. FIG. 9. FIG. 12. PMID:3530153

  3. Isolation of centrolobular and perilobular hepatocytes after phenobarbital treatment

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Daily phenobarbital (PB) injections, on 3-7 consecutive days, induce an intense proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associated with a decrease of the glucose-6-phosphatase activity. This situation first affects the centrolobular hepatocytes, enhancing the degree of liver lobule heterogeneity. This experimental model was used for isolation and further subfractionation of hepatocytes on Ficoll density gradients, as described in the preceding paper. Profiles of protein, DNA, RNA, glycogen, phosphorylase, and glucose-6-phosphatase were determined all along the gradient. Two liver cell populations were distinguished: (a) light hepatocytes (mean density 1.10) present the same morphological characteristics as centrolobular cells, i.e., an abundant smooth ER composed of tubular elements, numerous small mitochondria, and few glycogen particles; (b) heavy hepatocytes (mean density 1.14) are characterized by large and compact glycogen areas and prominent rough endoplasmic cisternae, as are the perilobular cells. After incubation in the Wachstein-Meisel medium, Centrolobular hepatocytes exhibit dispersed reaction sites of glucose-6-phosphatase activity, whereas perilobular cells present a continuous and intense reaction. Morphometric determinations were carried out for both cell populations. Centrolobular PB hepatocytes are considerably enlarged (mean diameter: 23.7 mum); perilobular hepatocytes have a significantly smaller mean diameter of 19.2 mum, which is close to the values of control liver cells. PMID:167029

  4. Xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation associated with constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is enhanced by pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Benoki, Satoshi; Numakura, Yuki; Kodama, Susumu; Miyata, Masaaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    Xenobiotic-responsive nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) play pivotal roles in the metabolic functions of the liver such as xenobiotics detoxification and energy metabolism. While CAR or PPARα activation induces hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocarcinogenesis in rodent models, it remains unclear whether PXR activation also shows such effects. In the present study, we have investigated the role of PXR in the xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation with or without CAR activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) and phenobarbital, or PPARα activation by Wy-14643 in mice. Treatment with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital increased the percentage of Ki-67-positive nuclei as well as mRNA levels of cell proliferation-related genes in livers as expected. On the other hand, treatment with the PXR activator pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) alone showed no such effects. Surprisingly, PCN co-treatment significantly augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by CAR activation with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital in wild-type mice but not in PXR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, PXR activation also augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by Wy-14643 treatment. Moreover, PCN treatment increased the RNA content of hepatocytes, suggesting the induction of G0/G1 transition, and reduced mRNA levels of Cdkn1b and Rbl2, encoding suppressors of cell cycle initiation. Our present findings indicate that xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation mediated by CAR or PPARα is enhanced by PXR co-activation despite that PXR activation alone does not cause the cell proliferation in mouse livers. Thus PXR may play a novel and unique role in the hepatocyte/liver hyperplasia upon exposure to xenobiotics.

  5. Hepatocytic parental progenitor cells of rat small hepatocytes maintain self-renewal capability after long-term culture

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    The liver has a variety of functions for maintaining homeostasis, and hepatocytes play a major role. In contrast with the high regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes (MHs) in vivo, they have not been successfully expanded ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that CD44-positive cells sorted from small hepatocyte (SH) colonies derived from a healthy adult rat liver can proliferate on a Matrigel-coated dish in serum-free chemically defined medium; in addition, a subpopulation of the cells can divide more than 50 times in a period of 17 weeks every 4-week-passage. The passage cells retained the capability to recover highly differentiated functions, such as glycogen storage, CYP activity and bile secretion. When Matrigel-treated cells from the third passage were transplanted into retrorsine/partial hepatectomy-treated rat livers, the cells engrafted to differentiate into MHs and cholangiocytes. These results suggest that long-term cultured CD44+ SHs retain hepatocytic characteristics in vitro and the capability to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in vivo. Thus, a newly identified subpopulation of MHs possessing the attributes of hepatocytic stem/progenitor cells can be passaged several times without losing hepatocytic characteristics.

  6. Development of coincidence-anticipation timing in a catching task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robyn; Nauhaus, Genevieve; Glazek, Kuba; Young, Douglas; Lin, Sherry

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the effects of age, target location, and stimulus speed on coincidence-anticipation timing in a catching task. Males aged 11 to 18 years made simulated catching movements toward a light stimulus that rapidly approached the head or chest at various speeds. Coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy, movement onset times, and movement times did not differ by age. However, 17- to 18-year-olds exhibited significantly faster movement speeds than 14- to 16-year-olds. Target location (head or chest) did not affect coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy or movement speed. However, movements toward the head were initiated earlier and took longer than movements to the chest. Finally, stimulus speed had statistically significant effects on all measures: faster stimuli were associated with longer delays in coincidence-anticipation timing responses, earlier movement onset times, shorter movement times, and faster movement speeds. These results underscore the adaptability of coincidence-anticipation timing abilities for responding to stimuli under varying temporal and spatial constraints.

  7. Exposure of small rodents to plague during epizootics in black-tailed prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Stapp, Paul; Salkeld, Daniel J; Eisen, Rebecca J; Pappert, Ryan; Young, John; Carter, Leon G; Gage, Kenneth L; Tripp, Daniel W; Antolin, Michael F

    2008-07-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, causes die-offs of colonies of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). It has been argued that other small rodents are reservoirs for plague, spreading disease during epizootics and maintaining the pathogen in the absence of prairie dogs; yet there is little empirical support for distinct enzootic and epizootic cycles. Between 2004 and 2006, we collected blood from small rodents captured in colonies in northern Colorado before, during, and for up to 2 yr after prairie dog epizootics. We screened 1,603 blood samples for antibodies to Y. pestis, using passive hemagglutination and inhibition tests, and for a subset of samples we cultured blood for the bacterium itself. Of the four species of rodents that were common in colonies, the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) was the only species with consistent evidence of plague infection during epizootics, with 11.1-23.1% of mice seropositive for antibody to Y. pestis during these events. Seropositive grasshopper mice, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were captured the year following epizootics. The appearance of antibodies to Y. pestis in grasshopper mice coincided with periods of high prairie dog mortality; subsequently, antibody prevalence rates declined, with no seropositive individuals captured 2 yr after epizootics. We did not detect plague in any rodents off of colonies, or on colonies prior to epizootics, and found no evidence of persistent Y. pestis infection in blood cultures. Our results suggest that grasshopper mice could be involved in epizootic spread of Y. pestis, and possibly, serve as a short-term reservoir for plague, but provide no evidence that the grasshopper mouse or any small rodent acts as a long-term, enzootic host for Y. pestis in prairie dog colonies.

  8. Implications on the cosmic coincidence by a dynamical extrinsic curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Cabral, Luis A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we apply the smooth deformation concept in order to obtain a modification of Friedmann’s equations. It is shown that the cosmic coincidence can be at least alleviated using the dynamical properties of the extrinsic curvature. We investigate the transition from nucleosynthesis to the coincidence era obtaining a very small variation of the ratio r=\\tfrac{{ρ }{{m}}}{{ρ }{{ext}}} that compares the matter energy density to extrinsic energy density, compatible with the known behavior of the deceleration parameter. We also show that the calculated ‘equivalence’ redshift matches the transition redshift from a deceleration to accelerated phase and the coincidence ceases to be. The dynamics on r is also studied based on Hubble parameter observations as the latest Baryons Acoustic Oscillations/Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (BAO/CMBR) + SNIa.

  9. Orthopox virus infections in Eurasian wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Paula M; Henttonen, Heikki; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kallio, Eva R; Korthase, Christian; Laakkonen, Juha; Niemimaa, Jukka; Palva, Airi; Schlegel, Mathias; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Suominen, Paula; Ulrich, Rainer G; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2011-08-01

    The genus Orthopoxvirus includes variola (smallpox) virus and zoonotic cowpox virus (CPXV). All orthopoxviruses (OPV) are serologically cross-reactive and cross-protective, and after the cessation of smallpox vaccination, CPXV and other OPV infections represent an emerging threat to human health. In this respect CPXV, with its reservoir in asymptomatically infected wild rodents, is of special importance. In Europe, clinical cowpox has been diagnosed in both humans and animals. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of OPV infections in wild rodents in different parts of Eurasia and to compare the performance of three real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in detecting OPV DNA in wildlife samples. We investigated 962 wild rodents from Northern Europe (Finland), Central Europe (Germany), and Northern Asia (Siberia, Russia) for the presence of OPV antibodies. According to a CPXV antigen-based immunofluorescence assay, animals from 13 of the 17 locations (76%) showed antibodies. Mean seroprevalence was 33% in Finland (variation between locations 0%-69%), 32% in Germany (0%-43%), and 3.2% (0%-15%) in Siberia. We further screened tissue samples from 513 of the rodents for OPV DNA using up to three real-time PCRs. Three rodents from two German and one Finnish location were OPV DNA positive. The amplicons were 96% to 100% identical to available CPXV sequences. Further, we demonstrated OPV infections as far east as the Baikal region and occurring in hamster and two other rodent species, ones previously unnoticed as possible reservoir hosts. Based on serological and PCR findings, Eurasian wild rodents are frequently but nonpersistently infected with OPVs. Results from three real-time PCR methods were highly concordant. This study extends the geographic range and wildlife species diversity in which OPV (or CPXV) viruses are naturally circulating.

  10. Instrument for determining coincidence and elapse time between independent sources of random sequential events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that receives pulses from a primary external source and one or more secondary external sources and determines when there is coincidence between the primary and one of the secondary sources is described. The instrument generates a finite time window (coincidence aperture) during which coincidence is defined to have occurred. The time intervals between coincidence apertures in which coincidences occur are measured.

  11. Coculture and Long-Term Maintenance of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Merav; Levy, Gahl; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals, serving a wide spectrum of vital functions. Loss of liver function due to drug toxicity, progressive fatty liver disease, or viral infection is a major cause of death in the United States of America. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic toxicity screening, basic research and the development of bioartificial liver devices require long-term hepatocyte culture techniques that sustain hepatocyte morphology and function. In recent years, several techniques have been developed that can support high levels of liver-specific gene expression, metabolic function, and synthetic activity for several weeks in culture. These include the collagen double gel configuration, hepatocyte spheroids, coculture with nonparenchymal cells, and micropatterned cocultures. This chapter will cover the current status of hepatocyte culture techniques, including media formulation, oxygen supply, and heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  12. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts to functional and expandable hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengyu; Zhang, Ludi; Gao, Yimeng; He, Zhiying; Yao, Dan; Wu, Zhitao; Cen, Jin; Chen, Xiaotao; Liu, Changcheng; Hu, Yiping; Lai, Dongmei; Hu, Zhenlei; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Xiaojun; Pan, Guoyu; Wang, Xin; Hui, Lijian

    2014-03-06

    The generation of large numbers of functional human hepatocytes for cell-based approaches to liver disease is an important and unmet goal. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to hepatic lineages could offer a solution to this problem but so far has only been achieved with mouse cells. Here, we generated human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) from fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of FOXA3, HNF1A, and HNF4A. hiHeps express hepatic gene programs, can be expanded in vitro, and display functions characteristic of mature hepatocytes, including cytochrome P450 enzyme activity and biliary drug clearance. Upon transplantation into mice with concanavalin-A-induced acute liver failure and fatal metabolic liver disease due to fumarylacetoacetate dehydrolase (Fah) deficiency, hiHeps restore the liver function and prolong survival. Collectively, our results demonstrate successful lineage conversion of nonhepatic human cells into mature hepatocytes with potential for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Toxicity of ethacrynic acid in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2002-04-01

    Ethacrynic acid, a loop diuretic drug, caused lipid peroxidation in isolated rat hepatocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation showed a good correlation with the leakage of glutamic-oxaloacetic acid transaminase (GOT) from the hepatocytes. The addition of antioxidants such as N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) and promethazine to the isolated rat hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid prevented the lipid peroxidation and decreased the GOT leakage to some extent. SKF-525A inhibited the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid and decreased the TBARS formation, suggesting that the lipid peroxidation was caused by the oxidative metabolism. The intracellular reduced glutathione markedly decreased in the hepatocyte suspension containing ethacrynic acid and the hepatocellular protein sulfhydryls were decreased, which was negatively correlated with the GOT leakage. Thus the ethacrynic acid-induced hepatotoxicity was found to be related to the lipid peroxidation and the decrease of cellular protein sulfhydryls.

  14. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  15. Intracytoplasmic Crystalline Inclusions in the Hepatocytes of an Antelope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hepatocytes of a 13-year-old female Thomson’s gazelle . Histologically, multifocal to coalescing areas of many hepatocytes contained large cytoplasmic...hepatocellular crystalline inclusions in a gazelle . 2. Case Description A 13-year-old female Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsoni) from a zoo was presented to...dead and had a history of severe parasitism. Postmortem examination revealed sparse body fat store in the gazelle . There was bilateral enlargement of

  16. Salvianolate Protects Hepatocytes from Oxidative Stress by Attenuating Mitochondrial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Yuan; Huang, Kai; Lei, Yang; Liu, Hong-Liang; Tao, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolate is widely used to treat angiocardiopathy in clinic in China, but its application in liver diseases remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Salvianolate on rat hepatic injury by protecting hepatocyte mitochondria. To evaluate the effects of Salvianolate on injured hepatocytes, alpha mouse liver 12 (AML-12) cells were induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and treated with Salvianolate. Cell viability and MitoTracker Green for mitochondria and 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazole-carbocyanide iodine (JC-1) levels and cytochrome C (Cyto-C) expressions were detected in vitro. To identify the effect of Salvianolate on protecting against mitochondria injury, male Wistar rats were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and treated with Salvianolate (40 mg·kg−1). Serum liver function, parameters for peroxidative damage, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) of hepatocyte mitochondria were assayed. Our results showed that Salvianolate effectively protected hepatocytes, increased mitochondria vitality, and decreased Cyto-C expressions in vitro. Besides, Salvianolate alleviated the liver function, attenuated the indicators of peroxidation, and relieved the mitochondria injury in vivo. In conclusion, Salvianolate is effective in protecting hepatocytes from injury in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism might be related to its protective effect on hepatocyte mitochondria against oxidative stress. PMID:27340417

  17. Biomechanics and functionality of hepatocytes in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shan; Song, Zhenyuan; Cotler, Scott J; Cho, Michael

    2014-06-27

    Cirrhosis is a life-threatening condition that is generally attributed to overproduction of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix that mechanically stiffens the liver. Chronic liver injury due to causes including viral hepatitis, inherited and metabolic liver diseases and external factors such as alcohol abuse can result in the development of cirrhosis. Progression of cirrhosis leads to hepatocellular dysfunction. While extensive studies to understand the complexity underlying liver fibrosis have led to potential application of anti-fibrotic drugs, no such FDA-approved drugs are currently available. Additional studies of hepatic fibrogenesis and cirrhosis primarily have focused on the extracellular matrix, while hepatocyte biomechanics has received limited attention. The role of hepatocyte biomechanics in liver cirrhosis remains elusive, and how the cell stiffness is correlated with biological functions of hepatocytes is also unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the biomechanical properties of hepatocytes are correlated with their functions (e.g., glucose metabolism), and that hepatic dysfunction can be restored through modulation of the cellular biomechanics. Furthermore, our results indicate the hepatocyte functionality appears to be regulated through a crosstalk between the Rho and Akt signaling. These novel findings may lead to biomechanical intervention of hepatocytes and the development of innovative tissue engineering for clinical treatment to target liver cells rather than exclusively focusing on the extracellular matrix alone in liver cirrhosis.

  18. Hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cattle during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Takamizawa, Aya; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Endoh, Daiji; Oikawa, Shin

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate hepatocyte apoptosis in dairy cows during the transition period. Four clinically healthy, pregnant dairy cattle were used. The cows had no clinical diseases throughout this study. Blood samples were collected and livers were biopsied from the cows at 3 different times: 3 weeks before expected partition (wk -3); during parturition (wk 0), and 3 weeks (wk +3) after parturition. The damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) caused by hepatocytes was evaluated by comet assay. The apoptotic features of hepatocytes were examined by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic analyses. The hepatic triglyceride content markedly increased at wk 0 and wk +3 compared with the values at wk -3. The results of the comet assay showed increases in the mean tail moment values of hepatic cells after parturition in all cows, which suggested increased DNA damage. Histopathologically, the hepatocytes began to contain lipid droplets at wk 0 and were severely opacified at wk +3. Caspase-3-positive and single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA)-positive cells were first detected in the liver after parturition. Condensation of nuclear chromatin, a typical sign of apoptosis, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy after parturition. These results suggest that apoptosis is induced in hepatocytes of dairy cows around parturition and may result from lipotoxicity in hepatocytes.

  19. Induction of hepatocyte proliferation by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ledda-Columbano, G M; Pibiri, M; Molotzu, F; Cossu, C; Sanna, L; Simbula, G; Perra, A; Columbano, A

    2004-11-01

    Retinoids have been shown to exert an anticarcinogenic effect through suppression of the cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and/or differentiation. In rat liver, in particular, retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit regeneration after partial hepatectomy, most probably through repression of the expression of c-fos and c-jun. Surprisingly enough, in spite of the proposed therapeutic effects of all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) no data are available on its effect on normal adult liver. Here, we show that tRA administration in the diet (150 mg/kg) increased DNA synthesis in mouse liver, at 1 and 2 weeks, with a return to control values at 4 weeks (labelling index was 16.5, 8.3 and 3.3%, respectively, versus control values of 1.4, 1.3 and 2.5%). Increase in mitotic index paralleled that of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Kinetic studies showed that entry into S phase began between 24 and 48 h, with a peak between 96 and 120 h. Histological observation of the liver and biochemical evaluation of the levels of serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminases did not reveal any evidence of cell death demonstrating that increased DNA synthesis was not due to tRA-induced liver damage and regeneration, but rather the consequence of a direct mitogenic effect. In addition, analysis of total hepatic DNA content after a 7-day treatment showed a significant increase in tRA-fed mice compared with controls (21.11 mg/100 g body wt in tRA-fed mice versus 15.67 mg/100 g body wt of controls). Hepatocyte proliferation in tRA-fed mice was associated with increased hepatic levels of cyclin D1, E and A, and enhanced expression of the member of pRb family, p107. In conclusion, the results showed that tRA induces hepatocyte proliferation in the absence of cell death, similarly to other ligands of steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily. The mitogenic effect of tRA cautions about its possible use for antitumoral purposes in liver carcinogenesis.

  20. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  1. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Rogers, Jeremy L.; Schweppe, John E.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-07-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in a configuration typically used for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. The specific application selected for boron-lined tube replacement in this project was one of the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) designs. This report, providing results for model development of a UNCL, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project. The current UNCL instruments utilize 3He tubes. As the first step in developing and optimizing a boron-lined proportional counter based version of the UNCL, models of eight different 3He-based UNCL detectors currently in use were developed and evaluated. A comparison was made between the simulated results and measured efficiencies for those systems with values reported in the literature. The reported experimental measurements for efficiencies and die-away times agree to within 10%.

  2. Multiple channel coincidence detector and controller for microseismic data analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-11-16

    A multiple channel coincidence detector circuit is provided for analyzing data either in real time or recorded data on a magnetic tape during an experiment for determining location and progression of fractures in an oil field or the like while water is being injected at high pressure in wells located in the field. The circuit is based upon the utilization of a set of parity generator trees combined with monostable multivibrators to detect the occurrence of two events at any pair of channel input terminals that are within a preselected time frame and have an amplitude above a preselected magnitude. The parity generators perform an exclusive OR function in a timing circuit composed of monostable multivibrators that serve to yield an output when two events are present in the preselected time frame. Any coincidences falling outside this time frame are considered either noise or not otherwise useful in the analysis of the recorded data. Input pulses of absolute magnitude below the low-level threshold setting of a bipolar low-level threshold detector are unwanted and therefore rejected. A control output is provided for a utilization device from a coincidence hold circuit that may be used to halt a tape search unit at the time of coincidence or perform other useful control functions.

  3. Coincidence doppler broadening study in electron-irradiated polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D. J.; Zhang, J. D.; Leung, J. K. C.; Beling, C. D.; Liu, L. B.

    2007-06-01

    Coincidence doppler broadening measurements on electron-irradiated polyurethanes were performed in the presence of air. It is shown that, after a certain electron irradiation, the momentum density distributions of annihilation electrons have obvious changes for the high crosslinking polyurethane, but no significant changes have been observed for the low crosslinking polyurethane. The results were performed to analyse by irradiation crosslinking and degradation principles.

  4. The Galileo/Mars Observer/Ulysses Coincidence Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    From March 21 to April 11, 1993 the Galileo, Mars Observer and Ulysses spacecraft were tracked in a coincidence experiment, searching for low-frequency (millihertz) gravitational radiation. In the spacecraft Doppler technique, the earth and a distant spacecraft act as separated test masses.

  5. Ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials using disturbed coincidence conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, F.; Olfert, S.; Schröder, A.; Rautenberg, J.; Henning, B.; Moritzer, E.

    2012-05-01

    In this contribution we present a new method detecting changes in the composite material's acoustic behavior by analyzing disturbed coincidence conditions on plate-like test samples. The coincidence condition for an undamaged GFRP test sample has been experimentally identified using Schlieren measurements. Disturbances of this condition follow from a disturbed acoustic behavior of the test sample which is an indicator for local damages in the region inspected. An experimental probe has been realized consisting of two piezoceramic elements adhered to the nonparallel sides of an isosceles trapezoidal body made of silicone. The base angles of the trapezoidal body have been chosen such that the incident wave meets pre-measured condition of coincidence. The receiving element receives the geometric reflection of the acoustic wave scattered at the test sample's surface which corresponds to the non-coupled part of the incident wave as send by the sending element. Analyzing the transfer function or impulse response of the electro-acoustic system (transmitter, scattering at test sample, receiver), it is possible to detect local disturbances with respect to Cramer's coincidence rule. Thus, it is possible to realize a very simple probe for local ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials (as well as non-composite material) which can be integrated in a small practical device and is good for small size inspection areas.

  6. Study of inner-shell vacancy cascades by coincidence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, T.; Arp, U.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    An inner-shell vacancy in an atom decays by an intricate combination of Auger and fluorescence processes. The interrelation between these processes is not well understood because traditional studies of core-excited atoms focus on only one of the many particles that participate in the relaxation - largely ignoring the other components and the correlations between them. To understand these correlations we developed a coincidence technique that uses coincident detection of X-rays and electrons to select decay pathways that involve emission of both an X-ray photon and electrons. In the first application of this technique, the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum was recorded selectively in coincidence with X-ray fluorescence to eliminate the asymmetric broadening and shifting of the energy distribution which results due to post-collision interaction with K-Auger electrons. This allowed the direct observation of the interaction between the photoelectron and the decay of core holes created after the initial photoionization event. We have also applied this technique to the much more complex problem of understanding Auger-electron spectra produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell excitation. For example, we previously recorded non-coincident electron spectra of L{sub 2,3}MM Auger transitions following K-shell excitation of argon. Interpretation of these spectra is difficult because they are complicated and consist of many overlapping or unresolved Auger transitions between different ionic states.

  7. The MAM rodent model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent models of human disease are essential to obtain a better understanding of disease pathology, the mechanism of action underlying conventional treatments, as well as for the generation of novel therapeutic approaches. There are a number of rodent models of schizophrenia based on either genetic manipulations, acute or sub-chronic drug administration, or developmental disturbances. The prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model is a developmental disruption model gaining increased attention because it displays a number of histological, neurophysiological and behavioral deficits analogous to those observed in schizophrenia patients. This unit describes the procedures required to safely induce the MAM phenotype in rats. In addition, we describe a simple behavioral procedure, amphetamine-induced hyper-locomotion, which can be utilized to verify the MAM phenotype. PMID:23559309

  8. Behavioral and mechanistic insight into rodent empathy.

    PubMed

    Sivaselvachandran, Sivaani; Acland, Erinn L; Abdallah, Salsabil; Martin, Loren J

    2016-06-14

    Empathy is a psychological construct that allows individuals to understand and share the emotions of others. The ability to share emotional states relies on basic social mechanisms, such as mimicry and emotional contagion, which are considered building blocks for empathy. Mimicking another's emotional or physical state is essential for successful social interactions and is found in a number of animal species. For the current review we focus on emotional state sharing in rodents, a core feature of empathy that is often measured using pain and fear as proxies; we also discuss prosociality in rodents. The evidence for empathy in rodents shows that rats and mice consistently imitate arousal states and behaviors of conspecifics and will even sacrifice personal gain to relieve the distress of a conspecific. These behaviors support basic processes that are crucial for the survival of individual animals and give us insight into the neural mechanisms that govern empathy-related behaviors.

  9. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  10. [Application of genetic diversity in the researches on rodents].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Yang, Chun-Wen; Xu, Yan-Chun; Jin, Zhi-Min; Ma, Jian-Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Genetic diversity is the base of the species diversity and ecosystem diversity, and also the foundation for biological evolution and species differentiation. Furthermore, genetic diversity is important evidence for evaluation of biological resources of nature. The genetic diversity data from a wide variety of rodents have many complex applications. We summarized the application of rodent prevention, the origin and differentiation including evolutionary history of rodents, the potential adaptation of rodents, the dynamics of population and regulatory mechanisms, and the conservation biology of rodents. Researches in the future should focus on the systematic study on the relationships between population dynamics and genetic diversity, and long-term monitoring of genetic diversity of rodents.

  11. Nonalcoholic Lipid Accumulation and Hepatocyte Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Juanjuan; Yao, Min; Yao, Dengbing; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuli; Yao, Dengfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is steadily increasing, highlighting its status as a public health concern, particularly due to its significant association with other comorbidities, such as diabetes. However, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a primary risk factor, with its own prevalence increasing in recent years, and it has gradually caught up with the historical primary etiological factors of infection with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, exposure to aflatoxin, or alcohol liver disease. The deeply worrisome aspects of all of these high risk factors, however, are their remarkable presence within populations. Systemic and genetic mechanisms involved in the malignant transformation of liver cells, as well as useful biomarkers of early stage HCC are being investigated. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the interrelation of NAFLD and HCC remain largely unknown. In this review, some of the recent advances in our understanding of liver lipid accumulation are summarized and discussed to provide insights into the relationship between NAFLD and hepatocyte malignant transformation. PMID:27350942

  12. In vitro culture of isolated primary hepatocytes and stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-08-01

    Various liver diseases result in terminal hepatic failure, and liver transplantation, cell transplantation and artificial liver support systems are emerging as effective therapies for severe hepatic disease. However, all of these treatments are limited by organ or cell resources, so developing a sufficient number of functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration is a priority. Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by growth factors (GFs), cytokines, transcription factors (TFs), hormones, oxidative stress products, metabolic networks, and microRNA. It is well-known that the function of isolated primary hepatocytes is hard to maintain; when cultured in vitro, these cells readily undergo dedifferentiation, causing them to lose hepatocyte function. For this reason, most studies focus on inducing stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. In this review, we mainly focus on the nature of the liver regeneration process and discuss how to maintain and enhance in vitro hepatic function of isolated primary hepatocytes or stem cell-derived HLCs for liver regeneration. In this way, hepatocytes or HLCs may be applied for clinical use for the treatment of terminal liver diseases and may prolong the survival time of patients in the near future.

  13. Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent middens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    American rodent middens have made a more dramatic contribution to understanding past environments and the development of ecological theory than Australian rodent middens. This relates to differences in the natural environment, the landscape histories, the scale and scientific approaches of the researchers. The comparison demonstrates: the power of synoptic perspectives; the value of thorough macrofossil identification in midden analysis and its potential advance in Australia where pollen has dominated analyses, the value of herbaria and reference collections; the potential of environmental databases; the importance of scientific history and 'critical research mass' and; finally, the opportunistic nature of palaeoecological research. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  15. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  16. Differentiated properties of hepatocytes induced from pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Tosh, David; Shen, Chia-Ning; Slack, Jonathan M W

    2002-09-01

    Transdifferentiation of pancreas to liver is a well-recognized phenomenon and has been described in animal experiments and human pathology. We recently produced an in vitro model for the transdifferentiation (or conversion) of the pancreatic cell line AR42J-B13 to hepatocytes based on culture with dexamethasone (Dex). To determine whether the hepatocytes express markers of hepatic intermediary metabolism and detoxification, we investigated the patterns of expression of glucokinase, cytochrome P450s CYP3A1 and CYP2B1/2, testosterone/4-nitrophenol uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT), and aryl sulfotransferase. All were expressed. We also determined the expression of 2 enzymes involved in ammonia detoxification: carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CPS I) and glutamine synthetase (GS). These enzymes are normally strictly compartmentalized in liver in a wide periportal pattern and the last downstream perivenous hepatocytes, respectively. Following culture with Dex, CPS I and GS are expressed in 2 different cell populations, suggesting that both periportal and perivenous hepatocytes are induced. We also produced a reporter assay based on the activation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by the transthyretin (TTR) promoter or glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) promoter. After culture with Dex, transfected cells begin to express GFP, showing that hepatic promoters are activated in concert with the induction of the hepatocyte phenotype. Lastly, we examined the stability of the hepatic phenotype and found that some cells still express liver markers (transferrin or albumin) up to 14 days after removal of Dex. In conclusion, these results suggest that pancreatic hepatocytes produced by this method may offer an alternative model to primary cultures of hepatocytes for the study of liver function.

  17. Role of macrophages in the immune response to hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, G.L.; Chen, S.; Almond, S.P.; Ascher, N.L.; Payne, W.D.; Matas, A.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of host macrophages in the development of allospecific cytolytic T cells (allo-CTLs) in response to purified allogeneic MHC Class I+, Class II- hepatocytes in vivo in hepatocyte sponge matrix allografts (HC-SMA). Depletion of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from responder splenocytes in mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte culture (MLHC) inhibits the development of allo-CTLs in response to purified hepatocytes. First the ability of sponge macrophages to function as accessory cells in indirect presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen was tested in MLHC. We found that addition of irradiated sponge cells (a source of sponge macrophages) restored the development of allo-CTLs in MLHC depleted of responder APCs. Therefore, radioresistant sponge macrophages can function as accessory cells in MLHC. We next employed silica as an immunotherapy targeted against host macrophages and assessed the effect on development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. We found that local (intrasponge) silica treatment completely inhibited the development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. Combined local and systemic silica treatment resulted in inhibition of allocytotoxicity comparable to local silica treatment alone in the doses tested. We conclude that host macrophages which infiltrate HC-SMA can function as accessory cells in vitro in MLHC and that both infiltrating host macrophages and lymphocytes participate in the development of an alloimmune response to purified hepatocytes in vivo. This interaction may involve indirect antigen presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen by macrophages to host lymphocytes which accumulate in HC-SMA.

  18. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism in cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, A P; Rasmussen, A; Xu, L; Kaminski, D L

    1995-08-01

    In our laboratory, cultured human hepatocytes are being evaluated as an experimental system to study drug interactions. We report the effect of a known cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducer, rifampicin, on the metabolism of lidocaine by primary human hepatocytes. Rifampicin has been shown to induce CYP3A4, a major human hepatic CYP isozyme that is known to metabolize lidocaine to its primary metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. Human hepatocytes were cultured on collagen-coated plates in serum-free, hormone-supplemented Waymouth medium for a 3-day period before they were treated with rifampicin at 50 microM for 1 to 3 days. Hepatocytes isolated from five individuals were studied, and, in all cases, lidocaine metabolism was found to be induced by rifampicin, as demonstrated by a higher rate of monoethylglycinexylidide formation than concurrent controls. For three of the hepatocyte cultures, lidocaine metabolism was evaluated at various times after treatment. Induction was observed at 1 day after treatment, and reached higher levels at day 2 or 3. The level of induction was found to be approximately 100% for two hepatocyte isolations and approximately 600% for one isolation. In a separate experiment, hepatocytes were treated with rifampicin for a 2-day period. Rate of lidocaine metabolism at multiple substrate concentrations (10-120 microM) were then studied. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism (approximately 100%) was observed at all the lidocaine concentrations studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the data showed an increase in Vmax and a less significant change in Km. Induction of lidocaine metabolism by rifampicin (concentrations of 0.1-50 microM) was found to be dose-dependent, with significant induction observed at 1 microM and higher concentrations. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Al-Griw, M.A.; Alghazeer, R.O.; Al-Azreg, S.A.; Bennour, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market. PMID:27800299

  20. System for monitoring non-coincident, nonstationary process signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    2005-01-04

    An improved system for monitoring non-coincident, non-stationary, process signals. The mean, variance, and length of a reference signal is defined by an automated system, followed by the identification of the leading and falling edges of a monitored signal and the length of the monitored signal. The monitored signal is compared to the reference signal, and the monitored signal is resampled in accordance with the reference signal. The reference signal is then correlated with the resampled monitored signal such that the reference signal and the resampled monitored signal are coincident in time with each other. The resampled monitored signal is then compared to the reference signal to determine whether the resampled monitored signal is within a set of predesignated operating conditions.

  1. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Yu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Tao

    2005-12-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown.

  2. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schoeffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Schmidt-Boecking, Horst; Doerner, Reinhard; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt and others

    2012-10-15

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 {pi} solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  3. Spatial coincidence modulates interaction between visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Martin; Kolev, Vasil; Menzel, Kristina; Yordanova, Juliana

    2002-05-07

    The time course of interaction between concurrently applied visual and somatosensory stimulation with respect to evoked potentials (EPs) was studied. Visual stimuli, either in the left or right hemifield, and electric stimuli to the left wrist were delivered either alone or simultaneously. Visual and somatosensory EPs were summed and compared to bimodal EPs (BiEP, response to actual combination of both modalities). Temporal coincidence of stimuli lead to sub-additive or over-additive amplitudes in BiEPs in several time windows between 75 and 275 ms. Additional effects of spatial coincidence (left wrist with left hemifield) were found between 75 and 300 ms and beyond 450 ms. These interaction effects hint at a temporo-spatial pattern of multiple brain areas participating in the process of multimodal integration.

  4. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  5. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  6. Using CHIMERA detector at LNS for gamma-particle coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Luca, S.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Francalanza, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evaluated the quality of γ-ray angular distributions that can be extracted in particle-gamma coincidence measurements using the CHIMERA detector at LNS. γ-rays have been detected using the CsI(Tl) detectors of the spherical part of the CHIMERA array. Very clean γ-rays angular distributions were extracted in reactions induced by different stable beams impinging on 12C thin targets. The results evidenced an effect of projectile spin flip on the γ-rays angular distributions. γ-particle coincidence measurements were also performed in reactions induced by neutron rich exotic beams produced through in-flight fragmentation at LNS. In recent experiments also the Farcos array was used to improve energy and angular resolution measurements of the detected charged particles. Results obtained with both stable and radioactive beams are reported.

  7. A new opportunity: coincident spectroscopy in neutron-deficient actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Baartman, B.; Fallon, P.; Esker, N. E.; Kwarsick, J.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Pang, G.; Rissanen, J.; Nitsche, H.

    2014-09-01

    Due to high γ-ray background rates heavy element production facilities are usually not sensitive to the electron capture decay of neutron deficient actinides. We have developed new capabilities at the Berkeley Gas Filled Separator (BGS) that allow us to study these isotopes. The highly selective and efficient separation of compound nucleus evaporation residue products using the BGS couple with a rapid delivery to a low-background detector facility, opens up many new possibilities for nuclear decay and structure studies in the neutron deficient actinides. The decay of these actinides produces vacancies in the K-shell resulting in x-rays uniquely identifying the Z of the decay products. We present the first results of this new methodology in studying the nuclear structure of fermium-254 by observing the gamma rays in coincidence with fermium x-rays. Coincident gamma-decay spectroscopy gives us a new tool to study the nuclear structure of previously inaccessible systems.

  8. Characteristic evaluation of a Lithium-6 loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Kaku, D; Watanabe, Y; Sagara, K

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of a (6)Li-loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer were investigated from both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The spectrometer consists of three (6)Li-glass scintillators embedded in a liquid organic scintillator BC-501A, which can detect selectively neutrons that deposit the total energy in the BC-501A using a coincidence signal generated from the capture event of thermalised neutrons in the (6)Li-glass scintillators. The relative efficiency and the energy response were measured using 4.7, 7.2 and 9.0 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. The measured ones were compared with the Monte Carlo calculations performed by combining the neutron transport code PHITS and the scintillator response calculation code SCINFUL. The experimental light output spectra were in good agreement with the calculated ones in shape. The energy dependence of the detection efficiency was reproduced by the calculation. The response matrices for 1-10 MeV neutrons were finally obtained.

  9. Dead time correction in coincidence counting of photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M. S.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Choi, S.-K.; Park, H. S.

    2008-08-01

    We describe two methods for evaluating the dead time of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). The dead time is obtained by measuring either the corresponding time interval in an oscilloscope trace or the relation between the single count rate and the coincidence count rate. Values for the TAC dead time are obtained in the range from 3.4 µs to 14.3 µs for the two methods with respective standard uncertainties of 2.9 × 10-8 s and 3.3 × 10-9 s. The TAC dead time is applied to the calibration of coincidence-counting measurements of optical transmission and photon-heralding efficiency.

  10. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  11. Conjunctival lymphoid follicles in new world rodents.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Chodosh, James; Caire, William; Wilson, Gregory M

    2007-09-01

    We report for the first time, the detection of conjunctival lymphoid follicles (CLF) in the eyes of New World rodents. CLF were found in 7 of the 15 species examined, 6 of the 10 genera, and in at least one individual in four families of rodents. These follicles are dense collections of leukocytes in the conjunctival substantia propria with a thinned overlying epithelium lacking in goblet cells. Although the precise location of CLF within the conjunctiva varied from species to species, all CLF were found in the fornix of the conjunctival sac. In general, size and complexity of CLF varied with the size of the eye; the larger the eye, the larger and more complex the CLF. Our findings also reveal that some species of New World rodents, like the majority of Old World rodents examined in this and previous studies might lack CLF. However, until larger samples are examined, this is difficult to state with certainty. Consequently, the presence/absence of CLF at this point might not be informative for phylogenetic comparisons. Our findings also suggest the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, might serve as a useful model species for studying ocular infections and immunology of the eye.

  12. Options for Dealing With Rodent Infestations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    After removing sources of food and water and shelter, your next options are rodent traps and poisons (rodenticides). Rat or mouse traps may be lethal (snap traps) or live (cage-type), and poison baits must be placed in tamper-resistant bait stations.

  13. Beta-gated gamma coincidence counting with a phoswich detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.H.; Warner, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A special type of phoswich detector system has been evaluated for measurement of radionuclides which decay with emission of time coincident beta and gamma radiation. Background reductions of more than two orders of magnitude have been obtained for the energy region from 500 to 950 keV. Both NE 102 plastic scintillators and anthracene were evaluated. Advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  14. Neutron depth profiling by large angle coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Cervena, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Havranek, V.; Fink, D.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely low concentrations of several technologically important elements (mainly lithium and boron) have been studied by a modified neutron depth profiling technique. Large angle coincidence spectroscopy using neutrons to probe solids with a thickness not exceeding several micrometers has proved to be a powerful analytical method with an excellent detection sensitivity. Depth profiles in the ppb atomic range are accessible for any solid material. A depth resolution of about 20 nanometers can be achieved.

  15. Morphology and function of isolated hepatocytes transplanted into rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Mito, M; Ebata, H; Kusano, M; Onishi, T; Saito, T; Sakamoto, S

    1979-12-01

    Hepatocytes isolated by the collagenase digestive method were transplanted into the spleens of syngeneic rats. Morphology and function of the hepatocytes in the spleen were investigated for 12 to 17 months after transplantation. The transplanted hepatocytes proliferated and reconfigured in the spleen without direct perfusion of portal venous blood and with the presence of an intact host liver. Fourteen to 17 months after transplantation, the hepatocytes which had formed a demarcated nodule occupied approximately 40% of the area of the splenic parenchyma without undifferentiation on microscopic examination. However, the weight of the hepatized spleen did not increase beyond the weight of a normal spleen and the weight of the host liver that had normal morphology also did not differ from a normal liver. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrated differentiated cord structure and normal architecture for each heptocyte. Furthermore, the hepatized spleen synthesized albumin and glycogen as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and histochemical studies. Ammonia tolerance and indocyanine green clearance tests revealed functioning hepatocytes in the spleen proper. These results indicate that our experimental model lends itself well to investigations in cell growth mechanism and that hepatocellular transplantation has potential clinical application to compensate for impaired hepatic function.

  16. Hepatocytes in collagen sandwich: evidence for transcriptional and translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The influence of extracellular matrix configuration on the tissue- specific function of cultured hepatocytes was investigated. Adult rat hepatocytes sandwiched between two layers of collagen gel were compared to cells cultured on a single layer of collagen gel for differences in the total RNA content, the level of albumin-specific mRNA, the rate of albumin gene transcription, and the rate of albumin mRNA translation. Adult hepatocytes in the sandwich system maintained the level of albumin mRNA similar to that found in the normal liver for at least six weeks, whereas the level of albumin mRNA declined rapidly in the single gel system. After one week of culture, hepatocytes in the single gel system could be induced to recover the high level of albumin mRNA and albumin production when a second layer of collagen gel was overlaid at that time. Furthermore, sandwiched hepatocytes maintained significantly higher transcriptional activity compared to cells in the single gel system. In addition to transcriptional control, the ultimate rate of albumin production was shown to depend on the rate of translation, which increased with culture time and reached a plateau in one to two weeks. This increase in translational activity over time in culture was observed in both the sandwich and the single gel systems and, thus, appeared to be independent of the configuration of extracellular matrix. PMID:1734019

  17. Molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of chlorpromazine in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Stephanie L; Young, Cheryl; Guzdek, Anna; Zhidkov, Nickholas; O'Brien, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a member of the largest class of first-generation antipsychotic agents, is known to cause hepatotoxicity in the form of cholestasis and hepatocellular necrosis in some patients. The mechanism of CPZ hepatotoxicity is unclear, but is thought to result from reactive metabolite formation. The goal of this research was to assess potential cytotoxic mechanisms of CPZ using the accelerated cytotoxicity mechanism screening (ACMS) technique with freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. This study identified CPZ cytotoxicity and inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) to be concentration-dependent. Furthermore, inhibition of cytochrome P450s (CYPs), including CYP2D1 and 1A2, delayed CPZ cytotoxicity, suggesting a role for CYP activation of CPZ to a toxic metabolite(s) in this model. Metabolism studies also demonstrated glucuronide and glutathione (GSH) requirement for CPZ detoxification in hepatocytes. Inactivating the 2-electron reduction pathway, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), caused a significant increase in hepatocyte susceptibility to CPZ, indicating quinoneimine contribution to CPZ cytotoxicity. Nontoxic concentrations of peroxidase/H(2)O(2) (inflammatory model) increased cytotoxicity in CPZ-treated hepatocytes and caused additional mitochondrial toxicity. Inflammation further depleted GSH and increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels. Results suggest activation of CPZ to reactive metabolites by 2 pathways in hepatocytes: (i) a CYP-catalyzed quinoneimine pathway, and (ii) a peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of CPZ to CPZ radicals.

  18. Hepatitis B antigen in hepatocytes of chronic active liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, H

    1979-04-01

    To study the morphologic interrelation of hepatocytes with the replication of hepatitis B vius (HBV) and immunocompetent cells in chronic active liver disease(CALD), organ cultures were prepared from liver biopsy specimens. Replication of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) appears to occur in the nucleus of the hepatocyte in close association with intranuclear electron-dense strands and sometimes intranucleolar matrixes (likely HBcAg genomes), and cytoplasmic maturation of the HBcAg takes place in the preautolytic condition of host hepatocytes. Immunocompetent cells became progressively autolyzed in the early period of cultures. No difference in progression of hepatocyte injury in tissues from normal subjects and from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive and HBsAg-negative patients with CALD may suggest that intracellular synthesis of HBV alone is not cytopathic to host hepatocytes. This model is promising for the study of HBV replication and development, and also for testing the efficacy of new antiviral agents against the virus.

  19. Strategies for short-term storage of hepatocytes for repeated clinical infusions.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Carl; Gramignoli, Roberto; Saliem, Mohammed; Zemack, Helen; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Isaksson, Bengt; Nowak, Greg; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Strom, Stephen; Ellis, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is an upcoming treatment for patients with metabolic liver diseases. Repeated cell infusions over 1-2 days improve clinical outcome. Isolated hepatocytes are usually cold stored in preservation solutions between repeated infusions. However, during cold storage isolated hepatocytes undergo cell death. We investigated if tissue preservation and repeated isolations are better than storage of isolated hepatocytes when cold preserving human hepatocytes. Liver tissue obtained from liver surgery or organ donors was divided into two pieces. Hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. Hepatocytes were analyzed directly after isolation (fresh) or after storage for 48 h at 4°C in University of Wisconsin solution (UW cells). Liver tissue from the same donor was stored at 4°C in UW and hepatocytes were isolated after 48 h (UW tissue cells). Hepatocyte viability and function was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion, plating efficiency, ammonia metabolism, CYP 1A1/2, 2C9, 3A7, and 3A4 activities, phase II conjugation, and apoptosis evaluation by TUNEL assay and caspase-3/7 activities. Hepatocytes stored in UW showed a significantly lower viability compared to fresh cells or hepatocytes isolated from tissue stored for 48 h (54% vs. 71% vs. 79%). Plating efficiency was significantly decreased for cells stored in UW (40%) compared to fresh and UW tissue cells (63% vs. 55%). No significant differences between UW cells and UW tissue cells could be shown for CYP activities or ammonia metabolism. Hepatocytes stored in UW showed a strong increase in TUNEL-positive cells, whereas TUNEL staining in cold-stored liver tissue and hepatocytes isolated after 48 h was unchanged. This observation was confirmed by increased caspase-3/7 activities in UW cells. Although preservation of isolated hepatocytes in UW maintains function, cold storage of liver tissue and repeated hepatocyte isolations is superior to cold storage of isolated hepatocytes in preserving

  20. Chemokine Receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, Differentially Regulate Exosome Release in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takanori; Freeman, Christopher M.; Schuster, Rebecca M.; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J.; Gulbins, Erich; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles released by different cell types, including hepatocytes, that play important roles in intercellular communication. We have previously demonstrated that hepatocyte-derived exosomes contain the synthetic machinery to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in target hepatocytes resulting in proliferation and liver regeneration after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We also demonstrated that the chemokine receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, regulate liver recovery and regeneration after I/R injury. In the current study, we sought to determine if the regulatory effects of CXCR1 and CXCR2 on liver recovery and regeneration might occur via altered release of hepatocyte exosomes. We found that hepatocyte release of exosomes was dependent upon CXCR1 and CXCR2. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes produced fewer exosomes, whereas CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes produced more exosomes compared to their wild-type controls. In CXCR2-deficient hepatocytes, there was increased activity of neutral sphingomyelinase (Nsm) and intracellular ceramide. CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no alterations in Nsm activity or ceramide production. Interestingly, exosomes from CXCR1-deficient hepatocytes had no effect on hepatocyte proliferation, due to a lack of neutral ceramidase and sphingosine kinase. The data demonstrate that CXCR1 and CXCR2 regulate hepatocyte exosome release. The mechanism utilized by CXCR1 remains elusive, but CXCR2 appears to modulate Nsm activity and resultant production of ceramide to control exosome release. CXCR1 is required for packaging of enzymes into exosomes that mediate their hepatocyte proliferative effect. PMID:27551720

  1. Volcanism, impact and mass extinctions: incredible or credible coincidences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rosalind V.; Saunders, Andrew D.

    2005-02-01

    Massive continental volcanism and/or bolide impacts are considered by many authors to have caused three major mass extinction events during the last 300 million years: the end-Permian, end-Cretaceous and end-Triassic extinctions. However, re-evaluation of the frequency of bolide impacts and plume-related flood basalt provinces indicates that both types of event occur much more frequently than mass extinctions, and so, in isolation, may not be responsible for the largest extinctions. Furthermore, the kill mechanisms associated with either flood basalts or impacts do not appear to be sufficiently powerful to cause worldwide collapse of ecosystems leading to the largest mass extinctions. Contemporaneous flood basalts and bolide impact may be prerequisites for the largest mass extinctions. We present a statistical analysis of the probability of coincidence between volcanism and impact, and show that three random coincidences of these events in the last 300 m.y. are likely. No causal relationship between impact and volcanism is necessary. The lesser mass extinctions, on the other hand, may not require juxtaposition of two such catastrophic events; such coincidences occurring on more than three occasions during the last 300 m.y. become increasingly unlikely.

  2. Glyphosate applications on arable fields considerably coincide with migrating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gert; Graef, Frieder; Pfeffer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate usage is increasing worldwide and the application schemes of this herbicide are currently changing. Amphibians migrating through arable fields may be harmed by Glyphosate applied to field crops. We investigated the population-based temporal coincidence of four amphibian species with Glyphosate from 2006 to 2008. Depending on a) age- and species-specific main migration periods, b) crop species, c) Glyphosate application mode for crops, and d) the presumed DT50 value (12 days or 47 days) of Glyphosate, we calculated up to 100% coincidence with Glyphosate. The amphibians regularly co-occur with pre-sowing/pre-emerging Glyphosate applications to maize in spring and with stubble management prior to crop sowing in late summer and autumn. Siccation treatment in summer coincides only with early pond-leaving juveniles. We suggest in-depth investigations of both acute and long-term effects of Glyphosate applications on amphibian populations not only focussed on exposure during aquatic periods but also terrestrial life stages.

  3. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  4. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  5. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  6. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria. PMID:26982388

  7. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  8. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  9. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria.

  10. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  11. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  12. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  13. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  14. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  15. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  16. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  17. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  18. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  19. A novel strategy for ADME screening of prodrugs: combined use of serum and hepatocytes to integrate bioactivation and clearance, and predict exposure to both active and prodrug to the systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Edmund; Hewitt, Nicola J; Buchstaller, Hans-Peter; Eggenweiler, Hans-Michael; Sirrenberg, Christian; Zimmermann, Astrid; März, Joachim; Schwartz, Harry; Saal, Christoph; Meyring, Michael; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Common strategies to optimize prodrugs use either in vitro or rodent in vivo approaches, which do not consider elimination pathways that do not result in the generation of the desired product or might be misleading because of species differences, respectively. As a step forward, we have incorporated a novel application of hepatocytes into our prodrug optimization strategy to increase the bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug candidate by attaching a charged ester linker. The model involves the incubation of hepatocytes from multiple species in serum-containing medium to mimic formation as well as simultaneous metabolism of both prodrug and active drug. Using this strategy, a correlation between the in vitro AUC and the AUC after intravenous administration was obtained for active drug formation in several species. Moreover, hepatocytes correctly predicted the likelihood of undesired exposure with nonhydrolyzed prodrug. This novel approach enabled us to identify several prodrugs, which showed improved exposure over a wide dose range. Furthermore, a strategy was developed resulting in a decision tree that can be used to determine the applicability of the hepatocyte model in the screening process.

  20. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  1. Using a decellularized splenic matrix as a 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Long; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Wu, Wan-Quan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Wen-Yan; Gao, Rui; Dong, Ding-Hui; Lv, Yi

    2015-08-18

    Using a decellularized liver matrix (DLM) to reengineer liver tissue is a promising therapy for end-stage liver disease. However, the limited supply of donor organs still hampers its potential clinical application, while a xenogenic decellularized matrix may bring a risk of zoonosis and immunological rejection. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In this research, we established a decellularized splenic matrix (DSM) in a rodent model, which preserved the 3D ultrastructure, the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the native vascular network. The DSM and DLM had similar components of ECM, and similar mechanical properties. Hepatocytes were seeded to the DSM and DLM for dynamic culturing up to 6 d, and distributed both in decellularized sinusoidal spaces and around the vessels. The TUNEL-positive cell percentage in a dynamic culturing decellularized splenic matrix (dDSM) was 10.7%  ±  3.6% at 3d and 25.8%  ±  5.6% at 5d, although 14.2%  ±  4.5% and 24.8%  ±  2.9%, respectively, in a dynamic culturing decellularized liver matrix (dDLM) at the same time point (p  >  0.05). Primary hepatocytes in the dDSM and dDLM expressed albumin, G6pc and Ugt1a1. The gene expression of Cyp2b1, Cyp1a2 and HNF1α in the gene transcription level revealed hepatocytes had lower gene expression levels in the dDSM compared with the dDLM at 3d, but better than those in a sandwich culture. The cumulative albumin production at 6 d of culture was 80.7   ±   9.6 μg per million cells in the dDSM and 89.6   ±   4.6 μg per million cells in the dDLM (p  >  0.05). In summary, the DSM is a promising 3D scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation in vitro.

  2. Production of hepatocyte like cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Nicholas R.F; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Touboul, Thomas; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    Large scale production of hepatocytes from a variety of genetic backgrounds would be beneficial for drug screening and to provide a source of cells to be used as a substitute for liver transplantation. However, fully functional primary hepatocytes remain difficult to expand in vitro and circumventing this problem by using an alternative source of cells is desirable. Here, we describe a 25 day protocol to direct the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into a near homogenous population of hepatocyte-like cells. As cells progress through this protocol they express genes in a chronological manner similar to that described during in-vivo hepatic development. The protocol relies on culture systems devoid of serum, feeders or complex extra-cellular matrices enabling molecular analyses without interference from unknown factors. This approach works efficiently with human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells and was recently used to model liver diseases in vitro. PMID:23424751

  3. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  4. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  5. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes for transplantation: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D

    2006-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from unused donor livers are being used for transplantation in patients with acute liver failure and liver-based metabolic defects. As large numbers of hepatocytes can be prepared from a single liver and hepatocytes need to be available for emergency and repeated treatment of patients it is essential to be able to cryopreserve and store cells with good thawed cell function. This review considers the current status of cryopreservation of human hepatocytes discussing the different stages involved in the process. These include pre-treatment of cells, freezing solution, cryoprotectants and freezing and thawing protocols. There are detrimental effects of cryopreservation on hepatocyte structure and metabolic function, including cell attachment, which is important to the engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes have been successfully used in clinical transplantation, with evidence of replacement of missing function. Further optimisation of hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols is important for their use in hepatocyte transplantation.

  6. Cytokine and chemokine expression associated with steatohepatitis and hepatocyte proliferation in rats fed ethanol via total enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Butura, Angelica; Korourian, Soheila; Shankar, Kartik; Simpson, Pippa; Badeaux, Jamie; Albano, Emanuele; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Badger, Thomas M

    2008-03-01

    To determine the temporal relationship between alcohol-induced changes in cytokines and chemokines, development of liver pathology and stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intragastrically fed low carbohydrate-containing ethanol (EtOH) diets via total enteral nutrition (TEN) for up to 49 d. Induction of EtOH metabolism and appearance of steatosis preceded development of oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death. A transitory peak of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and interferon gamma (IFN gamma) was observed at 14 d followed by reduced expression of TNFalpha, IFN gamma and another Th1 cytokine IL-12 accompanied by reduced expression of the Th1 regulators T-bet and STAT4. After 35-49 d of EtOH, at a time when hepatocyte proliferation was stimulated, IL-12 returned to control values and a second peak of TNFalpha occurred. The Th2 cytokine IL-4 remained suppressed throughout the study and was accompanied by reductions in the Th2 regulator GATA3. There was no temporal effect of EtOH on expression of IL-6 or TGFbeta. IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA were undetectable. Chemokine CXCL-2 expression increased progressively up to 35 d and preceded the appearance of inflammatory infiltrates. These data suggest that steatosis, increased ethanol metabolism, a transient induction of the innate immune response and suppression of Th2 responses were acute consequences of ethanol treatment and were followed by suppression of Th1 responses. However, the majority of necrosis, apoptosis and a late peak of TNFalpha only occurred after 6-7 weeks of ethanol, coincided with the appearance of inflammatory infiltrates and were associated with stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation.

  7. In vivo hepatocyte MR imaging using lactose functionalized magnetoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ketkar-Atre, Ashwini; Struys, Tom; Dresselaers, Tom; Hodenius, Michael; Mannaerts, Inge; Ni, Yicheng; Lambrichts, Ivo; Van Grunsven, Leo A; De Cuyper, Marcel; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel lactose functionalized magnetoliposomes (MLs) as an MR contrast agent to target hepatocytes as well as to evaluate the targeting ability of MLs for in vivo applications. In the present work, 17 nm sized iron oxide cores functionalized with anionic MLs bearing lactose moieties were used for targeting the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-r), which is highly expressed in hepatocytes. Non-functionalized anionic MLs were tested as negative controls. The size distribution of lactose and anionic MLs was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). After intravenous administration of both MLs, contrast enhancement in the liver was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Label retention was monitored non-invasively by MRI and validated with Prussian blue staining and TEM for up to eight days post MLs administration. Although the MRI signal intensity did not show significant differences between functionalized and non-functionalized particles, iron-specific Prussian blue staining and TEM analysis confirmed the uptake of lactose MLs mainly in hepatocytes. In contrast, non-functionalized anionic MLs were mainly taken up by Kupffer and sinusoidal cells. Target specificity was further confirmed by high-resolution MR imaging of phantoms containing isolated hepatocytes, Kupffer cell (KCs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) fractions. Hypointense signal was observed for hepatocytes isolated from animals which received lactose MLs but not from animals which received anionic MLs. These data demonstrate that galactose-functionalized MLs can be used as a hepatocyte targeting MR contrast agent to potentially aid in the diagnosis of hepatic diseases if the non-specific uptake by KCs is taken into account.

  8. Intrasplenic transplantation of allogeneic hepatocytes prolongs survival in anhepatic rats.

    PubMed

    Arkadopoulos, N; Lilja, H; Suh, K S; Demetriou, A A; Rozga, J

    1998-11-01

    To examine whether hepatocytes transplanted in the spleen can function as an ectopic liver, we performed hepatocyte transplantation in rats that were rendered anhepatic. Total hepatectomy was performed by using a novel single-stage technique. Following hepatectomy, Group 1 rats (n = 16) were monitored until death to determine survival time without prior intervention. Group 2 anhepatic rats (n = 20) were sacrificed at various times to measure blood hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) levels. Group 3 (n = 16) rats received intrasplenic injection of isolated hepatocytes (2.5 x 10(7) cells/rat) followed by total hepatectomy after 3 days. Group 4 (n = 12) sham-transplanted rats received intrasplenic saline infusion, and after 3 days they were rendered anhepatic. Group 2, 3, and 4 rats were maintained on daily Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg; intramuscularly). Group 1 anhepatic rats survived for 22.4 +/- 5.2 hours (standard deviation). The anhepatic state was associated with a progressive and statistically significant rise in blood HGF and TGF-beta1 levels. Rats that received hepatocyte transplantation before total hepatectomy had a significantly longer survival time than sham-transplanted anhepatic controls (34.1 +/- 8.5 vs. 15.5 +/- 4.8 hrs, P < .01). Additionally, at 12 hours post-hepatectomy, transplanted rats had significantly lower blood ammonia, prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and TGF-beta1 levels when compared with sham-transplanted controls. In conclusion, intrasplenic transplantation of allogeneic hepatocytes prolonged survival, improved blood chemistry, and lowered blood TGF-beta1 levels in rats rendered anhepatic.

  9. Evidence for two Ca2(+)-mobilizing purinoceptors on rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, C J; Woods, N M; Cuthbertson, K S; Cobbold, P H

    1990-01-01

    Aequorin measurements of cytosolic free Ca2+ in single rat hepatocytes show that ADP and ATP, thought to act through the same P2Y purinoceptor, elicited very different responses in the majority of cells tested. ADP invariably induced transients of short duration (approx. 9 s), whereas ATP induced either similar transients or transients with a much longer duration (approx. 49 s). We explain this variability in terms of two separate purinoceptors on rat hepatocytes, one of which responds to either ATP or ADP to generate free-Ca2+ transients of short duration, and the other responds to ATP only, with transients of longer duration. PMID:2386488

  10. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  11. [Current status and future perspectives of hepatocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Maupoey, Javier; San Juan, Fernando; López, Rafael; Mir, Jose

    2014-02-01

    The imbalance between the number of potential beneficiaries and available organs, originates the search for new therapeutic alternatives, such as Hepatocyte transplantation (HT).Even though this is a treatment option for these patients, the lack of unanimity of criteria regarding indications and technique, different cryopreservation protocols, as well as the different methodology to assess the response to this therapy, highlights the need of a Consensus Conference to standardize criteria and consider future strategies to improve the technique and optimize the results.Our aim is to review and update the current state of hepatocyte transplantation, emphasizing the future research attempting to solve the problems and improve the results of this treatment.

  12. Coculture with mesenchymal stem cells results in improved viability and function of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Emer; Wu, Yue; Dhadda, Paramjeet; Hughes, Robin D; Mitry, Ragai R; Qin, Hong; Lehec, Sharon C; Heaton, Nigel D; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is becoming an accepted therapy for acute liver failure, either as a bridge to liver regeneration or to organ transplantation. Hepatocytes provide liver function in place of the failing organ. The maintenance of sufficient viability and function of the transplanted hepatocytes is a concern. There is a lot of recent interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the provision of structural and trophic support to hepatocytes, but few studies currently use primary human hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate if coculture of human MSCs with cryopreserved human hepatocytes may improve their function and viability, thus with potential for cellular therapy of liver disease. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord or adipose tissue. Hepatocytes were isolated from donor organs unsuitable for transplantation. MSCs and hepatocytes were cocultured in both direct and indirect contact. Conditioned medium (CM) from cocultured MSCs and hepatocytes was also used on hepatocytes. Viability and liver-specific function were compared between test and controls. Human hepatocytes that were cocultured directly with MSCs demonstrated improved production of albumin from day 5 to day 25 of culture. This effect was most prominent at day 15. Likewise, urea production was improved in coculture from day 5 to 25. Indirect coculture demonstrated improved albumin production by day 4 (1,107 ng/ml) versus hepatocyte monoculture (940 ng/ml). Hepatocytes in CM demonstrated a nonsignificant improvement in function. The viability of cocultured hepatocytes was superior to that of monocultured cells with up to a 16% improvement. Thus, coculture of human hepatocytes with MSCs demonstrates both improved function and viability. The effect is seen mainly with direct coculture but can also be seen in indirect culture and with CM. Such coculture conditions may convey major advantages in hepatocyte survival and function for cell transplantation.

  13. Fate tracing of mature hepatocytes in mouse liver homeostasis and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Malato, Yann; Naqvi, Syed; Schürmann, Nina; Ng, Raymond; Wang, Bruce; Zape, Joan; Kay, Mark A.; Grimm, Dirk; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence has contradicted the prevailing view that homeostasis and regeneration of the adult liver are mediated by self duplication of lineage-restricted hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells. These new data suggest that liver progenitor cells do not function solely as a backup system in chronic liver injury; rather, they also produce hepatocytes after acute injury and are in fact the main source of new hepatocytes during normal hepatocyte turnover. In addition, other evidence suggests that hepatocytes are capable of lineage conversion, acting as precursors of biliary epithelial cells during biliary injury. To test these concepts, we generated a hepatocyte fate-tracing model based on timed and specific Cre recombinase expression and marker gene activation in all hepatocytes of adult Rosa26 reporter mice with an adenoassociated viral vector. We found that newly formed hepatocytes derived from preexisting hepatocytes in the normal liver and that liver progenitor cells contributed minimally to acute hepatocyte regeneration. Further, we found no evidence that biliary injury induced conversion of hepatocytes into biliary epithelial cells. These results therefore restore the previously prevailing paradigms of liver homeostasis and regeneration. In addition, our new vector system will be a valuable tool for timed, efficient, and specific loop out of floxed sequences in hepatocytes. PMID:22105172

  14. Molecular epidemiology of paramyxoviruses in Zambian wild rodents and shrews.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michihito; Muleya, Walter; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Moonga, Ladslav; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-01

    Rodents and shrews are known to harbour various viruses. Paramyxoviruses have been isolated from Asian and Australian rodents, but little is known about them in African rodents. Recently, previously unknown paramyxovirus sequences were found in South African rodents. To date, there have been no reports related to the presence and prevalence of paramyxoviruses in shrews. We found a high prevalence of paramyxoviruses in wild rodents and shrews from Zambia. Semi-nested reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to detect paramyxovirus RNA in 21 % (96/462) of specimens analysed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these viruses were novel paramyxoviruses and could be classified as morbillivirus- and henipavirus-related viruses, and previously identified rodent paramyxovirus-related viruses. Our findings suggest the circulation of previously unknown paramyxoviruses in African rodents and shrews, and provide new information regarding the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of paramyxoviruses.

  15. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  16. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany Y; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    2014-10-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models.

  17. The ZEPLIN-III anti-coincidence veto detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Araújo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; Edwards, B.; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lüscher, R.; Lyons, K.; Majewski, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neves, F.; Paling, S. M.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Preece, R.; Quenby, J. J.; Reichhart, L.; Scovell, P. R.; Solovov, V. N.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ≃0.4 to ≃0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for γ-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 10 -8 pb to be probed.

  18. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  19. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  20. Coincidence problem in YM field dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    The coincidence problem is studied in the effective Yang Mills condensate dark energy model. As the effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by quantum field theory, there is no adjustable parameter in this model except the energy scale, and the cosmic evolution only depends on the initial conditions. For generic initial conditions with the YM condensate subdominant to the radiation and matter, the model always has a tracking solution, the Universe transits from matter-dominated into the dark energy dominated stage only recently z˜0.3, and evolve to the present state with Ω˜0.73 and Ω˜0.27.

  1. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  2. Enhanced Photofission-based, Coincidence/Multiplicity Inspection Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; D.R. Norman; K.J. Haskell; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W.H. Geist; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman

    2010-07-01

    An enhanced active interrogation system has been developed that integrates a transportable Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system, using a pulsed bremsstrahlung source and a reconfigurable neutron detection system, with a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) list-mode data acquisition system. A series of active interrogation experiments have shown enhanced nuclear material detection and identification utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator. This paper describes the integrated inspection system and presents some key shielded and unshielded nuclear material inspection results. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security and possible nuclear weapon dismantlement treaties.

  3. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aucott, Timothy; Brand, Alexander; DiPrete, David

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  4. Changes in tau phosphorylation in hibernating rodents.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; Defelipe, Javier; Avila, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Tau is a cytoskeletal protein present mainly in the neurons of vertebrates. By comparing the sequence of tau molecule among different vertebrates, it was found that the variability of the N-terminal sequence in tau protein is higher than that of the C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is involved mainly in the binding of tau to cellular membranes, whereas the C-terminal region of the tau molecule contains the microtubule-binding sites. We have compared the sequence of Syrian hamster tau with the sequences of other hibernating and nonhibernating rodents and investigated how differences in the N-terminal region of tau could affect the phosphorylation level and tau binding to cell membranes. We also describe a change, in tau phosphorylation, on a casein kinase 1 (ck1)-dependent site that is found only in hibernating rodents. This ck1 site seems to play an important role in the regulation of tau binding to membranes.

  5. Rodent models of TDP-43: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, William; Jeong, Yun Ha; Lin, Sophie; Ling, Jonathan; Price, Donald L.; Chiang, Po-Min; Wong, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, missense mutations in the gene TARDBP encoding TDP-43 have been linked to familial ALS. The discovery of genes encoding these RNA binding proteins, such as TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, raised the notion that altered RNA metabolism is a major factor underlying the pathogenesis of ALS. To begin to unravel how mutations in TDP-43 cause dysfunction and death of motor neurons, investigators have employed both gain- and loss-of-function studies in rodent model systems. Here, we will summarize major findings from the initial sets of TDP-43 transgenic and knockout rodent models, identify their limitations, and point to future directions toward clarification of disease mechanism(s) and testing of therapeutic strategies that ultimately may lead to novel therapy for this devastating disease. PMID:22608070

  6. Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Rodents and Sheep, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Lin; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Yun-Xi; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Pan-He; Bian, Chang-Ling; Dumler, J. Stephen; Yang, Hong; Zuo, Shu-Qing; Chu, Chen-Yi; Liu, Wei; Richardus, Jan H.; Habbema, J. Dik F.

    2010-01-01

    To characterize the strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in wild and domestic animals in China, we isolated the organism from rodents and sheep in northeastern China. We isolated 3 strains (2 from rodents and 1 from sick sheep) through propagation in BALB/c mice and then cell culture in HL60 cells. The 3 isolates were identified by Wright-Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence, and electronic microscopy and were characterized by sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, partial citrate synthase gene, major surface protein 4 gene, and heat shock protein gene. The multiple sequences of the 3 isolates were identical to each other but different from all known strains from other countries. The public health and veterinary relevance of the isolates deserves further investigation. PMID:20409364

  7. MRI of neuronal plasticity in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Galit

    2011-01-01

    Modifications in the behavior and architecture of neuronal networks are well documented to occur in association with learning and memory, as well as following injury. These plasticity mechanisms are crucial to ensure adequate processing of stimuli, and they also dictate the degree of recovery following peripheral or central nervous system injury. Nevertheless, the underlying neuronal mechanisms that determine the degree of plasticity of neuronal pathways are not fully understood. Recent developments in animal-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and related hardware afford a high spatial and temporal resolution, making functional MRI and manganese-enhanced MRI emerging tools for studying reorganization of neuronal pathways in rodent models. Many of the observed changes in neuronal functions in rodent's brains following injury discussed here agree with clinical human fMRI findings. This demonstrates that animal model imaging can have a significant clinical impact in the neuronal plasticity and rehabilitation arenas.

  8. Learning in the Rodent Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andrew J; Liu, Haixin; Komiyama, Takaki

    2017-03-31

    The motor cortex is far from a stable conduit for motor commands and instead undergoes significant changes during learning. An understanding of motor cortex plasticity has been advanced greatly using rodents as experimental animals. Two major focuses of this research have been on the connectivity and activity of the motor cortex. The motor cortex exhibits structural changes in response to learning, and substantial evidence has implicated the local formation and maintenance of new synapses as crucial substrates of motor learning. This synaptic reorganization translates into changes in spiking activity, which appear to result in a modification and refinement of the relationship between motor cortical activity and movement. This review presents the progress that has been made using rodents to establish the motor cortex as an adaptive structure that supports motor learning. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 40 is July 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Barbara A; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E; Drake, John M

    2015-06-02

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States.

  10. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  11. Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Agnes M.; Lagakos, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments are discussed and presented with the goal of avoiding dosage group biases related to cage location. Considerations in selecting a cage design are first discussed in general terms. Specific designs are presented for use in experiments involving three, four, and five dose groups and with one, four, and five rodents per cage. Priorities for balancing treatment groups include horizontal position on shelf and shelf of rack, nearest neighbor balance, and male–female balance. It is proposed that these balance criteria be considered together with practical issues, such as the ability to accurately conform to a design and to determine a sensible and efficient design for each experiment. PMID:17539183

  12. Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, A M; Lagakos, S W

    1992-01-01

    Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments are discussed and presented with the goal of avoiding dosage group biases related to cage location. Considerations in selecting a cage design are first discussed in general terms. Specific designs are presented for use in experiments involving three, four, and five dose groups and with one, four, and five rodents per cage. Priorities for balancing treatment groups include horizontal position on shelf and shelf of rack, nearest neighbor balance, and male-female balance. It is proposed that these balance criteria be considered together with practical issues, such as the ability to accurately conform to a design and to determine a sensible and efficient design for each experiment. PMID:1295494

  13. Leptospira interrogans in Rodents from Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Plata-Luis, Josué; Foronda, Pilar; Martín-Alonso, Aaron; Feliu, Carlos; Alves, Joana; Gil, Horacio; Valladares, Basilio

    2016-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that can infect both animals and humans. In most cases, leptospirosis is a nonspecific self-limiting illness, but some patients can develop a severe form with a high mortality. This study was carried out in Santiago Island, Cape Verde, in 2012-2013. A total of 62 wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus domesticus) were analyzed. The lipL32 gene, present only in pathogenic Leptospira spp., was amplified by PCR, and 16 samples were positive (25.8%). In both rodent species, Leptospira interrogans was identified. The results show the presence of pathogenic Leptospira in the three localities analyzed in Santiago. The presence of L. interrogans demonstrates a serious health risk for the population, since this species has been associated with the most severe form of leptospirosis, the Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage.

  14. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  15. Evidence for Novel Hepaciviruses in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly; Coutard, Bruno; Adam, Alexander; Ritz, Daniel; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van Riel, Debby; Kallies, Rene; Klose, Stefan M.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Rupp, Daniel; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schlegel, Mathias; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Krüger, Detlev H.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Hemachudha, Thiravat; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Osterrieder, Klaus; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Matthee, Sonja; Beer, Martin; Kuiken, Thijs; Reusken, Chantal; Leroy, Eric M.; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species); and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species). Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8%) of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and 10 (1.9%) of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio). Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%). Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage efforts to

  16. Geometric Morphometrics of Rodent Sperm Head Shape

    PubMed Central

    Varea Sánchez, María; Bastir, Markus; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa, particularly those of rodent species, are extremely complex cells and differ greatly in form and dimensions. Thus, characterization of sperm size and, particularly, sperm shape represents a major challenge. No consensus exists on a method to objectively assess size and shape of spermatozoa. In this study we apply the principles of geometric morphometrics to analyze rodent sperm head morphology and compare them with two traditional morphometry methods, that is, measurements of linear dimensions and dimensions-derived parameters calculated using formulae employed in sperm morphometry assessments. Our results show that geometric morphometrics clearly identifies shape differences among rodent spermatozoa. It is also capable of discriminating between size and shape and to analyze these two variables separately. Thus, it provides an accurate method to assess sperm head shape. Furthermore, it can identify which sperm morphology traits differ between species, such as the protrusion or retraction of the base of the head, the orientation and relative position of the site of flagellum insertion, the degree of curvature of the hook, and other distinct anatomical features and appendices. We envisage that the use of geometric morphometrics may have a major impact on future studies focused on the characterization of sperm head formation, diversity of sperm head shape among species (and underlying evolutionary forces), the effects of reprotoxicants on changes in cell shape, and phenotyping of genetically-modified individuals. PMID:24312234

  17. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per {mu}Ci/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 {mu}s, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for {sup 18}F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  18. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  19. Improved β-γ Coincidence Detector For Radioxenon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W; Carman, April J; Hayes, James C; Heimbigner, Tom R; Hubbard, Charles W; Litke, Kevin E; McIntyre, Justin I; Morris, Scott J; Ripplinger, Michael D; Suarez, Reynold

    2005-08-31

    The Automated Radio-xenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes. ARSA is very sensitive to 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe due to the compact high efficiency coincidence detector it uses. For this reason it is an excellent treaty monitoring and environmental sampling device. Although the system is shown to be both robust and reliable, based on several field tests, it is also complex due to a detailed photomultiplier tube gain matching regime. This complexity is a problem from a maintenance and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) standpoint. To reduce these issues a simplified coincident detector has been developed. A comparison of three different well detectors has been completed. In addition, a new plastic scintillator gas cell was constructed. The new simplified detector system has been demonstrated to equal or better performance compared with the original ARSA design in spectral resolution and efficiency and significantly easier to setup and calibrate.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy to determine line coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy in the 12-15 A region of L-shell lines from selected transition elements was performed in a joint Naval Research Laboratory - KMS Fusion, Inc. experiment. The accurate wavelengths determined in this work will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future X-ray lasing schemes. Specifically, high-resolution X-ray spectra were collected under controlled geometric and target conditions using both red and green light laser excitation in the KMS Chroma laser. Three groups of X-ray spectra were collected with highly-dispersive X-ray crystals at wavelengths centered at 12.543, 13.781 and 14.458 A corresponding to He- and H-like lines from fluorine. Two specially-designed flat crystal spectrographs employing film shutters were used with pairs of beryl and TAP crystals. The spectra from potential lasant and pump candidates could be recorded on the same spectrogram to aid in identifying X-ray line coincidences. In cases where wavelengths were measured in both the red and green laser work, agreement within 1-3 mA was obtained for the L-series X-ray lines. Within this accuracy range, five L series X-ray lines, mostly 2p-3d transitions from the metals Cr, Mn, and Ni, had wavelength values coincident to K-series lines in fluorine.

  1. Investigating Coincidence Techniques in Biomedical Applications of Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Gramer, R.; Tandel, S. K.; Reinhardt, C. J.

    2004-05-01

    While neutron activation analysis has been widely used in biomedical applications for some time, the use of non-radioactive tracer techniques, to monitor, for example, organ blood flow, is more recent. In these studies, pre-clinical animal models are injected with micro-spheres labeled with stable isotopes of elements that have a high neutron absorption cross-section. Subsequently, samples of blood and/or tissue from different locations in the body are subjected to neutron activation analysis to measure the propagation of the labeled micro-spheres through the body. Following irradiation, the counting (with high-resolution Ge detectors) is typically delayed by a few days to dissipate short-lived activity in the samples and improve signal-to-noise for the peaks of interest in the activation spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coincidence techniques (for isotopes which decay via two-photon cascades) could improve signal-to-noise and turn-around times. The samples were irradiated at the 1 MW research reactor at the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory. The analysis of the multi-parameter coincidence data recorded in event-mode will be presented and compared with the standard method of recording singles spectra.

  2. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  3. CSF biomarkers cutoffs: the importance of coincident neuropathological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Brettschneider, Johannes; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E.; Hu, William T.; Xie, Sharon X.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of applying clinical versus neuropathological diagnosis and the inclusion of cases with coincident neuropathological diagnoses have not been assessed specifically when studying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker classification cutoffs for patients with neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. Thus, 142 neuropathologically diagnosed neurodegenerative dementia patients [71 Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 29 frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 3 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 dementia with Lewy bodies, 32 of which cases also had coincident diagnoses] were studied. 96 % had enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) CSF data and 77 % had Luminex CSF data, with 43 and 46 controls for comparison, respectively. Aβ42, total, and phosphorylated tau181 were measured. Clinical and neuropathological diagnoses showed an 81.4 % overall agreement. Both assays showed high sensitivity and specificity to classify AD subjects against FTLD subjects and controls, and moderate sensitivity and specificity for classifying FTLD subjects against controls. However, among the cases with neuropathological diagnoses of AD plus another pathology (26.8 % of the sample), 69.4 % (ELISA) and 96.4 % (Luminex) were classified as AD according to their biomarker profiles. Use of clinical diagnosis instead of neuropathological diagnosis led to a 14–17 % underestimation of the biomarker accuracy. These results show that while CSF Aβ and tau assays are useful for diagnosis of AD and neurodegenerative diseases even at MCI stages, CSF diagnostic analyte panels that establish a positive diagnosis of Lewy body disease and FTLD are also needed, and must be established based on neuropathological rather than clinical diagnoses. PMID:22526019

  4. Interacting quintessence, the coincidence problem, and cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huey, Greg; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2006-07-01

    Faced by recent evidence for a flat universe dominated by dark energy, cosmologists grapple with deep cosmic enigmas such as the cosmological constant problem, extreme fine-tuning and the cosmic coincidence problem. The extent to which we observe the dimming of distant supernovae suggests that the cosmic acceleration is as least as severe as in cosmological constant models. Extrapolating this to our cosmic future implies terrifying visions of either a cold and empty universe or an explosive demise in a “Big Rip.” We construct a class of dynamical scalar field models of dark energy and dark matter. Within this class we can explain why supernovae imply a cosmic equation of state w≲-1, address fine-tuning issues, protect the universe from premature acceleration and predict a constant fraction of dark energy to dark matter in the future (thus solving the coincidence problem), satisfy the dominant energy condition, and ensure that gravitationally bound objects remain so forever (avoid a Big Rip). This is achieved with a string theory inspired Lagrangian containing standard kinetic terms, exponential potentials and couplings, and parameters of order unity.

  5. A Microfabricated Platform for Generating Physiologically-Relevant Hepatocyte Zonation

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, William J.; Usta, O. Berk; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver models have been important tools for more than 40 years for academic research and preclinical toxicity screening by the pharmaceutical industry. Hepatocytes, the highly metabolic parenchymal cells of the liver, are efficient at different metabolic chemistries depending on their relative spatial location along the sinusoid from the portal triad to the central vein. Although replicating hepatocyte metabolic zonation is vitally important for physiologically-relevant in vitro liver tissue and organ models, it is most often completely overlooked. Here, we demonstrate the creation of spatially-controlled zonation across multiple hepatocyte metabolism levels through the application of precise concentration gradients of exogenous hormone (insulin and glucagon) and chemical (3-methylcholanthrene) induction agents in a microfluidic device. Observed gradients in glycogen storage via periodic acid-Schiff staining, urea production via carbamoyl phosphatase synthetase I staining, and cell viability after exposure to allyl alcohol and acetaminophen demonstrated the in vitro creation of hepatocyte carbohydrate, nitrogen, alcohol degradation, and drug conjugation metabolic zonation. This type of advanced control system will be crucial for studies evaluating drug metabolism and toxicology using in vitro constructs. PMID:27240736

  6. Preservation of hepatocyte suspensions at 4 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Lund, P; Wiggins, D

    1988-10-01

    Suspensions of rat hepatocytes are resistant to hypoxia for at least 24 hr at 4 degrees C. After storage for 24 hr with xylitol, sorbitol, or glycerol, their subsequent capacity for glucogenesis from these substrates is increased. Even storage under N2/CO2 as the gas phase has little deleterious effect.

  7. A Microfabricated Platform for Generating Physiologically-Relevant Hepatocyte Zonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, William J.; Usta, O. Berk; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-05-01

    In vitro liver models have been important tools for more than 40 years for academic research and preclinical toxicity screening by the pharmaceutical industry. Hepatocytes, the highly metabolic parenchymal cells of the liver, are efficient at different metabolic chemistries depending on their relative spatial location along the sinusoid from the portal triad to the central vein. Although replicating hepatocyte metabolic zonation is vitally important for physiologically-relevant in vitro liver tissue and organ models, it is most often completely overlooked. Here, we demonstrate the creation of spatially-controlled zonation across multiple hepatocyte metabolism levels through the application of precise concentration gradients of exogenous hormone (insulin and glucagon) and chemical (3-methylcholanthrene) induction agents in a microfluidic device. Observed gradients in glycogen storage via periodic acid-Schiff staining, urea production via carbamoyl phosphatase synthetase I staining, and cell viability after exposure to allyl alcohol and acetaminophen demonstrated the in vitro creation of hepatocyte carbohydrate, nitrogen, alcohol degradation, and drug conjugation metabolic zonation. This type of advanced control system will be crucial for studies evaluating drug metabolism and toxicology using in vitro constructs.

  8. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-11-30

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  9. Liver glycogen bodies: ground-glass hepatocytes in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Pablo A; Garcia, Monica T; Rodriguez, Maria M; Ruiz, Phillip; Tzakis, Andreas G

    2006-11-01

    Ground-glass hepatocytes have been described in Lafora's disease, fibrinogen deposition, hepatitis B, type IV glycogenosis, and alcohol aversion (cyanamide) therapy. We encountered ground-glass hepatocytes with intracytoplasmic inclusions in four liver biopsies from three transplanted patients who had none of the above-mentioned underlying diseases. One patient was a 4-year-old boy who had a kidney transplant for severe ureterovesical reflux. Patient 2 was a 52-year-old man who had two liver transplants because of hepatitis C. The third patient was a 7-month-old girl who underwent a multivisceral transplant because of necrotizing enterocolitis and liver failure induced by total parenteral nutrition. The patients developed liver abnormalities from 45 days to 4 years after their transplants. The livers showed conspicuous ground-glass hepatocytes in 90% of the children's samples and 30% of the adult liver cells. The cytoplasmic bodies stained strongly for Gomori methenamine-silver; they were positive for periodic acid-Schiff without diastase, but negative after diastase digestion. They were negative for colloidal iron and hepatitis B core and surface antigens. Electron microscopy revealed non-membrane bound aggregates of glycogen. Idiopathic ground-glass hepatocytes occur in transplanted patients and represent accumulation of altered glycogen. However, their clinical significance and cause are not entirely elucidated.

  10. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  11. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  12. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device. PMID:27600213

  13. DIFFERENTIATING MECHANISMS OF REACTIVE CHEMICAL TOXICITY IN ISOLATED TROUT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of four quinones, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMONQ), 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ ),1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ), and 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), which redox cycle or arlyate in mammalian cells, was determined in isolated trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. Mor...

  14. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  15. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  16. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes. PMID:27916916

  17. Hepatocytes: a key cell type for innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Gao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the major parenchymal cells in the liver, play pivotal roles in metabolism, detoxification, and protein synthesis. Hepatocytes also activate innate immunity against invading microorganisms by secreting innate immunity proteins. These proteins include bactericidal proteins that directly kill bacteria, opsonins that assist in the phagocytosis of foreign bacteria, iron-sequestering proteins that block iron uptake by bacteria, several soluble factors that regulate lipopolysaccharide signaling, and the coagulation factor fibrinogen that activates innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the wide variety of innate immunity proteins produced by hepatocytes and discuss liver-enriched transcription factors (e.g. hepatocyte nuclear factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins), pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin (IL)-6, IL-22, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and downstream signaling pathways (e.g. signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 and nuclear factor-κB) that regulate the expression of these innate immunity proteins. We also briefly discuss the dysregulation of these innate immunity proteins in chronic liver disease, which may contribute to an increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26685902

  18. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  19. [Use of xenogenic lyophilized hepatocytes in the treatment of acute and chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Musselius, S G; Vasina, N V; Gladskikh, L V

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic effect of lyophilized xenogenic hepatocytes was demonstrated on 30 dogs with acute hepatic failure and on white mice. The major biochemical values were corrected and the yeast fermentation test showed biological activity of isolated hepatocytes. Clinically, lyophilized hepatocytes were used in the treatment of patients with acute hepatic failure: orally in 47 and for extracorporeal dialysis in 8. The therapeutic effect of lyophilized hepatocytes is based on active detoxication and hemostasis correction. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental studies showed improvement of the clinical status, decreased encephalopathy, and accelerated repair processes in the liver. Addition of lyophilized hepatocytes to combined therapy decreased the mortality by 2.5 times.

  20. Enzymatic antioxidant defense in isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Skrzycki, M; Czeczot, H; Majewska, M; Podsiad, M; Karlik, W; Grono, D; Wiechetek, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of cadmium effects on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rat hepatocytes. The studies were conducted with isolated rat hepatocytes incubated for 1 or 2 hours in a modified (deprived of carbonates with phosphates) Williams' E medium (MWE) in the presence of cadmium chloride (25, 50 and 200 microM). Hepatocytes incubated in the MWE medium without cadmium chloride were used as a control. The application of the modified Williams' E medium allowed for the appearance of cadmium compounds in a soluble form that is indispensable for suitable estimation of its toxic action. There were evaluated markers of the oxidative stress such as: concentration of thiobarbiturate reactive substances (TBARS)--proportional to the level of lipid peroxidation, concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and SOD2), catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), selenium--dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHPx), glutathione transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GSHR). Alterations of antioxidant enzymes activity, the level of TBARS and GSH in isolated rat hepatocytes caused by cadmium in vitro, were shown to depend on the concentration and time of exposure of cells to this metal. The increased level of TBARS and GSH was observed as well as changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The activity of SOD isoenzymes and CAT was increased, whereas GSHPx and GST were decreased. These results indicate that cadmium induces oxidative stress followed by alterations in the cellular antioxidant enzyme system in isolated rat hepatocytes.

  1. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shan-Bo; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Shan; Gao, Bin; Lu, Yang; Hui, Sen; Li, Long; Shi, Xiao-Peng; Wen, Ai-Dong

    2017-04-07

    Hyperglycemia is a typical pathogenic factor in a series of complications among patients with type II diabetes. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol extracted from green tea and is reported to be an antioxidant. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of EGCG on insulin resistance in human HepG2 cells pretreated with high concentrations of glucose. The protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) pathways were analyzed using western blot analysis in HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes treated with high glucose and/or EGCG. Cellular glycogen content was determined using a glycogen assay kit. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using dihydroethidium staining and flow cytometry. c‑JUN N‑terminal kinase (JNK)/insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1)/AKT/GSK signaling was explored using western blot analysis in HepG2 cells treated with high glucose and/or EGCG or N-acetyl-cysteine. High glucose significantly decreased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK in HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. Pretreatment with EGCG significantly restored the activation of AKT and GSK in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes exposed to high glucose. In HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes, glycogen synthesis was improved by EGCG treatment in a dose‑dependent manner. High glucose significantly stimulated the production of ROS while EGCG protected high glucose‑induced ROS production. ROS is known to serve a major role in high glucose induced‑insulin resistance by increasing JNK and IRS1 serine phosphorylation. In the present study, EGCG was observed to enhance the insulin‑signaling pathway. EGCG ameliorated high glucose‑induced insulin resistance in the hepatocytes by potentially decreasing ROS‑induced JNK/IRS1/AKT/GSK signaling.

  2. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  3. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  4. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  5. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  6. Blood-Compatible Polymer for Hepatocyte Culture with High Hepatocyte-Specific Functions toward Bioartificial Liver Development.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Otaki, Takayuki; Nemoto, Eri; Maruyama, Hiroka; Tanaka, Masaru

    2015-08-19

    The development of bioartificial liver (BAL) is expected because of the shortage of donor liver for transplantation. The substrates for BAL require the following criteria: (a) blood compatibility, (b) hepatocyte adhesiveness, and (c) the ability to maintain hepatocyte-specific functions. Here, we examined blood-compatible poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate) (PTHFA) (PTHFA) as the substrates for BAL. HepG2, a human hepatocyte model, could adhere on PMEA and PTHFA substrates. The spreading of HepG2 cells was suppressed on PMEA substrates because integrin contribution to cell adhesion on PMEA substrate was low and integrin signaling was not sufficiently activated. Hepatocyte-specific gene expression in HepG2 cells increased on PMEA substrate, whereas the expression decreased on PTHFA substrates due to the nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that blood-compatible PMEA is suitable for BAL substrate. Also, PMEA is expected to be used to regulate cell functions for blood-contacting tissue engineering.

  7. Caveolin-1-dependent activation of the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 by TGF-β in hepatocytes requires activation of Src and the NADPH oxidase NOX1.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Mainez, Jèssica; Mayoral, Rafael; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Egea, Gustavo; Fabregat, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a dual role in hepatocytes, inducing both pro- and anti-apoptotic responses, the balance between which decides cell fate. Survival signals are mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, which is activated by TGF-β. We have previously shown that caveolin-1 (CAV1) is required for activation of the metalloprotease tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-converting enzyme/a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (TACE/ADAM17), and hence transactivation of the EGFR pathway. The specific mechanism by which TACE/ADAM17 is activated has not yet been determined. Here we show that TGF-β induces phosphorylation of sarcoma kinase (Src) in hepatocytes, a process that is impaired in Cav1(-/-) hepatocytes, coincident with a decrease in phosphorylated Src in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. TGF-β-induced activation of TACE/ADAM17 and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked using the Src inhibitor PP2. Cav1(+/+) hepatocytes showed early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by TGF-β, which was not seen in Cav1(-/-) cells. Production of ROS was inhibited by both the NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) inhibitor STK301831 and NOX1 knock-down, which also impaired TACE/ADAM17 activation and thus EGFR phosphorylation. Finally, neither STK301831 nor NOX1 silencing impaired Src phosphorylation, but PP2 blocked early ROS production, showing that Src is involved in NOX1 activation. As expected, inhibition of Src or NOX1 increased TGF-β-induced cell death in Cav1(+/+) cells. In conclusion, CAV1 is required for TGF-β-mediated activation of TACE/ADAM17 through a mechanism that involves phosphorylation of Src and NOX1-mediated ROS production.

  8. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  9. IXO-XMS LVSID Anti-Coincidence Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Scott F.; Kilbourne, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This document describes a high-TRL backup implementation of the anti-coincidence detector for the IXO/XMS instrument. The backup detector, hereafter referred to as the low-voltage silicon ionization detector (LVSID), has been successfully flown on Astro-E2 (Suzaku)/XRS and is currently being implemented, without significant changes, on the Astro-H/SXS instrument. The LVSID anti-coincidence detector on Astro-E2/XRS operated successfully for almost 2 years, and was not affected by the loss of liquid helium in that instrument. The LVSID continues to operate after almost 5 years on-orbit (LEO, 550 km) but with slightly increased noise following the expected depletion of solid Neon after 22 months. The noise of the device is increased after the loss of sNe due to thermally induced bias and readout noise. No radiation damage, or off-nominal affects have been observed with the LVSID on-orbit during the Astro-E2/XRS program. A detector die from the same fabrication run will be used on the Astro-H/SXS mission. The LVSID technology and cryogenic JFET readout system is thus TRL 9. The technology is described in detail in section 2. The IXO/XMS "backup-up" anti-coincidence detector is a small array of LVSID detectors that are almost identical to those employed for Astro -E2/XRS as described in this document. The readout system is identical and, infact would use the same design as the Astro -E2/XRS JFET amplifier module (19 channels) essentially without changes except for its mechanical mount. The changes required for the IXO/XMS LVSID array are limited to the mounting of the LVSID detectors, and the mechanical mounting of the JFET amplifier sub-assembly. There is no technical development needed for the IXO/XMS implementation and the technology is ready for detailed design-work leading to PDR. The TRL level is thus at least 6, and possibly higher. Characteristics of an IXO/XMS LVSID anti-co detector are given in Table 1 and described in detail in section 3.

  10. Coincidence landscapes for three-channel linear optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guise, Hubert; Tan, Si-Hui; Poulin, Isaac P.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-06-01

    We use permutation-group methods plus SU(3) group-theoretic methods to determine the action of a three-channel passive optical interferometer on controllably delayed single-photon pulse inputs to each channel. Permutation-group techniques allow us to relate directly expressions for rates and, in particular, investigate symmetries in the coincidence landscape. These techniques extend the traditional Hong-Ou-Mandel effect analysis for two-channel interferometry to valleys and plateaus in three-channel interferometry. Our group-theoretic approach is intuitively appealing because the calculus of Wigner D functions partially accounts for permutational symmetries and directly reveals the connections among D functions, partial distinguishability, and immanants.

  11. Application of annihilation coincidence detection to transaxial reconstruction tomography.

    PubMed

    Phelps, M E; Hoffman, E J; Mullani, N A; Ter-Pogossian, M M

    1975-03-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the use of annihilation coincidence detection (ACD) in emmision transaxial reconstruction tomography. The ACD was evaluated in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity with depth, detection efficiency, effect of pulse-height analysis on resolution and efficiency, correction for attenuation, and cold spot contrast. A prototype positron emission transaxial tomograph (PETT) consisting of a hexagonal array of 24 Nal (Tl) detectors employing ACD was constructed. A fast Fourier transform algorithm was employed to generate the reconstructed image. Computer simulations and phantom and animal studies were carried out to demonstrate that this approach yields tomographic radionuclide images that have high resolution and contrast (hot and cold spot) and that are independent of activity above and below the plane examined. The ACD yields a quantitative nuclear medicine imaging device with high detection efficiency. Comparisons are presented between the ACD and the scintillation camera and scanner. Discussion of the possible applications of the PETT in nuclear medicine is included.

  12. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  13. Coincidence of GIST and pancreatic endocrine neoplasm in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Comesaña, Elias; Tome-Espiñeiro, Catherine; Ulla-Rocha, Jose L; Lorenzo-Lorenzo, Isabel; Lede-Fernandez, Angel; Portela-Serra, Jose L

    2011-09-01

    Carcinoids of the ampulla of Vater are infrequent tumors of which a quarter of cases have been detected in patients with type I neurofibromatosis. This hereditary disease is also associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). However, the coincidence of these three entities together have only been formerly detected in five cases. A 53 year-old female patient, diagnosed with type I neurofibromatosis, with a malignant carcinoid of ampulla of Vater and multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the duodenum and jejunum, was treated with total pancreatectomy and the excision of her intestinal tumors. Five-years on, a follow-up showed the patient to be well, and free from tumor recurrence. The coexistence of an ampullary carcinoid tumor, GIST and neurofibramatosis is very rare. Radical curative surgical resection is a good treatment option, but the optimal management of this is not yet well established.

  14. Coincidence-Summing Corrections for Close Geometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueray, R. Taygun

    2008-11-11

    For a given stellar temperature, nuclear reactions take place in the energy range of the Gamow window with the relatively low energies of the astrophysical interest for charged particle induced reactions. In order to measure the nuclear reaction cross sections with the activation method at projectile energies as low as possible, a gamma counting system that consists of Ge detectors and the irradiated target in close geometry is required. The presence of cascade transitions requires coincidence summing corrections that can not be ignored because of the very large solid angle. In this study, the determination of the summing correction factor and photopeak efficiency for a gamma spectrometer, as an example, composed of two Ge clover detectors in close geometry is briefly described.

  15. Coincident vortices in Antarctic wind fields and sea ice motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, S.; Schmitt, C.; Kottmeier, C.; Simmonds, I.

    2006-08-01

    This study introduces a method to examine the coincidence of rotational ice drift and winds caused by the forcing of ice motion by Antarctic cyclones. Vortices are automatically detected using the algorithm of Murray and Simmonds (1991) from both ECMWF surface pressures and SSM/I sea ice motions. For compatibility with this algorithm sea ice motion vectors are transformed to a scalar stream function. During a seven-day test period positions of pressure minima and stream function maxima (SFM) of ice drift are within 300 km in 96% of the cases. Lowest pressure minima are related to highest stream function maxima. The results promise the method to provide a complementary tool of detecting and localizing low-pressure systems over sea ice, adding to numerical pressure analyses.

  16. Gamma Efficiency Simulations towards Coincidence Measurements for Fusion Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Jenkins, D. G.; Montanari, D.; Morris, L.; Regan, P. H.; Rudigier, M.; Symochko, D.

    2016-10-01

    With the experimental station STELLA (STELlar LAboratory) we will measure fusion cross sections of astrophysical relevance making use of the coincident detection of charged particles and gamma rays for background reduction. For the measurement of gamma rays from the de-excitation of fusion products a compact array of 36 UK FATIMA LaBr3 detectors is designed based on efficiency studies with Geant4. The photo peak efficiency in the region of interest compares to other gamma detection systems used in this field. The features of the internal decay of 138La is used in a background study to obtain an online calibration of the gamma detectors. Background data are fit to the Monte Carlo model of the self activity assuming crude exponential behavior of external background. Accuracy in the region of interest is of the order of some keV in this first study.

  17. Geometric origin of coincidences and hierarchies in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Freivogel, Ben

    2011-10-15

    We show that the geometry of cutoffs on eternal inflation strongly constrains predictions for the time scales of vacuum domination, curvature domination, and observation. We consider three measure proposals: the causal patch, the fat geodesic, and the apparent horizon cutoff, which is introduced here for the first time. We impose neither anthropic requirements nor restrictions on landscape vacua. For vacua with positive cosmological constant, all three measures predict the double coincidence that most observers live at the onset of vacuum domination and just before the onset of curvature domination. The hierarchy between the Planck scale and the cosmological constant is related to the number of vacua in the landscape. These results require only mild assumptions about the distribution of vacua (somewhat stronger assumptions are required by the fat geodesic measure). At this level of generality, none of the three measures are successful for vacua with negative cosmological constant. Their applicability in this regime is ruled out unless much stronger anthropic requirements are imposed.

  18. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, Joseph T.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-05-01

    L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  19. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: potential roles in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dever, Joseph T; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2009-05-01

    L-methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 degrees C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-d-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-dl-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  20. Rodents and risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: seroprevalence of selected zoonotic viruses in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Bryant, Juliet E

    2015-01-01

    In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade.

  1. Leptospira and Rodents in Cambodia: Environmental Determinants of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Svilena; Herbreteau, Vincent; Blasdell, Kim; Chaval, Yannick; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    We investigated infection of rodents and shrews by Leptospira spp. in two localities of Cambodia (Veal Renh, Kaev Seima) and in four types of habitat (forests, non-flooded lands, lowland rain-fed paddy fields, houses) during the wet and the dry seasons. Habitat preference was common, and rodent and shrew species were found only in houses or in rain-fed paddy fields or in forests. Among 649 small mammals trapped belonging to 12 rodent species and 1 shrew species, 71 of 642 animals tested were carriers of Leptospira according to the 16S ribosomal RNA marker used. Rodent infection was higher in low-slope locations, corresponding to rain-fed paddy fields, especially in the rainy season and in Kaev Seima. Rodents (Rattus exulans) and shrews (Suncus murinus) inhabiting households showed significantly low levels of infections, whereas rodents living in and near to forests (shrubby wasteland, orchards) showed high levels of infection. PMID:22665613

  2. Bartonella infection in rodents and their flea ectoparasites: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella-rodent-flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized.

  3. Retinal image quality in the rodent eye.

    PubMed

    Artal, P; Herreros de Tejada, P; Muñoz Tedó, C; Green, D G

    1998-01-01

    Many rodents do not see well. For a target to be resolved by a rat or a mouse, it must subtend a visual angle of a degree or more. It is commonly assumed that this poor spatial resolving capacity is due to neural rather than optical limitations, but the quality of the retinal image has not been well characterized in these animals. We have modified a double-pass apparatus, initially designed for the human eye, so it could be used with rodents to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye's optics. That is, the double-pass retinal image of a monochromatic (lambda = 632.8 nm) point source was digitized with a CCD camera. From these double-pass measurements, the single-pass MTF was computed under a variety of conditions of focus and with different pupil sizes. Even with the eye in best focus, the image quality in both rats and mice is exceedingly poor. With a 1-mm pupil, for example, the MTF in the rat had an upper limit of about 2.5 cycles/deg, rather than the 28 cycles/deg one would obtain if the eye were a diffraction-limited system. These images are about 10 times worse than the comparable retinal images in the human eye. Using our measurements of the optics and the published behavioral and electrophysiological contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of rats, we have calculated the CSF that the rat would have if it had perfect rather than poor optics. We find, interestingly, that diffraction-limited optics would produce only slight improvement overall. That is, in spite of retinal images which are of very low quality, the upper limit of visual resolution in rodents is neurally determined. Rats and mice seem to have eyes in which the optics and retina/brain are well matched.

  4. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  5. Klebsiella oxytoca: opportunistic infections in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Andre; Kirsch, Petra; Sahly, Hany; Fahey, Jim; Smoczek, Anna; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Sundberg, John P

    2008-07-01

    Opportunistic pathogens have become increasingly relevant as the causative agents of clinical disease and pathological lesions in laboratory animals. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of Klebsiella oxytoca as an opportunistic pathogen in laboratory rodents. Therefore, K. oxytoca-induced lesions were studied from 2004 to early 2006 in naturally infected rodent colonies maintained at The Jackson Laboratory (TJL), Bar Harbor, USA, the Animal Research Centre (Tierforschungszentrum, TFZ) of the University of Ulm, Germany and the Central Animal Facility (ZTM) of the Hannover Medical School, Germany. K. oxytoca infections were observed in substrains of C3H/HeJ mice, which carry the Tlr4(Lps-d) allele; in LEW.1AR1-iddm rats, the latter being prone to diabetes mellitus; in immunodeficient NMRI-Foxn1(nu) mice; and in mole voles, Ellobius lutescens. The main lesions observed were severe suppurative otitis media, urogenital tract infections and pneumonia. Bacteriological examination revealed K. oxytoca as monocultures in all cases. Clonality analysis performed on strains isolated at the ZTM and TFZ (serotyping, pulse field gel electrophoresis [PFGE], enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) polymerase chain reaction, sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes) revealed that the majority of bacteria belonged to two clones, one in each facility, expressing the capsule type K55 (ZTM) or K72 (TFZ). Two strains, one isolated at the ZTM and one at the TFZ, showed different PFGE and ERIC pattern than all other isolates and both expressed capsule type K35. In conclusion, K. oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen capable of inducing pathological lesions in different rodent species.

  6. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  7. [An experimental study on the protective effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) for the primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from iron-loaded rats].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, J

    1995-01-01

    Pathological iron deposition in liver is often found in various liver diseases. The deposited iron is thought to be one of the most important factor of liver cell injury, not only in hemochromotosis but also in cirrhosis following hepatitis virus B or C infection. To investigate the influence of the deposited iron on damage and regeneration of hepatocyte, primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from carbonyl iron-loaded rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in the presence or absence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Although the section of liver from carbonyl iron-loaded rats showed no necrosis and fibrosis, iron-loaded hepatocytes contained about twofold more iron than control. The damage of iron-loaded hepatocytes induced by CCl4 was more serious than that of control, and HGF decreased this injury only in iron-loaded hepatocytes but not in control. There is no difference in DNA synthesis stimulated by HGF between iron-loaded hepatocytes and control. These findings suggest that the pathological iron deposition induces the fragility of hepatocyte and that cytoprotective effect of HGF is induced by this pathological iron.

  8. Liver tissue engineering utilizing hepatocytes propagated in mouse livers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Tateno, Chise; Kataoka, Miho; Utoh, Rie; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Okano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering technologies have highlighted the ability to create functional liver systems using isolated hepatocytes in vivo. Considering the serious shortage of donor livers that can be used for hepatocyte isolation, it has remained imperative to establish a hepatocyte propagation protocol to provide highly efficient cell recovery allowing for subsequent tissue engineering procedures. Donor primary hepatocytes were isolated from human α-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) transgenic mice and were transplanted into the recipient liver of urokinase-type plasminogen activator-severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice. Transplanted donor hepatocytes actively proliferated within the recipient liver of the uPA/SCID mice. At week 8 or later, full repopulation of the uPA/SCID livers with the transplanted hA1AT hepatocytes were confirmed by blood examination and histological assessment. Proliferated hA1AT hepatocytes were recovered from the recipient uPA/SCID mice, and we generated hepatocyte sheets using these recovered hepatocytes for subsequent transplantation into the subcutaneous space of mice. Stable persistency of the subcutaneously engineered liver tissues was confirmed for up to 90 days, which was the length of our present study. These new data demonstrate the feasibility in propagating murine hepatocytes prior to the development of hepatic cells and bioengineered liver systems. The ability to regenerate and expand hepatocytes has potential clinical value whereby procurement of small amounts of tissue could be expanded to sufficient quantities prior to their use in hepatocyte transplantation or other hepatocyte-based therapies.

  9. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  10. Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the central nervous system. Patients with ALS develop extensive muscle wasting and atrophy leading to paralysis and death 3 to 5 years after disease onset. The condition may be familial (fALS 10%) or sporadic ALS (sALS, 90%). The large majority of fALS cases are due to genetic mutations in the Superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1, 15% of fALS) and repeat nucleotide expansions in the gene encoding C9ORF72 (∼ 40% to 50% of fALS and ∼ 10% of sALS). Studies suggest that ALS is mediated through aberrant protein homeostasis (i.e., ER stress and autophagy) and/or changes in RNA processing (as in all non-SOD1-mediated ALS). In all of these cases, animal models suggest that the disorder is mediated non-cell autonomously, i.e., not only motor neurons are involved, but glial cells including microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, and other neuronal subpopulations are also implicated in the pathogenesis. Provided in this unit is a review of ALS rodent models, including discussion of their relative advantages and disadvantages. Emphasis is placed on correlating the model phenotype with the human condition and the utility of the model for defining the disease process. Information is also presented on RNA processing studies in ALS research, with particular emphasis on the newest ALS rodent models.

  11. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  12. ER stress induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Lebeaupin, C; Proics, E; de Bieville, C H D; Rousseau, D; Bonnafous, S; Patouraux, S; Adam, G; Lavallard, V J; Rovere, C; Le Thuc, O; Saint-Paul, M C; Anty, R; Schneck, A S; Iannelli, A; Gugenheim, J; Tran, A; Gual, P; Bailly-Maitre, B

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of chronic liver disease is constantly increasing, owing to the obesity epidemic. However, the causes and mechanisms of inflammation-mediated liver damage remain poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an initiator of cell death and inflammatory mechanisms. Although obesity induces ER stress, the interplay between hepatic ER stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death signaling has not yet been explored during the etiology of chronic liver diseases. Steatosis is a common disorder affecting obese patients; moreover, 25% of these patients develop steatohepatitis with an inherent risk for progression to hepatocarcinoma. Increased plasma LPS levels have been detected in the serum of patients with steatohepatitis. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of increased plasma LPS, ER stress could be induced and lead to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death associated with steatohepatitis progression. In livers from obese mice, administration of LPS or tunicamycin results in IRE1α and PERK activation, leading to the overexpression of CHOP. This, in turn, activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, subsequently initiating hepatocyte pyroptosis (caspase-1, -11, interleukin-1β secretion) and apoptosis (caspase-3, BH3-only proteins). In contrast, the LPS challenge is blocked by the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA, resulting in: CHOP downregulation, reduced caspase-1, caspase-11, caspase-3 activities, lowered interleukin-1β secretion and rescue from cell death. The central role of CHOP in mediating the activation of proinflammatory caspases and cell death was characterized by performing knockdown experiments in primary mouse hepatocytes. Finally, the analysis of human steatohepatitis liver biopsies showed a correlation between the upregulation of inflammasome and ER stress markers, as well as liver injury. We demonstrate here that ER stress leads to hepatic NLRP3 inflammasome pyroptotic death, thus contributing as a novel mechanism of

  13. Evaluation of chronic toxicity and carcinogenesis in rodents with the synthetic analgesic, tilidine fumarate.

    PubMed

    McGuire, E J; DiFonzo, C J; Martin, R A; de la Iglesia, F A

    1986-05-01

    The carcinogenic potential of tilidine fumarate, a synthetic analgesic, was studied for 80 and 104 weeks in mice and rats, respectively. Groups of 50 albino CF1 mice and 65 albino Wistar rats of each sex received tilidine fumarate-lactose blend (1:1) at doses of 100, 40 and 16 mg/kg. The control groups consisted of 100 mice and 115 rats of each sex and received the lactose vehicle only. Treatment-related non-neoplastic changes consisted of reversible, increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia of hepatocytes in high and mid dose rats corresponding to areas of proliferating smooth endoplasmic reticulum; and an increased incidence in high dose rats of proliferative or cystic lesions of the biliary epithelium. Adequate survival rates allowed stringent statistical analysis of neoplasia. Tilidine did not evoke increased tumor incidences or changes in the average latency or onset of tumors in either species. The most frequent tumors represented spontaneous neoplasia characteristic of historical background incidence in these strains. In mice, the only statistically significant (P less than 0.01) variation in tumor incidence was an increased rate of lung alveologenic adenocarcinomas in females at 100 mg/kg (24%), compared with the concurrent untreated controls (10%), but without a statistically significant difference from historical control data (27%). Female rats given 100 mg/kg showed statistically significant (P less than 0.01) decreased incidences of mammary fibroadenoma and pituitary adenoma. From these data, it was concluded that the synthetic analgesic tilidine does not possess tumorigenic potential in rodents.

  14. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts.

  15. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S.; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  16. Hepatocyte and Sertoli Cell Aquaporins, Recent Advances and Research Trends

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Raquel L.; Marinelli, Raul A.; Maggio, Anna; Gena, Patrizia; Cataldo, Ilaria; Alves, Marco G.; Svelto, Maria; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteinaceous channels widespread in nature where they allow facilitated permeation of water and uncharged through cellular membranes. AQPs play a number of important roles in both health and disease. This review focuses on the most recent advances and research trends regarding the expression and modulation, as well as physiological and pathophysiological functions of AQPs in hepatocytes and Sertoli cells (SCs). Besides their involvement in bile formation, hepatocyte AQPs are involved in maintaining energy balance acting in hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipid metabolism, and in critical processes such as ammonia detoxification and mitochondrial output of hydrogen peroxide. Roles are played in clinical disorders including fatty liver disease, diabetes, obesity, cholestasis, hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. In the seminiferous tubules, particularly in SCs, AQPs are also widely expressed and seem to be implicated in the various stages of spermatogenesis. Like in hepatocytes, AQPs may be involved in maintaining energy homeostasis in these cells and have a major role in the metabolic cooperation established in the testicular tissue. Altogether, this information represents the mainstay of current and future investigation in an expanding field. PMID:27409609

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  18. Polyethylene glycol protects primary hepatocytes during supercooling preservation.

    PubMed

    Puts, C F; Berendsen, T A; Bruinsma, B G; Ozer, Sinan; Luitje, Martha; Usta, O Berk; Yarmush, M L; Uygun, K

    2015-08-01

    Cold storage (at 4°C) offers a compromise between the benefits and disadvantages of cooling. It allows storage of organs or cells for later use that would otherwise quickly succumb to warm ischemia, but comprises cold ischemia that, when not controlled properly, can result in severe damage as well by both similar and unique mechanisms. We hypothesized that polyethylene glycol (PEG) 35 kDa would ameliorate these injury pathways and improve cold primary hepatocyte preservation. We show that reduction of the storage temperature to below zero by means of supercooling, or subzero non-freezing, together with PEG supplementation increases the viable storage time of primary rat hepatocytes in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution from 1 day to 4 days. We find that the addition of 5% PEG 35 kDa to the storage medium prevents cold-induced lipid peroxidation and maintains hepatocyte viability and functionality during storage. These results suggest that PEG supplementation in combination with supercooling may enable a more optimized cell and organ preservation.

  19. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-17

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  20. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics of Neuronal Excitability, Oscillations, and Coincidence Detection

    PubMed Central

    RINZEL, JOHN; HUGUET, GEMMA

    2014-01-01

    We review some widely studied models and firing dynamics for neuronal systems, both at the single cell and network level, and dynamical systems techniques to study them. In particular, we focus on two topics in mathematical neuroscience that have attracted the attention of mathematicians for decades: single-cell excitability and bursting. We review the mathematical framework for three types of excitability and onset of repetitive firing behavior in single-neuron models and their relation with Hodgkin’s classification in 1948 of repetitive firing properties. We discuss the mathematical dissection of bursting oscillations using fast/slow analysis and demonstrate the approach using single-cell and mean-field network models. Finally, we illustrate the properties of Type III excitability in which case repetitive firing for constant or slow inputs is absent. Rather, firing is in response only to rapid enough changes in the stimulus. Our case study involves neuronal computations for sound localization for which neurons in the auditory brain stem perform extraordinarily precise coincidence detection with submillisecond temporal resolution. PMID:25392560

  2. Performance of Down syndrome subjects during a coincident timing task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The time synchronization is a very important ability for the acquisition and performance of motor skills that generate the need to adapt the actions of body segments to external events of the environment that are changing their position in space. Down Syndrome (DS) individuals may present some deficits to perform tasks with synchronization demand. We aimed to investigate the performance of individuals with DS in a simple Coincident Timing task. Method 32 individuals were divided into 2 groups: the Down syndrome group (DSG) comprised of 16 individuals with average age of 20 (+/− 5 years old), and a control group (CG) comprised of 16 individuals of the same age. All individuals performed the Simple Timing (ST) task and their performance was measured in milliseconds. The study was conducted in a single phase with the execution of 20 consecutive trials for each participant. Results There was a significant difference in the intergroup analysis for the accuracy adjustment - Absolute Error (Z = 3.656, p = 0.001); and for the performance consistence - Variable Error (Z = 2.939, p = 0.003). Conclusion DS individuals have more difficulty in integrating the motor action to an external stimulus and they also present more inconsistence in performance. Both groups presented the same tendency to delay their motor responses. PMID:23618314

  3. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum.

  4. Coincidence ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Cudry, Fadia; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Fan, Lin; Li, Wen

    2014-12-15

    A new time- and position-sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) camera is developed for coincidence ion imaging. The system is composed of four major components: a conventional microchannel plate/phosphor screen ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera, a single anode photomultiplier tube (PMT), and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of a PMT processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum of a PMT. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide.

  5. Intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruonan; Sen, Pratik; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2017-02-20

    An intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter is demonstrated by using strain-aligned polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb certain polarized states of incident light. The photovoltaic-based polarimeter is capable of measuring four Stokes parameters by cascading four semitransparent OPVs in series along the same optical axis. This in-line polarimeter concept potentially ensures high temporal and spatial resolution with higher radiometric efficiency as compared to the existing polarimeter architecture. Two wave plates were incorporated into the system to modulate the S3 Stokes parameter so as to reduce the condition number of the measurement matrix and maximize the measured signal-to-noise ratio. Radiometric calibration was carried out to determine the measurement matrix. The polarimeter presented in this paper demonstrated an average RMS error of 0.84% for reconstructed Stokes vectors after normalized to S0. A theoretical analysis of the minimum condition number of the four-cell OPV design showed that for individually optimized OPV cells, a condition number of 2.4 is possible.

  6. The alpha-gamma coincidence spectrometer and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Shengzhong Qiao )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the structure and properties of the high-resolution {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrometer and its applications in determining heavy nuclides qualitatively and quantitatively. The energy resolution of the spectrometer is 0.25% (full-width at half-maximum is 13.8 keV for 5.486-MeV alpha particles); the energy shift of the peak is 0.05% in 8 h; non-linearity is < 0.2% for the 4- to 8-MeV energy region. the uncertainty in the quantitative measurement is better than {plus minus}1%. The spectrometer is being applied to some important measurements of specific cases. It can resolve some complex and difficult measurements problems because of its high accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity, and ability to remove interferences. The paper describes results with determination of {sup 242}Pu in plutonium samples; determination of the {sup 241}Am content in the presence of {sup 242}Cm and fission products; determination of the {sup 241}Am in plutonium samples; determination of the {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Cm in irradiated plutonium solutions; and other applications.

  7. The Structure of the Cubic Coincident Site Lattice Rotation Group

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Minich, R W; Rudd, R E; Kumar, M

    2004-01-13

    This work is intended to be a mathematical underpinning for the field of grain boundary engineering and its relatives. The interrelationships within the set of rotations producing coincident site lattices in cubic crystals are examined in detail. Besides combining previously established but widely scattered results into a unified context, the present work details newly developed representations of the group structure in terms of strings of generators (based on quaternionic number theory, and including uniqueness proofs and rules for algebraic manipulation) as well as an easily visualized topological network model. Important results that were previously obscure or not universally understood (e.g. the {Sigma} combination rule governing triple junctions) are clarified in these frameworks. The methods also facilitate several general observations, including the very different natures of twin-limited structures in two and three dimensions, the inadequacy of the {Sigma} combination rule to determine valid quadruple nodes, and a curious link between allowable grain boundary assignments and the four-color map theorem. This kind of understanding is essential to the generation of realistic statistical models of grain boundary networks (particularly in twin-dominated systems) and is especially applicable to the field of grain boundary engineering.

  8. Effects of clofibric acid alone and in combination with 17β-estradiol on mRNA abundance in primary hepatocytes isolated from rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sovadinová, I; Liedtke, A; Schirmer, K

    2014-09-01

    Clofibric acid (CA) is the active substance of lipid lowering drugs. It is resistant to degradation, polar in nature, and has been found ubiquitously in the aquatic environment. Though CA is classified as a peroxisomal proliferator in rodents and is considered as a potential endocrine disruptor, little information exists on the effects of CA in aquatic organisms, such as fish. In the present study, we examined the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator- and estrogen-sensitive genes on the exposure of primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes to CA alone and in combination with the natural female sex hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2). Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout hepatocytes are relatively refractory to the effects of CA on the PPAR signaling pathway and lipid metabolism. Moreover, CA did not show recognizable estrogenic activity, but after the induction of vitellogenesis by E2, CA significantly reduced vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA abundance. Apparently, the indirect repression of VTG transcription, independent of estrogen receptors, occurred. The mechanism is not yet clearly understood but may involve disruption of the stabilization of VTG mRNA known to be induced by E2.

  9. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION MODELING FOR ANTIANDROGEN IMPACTS ON RODENT PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive simulation modeling for antiandrogen impacts on rodent prostate
    HA Barton1, RW Setzer1, LK Potter1,2
    1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC and 2Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC

    Changes in rodent prostate weight and functi...

  10. Vitamin K Contents of Rodent Diets: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrient intake is critical in the maintenance of normal physiological activity of rodents in biomedical studies. Vitamin K is an essential nutrient in rodent diets and functions as a cofactor for the y-carboxylation of certain proteins involved in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. Dif...

  11. Visual Landmarks Facilitate Rodent Spatial Navigation in Virtual Reality Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain…

  12. Lurking in the Shadows: Emerging Rodent Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Besselsen, David G.; Franklin, Craig L.; Livingston, Robert S.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent parvoviruses, Helicobacter spp., murine norovirus, and several other previously unknown infectious agents have “emerged” in laboratory rodents relatively recently. These agents have been discovered serendipitously or through active investigation of atypical serology results, cell culture contamination, unexpected histopathology, or previously unrecognized clinical disease syndromes. The potential research impact of these agents is not fully known. Infected rodents have demonstrated immunomodulation, tumor suppression, clinical disease (particularly in immunodeficient rodents), and histopathology. Perturbations of organismal and cellular physiology also likely occur. These agents posed unique challenges to laboratory animal resource programs once discovered; it was necessary to develop specific diagnostic assays and an understanding of their epidemiology and transmission routes before attempting eradication, and then evaluate eradication methods for efficacy. Even then management approaches varied significantly, from apathy to total exclusion, and such inconsistency has hindered the sharing and transfer of rodents among institutions, particularly for genetically modified rodent models that may not be readily available. As additional infectious agents are discovered in laboratory rodents in coming years, much of what researchers have learned from experiences with the recently identified pathogens will be applicable. This article provides an overview of the discovery, detection, and research impact of infectious agents recently identified in laboratory rodents. We also discuss emerging syndromes for which there is a suspected infectious etiology, and the unique challenges of managing newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:18506061

  13. Bartonella Infection in Rodents and Their Flea Ectoparasites: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella–rodent–flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized. PMID:25629778

  14. In Vitro Metabolism of Thyroxine by Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The liver metabolizes thyroxine (T4) through two major pathways: deiodination and conjugation. Rodents utilize both pathways, but it is uncertain to what degree different species employ deiodination and conjugation in the metabolism of T4. The objective of this study was to compa...

  15. Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ► Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ► 3D hepatocytes in 21 days’ long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ► Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

  16. Measurement of the coincidence response of very thin BGO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.; Thompson, C.J. . Montreal Neurological Inst.); Weinberg, I.N. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD . Dept. of Radiology); Mako, F.M. )

    1994-08-01

    More then half the 511 keV photons in BGO crystals undergo Compton scattering at least once prior to photo-electric interaction within the detector. In a PET scanner, this can result in mis-positioning of annihilation events. As crystal dimensions are made smaller, the fraction of mispositioned events increases. The authors have studied the coincidence aperture function (CAF) of 25 mm [times] 10 mm BGO crystals with thicknesses varying from 1 mm to 3 mm in steps of 0.5 mm. By sandwiching the active crystal between two other BGO crystals not in contact with the photomultiplier, the authors have studied the effect of Compton scatter upon CAF. By allowing the annihilation photons to be incident along the 25 mm axis and the 10 mm axis, the authors have studied the effect of detector depth upon the CAF, with and without Compton Scatter. The CAF increases linearly with crystal width, ranging from 1.3 mm for the 1 mm wide crystal to 2.15 for 3 mm crystal. The lines joining the FWHM of the CAFs as a function of crystal width appear to converge indicating that no further improvement in resolution can be achieved by reducing crystal width. The CAFs for 10 mm and 25 mm long crystals without Compton scatter is essentially the same. The presence of neighboring crystals results in an increase in the CAF which is greater for long crystals compared with short ones of the same width. Using 1 mm wide and 10 mm long crystals sandwiched between two uncoupled BGO crystals, the authors have achieved spatial resolution of 1.64 mm FWHM for a PMT separation of 34 cm. Recent experiments with PMT separation of 11.5 cm have yielded 1.23 mm FWHM CAF in the same setup.

  17. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  18. Near coincidence site lattice misorientations in monoclinic zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, V.Y. |; Zhilyaev, A.P. |; Szpunar, J.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide, ZrO{sub 2}, exists in three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic. Calculations of the coincidence site lattice (CSL) misorientations for the last two lattices and for hexagonal ones using the methods developed represent little difficulty. However, no procedure for the determination of the CSL misorientations in the monoclinic system has been reported so far. Monoclinic zirconia has the crystallographic space group P2{sub 1}/c and the following parameters of the unit cell (e.g., 5, 6): a = 5.1490 {angstrom}, b = 5.2133 {angstrom}, c = 5.3161 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 99.228{degree}. Before discussing possible CSL misorientations in zirconia, consider a simple example based on geometric considerations. In any monoclinic crystal (with any lattice parameters) the two symmetrical boundaries along the (001) and (100) planes must have highly ordered atomic structure. The misorientation of the first boundary is descried as a rotation of either 180{degree} around the [100] direction or 180{degree} around the normal to the (001) plane. The misorientation of the second boundary is 180{degree} [001] or 180{degree} around the normal to the (100) plane. It can be shown that three-dimensional CSLs will exist in both cases if (c/a)cos{beta} is a rational number. This example justifies the following approximation of the unit cell in the monoclinic zirconia: a = b = c and cos{beta} = {minus}1/6 (i.e., {beta} = 99.594{degree}). Consider the following prismatic cell in the monoclinic crystal structure: ([1 0 1], [{bar 1} 0 1], [0 1 0]). With the above approximation, this cell is orthogonal with the ratios of the squares of the edge lengths expressed as 5:7:3. Therefore, one can apply the algorithm for calculations of the CSL misorientations in orthorhombic lattices with rational ratios of squares of the lattice periods, which is based on the general vector-quaternion method of misorientation representation.

  19. Scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly astringent food.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2011-01-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and their seed plants is highly complex yet poorly understood. Plants may benefit from the seed dispersal behavior of rodents, as long as seed consumption is minimized. In parallel, rodents may maximize foraging efficiency and cache high-quality resources for future consumption. Defensive compounds, such as tannins, are thought to be a major mechanism for plant control over rodent behavior. However, previous studies, using naturally occurring seeds, have not provided conclusive evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we test the importance of tannin concentrations on the scatter-hoarding behavior of rodents by using an artificial seed system. We combined feeding trials and field observations to examine the overall impact of seed tannin concentrations on rodent behavior and health. We found that rodents favored seeds with an intermediate amount of tannin (~5%) in the field. Meanwhile, in rodents that were fed a diet with different tannin content, only diets with high tannin content (25%, 15%, and 10%) caused a significant negative influence on rodent survival and health. Significant differences were not found among treatments with tannin levels of 0-5%. In contrast to many existing studies, our results clearly demonstrate that scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly 'astringent' food. In the co-evolutionary arms race between plants and animals, our results suggest that while tannins may play a significant role in reducing general predation levels by the faunal community, they have no precise control over the behavior of their mutualistic partner. Instead, the two partners appear to have reached an evolutionary point where both parties receive adequate benefits, with the year-to-year outcome being dependent on a wide range of factors beyond the control of either partner.

  20. Epidemiology of Leptospira Transmitted by Rodents in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Mathilde; Tatard, Caroline; Chaval, Yannick; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Buchy, Philippe; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herbreteau, Vincent; Morand, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses and has been identified as an important emerging global public health problem in Southeast Asia. Rodents are important reservoirs for human leptospirosis, but epidemiological data is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled rodents living in different habitats from seven localities distributed across Southeast Asia (Thailand, Lao PDR and Cambodia), between 2009 to 2010. Human isolates were also obtained from localities close to where rodents were sampled. The prevalence of Leptospira infection was assessed by real-time PCR using DNA extracted from rodent kidneys, targeting the lipL32 gene. Sequencing rrs and secY genes, and Multi Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analyses were performed on DNA extracted from rat kidneys for Leptospira isolates molecular typing. Four species were detected in rodents, L. borgpetersenii (56% of positive samples), L. interrogans (36%), L. kirschneri (3%) and L. weilli (2%), which were identical to human isolates. Mean prevalence in rodents was approximately 7%, and largely varied across localities and habitats, but not between rodent species. The two most abundant Leptospira species displayed different habitat requirements: L. interrogans was linked to humid habitats (rice fields and forests) while L. borgpetersenii was abundant in both humid and dry habitats (non-floodable lands). Conclusion/Significance L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii species are widely distributed amongst rodent populations, and strain typing confirmed rodents as reservoirs for human leptospirosis. Differences in habitat requirements for L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii supported differential transmission modes. In Southeast Asia, human infection risk is not only restricted to activities taking place in wetlands and rice fields as is commonly accepted, but should also include tasks such as forestry work, as well as the hunting and preparation of rodents for consumption, which

  1. Nutrition and energetics in rodent longevity research.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Victoria K; Smith, Daniel L

    2016-12-15

    The impact of calorie amount on aging has been extensively described; however, variation over time and among laboratories in animal diet, housing condition, and strains complicates discerning the true influence of calories (energy) versus nutrients on lifespan. Within the dietary restriction field, single macronutrient manipulations have historically been researched as a means to reduce calories while maintaining adequate levels of essential nutrients. Recent reports of nutritional geometry, including rodent models, highlight the impact macronutrients have on whole organismal aging outcomes. However, other environmental factors (e.g., ambient temperature) may alter nutrient preferences and requirements revealing context specific outcomes. Herein we highlight factors that influence the energetic and nutrient demands of organisms which oftentimes have underappreciated impacts on clarifying interventional effects on health and longevity in aging studies and subsequent translation to improve the human condition.

  2. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, J. P.; Andari, E.; Johnson, Z. V.; Curry, D. C.; de Waal, F. B. M.; Young, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  3. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  4. In vivo OCT microangiography of rodent iris.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo June; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-04-15

    We report on the functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of iris tissue morphology and microcirculation in living small animals. Anterior segments of healthy mouse and rat eyes are imaged with high-speed spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) utilizing ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) imaging protocol. 3D iris microvasculature is produced by the use of an algorithm that calculates absolute differences between the amplitudes of the OCT interframes. We demonstrate that the UHS-OMAG is capable of delineating iris microvascular beds in the mouse and rat with capillary-level resolution. Furthermore, the fast imaging speed enables dynamic imaging of iris micro-vascular response during drug-induced pupil dilation. We believe that this OCT angiographic approach has a great potential for in situ and in vivo monitoring of the microcirculation within iris tissue beds in rodent disease models that have microvascular involvement.

  5. Domestic Rodent Control Training Manual: A Training Aid for the Rodent Control Category for Certification of Pesticide Applicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, William R., Jr.; And Others

    This training manual, designed for training applicants who wish to obtain certification in pesticide application relative to rodent control, covers the following topics: economic factors, public health factors, biological characteristics of domestic rodents, rat and mouse signs, trapping, repellents, poisons, baits, poisoned water, dumps, sewers,…

  6. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  7. DNA synthesis in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes of intact and hepatectomized young mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco, A; Inda, A M; Errecalde, A L

    2015-01-01

    DNA synthesis of hepatocytes in two areas of Intact and Hepatectomized young mice liver along a circadian period was studied. DNA synthesis was significantly different at all analyzed time points in Intact and Hepatectomized animals. Differences between periportal and perivenous hepatocytes were found in hepatectomized animals at 04/42 and 08/46 hr of day/hour post-hepatectomy. DNAs peak in periportal hepatocytes regenerating liver occurs 4 hr earlier than in perivenous hepatocytes, probably reflecting their shorter G1 phase. Besides, daily mean values of regenerating livers were higher than those observed in Intact animals, as a consequence of surgical removal.

  8. Gel entrapment culture of rat hepatocytes for investigation of tetracycline-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Chong; Meng Qin Schmelzer, Eva; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-07-15

    This paper aimed to explore three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes for testing drug-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Gel entrapped rat hepatocytes were applied for investigation of the tetracycline-induced steatohepatitis, while hepatocyte monolayer was set as a control. The toxic responses of hepatocytes were systematically evaluated by measuring cell viability, liver-specific function, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, adenosine triphosphate content and mitochondrial membrane potential. The results suggested that gel entrapped hepatocytes showed cell death after 96 h of tetracycline treatment at 25 {mu}M which is equivalent to toxic serum concentration in rats, while hepatocyte monolayer showed cell death at a high dose of 200 {mu}M. The concentration-dependent accumulation of lipid as well as mitochondrial damage were regarded as two early events for tetracycline hepatotoxicity in gel entrapment culture due to their detectability ahead of subsequent increase of oxidative stress and a final cell death. Furthermore, the potent protection of fenofibrate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate were evidenced in only gel entrapment culture with higher expressions on the genes related to {beta}-oxidation than hepatocyte monolayer, suggesting the mediation of lipid metabolism and mitochondrial damage in tetracycline toxicity. Overall, gel entrapped hepatocytes in three-dimension reflected more of the tetracycline toxicity in vivo than hepatocyte monolayer and thus was suggested as a more relevant system for evaluating steatogenic drugs.

  9. Three-dimensional (3D) printing of mouse primary hepatocytes to generate 3D hepatic structure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyojin; Jeong, Jaemin; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Ji Sook; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Park, Jisun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The major problem in producing artificial livers is that primary hepatocytes cannot be cultured for many days. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology draws attention and this technology regarded as a useful tool for current cell biology. By using the 3D bio-printing, these problems can be resolved. Methods To generate 3D bio-printed structures (25 mm × 25 mm), cells-alginate constructs were fabricated by 3D bio-printing system. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of 6–8 weeks old mice by a 2-step collagenase method. Samples of 4 × 107 hepatocytes with 80%–90% viability were printed with 3% alginate solution, and cultured with well-defined culture medium for primary hepatocytes. To confirm functional ability of hepatocytes cultured on 3D alginate scaffold, we conducted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence with hepatic marker genes. Results Isolated primary hepatocytes were printed with alginate. The 3D printed hepatocytes remained alive for 14 days. Gene expression levels of Albumin, HNF-4α and Foxa3 were gradually increased in the 3D structures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the primary hepatocytes produced hepatic-specific proteins over the same period of time. Conclusion Our research indicates that 3D bio-printing technique can be used for long-term culture of primary hepatocytes. It can therefore be used for drug screening and as a potential method of producing artificial livers. PMID:28203553

  10. HGF Secreted by Activated Kupffer Cells Induces Apoptosis of Plasmodium-Infected Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodo, Joana; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Malaria liver stage infection is an obligatory parasite development step and represents a population bottleneck in Plasmodium infections, providing an advantageous target for blocking parasite cycle progression. Parasite development inside hepatocytes implies a gross cellular insult evoking innate host responses to counteract intra-hepatocytic infection. Using primary hepatocyte cultures, we investigated the role of Kupffer cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in malaria liver stage infection. We found that Kupffer cells from Plasmodium-infected livers produced high levels of HGF, which trigger apoptosis of infected hepatocytes through a mitochondrial-independent apoptosis pathway. HGF action in infected hepatocyte primary cultures results in a potent reduction of parasite yield by specifically sensitizing hepatocytes carrying established parasite exo-erythrocytic forms to undergo apoptosis. This apoptosis mechanism is distinct from cell death that is spontaneously induced in infected cultures and is governed by Fas signaling modulation through a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. This work indicates that HGF and Fas signaling pathways are part of an orchestrated host apoptosis response that occurs during malaria liver stage infection, decreasing the success of infection of individual hepatocytes. Our results raise the hypothesis that paracrine signals derived from Kupffer cell activation are implicated in directing death of hepatocytes infected with the malaria parasite. PMID:28220125

  11. Cholesterol Enhances the Toxic Effect of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    López-Islas, Anayelly; Chagoya-Hazas, Victoria; Pérez-Aguilar, Benjamin; Palestino-Domínguez, Mayrel; Souza, Verónica; Miranda, Roxana U.; Bucio, Leticia; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María-Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and alcohol consumption are risk factors for hepatic steatosis, and both commonly coexist. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on primary hepatocytes obtained from mice fed for two days with a high cholesterol (HC) diet. HC hepatocytes increased lipid and cholesterol content. HC diet sensitized hepatocytes to the toxic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde. Cyp2E1 content increased with HC diet, as well as in those treated with ethanol or acetaldehyde, while the activity of this enzyme determined in microsomes increased in the HC and in all ethanol treated hepatocytes, HC and CW. Oxidized proteins were increased in the HC cultures treated or not with the toxins. Transmission electron microscopy showed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and megamitochondria in hepatocytes treated with ethanol as in HC and the ethanol HC treated hepatocytes. ER stress determined by PERK content was increased in ethanol treated hepatocytes from HC mice and CW. Nuclear translocation of ATF6 was observed in HC hepatocytes treated with ethanol, results that indicate that lipids overload and ethanol treatment favor ER stress. Oxidative stress, ER stress, and mitochondrial damage underlie potential mechanisms for increased damage in steatotic hepatocyte treated with ethanol. PMID:26788255

  12. Cholesterol Enhances the Toxic Effect of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Islas, Anayelly; Chagoya-Hazas, Victoria; Pérez-Aguilar, Benjamin; Palestino-Domínguez, Mayrel; Souza, Verónica; Miranda, Roxana U; Bucio, Leticia; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María-Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and alcohol consumption are risk factors for hepatic steatosis, and both commonly coexist. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on primary hepatocytes obtained from mice fed for two days with a high cholesterol (HC) diet. HC hepatocytes increased lipid and cholesterol content. HC diet sensitized hepatocytes to the toxic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde. Cyp2E1 content increased with HC diet, as well as in those treated with ethanol or acetaldehyde, while the activity of this enzyme determined in microsomes increased in the HC and in all ethanol treated hepatocytes, HC and CW. Oxidized proteins were increased in the HC cultures treated or not with the toxins. Transmission electron microscopy showed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and megamitochondria in hepatocytes treated with ethanol as in HC and the ethanol HC treated hepatocytes. ER stress determined by PERK content was increased in ethanol treated hepatocytes from HC mice and CW. Nuclear translocation of ATF6 was observed in HC hepatocytes treated with ethanol, results that indicate that lipids overload and ethanol treatment favor ER stress. Oxidative stress, ER stress, and mitochondrial damage underlie potential mechanisms for increased damage in steatotic hepatocyte treated with ethanol.

  13. Toxicity of microcystins in the isolated hepatocytes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Jie; Liang, Jun-Bo; Liu, Yong-Ding

    2007-07-01

    The toxicity of hepatotoxic microcystins produced mainly by Microcystis aeruginosa in mammals and fishes was well studied in recent years. However, there were scarcely reports in toxic effects of microcystins on isolated hepatocytes of fishes, especially investigation of microcystin-induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in carp hepatocytes. In the present study, the isolated hepatocytes of common carp were exposed to various concentrations of microcystins (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000 microg L(-1)) for 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24h, respectively, and cytotoxicity of microcystins in the toxin-treated cells was determined. Results of this study showed that cytotoxicity of microcystins on carp hepatocytes was time and dose-dependent, and the approximate LC(50) of microcystins in carp hepatocytes was 169.2 microg L(-1). The morphological changes typical of apoptosis, such as blebbing of cell membrane, condensation and fragmentation of cell nucleus were observed in the hepatocytes exposed to microcystins (1, 10 and 100 microg L(-1)) using fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA demonstrated a typical apoptotic "ladder pattern" in microcystin-treated hepatocytes after 16 h of exposure. Results of the present study indicated that the form of cell death in microcystin-treated hepatocytes depend on the exposure dose of toxin. When lower concentration of microcystins (10 and 100 microg L(-1)) was used for exposure, carp hepatocytes died in apoptosis while, when higher one used (1000 microg L(-1)), they died in the form of necrosis.

  14. A Curated Database of Rodent Uterotrophic Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Ceger, Patricia C.; Allen, David G.; Strickland, Judy; Chang, Xiaoqing; Hamm, Jonathan T.; Casey, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Novel in vitro methods are being developed to identify chemicals that may interfere with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, but the results are difficult to put into biological context because of reliance on reference chemicals established using results from other in vitro assays and because of the lack of high-quality in vivo reference data. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-validated rodent uterotrophic bioassay is considered the “gold standard” for identifying potential ER agonists. Objectives: We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify and evaluate data from uterotrophic studies and to analyze study variability. Methods: We reviewed 670 articles with results from 2,615 uterotrophic bioassays using 235 unique chemicals. Study descriptors, such as species/strain, route of administration, dosing regimen, lowest effect level, and test outcome, were captured in a database of uterotrophic results. Studies were assessed for adherence to six criteria that were based on uterotrophic regulatory test guidelines. Studies meeting all six criteria (458 bioassays on 118 unique chemicals) were considered guideline-like (GL) and were subsequently analyzed. Results: The immature rat model was used for 76% of the GL studies. Active outcomes were more prevalent across rat models (74% active) than across mouse models (36% active). Of the 70 chemicals with at least two GL studies, 18 (26%) had discordant outcomes and were classified as both active and inactive. Many discordant results were attributable to differences in study design (e.g., injection vs. oral dosing). Conclusions: This uterotrophic database provides a valuable resource for understanding in vivo outcome variability and for evaluating the performance of in vitro assays that measure estrogenic activity. Citation: Kleinstreuer NC, Ceger PC, Allen DG, Strickland J, Chang X, Hamm JT, Casey WM. 2016. A curated database of rodent uterotrophic bioactivity. Environ

  15. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the neocortex surface. For the statistical analysis, it is important to sample thickness at corresponding points. This is achieved by the particle correspondence algorithm which minimizes entropy between dynamically moving sample points called particles. Since the computational cost of the correspondence algorithm may limit the number of corresponding points, we use thin-plate spline based interpolation to increase the number of corresponding sample points. As a driving application, we measured the thickness difference to assess the effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure that persist into adulthood and performed t-test between the control and exposed rat groups. We found significantly differing regions in both hemispheres.

  16. Digital coincidence counting (DCC) and its use in the corrections for out-of-channel gamma events in 4pi beta-gamma coincidence counting.

    PubMed

    Keightle, J D; Watt, G C

    2002-01-01

    The digital coincidence counting system developed by NPL and ANSTO is briefly described along with its benefits in the data collection and processing for the 4pi beta-gamma coincidence counting technique of radionuclide standardization. One of these benefits is the automatic detection of and correction for out-of-channel coincidences in the Computer Discrimination method. Where the criteria for the use of the Cox-Isham/Smith correction formulae for dead times and resolving times are not met, a generalized approximation based on the work of Campion is suggested.

  17. Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J.; Talbot, Neil C.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility. PMID:25856627

  18. Elongation Factor 1A-1 Is a Mediator of Hepatocyte Lipotoxicity Partly through Its Canonical Function in Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoianov, Alexandra M.; Robson, Debra L.; Hetherington, Alexandra M.; Sawyez, Cynthia G.; Borradaile, Nica M.

    2015-01-01

    Elongation factor 1A-1 (eEF1A-1) has non-canonical functions in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and apoptosis. It was previously identified through a promoter-trap screen as a mediator of fatty acid-induced cell death (lipotoxicity), and was found to participate in this process downstream of ER stress. Since ER stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), we investigated the mechanism of action of eEF1A-1 in hepatocyte lipotoxicity. HepG2 cells were exposed to excess fatty acids, followed by assessments of ER stress, subcellular localization of eEF1A-1, and cell death. A specific inhibitor of eEF1A-1 elongation activity, didemnin B, was used to determine whether its function in protein synthesis is involved in lipotoxicity. Within 6 h, eEF1A-1 protein was modestly induced by high palmitate, and partially re-localized from its predominant location at the ER to polymerized actin at the cell periphery. This early induction and subcellular redistribution of eEF1A-1 coincided with the onset of ER stress, and was later followed by cell death. Didemnin B did not prevent the initiation of ER stress by high palmitate, as indicated by eIF2α phosphorylation. However, consistent with sustained inhibition of eEF1A-1-dependent elongation activity, didemnin B prevented the recovery of protein synthesis and increase in GRP78 protein that are normally associated with later phases of the response to ongoing ER stress. This resulted in decreased palmitate-induced cell death. Our data implicate eEF1A-1, and its function in protein synthesis, in hepatocyte lipotoxicity. PMID:26102086

  19. Elongation Factor 1A-1 Is a Mediator of Hepatocyte Lipotoxicity Partly through Its Canonical Function in Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stoianov, Alexandra M; Robson, Debra L; Hetherington, Alexandra M; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Borradaile, Nica M

    2015-01-01

    Elongation factor 1A-1 (eEF1A-1) has non-canonical functions in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and apoptosis. It was previously identified through a promoter-trap screen as a mediator of fatty acid-induced cell death (lipotoxicity), and was found to participate in this process downstream of ER stress. Since ER stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), we investigated the mechanism of action of eEF1A-1 in hepatocyte lipotoxicity. HepG2 cells were exposed to excess fatty acids, followed by assessments of ER stress, subcellular localization of eEF1A-1, and cell death. A specific inhibitor of eEF1A-1 elongation activity, didemnin B, was used to determine whether its function in protein synthesis is involved in lipotoxicity. Within 6 h, eEF1A-1 protein was modestly induced by high palmitate, and partially re-localized from its predominant location at the ER to polymerized actin at the cell periphery. This early induction and subcellular redistribution of eEF1A-1 coincided with the onset of ER stress, and was later followed by cell death. Didemnin B did not prevent the initiation of ER stress by high palmitate, as indicated by eIF2α phosphorylation. However, consistent with sustained inhibition of eEF1A-1-dependent elongation activity, didemnin B prevented the recovery of protein synthesis and increase in GRP78 protein that are normally associated with later phases of the response to ongoing ER stress. This resulted in decreased palmitate-induced cell death. Our data implicate eEF1A-1, and its function in protein synthesis, in hepatocyte lipotoxicity.

  20. Gender Differences in Response to Prolonged Every-Other-Day Feeding on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Zgutka, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent fasting decreases glucose and insulin levels and increases insulin sensitivity and lifespan. Decreased food intake influences the liver. Previous studies have shown gender differences in response to various types of caloric restriction, including every-other-day (EOD) feeding, in humans and rodents. Our goal was to show the influence of prolonged EOD feeding on the morphology, proliferation and apoptosis of livers from male and female mice. After nine months of an EOD diet, the livers from male and female mice were collected. We examined their morphology on histological slides using the Hematoxilin and Eosine (H_E) method and Hoechst staining of cell nuclei to evaluate the nuclear area of hepatocytes. We also evaluated the expression of mRNA for proto-oncogens, pro-survival proteins and apoptotic markers using Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We noted increased lipid content in the livers of EOD fed female mice. EOD feeding lead to a decrease of proliferation and apoptosis in the livers of female and male mice, which suggest that tissue maintenance occurred during EOD feeding. Our experiment revealed sex-specific expression of mRNA for proto-oncogenes and pro-survival and pro-apoptotic genes in mice as well as sex-specific responses to the EOD treatment. PMID:27007393

  1. The discovery of Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and its significance for cell biology, life sciences and clinical medicine

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, Toshikazu; MIZUNO, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    It has been more than 25 years since HGF was discovered as a mitogen of hepatocytes. HGF is produced by stromal cells, and stimulates epithelial cell proliferation, motility, morphogenesis and angiogenesis in various organs via tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor, c-Met. In fetal stages, HGF-neutralization, or c-Met gene destruction, leads to hypoplasia of many organs, indicating that HGF signals are essential for organ development. Endogenous HGF is required for self-repair of injured livers, kidneys, lungs and so on. In addition, HGF exerts protective effects on epithelial and non-epithelial organs (including the heart and brain) via anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory signals. During organ diseases, plasma HGF levels significantly increased, while anti-HGF antibody infusion accelerated tissue destruction in rodents. Thus, endogenous HGF is required for minimization of diseases, while insufficient production of HGF leads to organ failure. This is the reason why HGF supplementation produces therapeutic outcomes under pathological conditions. Moreover, emerging studies delineated key roles of HGF during tumor metastasis, while HGF-antagonism leads to anti-tumor outcomes. Taken together, HGF-based molecules, including HGF-variants, HGF-fragments and c-Met-binders are available as regenerative or anti-tumor drugs. Molecular analysis of the HGF-c-Met system could provide bridges between basic biology and clinical medicine. PMID:20551596

  2. Rodent laparoscopy: refinement for rodent drug studies and model development, and monitoring of neoplastic, inflammatory and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Baran, Szczepan W; Perret-Gentil, Marcel I; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Miedel, Emily L; Kehler, James

    2011-10-01

    The refinement of surgical techniques represents a key opportunity to improve the welfare of laboratory rodents, while meeting legal and ethical obligations. Current methods used for monitoring intra-abdominal disease progression in rodents usually involve euthanasia at various time-points for end of study, one-time individual tissue collections. Most rodent organ tumour models are developed by the introduction of tumour cells via laparotomy or via ultrasound-guided indirect visualization. Ischaemic rodent models are often generated using laparotomies. This approach requires a high number of rodents, and in some instances introduces high degrees of morbidity and mortality, thereby increasing study variability and expense. Most importantly, most laparotomies do not promote the highest level of rodent welfare. Recent improvements in laparoscopic equipment and techniques have enabled the adaptation of laparoscopy for rodent procedures. Laparoscopy, which is considered the gold standard for many human abdominal procedures, allows for serial biopsy collections from the same animal, results in decreased pain and tissue trauma as well as quicker postsurgical recovery, and preserves immune function in comparison to the same procedures performed by laparotomy. Laparoscopy improves rodent welfare, decreases inter-animal variability, thereby reducing the number of required animals, allows for the replacement of larger species, decreases expense and improves data yield. This review article compares rodent laparotomy and laparoscopic surgical methods, and describes the utilization of laparoscopy for the development of cancer models and assessment of disease progression to improve data collection and animal welfare. In addition, currently available rodent laparoscopic equipment and instrumentation are presented.

  3. Characterization of Alpha Contamination in Lanthanum Trichloride Scintillators Using Coincidence Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Runkle, Robert C.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kaye, William R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-08-01

    The commercial availability of LaCl3:Ce scintillators has been much anticipated due to their significantly lower resolution relative to NaI(Tl). Our investigation of these scintillators in regards to the effect of their improved resolution for coincidence gamma-ray measurement applications revealed that the scintillators had a large, internal alpha contamination affecting the gamma-ray energy range from 1700-3000 keV. One passive method of identifying contaminants relies on exploiting coincident signatures. Aided by a coincidence lookup library developed at PNNL, we determined that the parent contaminant is Ac-227 via an alpha-gamma coincidence measurement. In this paper, we characterize the level of contamination and describe our coincidence measurement technique. The Ac-227 concentration was approximately 0.13 ppt. We demonstrate that this coincidence technique measures minimum detectable activities much lower than singles gamma-ray spectroscopy. We also discuss gamma- and beta-contamination in these scintillators.

  4. Interaction between acari ectoparasites and rodents in Suez Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Younis, T A; Fayad, M E; el Hariry, M A; Morsy, T A

    1995-08-01

    From the medical point of view, the relation between man and rodents comes in the priority. Some rodent populations are wild but others are commensal and live in close association with man. They steal his food and conveying many zoonotic diseases. Their arthropod ectoparasites play an important role in conveying or transmitting these zoonotic diseases. Several disorders and diseases of man are tick borne relapsing fever, Rocky mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, and many others. Besides numerous species of mites occasionally infest man. They transmit several diseases as Rickettsia tsutsugamushi fever, epidemic haemorrhagic fever, and they cause severe allergic reaction. The results obtained are summarized in the following (1) Six species and subspecies of rodents were detected. In a descending order of abundance, they were (a) Rattus norvegicus, (b) Rattus rattus alexandrinus (c) Rattus rattus frugivorous (d) Acomys cahirinus (e) Gerbillus gerbillus asyutensis (f) Mus m. praetextus. (2) The most common rodent was R. norvegicus and the least common was M. musculus. (3) The collected ticks and mites were 2 genera of tick larvae; Rhipicephalus species and Hyalomma species. The collected mites were Ornithonyssus bacoti and Laelaps nuttali. (4) Most of the tick larvae were collected from wild rodents; Gerbillus g. asyutensis. (5) Most of the mites were collected from commensal rodents particularly R. norvegicus. Descriptive morphology and illustrations were given to the collected rodents and their acari ectoparasites.

  5. Identification of evolutionary hotspots in the rodent genomes.

    PubMed

    Yap, Von Bing; Pachter, Lior

    2004-04-01

    We describe a whole-genome comparative analysis of the human, mouse, and rat genomes to describe the average substitution patterns of four genomic regions: ancient repeats, rodent-specific DNA, exons, and conserved (coding and noncoding) regions, and to identify rodent evolutionary hotspots. In all types of regions, except the rodent-specific DNA, the rat branch is slightly longer than the mouse branch. Moreover, the mouse-rat distance is longer in the rodent-specific DNA than in the ancient repeats. Analysis of individual conserved regions with different substitution models yielded the conclusion that the Jukes-Cantor model is inadequate, and the Hasegawa-Kishino-Yano model is almost as good as the REV model. Using human as an outgroup, we identified 5055 evolutionary hotspots, which are highly conserved subalignment blocks (each consisting of at least 100 aligned sites and a small fraction of gaps) with a large and statistically significant difference in the branch lengths of the rodent species. The cutoffs used to identify the hotspots are partially based on estimates of the average rates of substitution. The fractions of hotspots overlapping with the rodent RefSeq genes, RefSeq exons, and ESTs are all higher than expected. Still, more than half of the hotspots lie in noncoding regions of the mouse genome. We believe that the hotspots represent biologically interesting regions in the rodent genomes.

  6. Effect of carbohydrates attached to polystyrene on hepatocyte morphology on sugar-derivatized polystyrene matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Hoshiba, Takashi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2003-12-15

    Sugar-carrying polymers have been utilized as artificial matrices for cell adhesion in tissue engineering. We have developed sugar-derivatized polystyrenes (PV-sugars) as artificial matrices, which control hepatocyte adhesion and hepatic function. Hepatocytes adhere to PV-sugar matrices in a receptor-mediated manner. In this study, we designed a new galactose-derivatized PV-sugar, poly-(6-O-p-vinylbenzyl-alpha-D-galactose) (PV6Gal) and evaluated the role of carbohydrate attached to polystyrene (PS) backbone in the morphological difference of hepatocyte cultured on PV-sugar matrices. Hepatocytes spread on monosaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars but not on disaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars. The actin filament remained aggregated in the central area of the cell body on disaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars. Hepatocyte cell bodies fully were spread on collagen, and the actin filament was almost completely reorganized. Hepatocyte spreading on monosaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars, however, was caused by protrusive cell-matrix contact like lamellipodia and the actin filament was not completely reorganized. This indicated that hepatocyte spreading on PV-sugar matrices was restricted compared with ECM-mediated cell spreading. In addition, typical spheroid formation of hepatocytes was promoted on disaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars compared with monosaccharide-derivatized PV-sugars. Although hepatocytes adhered with different affinities to PV-sugar matrices, hepatocyte morphology was not affected by the adhesion affinity. We suggest that the type of carbohydrate attached to the PS backbone governs the morphology of hepatocyte cultured on PV-sugar matrices.

  7. Allicin Modulates the Antioxidation and Detoxification Capabilities of Primary Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Chung; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-01-01

    The effect of allicin, an active ingredient of garlic, on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) content, and GSH-related enzyme activity was investigated in primary hepatocytes. In this study, allicin was synthesized in our laboratory as an experimental material, and primary hepatocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats were used as an experimental model. According to the results, hepatocytes treated with 10 μM allicin did not differ from the control on LDH leakage during various incubation times. When the hepatocytes were treated with 10 μM allicin, their levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive-substances (TBARS) did not differ significantly from that of the control within the 8-h incubation. However, the TBARS values of hepatocytes treated with 30 and 50 μM allicin were higher compared to the control after incubation for 4 h and 8 h, respectively. The hepatocyte intracellular GSH content was significantly higher than that of the control after 30 μM allicin treatment, but treatment with 50 μM allicin caused a significant GSH depletion after incubation for 4 h or longer. In addition, when hepatocytes were treated for 24 h with 10 or 30 μM allicin, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was significantly increased compared to that of the control, whereas 50 μM allicin treatment for 24 h or longer significantly decreased the GPx activity. Glutathione reductase (GRd) activity was significantly increased when the hepatocytes were treated with 10 μM allicin for 24 h, but GRd activity significantly decreased when the hepatocytes were treated with 50 μM allicin. However, hepatocytes treated for 24 h with 10 or 30 μM allicin showed significantly increased glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity compared to the control. These results suggest that 10 μM allicin potentially enhances the antioxidation and detoxification capabilities of primary rat hepatocytes. PMID:24716147

  8. Description and performance characteristics for the neutron Coincidence Collar for the verification of reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.

    1981-08-01

    An active neutron interrogation method has been developed for the measurement of /sup 235/U content in fresh fuel assemblies. The neutron Coincidence Collar uses neutron interrogation with an AmLi neutron source and coincidence counting the induced fission reaction neutrons from the /sup 235/U. This manual describes the system components, operation, and performance characteristics. Applications of the Coincidence Collar to PWR and BWR types of reactor fuel assemblies are described.

  9. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, E.; Barritt, G.J.; Rychkov, G.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca2+ entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5 µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca2+]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50 nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  10. Protective effects of Salvia plebeia compound homoplantaginin on hepatocyte injury.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xian-Jun; Xia, Xue; Wang, Yuan-Shu; Song, Mei-Juan; Liu, Li-Li; Xie, Yan-Ying; Cheng, Yan-Na; Liu, Xiang-Juan; Qiu, Lu-Lu; Xiang, Lan; Gao, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Fan; Cui, Shu-Xiang

    2009-07-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br is a traditional Chinese herb which has been considered as an inflammatory mediator used for treatment of many infectious diseases including hepatitis. Previously, the compound homoplantaginin was isolated in our group. Hence, we evaluated the protective effects of homoplantaginin on hepatocyte injury. Homoplantaginin displayed an antioxidant property in a cell-free system and showed IC(50) of reduction level of DPPH radical at 0.35 microg/ml. In human hepatocyte HL-7702 cells exposed to H(2)O(2), the addition of 0.1-100 microg/ml of homoplantaginin, which did not have a toxic effect on cell viability, significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and increased glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in supernatant. In vivo assay, we employed the model of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic injury mice to evaluate efficacy of homoplantaginin. Homoplantaginin (25-100mg/kg) significantly reduced the increase in serum alanine aminotranseferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1). The same treatment also reduced the content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), elevated the levels of GSH, GSH-Px and SOD in hepatic homogenate. The histopathological analysis showed that the grade of liver injury was ameliorated with reduction of inflammatory cells and necrosis of liver cells in homoplantaginin treatment mice. These results suggest that homoplantaginin has a protective and therapeutic effect on hepatocyte injury, which might be associated with its antioxidant properties.

  11. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, E; Barritt, G J; Rychkov, G Y

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca(2+) entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca(2+)]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels.

  12. Effects of ethanol on antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sien-Sing; Huang, Chi-Chang; Chen, Jiun-Rong; Chiu, Che-Lin; Shieh, Ming-Jer; Lin, Su-Jiun; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dose-response and time-course of the effects of ethanol on the cell viability and antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from male adult Wistar rats and seeded into 100-mm dishes. Hepatocytes were treated with ethanol at concentrations between 0 (C), 10 (E10), 50 (E50), and 100 (E100) mmol/L (dose response) for 12, 24, and 36 h (time course). Then, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione (GSH) level, and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured. RESULTS: Our data revealed that LDH leakage was significantly increased by about 30% in group E100 over those in groups C and E10 at 24 and 36 h, The MDA concentration in groups C, E10 and E50 were significantly lower than that in group E100 at 36 h. Furthermore, the concentration of MDA in group E100 at 36 h was significantly higher by 4.5- and 1.7-fold, respectively, than that at 12 and 24 h. On the other hand, the GSH level in group E100 at 24 and 36 h was significantly decreased, by 32% and 28%, respectively, compared to that at 12 h. The activities of GRD and CAT in group E100 at 36 h were significantly less than those in groups C and E10. However, The GPX and SOD activities showed no significant change in each group. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that long-time incubation with higher concentration of ethanol (100 mmol/L) decreased the cell viability by means of reducing GRD and CAT activities and increasing lipid peroxidation. PMID:16437627

  13. Proliferation of rat small hepatocytes requires follistatin expression.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hidekazu; Chen, Qijie; Kon, Junko; Sasaki, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Tanimizu, Naoki; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    Small hepatocytes (SHs) are a subpopulation of hepatocytes that have high growth potential in culture and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes (MHs). The activin (Act)/follistatin (Fst) system critically contributes to homeostasis of cell growth in the normal liver. ActA and ActB consist of two disulfide-linked Inhibin (Inh)β subunits, InhβA and InhβB, respectively. Fst binds to Act and blocks its bioactivity. In the present study we carried out the experiments to clarify how Fst regulates the proliferation of SHs. The gene expression was analyzed using DNA microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR, and protein expression was examined by western blots, immunocytochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RT-PCR showed that Fst expression was high in SHs and low in MHs. Although the ActA expression was opposite to that of Fst, ActB expression was high in SHs and low in MHs and increased with time in culture. Fst protein was detected in the cytoplasm of SHs and secreted into the culture medium. ActB protein was also secreted into the medium. Although the exogenous administration of ActA and ActB apparently suppressed the proliferation of SHs, apoptosis of SHs was not induced by treatment with ActA or ActB. On the other hand, Fst treatment did not affect the colony formation of SHs but prevented the inhibitory effect of ActA. Neutralization by the anti-Fst antibody resulted in the suppression of DNA synthesis in SHs, and small hairpin RNA against Fst suppressed the expansion of SH colonies. In conclusion, Fst expression is necessary for the proliferation of SHs.

  14. Isolated rat hepatocytes acquire iron from lactoferrin by endocytosis.

    PubMed

    McAbee, D D

    1995-10-15

    The iron-binding protein lactoferrin (Lf) present in blood is metabolized by the liver. Isolated rat hepatocytes vigorously endocytose bovine Lf via recycling Ca2(+)-dependent binding sites, but the uptake of iron from Lf by hepatocytes has not been examined. In this study, isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated with radiolabelled bovine Lf (125I-Lf, 59Fe-Lf or 125I-59Fe-Lf) at 37 degrees C, then washed at 4 degrees C in the presence of dextran sulphate with either Ca2+ or EGTA to distinguish between total bound and internal radioactivity respectively. Cells internalized 125I-Lf protein and Lf-bound 59Fe at maximal endocytic rates of 1700 and 480 mol.cell-1.s-1 respectively. When Lf was normalized for 59Fe content, these endocytic rates were equivalent and reflected an uptake potential of at least 3400 mol of iron.cell-1.s-1. Cells prebound with 125I-59Fe-Lf to Ca2+(-)dependent sites at 4 degrees C internalized more than 80% of both 125I-Lf protein and Lf-bound 59Fe approx. 6 min after warming to 37 degrees C at similar rates (125I-Lf: k(in) = 0.276 min-1, 59Fe: k(in) = 0.303 min-1). Within 4 h at 37 degrees C, cells had released 25% or less internalized Lf protein in the form of acid-soluble 125I-by-products but retained all the Lf-delivered 59Fe. Hyperosmotic disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked the uptake of 125I-Lf and Lf-bound 59Fe. Incubation of cells with 125I-59Fe-Lf and a 100 molar excess of diferric transferrin reduced slightly the endocytosis of 125I-Lf protein and 59Fe accumulation. Treatment of cells with the ferric chelator desferrioxamine did not alter uptake of 125I-Lf protein or Lf-bound 59Fe, but the ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulphonate slightly elevated endocytosis of 125I-Lf protein and Lf-bound 59Fe. These findings indicate that Lf does not release its bound iron before endocytosis. It was concluded from this study that hepatocytes take up iron from Lf at high rates by a process that requires endocytosis of Lf

  15. The effect of cysteine oxidation on isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Viña, J; Saez, G T; Wiggins, D; Roberts, A F; Hems, R; Krebs, H A

    1983-01-01

    Isolated hepatocytes incubated with 4mM-cysteine lose reduced glutathione, adenine nucleotides and intracellular enzymes, thus showing extensive membrane damage. The toxic effects of cysteine are enhanced by NH4Cl. Lactate, ethanol and unsaturated fatty acids afford significant protection against cysteine-induced cytoxicity. Addition of catalase to the incubation medium also protected against cysteine toxicity, indicating that H2O2 formed during the oxidation of cysteine is involved in the toxic effects observed. Under anaerobic conditions cysteine did not cause leakage of lactate dehydrogenase from cells, confirming that rapid autoxidation is an essential condition for development of the toxic effects of cysteine. PMID:6870855

  16. HCV Induces Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Increases Its Catalytic Activity, and Promotes Caspase Degradation in Infected Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Tran, Huy; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Moninger, Thomas O.; Schmidt, Warren N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Telomerase repairs the telomeric ends of chromosomes and is active in nearly all malignant cells. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be oncogenic and potential interactions with the telomerase system require further study. We determined the effects of HCV infection on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and enzyme activity in primary human hepatocytes and continuous cell lines. Results Primary human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells showed early de novo TERT protein expression 2–4 days after infection and these events coincided with increased TERT promoter activation, TERT mRNA, and telomerase activity. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that NS3-4A protease-helicase, in contrast to core or NS5A, specifically bound to the C-terminal region of TERT through interactions between helicase domain 2 and protease sequences. Increased telomerase activity was noted when NS3-4A was transfected into cells, when added to reconstituted mixtures of TERT and telomerase RNA, and when incubated with high molecular weight telomerase ‘holoenzyme’ complexes. The NS3-4A catalytic effect on telomerase was inhibited with primuline or danoprevir, agents that are known to inhibit NS3 helicase and protease activities respectively. In HCV infected cells, NS3-4A could be specifically recovered with telomerase holoenzyme complexes in contrast to NS5A or core protein. HCV infection also activated the effector caspase 7 which is known to target TERT. Activation coincided with the appearance of lower molecular weight carboxy-terminal fragment(s) of TERT, chiefly sized at 45 kD, which could be inhibited with pancaspase or caspase 7 inhibitors. Conclusions HCV infection induces TERT expression and stimulates telomerase activity in addition to triggering Caspase activity that leads to increased TERT degradation. These activities suggest multiple points whereby the virus can influence neoplasia. The NS3-4A protease-helicase can directly bind to TERT

  17. Data quality in predictive toxicology: reproducibility of rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Gottmann, E; Kramer, S; Pfahringer, B; Helma, C

    2001-01-01

    We compared 121 replicate rodent carcinogenicity assays from the two parts (National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program and literature) of the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) to estimate the reliability of these experiments. We estimated a concordance of 57% between the overall rodent carcinogenicity classifications from both sources. This value did not improve substantially when additional biologic information (species, sex, strain, target organs) was considered. These results indicate that rodent carcinogenicity assays are much less reproducible than previously expected, an effect that should be considered in the development of structure-activity relationship models and the risk assessment process. PMID:11401763

  18. Effects of methylmercury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes: Cell injury and inhibition of growth factor stimulated DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Keiichi; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Tajima, Shizuko; Fujiki, Motoo )

    1992-08-01

    Many more studies deal with the toxicity of methylmercury on nervous tissue than on its toxicity to the liver. Methylmercury accumulates in the liver in higher concentrations than brain and the liver has the primary function of detoxifying methylmercury. According to recent studies, hepatocyte mitochondrial membranes are destroyed by methylmercury and DNA synthesis is inhibited by methylmercury during hepatocyte regeneration. Methylmercury alters the membrane ion permeability of isolate skate hepatocytes, and inhibits the metal-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase of primary cultured rat hepatocytes. However, little is known about the effect of methylmercury on hepatocyte proliferation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. We therefore used the primary cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the effects of methylmercury on cell injury and growth factor stimulate DNA synthesis. The primary effect of methylmercury is to inhibit hepatocyte proliferation rather than to cause direct cell injury. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor: a regenerative drug for acute hepatitis and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shinya; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2007-03-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of morbidity worldwide and is characterized by the loss of hepatocytes with interstitial fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the potential uses of hepatocyte growth factor for treating hepatic diseases, focusing on the molecular mechanisms whereby hepatocyte growth factor reverses liver cirrhosis. Hepatic myofibroblasts play a central role in the development of liver cirrhosis, while myofibroblasts acquire c-Met. Using a rat model of liver cirrhosis, we recently delineated the direct effect of hepatocyte growth factor toward myofibroblasts: the induction of apoptotic cell death associated with matrix degradation, the inhibition of overproliferation and the suppression of transforming growth factor-beta1 production in myofibroblasts. Hepatocyte growth factor elicits mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory functions in hepatocytes, therefore contributing to reversing liver dysfunction. Considering the insufficient production of hepatocyte growth factor is responsible for the manifestation of chronic hepatitis, supplementation with or reinduction of hepatocyte growth factor represents a new strategy for attenuating intractable liver diseases.

  20. HepatoDyn: A Dynamic Model of Hepatocyte Metabolism That Integrates 13C Isotopomer Data

    PubMed Central

    Foguet, Carles; Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Fanchon, Eric; Guinovart, Joan J.; de Atauri, Pedro; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs many essential metabolic functions, which can be studied using computational models of hepatocytes. Here we present HepatoDyn, a highly detailed dynamic model of hepatocyte metabolism. HepatoDyn includes a large metabolic network, highly detailed kinetic laws, and is capable of dynamically simulating the redox and energy metabolism of hepatocytes. Furthermore, the model was coupled to the module for isotopic label propagation of the software package IsoDyn, allowing HepatoDyn to integrate data derived from 13C based experiments. As an example of dynamical simulations applied to hepatocytes, we studied the effects of high fructose concentrations on hepatocyte metabolism by integrating data from experiments in which rat hepatocytes were incubated with 20 mM glucose supplemented with either 3 mM or 20 mM fructose. These experiments showed that glycogen accumulation was significantly lower in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 20 mM fructose than in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 3 mM fructose. Through the integration of extracellular fluxes and 13C enrichment measurements, HepatoDyn predicted that this phenomenon can be attributed to a depletion of cytosolic ATP and phosphate induced by high fructose concentrations in the medium. PMID:27124774

  1. IGF-I mediated inhibition of leptin receptor expression in porcine hepatocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to elucidate hormonal control of leptin receptor gene expression in primary cultures of porcine hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from pigs (52 kg) and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Monolayer cultures were established in medium containing fetal bovine serum fo...

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  3. Effect of Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Melatonin on the Isolation of Human Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Solanas, Estela; Sostres, Carlos; Serrablo, Alejandro; García-Gil, Agustín; García, Joaquín J; Aranguren, Francisco J; Jiménez, Pilar; Hughes, Robin D; Serrano, María T

    2015-01-01

    The availability of fully functional human hepatocytes is critical for progress in human hepatocyte transplantation and the development of bioartificial livers and in vitro liver systems. However, the cell isolation process impairs the hepatocyte status and determines the number of viable cells that can be obtained. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and melatonin in the human hepatocyte isolation protocol. Human hepatocytes were isolated from liver pieces resected from 10 patients undergoing partial hepatectomy. Each piece was dissected into 2 equally sized pieces and randomized, in 5 of 10 isolations, to perfusion with 1% DMSO-containing perfusion buffer or buffer also containing 5 mM melatonin using the 2-step collagenase perfusion technique (experiment 1), and in the other 5 isolations to standard perfusion or perfusion including 1% DMSO (experiment 2). Tissues perfused with DMSO yielded 70.6% more viable hepatocytes per gram of tissue (p = 0.076), with a 26.1% greater albumin production (p < 0.05) than those perfused with control buffer. Melatonin did not significantly affect (p > 0.05) any of the studied parameters, but cell viability, dehydrogenase activity, albumin production, urea secretion, and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activity were slightly higher in cells isolated with melatonin-containing perfusion buffer compared to those isolated with DMSO. In conclusion, addition of 1% DMSO to the hepatocyte isolation protocol could improve the availability and functionality of hepatocytes for transplantation, but further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved.

  4. Autophagy: a cyto-protective mechanism which prevents primary human hepatocyte apoptosis during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Ricky H; Weston, Christopher J; Curbishley, Stuart M; Adams, David H; Afford, Simon C

    2012-04-01

    The role of autophagy in the response of human hepatocytes to oxidative stress remains unknown. Understanding this process may have important implications for the understanding of basic liver epithelial cell biology and the responses of hepatocytes during liver disease. To address this we isolated primary hepatocytes from human liver tissue and exposed them ex vivo to hypoxia and hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R). We showed that oxidative stress increased hepatocyte autophagy in a reactive oxygen species (ROS) and class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner. Specifically, mitochondrial ROS and NADPH oxidase were found to be key regulators of autophagy. Autophagy involved the upregulation of BECN1, LC3A, Atg7, Atg5 and Atg 12 during hypoxia and H-R. Autophagy was seen to occur within the mitochondria of the hepatocyte and inhibition of autophagy resulted in the lowering a mitochondrial membrane potential and onset of cell death. Autophagic responses were primarily observed in the large peri-venular (PV) hepatocyte subpopulation. Inhibition of autophagy, using 3-methyladenine, increased apoptosis during H-R. Specifically, PV human hepatocytes were more susceptible to apoptosis after inhibition of autophagy. These findings show for the first time that during oxidative stress autophagy serves as a cell survival mechanism for primary human hepatocytes.

  5. Mfsd2a+ hepatocytes repopulate the liver during injury and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Xiuzhen; Tian, Xueying; He, Lingjuan; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Libo; Liu, Qiaozhen; Li, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Huan; Liu, Kuo; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Huang, Pengyu; Nie, Yu; Yan, Yan; Hui, Lijian; Lui, Kathy O.; Zhou, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are functionally heterogeneous and are divided into two distinct populations based on their metabolic zonation: the periportal and pericentral hepatocytes. During liver injury and regeneration, the cellular dynamics of these two distinct populations remain largely elusive. Here we show that major facilitator super family domain containing 2a (Mfsd2a), previously known to maintain blood–brain barrier function, is a periportal zonation marker. By genetic lineage tracing of Mfsd2a+ periportal hepatocytes, we show that Mfsd2a+ population decreases during liver homeostasis. Nevertheless, liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy significantly stimulates expansion of the Mfsd2a+ periportal hepatocytes. Similarly, during chronic liver injury, the Mfsd2a+ hepatocyte population expands and completely replaces the pericentral hepatocyte population throughout the whole liver. After injury recovery, the adult liver re-establishes the metabolic zonation by reprogramming the Mfsd2a+-derived hepatocytes into pericentral hepatocytes. The evidence of entire zonation replacement during injury increases our understanding of liver biology and disease. PMID:27857132

  6. Autoradiographic analysis of hepatocytes in mirex-induced adaptive liver growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.; Yarbrough, J.D. )

    1988-07-01

    The relationships between ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into hepatocyte nuclei, cell enlargement, and mitotic index were studied in intact (INT) and adrenalectomized (ADX) mirex-dosed rats. In INT mirex-dosed rats the sequence of events included the following: a biphasic response in nuclear labeling of mononuclear hepatocyes with peaks at 48 and 66 h postmirex dose, a peak in mitotic activity 66 h postmirex dose, and a significant increase in binuclear hepatocyte size 48 h postmirex dose. In ADX mirex-dosed rats the sequence of events included the following: a biphasic response in nuclear labeling mononuclear hepatocytes with peaks at 24 and 48 h postmirex dose, a peak in mitotic activity 60 h postmirex dose, and a marginal increase in binuclear hepatocyte size 48 h postmirex dose. Corticosterone supplements to ADX mirex-dosed rats significantly reduced nuclear labeling of the mononuclear hepatocytes and increased the size of binuclear hepatocytes to that observed in INT mirex-dosed rats. This study demonstrates that adaptive liver growth consists of a hyperplastic response that involves mononuclear hepatocytes and a hypertrophic response that involves binuclear hepatocytes. Both responses appear to be modulated by corticosterone.

  7. Using reconfigurable microfluidics to study the role of HGF in autocrine and paracrine signaling of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipali; Haque, Amranul; Gao, Yandong; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Cancer, developmental biology and tissue injury present multiple examples where groups of cells residing in close proximity communicate via paracrine factors. It is nearly impossible to dissect such cellular interactions in vivo and is quite challenging in vitro. The goal of this study is to utilize a reconfigurable microfluidic device in order to study paracrine signal exchange between groups of primary hepatocytes in vitro. Previously, we demonstrated that hepatocytes residing on protein spots containing collagen and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) spots expressed epithelial (hepatic) phenotypes and also rescued them in neighboring hepatocytes on collagen spots that did not receive direct HGF stimulus. Herein, we designed a microfluidic device with parallel fluidic channels separated by retractable (reconfigurable) walls and employed this device to investigate interactions between groups of HGF-stimulated and unstimulated hepatocytes. Using a novel reconfigurable microfluidic device, we demonstrate that cultivation of HGF-containing protein spots upregulates the production of endogenous HGF in hepatocytes and that these HGF molecules diffuse over, causing phenotype enhancement in the recipient cells. We also show that selective treatment of the recipient hepatocytes with a c-met inhibitor (SU11274) diminishes the rescue effect, as gauged by the down-regulation of albumin and HGF expression. Our study is one of the first to demonstrate paracrine signaling via HGF in primary hepatocytes. More broadly, tools and methods described here may be used to study paracrine signaling in other types of cells and will have relevance for various fields of biomedical research from cancer to immunology.

  8. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated Rubicon expression enhances hepatocyte lipoapoptosis and promotes hepatocyte ballooning

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Wang, Ting; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the relationship between autophagy and lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis, which is termed “lipoapoptosis,” in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk, after which the liver histology and expression of proteins such as p62 or LC3 were evaluated. Alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells treated with palmitate (PA) were used as an in vitro model. RESULTS: LC3-II, p62, and Run domain Beclin-1 interacting and cysteine-rich containing (Rubicon) proteins increased in both the HFD mice and in AML12 cells in response to PA treatment. Rubicon expression was decreased upon c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition at both the mRNA and the protein level in AML12 cells. Rubicon knockdown in AML12 cells with PA decreased the protein levels of both LC3-II and p62. Rubicon expression peaked at 4 h of PA treatment in AML12, and then decreased. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor ameliorated the decrease in Rubicon protein expression at 10 h of PA and resulted in enlarged AML12 cells under PA treatment. The enlargement of AML12 cells by PA with caspase-9 inhibition was canceled by Rubicon knockdown. CONCLUSION: The JNK-Rubicon axis enhanced lipoapoptosis, and caspase-9 inhibition and Rubicon had effects that were cytologically similar to hepatocyte ballooning. As ballooned hepatocytes secrete fibrogenic signals and thus might promote fibrosis in the liver, the inhibition of hepatocyte ballooning might provide anti-fibrosis in the NASH liver. PMID:27605885

  9. Active vibrissal sensing in rodents and marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Grant, Robyn A.; Arkley, Kendra; Rankov, Vladan; Perkon, Igor; Prescott, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    In rats, the long facial whiskers (mystacial macrovibrissae) are repetitively and rapidly swept back and forth during exploration in a behaviour known as ‘whisking’. In this paper, we summarize previous evidence from rats, and present new data for rat, mouse and the marsupial grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) showing that whisking in all three species is actively controlled both with respect to movement of the animal's body and relative to environmental structure. Using automatic whisker tracking, and Fourier analysis, we first show that the whisking motion of the mystacial vibrissae, in the horizontal plane, can be approximated as a blend of two sinusoids at the fundamental frequency (mean 8.5, 11.3 and 7.3 Hz in rat, mouse and opossum, respectively) and its second harmonic. The oscillation at the second harmonic is particularly strong in mouse (around 22 Hz) consistent with previous reports of fast whisking in that species. In all three species, we found evidence of asymmetric whisking during head turning and following unilateral object contacts consistent with active control of whisker movement. We propose that the presence of active vibrissal touch in both rodents and marsupials suggests that this behavioural capacity emerged at an early stage in the evolution of therian mammals. PMID:21969685

  10. Pediatric Rodent Models of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Carlson, Jaclyn; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents, age-specific studies are necessary to fully understand the long-term consequences of injuries to the immature brain. Preclinical and translational research can help elucidate the vulnerabilities of the developing brain to insult, and provide model systems to formulate and evaluate potential treatments aimed at minimizing the adverse effects of TBI. Several experimental TBI models have therefore been scaled down from adult rodents for use in juvenile animals. The following chapter discusses these adapted models for pediatric TBI, and the importance of age equivalence across species during model development and interpretation. Many neurodevelopmental processes are ongoing throughout childhood and adolescence, such that neuropathological mechanisms secondary to a brain insult, including oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction and inflammation, may be influenced by the age at the time of insult. The long-term evaluation of clinically relevant functional outcomes is imperative to better understand the persistence and evolution of behavioral deficits over time after injury to the developing brain. Strategies to modify or protect against the chronic consequences of pediatric TBI, by supporting the trajectory of normal brain development, have the potential to improve quality of life for brain-injured children.

  11. Cellular scaling rules for rodent brains

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Mota, Bruno; Lent, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    How do cell number and size determine brain size? Here, we show that, in the order Rodentia, increased size of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and remaining areas across six species is achieved through greater numbers of neurons of larger size, and much greater numbers of nonneuronal cells of roughly invariant size, such that the ratio between total neuronal and nonneuronal mass remains constant across species. Although relative cerebellar size remains stable among rodents, the number of cerebellar neurons increases with brain size more rapidly than in the cortex, such that the cerebellar fraction of total brain neurons increases with brain size. In contrast, although the relative cortical size increases with total brain size, the cortical fraction of total brain neurons remains constant. We propose that the faster increase in average neuronal size in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum as these structures gain neurons and the rapidly increasing glial numbers that generate glial mass to match total neuronal mass at a fixed glia/neuron total mass ratio are fundamental cellular constraints that lead to the relative expansion of cerebral cortical volume across species. PMID:16880386

  12. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  13. Assessing Spatial Learning and Memory in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  14. Rodent models of neuroinflammation for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazem, Amir; Sankowski, Roman; Bacher, Michael; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease remains incurable, and the failures of current disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's disease could be attributed to a lack of in vivo models that recapitulate the underlying etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease is not based on mutations related to amyloid-β (Aβ) or tau production which are currently the basis of in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease. It has recently been suggested that mechanisms like chronic neuroinflammation may occur prior to amyloid-β and tau pathologies in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of rodent models of neuroinflammation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Our search criteria were based on characteristics of an idealistic disease model that should recapitulate causes, symptoms, and lesions in a chronological order similar to the actual disease. Therefore, a model based on the inflammation hypothesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease should include the following features: (i) primary chronic neuroinflammation, (ii) manifestations of memory and cognitive impairment, and (iii) late development of tau and Aβ pathologies. The following models fit the pre-defined criteria: lipopolysaccharide- and PolyI:C-induced models of immune challenge; streptozotocin-, okadaic acid-, and colchicine neurotoxin-induced neuroinflammation models, as well as interleukin-1β, anti-nerve growth factor and p25 transgenic models. Among these models, streptozotocin, PolyI:C-induced, and p25 neuroinflammation models are compatible with the inflammation hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Hypoxia Signaling Cascade for Erythropoietin Production in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Yutaka; Sekine, Hiroki; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Souma, Tomokazu; Tsujita, Tadayuki; Kawaguchi, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Norihiko; Takeda, Kotaro; Fong, Guo-Hua; Dan, Takashi; Ichinose, Masakazu; Miyata, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Norio

    2015-08-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is produced in the kidney and liver in a hypoxia-inducible manner via the activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) to maintain oxygen homeostasis. Accelerating Epo production in hepatocytes is one plausible therapeutic strategy for treating anemia caused by kidney diseases. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of hepatic Epo production, we analyzed mouse lines harboring liver-specific deletions of genes encoding HIF-prolyl-hydroxylase isoforms (PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3) that mediate the inactivation of HIF1α and HIF2α under normal oxygen conditions. The loss of all PHD isoforms results in both polycythemia, which is caused by Epo overproduction, and fatty livers. We found that deleting any combination of two PHD isoforms induces polycythemia without steatosis complications, whereas the deletion of a single isoform induces no apparent phenotype. Polycythemia is prevented by the loss of either HIF2α or the hepatocyte-specific Epo gene enhancer (EpoHE). Chromatin analyses show that the histones around EpoHE dissociate from the nucleosome structure after HIF2α activation. HIF2α also induces the expression of HIF3α, which is involved in the attenuation of Epo production. These results demonstrate that the total amount of PHD activity is more important than the specific function of each isoform for hepatic Epo expression regulated by a PHD-HIF2α-EpoHE cascade in vivo.

  16. Cytotoxicity of ortho-phenylphenol in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Y; Moldéus, P; Moore, G A

    1992-01-22

    The effects of ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) and its metabolites, phenyl-hydroquinol (PHQ) and phenyl-benzoquinone (PBQ), on isolated rat hepatocytes were investigated. Addition of OPP (0.5-1.0 mM) to cells caused a dose-dependent cell death accompanied by the depletion of intracellular levels of ATP, glutathione (GSH) and protein thiols. GSH loss correlated with the formation of oxidized GSH. In addition, PHQ and especially PBQ (both at 0.5 mM) resulted in acute cell death with rapid depletion of ATP, GSH and protein thiols, and further low doses of PBQ (10-50 microM) elicited serious impairment of mitochondrial functions related to oxidative phosphorylation and Ca fluxes in isolated liver mitochondria. These results indicate that mitochondria are a target for these compounds and that OPP is itself toxic to hepatocytes even when metabolism is inhibited. The loss of cellular GSH and protein thiols accompanied by the impairment of mitochondrial function may be the main mechanisms of cytotoxicity induced by OPP and its metabolites.

  17. Methamphetamine enhances Hepatitis C virus replication in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Peng, J S; Wang, X; Wang, Y J; Luo, G X; Ho, W Z

    2008-04-01

    Very little is known about the interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and methamphetamine, which is a highly abused psychostimulant and a known risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV infection. This study examined whether methamphetamine has the ability to inhibit innate immunity in the host cells, facilitating HCV replication in human hepatocytes. Methamphetamine inhibited intracellular interferon alpha expression in human hepatocytes, which was associated with the increase in HCV replication. In addition, methamphetamine also compromised the anti-HCV effect of recombinant interferon alpha. Further investigation of mechanism(s) responsible for the methamphetamine action revealed that methamphetamine was able to inhibit the expression of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, a key modulator in interferon-mediated immune and biological responses. Methamphetamine also down-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory factor-5, a crucial transcriptional factor that activates the interferon pathway. These in vitro findings that methamphetamine compromises interferon alpha-mediated innate immunity against HCV infection indicate that methamphetamine may have a cofactor role in the immunopathogenesis of HCV disease.

  18. Responses of hepatocytes to DDT and methyl mercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Bussolaro, D; Filipak Neto, F; Ribeiro, C A Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the current work was to investigate the effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and monomethyl mercury (MeHg) on hepatocytes from tropical fish Hypostomus commersoni (cascudo). In order to verify DDT and MeHg impacts on the redox milieu, cells were exposed for 4 days to 50 nM of DDT, 0.25 and 2.5 microM of MeHg and to a combination of 50 nM of DDT and 0.25 microM of MeHg. These concentrations were compared with those previously published (Filipak Neto et al., 2008) for the predator fish Hoplias malabaricus (traíra). The effects were mostly noticeable on reduced glutathione concentration and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and glutathione S-transferase activity. Catalase activity increased in the group exposed to 2.5 microM of MeHg and hydrogen peroxide levels decreased in all exposed groups. Also, superoxide anion levels decreased in the groups exposed to 2.5 microM of MeHg and DDT *MeHg group. Cell viability decreased only in the DDT exposed group, demonstrating that the antioxidant defense mechanism of H. commersoni hepatocytes is more efficient than H. malabaricus. These results corroborate the resistance of H. commersoni to polluted areas and support the hypothesis that this species is more resistant to DDT and MeHg than H. malabaricus species.

  19. Multilayered heparin hydrogel microwells for cultivation of primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    You, Jungmok; Shin, Dong-Sik; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine need to be rationally designed to achieve the desired cell fate and function. This paper describes the development of hydrogel microstructures for cultivation of primary hepatocytes. Four different micropatterned surfaces are tested: 1) poly(ethyelene glycol) (PEG) microwells patterned on glass, 2) heparin hydrogel microwells patterned on glass, 3) PEG microwells patterned on heparin hydrogel-coated substrates, and 4) heparin hydrogel microwells patterned on heparin hydrogel-coated substrates. The latter surfaces are constructed by a combination of micromolding and microcontact printing techniques to create microwells with both walls and floor composed of heparin hydrogel. Individual microwell dimensions are 200 μm diameter and 20 μm in height. In all cases, the floor of the microwells is modified with collagen I to promote cell adhesion. Cultivation of hepatocytes followed by analysis of hepatic markers (urea production, albumin synthesis, and E-cadherin expression) reveals that the all-heparin gel microwells are most conducive to hepatic phenotype maintenance. For example, ELISA analysis shows 2.3 to 13.1 times higher levels of albumin production in all-heparin gel wells compared with other micropatterned surfaces. Importantly, hepatic phenotype expression can be further enhanced by culturing fibroblasts on the heparin gel walls of the microwells. In the future, multicomponent all-heparin gel microstructures may be employed in designing hepatic niche for liver-specific differentiation of stem cells.

  20. Cysteine aggravates palmitate-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhigang; Yao, Tong; Song, Zhenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Aims Lipotoxicity, defined as cell death induced by excessive fatty acids, especially saturated fatty acids, is critically involved in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent studies report that plasma cysteine concentrations is elevated in the subjects with either alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) or NASH than normal subjects. The present study was conducted to determine if elevation of cysteine could be a deleterious factor in palmitate-induced hepatocyte cell death. Main methods HepG2 and Hep3B cells were treated with palmitate with/without the inclusion of cysteine in the media for 24 hours. The effects of cysteine inclusion on palmitate induced cell death were determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and MTT assay. Oxidative stress was evaluated by intracellular glutathione (GSH) level, malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and DCFH-DA assay. Western blotting was performed to detect the changes of endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress markers: C/EBP homologous transcription factor (CHOP), GRP-78, and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK). Key findings Elevated intracellular cysteine aggravates hepatocytes to palmitate-induced cell death. Enhancement of ER stress, specifically increased activation of JNK pathway, contributed to this cell death process. Significance Increase of plasma cysteine levels, as observed in both ASH and NASH patients, may play a pathological role in the development of the liver diseases. Manipulation of dietary amino acids supplementation could be a therapeutic choice. PMID:22008477

  1. Study of Valproic Acid-Enhanced Hepatocyte Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Renin; Chou, Mei-Chia; Hung, Li-Ying; Wang, Mu-En; Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used antiepilepsy drugs. However, several side effects, including weight gain and fatty liver, have been reported in patients following VPA treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatic steatosis using FL83B cell line-based in vitro model. Using fluorescent lipid staining technique, we found that VPA enhanced oleic acid- (OLA-) induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes; this may be due to upregulated lipid uptake, triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Real-time PCR results showed that, following VPA treatment, the expression levels of genes encoding cluster of differentiation 36 (Cd36), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), and perilipin 2 (Plin2) were increased, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I a (Cpt1a) was not affected, and those of acetyl-Co A carboxylase α (Acca) and fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were decreased. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analyses, we found that VPA also induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear translocation and increased levels of cell-surface CD36. Based on these results, we propose that VPA may enhance OLA-induced hepatocyte steatosis through the upregulation of PPARγ- and CD36-dependent lipid uptake, TAG synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. PMID:27034954

  2. Sulodexide induces hepatocyte growth factor release in humans.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-03-08

    Heparin influences numerous pleiotropic growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), partially by their release from endothelial and extracellular matrix stores. The effects of sulodexide, a heparin-like glycosaminoglycan medication of growing importance in medicine, on HGF liberation are not known. We performed a 2-week open-label sulodexide trial in healthy male volunteers. The drug was initially administered intravenously (i.v.) in a single dose of 1200 Lipoprotein Lipase Releasing Units (LRU), then -- orally for 12 days (500 LRU twice a day), and -- again by i.v. route (1200 LRU) on day 14. Intravenous sulodexide injections were repeatedly found to induce marked and reproducible increases in immunoreactive plasma HGF levels (more than 3500% vs baseline after 10 min, and more than 1200% after 120 min), and remained unchanged when measured 120 min following oral sulodexide administration. The percentage increments in plasma HGF evoked by i.v. sulodexide at both time points and on both days inversely correlated with baseline levels of the growth factor. On day 14, the HGF levels after 120 min and their percentage increase vs baseline were strongly and directly dependent on i.v. sulodexide dose per kg of body weight. This study shows that sulodexide has a novel, remarkable and plausibly biologically important stimulating effect on the release of pleiotropic hepatocyte growth factor in humans.

  3. Repopulation of adult and neonatal mice with human hepatocytes: a chimeric animal model.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Le, Tam T; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Verma, Inder M

    2007-12-18

    We report the successful transplantation of human hepatocytes in immunodeficient, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (fah(-/-)) mice. Engraftment occurs over the entire liver acinus upon transplantation. A few weeks after transplantation, increasing concentrations of human proteins (e.g., human albumin and human C3a) can be measured in the blood of the recipient mouse. No fusion between mouse and human hepatocytes can be detected. Three months after transplantation, up to 20% of the mouse liver is repopulated by human hepatocytes, and sustained expression of lentiviral vector transduced gene can be observed. We further report the development of a hepatocyte transplantation method involving a transcutaneous, intrahepatic injection in neonatal mice. Human hepatocytes engraft over the entire injected lobe with an expansion pattern similar to those observed with intrasplenic transplantation.

  4. Sex and strain differences in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, C.A.; Way, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was developed using hepatocytes isolated from male F-344 rats. A number of genetic polymorphisms have been shown to occur in inbred strains of rats, which may lead to variation in biotransformation of xenobiotics resulting in differences in susceptibility to genotoxins. The effect of the strain utilized as a source of hepatocytes was investigated with female Lewis, F-344, and DA rats. Variation was observed when hepatocytes from the three strains were exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). No clearcut strain differences were seen when cells were exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate that both the strain and the sex of the animal used as a source of hepatocytes can affect the HPC/DNA repair test.

  5. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  6. In vivo N-acetyl cysteine reduce hepatocyte death by induced acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the famous drug in global, and taking overdose Acetaminophen will intake hepatic cell injure. Desptie substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanism of hepatocellular injury during the last 40 years, many aspects of the pathophysiology are still unknown or controversial.1 In this study, mice are injected APAP overdose to damage hepatocyte. APAP deplete glutathione and ATP of cell, N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) plays an important role to protect hepatocytes be injury. N-Acetyl Cysteine provides mitochondrial to produce glutathione to release drug effect hepatocyte. By 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) metabolism in vivo, glutathione keep depleting to observe the hepatocyte morphology in time. Without NAC, cell necrosis increase to plasma membrane damage to release 6-CFDA, that's rupture. After 6-CFDA injection, fluorescence will be retained in hepatocyte. For cell retain with NAC and without NAC are almost the same. With NAC, the number of cell rupture decreases about 75%.

  7. Incomplete cytokinesis/binucleation in mammals: The powerful system of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fortier, M; Celton-Morizur, S; Desdouets, C

    2017-01-01

    Polyploidy, the state of having greater than a diploid DNA content (tetraploid, octoploid, etc.) is a characteristic feature of mammalian hepatocytes and accompanies late fetal development and postnatal maturation of the liver. During the weaning period, diploid hepatocytes can engage either into normal cell division cycle giving rise to two diploid hepatocytes or follow a scheduled division program characterized by incomplete cytokinesis. In that case, diploid hepatocytes undergo mitosis, but do not form a contractile ring. Indeed, cleavage-plane specification is never established, because of the deficiencies of actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Furthermore, microtubules fail both to contact the cortex and to deliver their molecular signal, preventing localization and activation of RhoA. Therefore, cytokinesis aborts and a binucleate tetraploid liver cell is generated, which subsequently plays a pivotal role in liver progressive polyploidization. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols to monitor hepatocyte proliferation and cytokinesis process by in situ and dynamic ex vivo approaches.

  8. Protective effects of HGF gene-expressing human mesenchymal stem cells in acetaminophen-treated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Ho; You, Dong Hun; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) secrete a great variety of cytokines that have beneficial paracrine actions. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes proliferation in several cell types. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of HGF gene-transfected MSC (HGF-MSC) in acetaminophen (AAP)-treated hepatocytes. We transfected the HGF gene into MSCs and confirmed HGF expression by RT-PCR and western blot. The concentration of HGF in HGF-MSC conditioned media (HGFCM) was upregulated compared with that in control MSCCM samples. Cell viability was increased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. Expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptosis protein, was increased and expression of pro-apoptosis proteins (Bad, Bik and Bid) was decreased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. HGF-MSC had protective effects on AAP-induced hepatocyte damage by enhancing proliferation. These results suggest that HGF-expressing MSCs may provide regenerative potential for liver cell damage.

  9. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY CORE TEMPERATURE INSTABILITY IN RODENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to quantify instability of autonomic systems such as temperature regulation should be important in toxicant and drug safety studies. Stability of core temperature (Tc) in laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of stimuli. Calculating the temperature differential o...

  10. Occurrence of ectoparasites on rodents in Sukhothai Province, northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Changbunjong, Tanasak; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Chamsai, Tatiyanuch; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Ngamloephochit, Seni; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Yongyuttawichai, Plern; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Chaichoun, Kridsada; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2010-11-01

    A survey of ectoparasites on rodents was carried out bimonthly from April 2008 to March 2009 in 3 districts of Sukhothai Province, northern Thailand. A total of 130 rodents comprising 8 species of hosts were captured and examined for ectoparasites. The hosts examined were Bandicota indica, Bandicota savilei, Rattus losea, Rattus rattus, Rattus exulans, Rattus norvegicus, Menetes berdmorei and Tamiops mcclellandii. Ninety-seven ectoparasites were collected: 1 species of tick (Hemaphysalis bandicota), 2 species of mites (Laelaps nuttali and Laelaps echidninus), and 1 species of flea (Xenopsylla cheopis) were identified. The infestation rates by ticks, mites and fleas on the rodents were 0.77, 5.38 and 6.15%, respectively. Monitoring the rodent population and their ectoparasites is important for future planning of prevention and control of zoonotic diseases in the area.

  11. Bone morphology of the hind limbs in two caviomorph rodents.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, F A P; Sesoko, N F; Rahal, S C; Teixeira, C R; Müller, T R; Machado, M R F

    2013-04-01

    In order to evaluate the hind limbs of caviomorph rodents a descriptive analysis of the Cuniculus paca (Linnaeus, 1766) and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) was performed using anatomical specimens, radiography, computed tomography (CT) and full-coloured prototype models to generate bone anatomy data. The appendicular skeleton of the two largest rodents of Neotropical America was compared with the previously reported anatomical features of Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout, 1769) and domestic Cavia porcellus (Linnaeus, 1758). The structures were analyzed macroscopically and particular findings of each species reported. Features including the presence of articular fibular projection and lunulae were observed in the stifle joint of all rodents. Imaging aided in anatomical description and, specifically in the identification of bone structures in Cuniculus paca and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris. The imaging findings were correlated with the anatomical structures observed. The data may be used in future studies comparing these animals to other rodents and mammalian species.

  12. First Isolates of Leptospira spp., from Rodents Captured in Angola

    PubMed Central

    Fortes-Gabriel, Elsa; Carreira, Teresa; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2016-01-01

    Rodents play an important role in the transmission of pathogenic Leptospira spp. However, in Angola, neither the natural reservoirs of these spirochetes nor leptospirosis diagnosis has been considered. Regarding this gap, we captured rodents in Luanda and Huambo provinces to identify circulating Leptospira spp. Rodent kidney tissue was cultured and DNA amplified and sequenced. Culture isolates were evaluated for pathogenic status and typing with rabbit antisera; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were also performed. A total of 37 rodents were captured: Rattus rattus (15, 40.5%), Rattus norvegicus (9, 24.3%), and Mus musculus (13, 35.2%). Leptospiral DNA was amplified in eight (21.6%) kidney samples. From the cultures, we obtained four (10.8%) Leptospira isolates belonging to the Icterohaemorrhagiae and Ballum serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii genospecies, respectively. This study provides information about circulating leptospires spread by rats and mice in Angola. PMID:26928840

  13. First Isolates of Leptospira spp., from Rodents Captured in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fortes-Gabriel, Elsa; Carreira, Teresa; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2016-05-04

    Rodents play an important role in the transmission of pathogenic Leptospira spp. However, in Angola, neither the natural reservoirs of these spirochetes nor leptospirosis diagnosis has been considered. Regarding this gap, we captured rodents in Luanda and Huambo provinces to identify circulating Leptospira spp. Rodent kidney tissue was cultured and DNA amplified and sequenced. Culture isolates were evaluated for pathogenic status and typing with rabbit antisera; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were also performed. A total of 37 rodents were captured: Rattus rattus (15, 40.5%), Rattus norvegicus (9, 24.3%), and Mus musculus (13, 35.2%). Leptospiral DNA was amplified in eight (21.6%) kidney samples. From the cultures, we obtained four (10.8%) Leptospira isolates belonging to the Icterohaemorrhagiae and Ballum serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii genospecies, respectively. This study provides information about circulating leptospires spread by rats and mice in Angola.

  14. Rodent-associated Bartonella Febrile Illness, Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Iralu, Jonathan; Bai, Ying; Crook, Larry; Tempest, Bruce; Simpson, Gary; McKenzie, Taylor

    2006-01-01

    Serum specimens from 114 patients hospitalized with a febrile illness were tested with an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using Bartonella antigens prepared from 6 species of sigmodontine rodents and 3 known human Bartonella pathogens: B. henselae, B. quintana, and B. elizabethae. Acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from 5 of these patients showed seroconversion with an IFA titer >512 to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens. The highest titer was against antigen derived from the white-throated woodrat (Neotoma albigula), although this rodent is not necessarily implicated as the source of infection. Three of the 5 who seroconverted showed no cross-reaction to the 3 Bartonella human pathogens. Common clinical characteristics were fever, chills, myalgias, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and transaminasemia. Although antibodies to Bartonella are cross-reactive, high-titer seroconversions to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens in adults with common clinical characteristics should stimulate the search for additional Bartonella human pathogens. PMID:16836824

  15. TGFbeta Induces Binucleation/Polyploidization in Hepatocytes through a Src-Dependent Cytokinesis Failure

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Germana; Bisceglia, Francesca; Strippoli, Raffaele; Guarguaglini, Giulia; Citarella, Franca; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Tripodi, Marco; Amicone, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In all mammals, the adult liver shows binucleated as well as mononucleated polyploid hepatocytes. The hepatic polyploidization starts after birth with an extensive hepatocyte binucleation and generates hepatocytes of several ploidy classes. While the functional significance of hepatocyte polyploidy is becoming clearer, how it is triggered and maintained needs to be clarified. Aim of this study was to identify a major inducer of hepatocyte binucleation/polyploidization and the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. We found that, among several cytokines analyzed, known to be involved in early liver development and/or mass control, TGFbeta1 was capable to induce, together with the expected morphological changes, binucleation in hepatocytes in culture. Most importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of TGFbeta signaling in healthy mice during weaning, when the physiological binucleation occurs, induced a significant decrease of hepatocyte binucleation rate, without affecting cell proliferation and hepatic index. The TGFbeta-induced hepatocyte binucleation resulted from a cytokinesis failure, as assessed by video microscopy, and is associated with a delocalization of the cytokinesis regulator RhoA-GTPase from the mid-body of dividing cells. The use of specific chemical inhibitors demonstrated that the observed events are Src-dependent. Finally, the restoration of a fully epithelial phenotype by TGFbeta withdrawal gave rise to a cell progeny capable to maintain the polyploid state. In conclusion, we identified TGFbeta as a major inducer of hepatocyte binucleation both in vitro and in vivo, thus ascribing a novel role to this pleiotropic cytokine. The production of binucleated/tetraploid hepatocytes is due to a cytokinesis failure controlled by the molecular axis TGFbeta/Src/RhoA. PMID:27893804

  16. Enhanced Cell Survival and Yield of Rat Small Hepatocytes by Honeycomb-Patterned Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukiyama, Shusaku; Matsushita, Michiaki; Tanaka, Masaru; Tamura, Hitoshi; Todo, Satoru; Yamamoto, Sadaaki; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2008-02-01

    Surface designing of substrate to regulate cell adhesion and function in nano and micro scale is a critical issue in biomaterial science. In this study, we describe the fabrication of highly regular patterned porous films (honeycomb-patterned film) formed by a simply casting technique, and the culture of mature hepatocytes and small hepatocytes on the films. The pore size of the honeycomb-patterned films used was 6, 12, and 16 µm. We evaluated the effect of the honeycomb-patterned films on the morphology, cell yield, survival and the differentiated hepatic function (albumin production) of the both hepatocytes. Both hepatocytes attached on the flat films appeared to spread well, showing a typical monolayer morphology. They peeled off from the films at 7 days in culture on the flat films. On the other hand, spreading of the each hepatocytes was restricted on the honeycomb-patterned films at 3 and 7 days in culture. The cell yield and survival of the each hepatocytes increased with increasing culture time. Small hepatocyte on the pore sizes of 16 µm showed the highest cell yield (approximately 3 times). Albumin production of mature hepatocyte on the pore sizes of 16 µm (224.1.3 ±157 ng ml-1 well-1 at 1 day in culture, 369.5 ±222 ng ml-1 well-1 at 3 days in culture) was higher than that of the hepatocytes on the flat films (119.3 ±9.3 ng ml-1 well-1 at 1 day in culture, 262.8 ±47.3 ng ml-1 well-1 at 3 days in culture), although that of small hepatocytes on the honeycomb-patterned films (pore size: 16 µm) was similar on the flat film. These results indicated that both the surface topography and the pore size of the honeycomb-patterned film affected the hepatic metabolic function.

  17. The search for coincidences of rare events using LVD and BUST detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. Yu.; Ashikhmin, V. V.; Boliev, M. M.; Volchenko, V. V.; Dadykin, V. L.; Dzaparova, I. M.; Dobrynina, E. A.; Enikeev, R. I.; Kochkarov, M. M.; Novoseltsev, Yu. F.; Novoseltseva, R. V.; Mal'gin, A. S.; Petkov, V. B.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Shakiryanova, I. R.; Yakushev, V. F.; Yanin, A. F.; LVD Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The results of the time coincidences of rare events in the LVD and BUST detectors are presented. The rare events could be caused by neutrino interaction in the experimental setup. The distributions of the coincidence number per day for 4-year period are obtained.

  18. Secondary ion coincidence in highly charged ion based secondary ion mass spectroscopy for process characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A.V.; Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Coincidence counting in highly charged ion based secondary ion mass spectroscopy has been applied to the characterization of selective tungsten deposition via disilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride on a patterned SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer. The high secondary ion yield and the secondary ion emission from a small area produced by highly charged ions make the coincidence technique very powerful.

  19. Manganese-56 coincidence-counting facility precisely measures neutron-source strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Volpi, A.; Larsen, R. N.; Porges, K. G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Precise measurement of neutron-source strength is provided by a manganese 56 coincidence-counting facility using the manganese-bath technique. This facility combines nuclear instrumentation with coincidence-counting techniques to handle a wide variety of radioisotope-counting requirements.

  20. It takes two—coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Martin F.; Meyer, Anneke; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g., in the visual system), increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrate information from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and memory or stimulus feature detection (e.g., in auditory delay lines). Within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee both of these mechanisms might be implemented by uniglomerular projection neurons (PNs) that transfer information from the primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobe (AL), to a multimodal integration center, the mushroom body (MB). PNs from anatomically distinct tracts respond to the same stimulus space, but have different physiological properties, characteristics that are prerequisites for parallel processing of different stimulus aspects. However, the PN pathways also display mirror-imaged like anatomical trajectories that resemble neuronal coincidence detectors as known from auditory delay lines. To investigate temporal processing of olfactory information, we recorded PN odor responses simultaneously from both tracts and measured coincident activity of PNs within and between tracts. Our results show that coincidence levels are different within each of the two tracts. Coincidence also occurs between tracts, but to a minor extent compared to coincidence within tracts. Taken together our findings support the relevance of spike timing in coding of olfactory information (temporal code). PMID:26283968

  1. Transmission ecology of rodent-borne diseases: New frontiers.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Frédéric; Blasdell, Kim; Morand, Serge

    2015-09-01

    Rodents are recognized reservoir hosts for many human zoonotic pathogens. The current trends resulting from anthropocene defaunation suggest that in the future they, along with other small mammals, are likely to become the dominant mammals in almost all human-modified environments. Recent intricate studies on bat-borne emerging diseases have highlighted that many gaps exist in our understanding of the zoonotic transmission of rodent-borne pathogens. This has emphasized the need for scientists interested in rodent-borne diseases to integrate rodent ecology into their analysis of rodent-borne pathogen transmission in order to identify in more detail the mechanisms of spillover and chains of transmission. Further studies are required to better understand the true impact of rodent abundance and the importance of pathogen sharing and circulation in multi-host- multi-pathogen communities. We also need to explore in more depth the roles of generalist and abundant species as the potential links between pathogen-sharing, co-infections and disease transmission.

  2. Immunological Mechanisms Mediating Hantavirus Persistence in Rodent Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Easterbrook, Judith D.; Klein, Sabra L.

    2008-01-01

    Hantaviruses, similar to several emerging zoonotic viruses, persistently infect their natural reservoir hosts, without causing overt signs of disease. Spillover to incidental human hosts results in morbidity and mortality mediated by excessive proinflammatory and cellular immune responses. The mechanisms mediating the persistence of hantaviruses and the absence of clinical symptoms in rodent reservoirs are only starting to be uncovered. Recent studies indicate that during hantavirus infection, proinflammatory and antiviral responses are reduced and regulatory responses are elevated at sites of increased virus replication in rodents. The recent discovery of structural and non-structural proteins that suppress type I interferon responses in humans suggests that immune responses in rodent hosts could be mediated directly by the virus. Alternatively, several host factors, including sex steroids, glucocorticoids, and genetic factors, are reported to alter host susceptibility and may contribute to persistence of hantaviruses in rodents. Humans and reservoir hosts differ in infection outcomes and in immune responses to hantavirus infection; thus, understanding the mechanisms mediating viral persistence and the absence of disease in rodents may provide insight into the prevention and treatment of disease in humans. Consideration of the coevolutionary mechanisms mediating hantaviral persistence and rodent host survival is providing insight into the mechanisms by which zoonotic viruses have remained in the environment for millions of years and continue to be transmitted to humans. PMID:19043585

  3. Ectoparasites of Rodents Captured in Hamedan, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zendehfili, Hamid; Zahirnia, Amir Hossein; Maghsood, Amir Hossein; Khanjani, Mohammad; Fallah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rodents with a population greater than the entire population of other mammals on earth are the source of economic losses and health conflicts. One of the major health problems with the rodents is their role as reservoir hosts of zoonotic diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the infestation of commensal rodents with ectoparasites in Hamedan City, Western Iran. Methods: The samples were collected by live traps during years 2012–2013. After transferring the samples to the Entomological Laboratory of Hamedan University of Medical Sciences, their ectoparasites were collected and identified. Results: A total of 171 slides were prepared from 105 captured commensal rodents: Mus musculus, Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus comprising three orders namely Mesostigmata: Hypoaspis (Laelaspis) astronomica, Dermanyssius sp, Pachylaelapidae (male). Metastigmata: Rhipicephalus sp and Anoplura: Polyplax spinulosa were recovered in Hamedan City. Seventy (66.6%) rodents were found infested with at least one species of ectoparasites. Conclusion: The results of our study indicate that ectoparasites infestation in commensal rodents of Hamedan city is high and more attention by local health authorities is needed to prevent zoonotic diseases. PMID:26623438

  4. Standardisation of 124SB and 152EU using software coincidence counting system.

    PubMed

    Havelka, Miroslav; Sochorová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Activities of the radionuclides (124)Sb and (152)Eu were determined by the efficiency extrapolation method applied to 4pi(PC)-gamma coincidence counting. The (124)Sb sources were prepared from a solution with the chemical form of 50 microg g(-1) SbCl(3) in 2 M HCl. To inhibit the volatility of antimony chlorides, the sources were slowly dried in a H(2)S atmosphere with relative humidity of 76% for about 48 h. This procedure increased the beta detection efficiency up to 0.98, which simplified the standardisation. In the (152)Eu standardisation, the optimal gamma-ray energy window setting to achieve a linear dependency and the correct slope of the extrapolation curve were derived by means of software coincidence counting system using offline evaluation of data with different coincidence parameter settings. The results obtained by the software coincidence counting system were compared with those obtained by the conventional coincidence method.

  5. Expression of ORAI1, a Plasma Membrane Resident Subunit of the CRAC Channel, in Rodent and Non-rodent Species

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Roberto; Valente, Eliane G.; Pretorius, Jim; Pacheco, Efrain; Qi, Meiying; Bennett, Brian D.; Fong, David H.; Lin, Fen-Fen; Bi, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    We determined the expression of ORAI1 protein in rodent and non-rodent tissues using a monoclonal antibody directed against an extracellular loop of the protein. Previous reports using antibodies directed at the C-terminus of ORAI1 have not detected central nervous system (CNS) expression. Our results demonstrate broad tissue expression that includes the CNS using a unique monoclonal antibody specific to an extracellular loop of ORAI1. In addition, we present in situ hybridization (ISH) results using a probe within the middle of the mouse coding region showing CNS expression of Orai1 RNA. We contrast the patterns of rodent and human tissue expression and conclude that rodents have similar expression of ORAI1 in most tissue types when compared to primates, with an important exception being the male reproductive system, where human-specific expression is observed. PMID:25249026

  6. Ecological and Control Techniques for Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) Associated with Rodent Reservoirs of Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-12

    found naturally in plant and animal tissues was highly effective for linking adult sand flies with their larval diet, without having to locate or capture...on rodent feces. Through the identification of rodent feces as a sand fly larval habitat, we now know that rodent baits containing insecticides that...rodents, and that the elimination of sand flies that feed on rodents can be achieved using baits containing an insecticide that circulates in the blood of

  7. Investigation of functional and morphological integrity of freshly isolated and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, A; Bode, D C; Pruss, J; Bilir, B; Smith, G D; Zeisloft, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a pressing need for alternative therapeutic methods effective in the treatment of patients with liver insufficiency. Isolated human hepatocytes may be a viable alternative or adjunct to orthotopic liver transplantation in such patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the viability and functional integrity of freshly isolated and cryopreserved human hepatocytes, in preparation for a multi-center human hepatocyte transplantation trial. We are currently processing transplant-grade human parenchymal liver cells from nondiseased human livers that are obtained through a network of organ procurement organizations (OPOs). Thus far, sixteen hepatocyte transplants have been performed using hepatocytes processed by our methods. At the time of referral all specimens were deemed unsuitable for transplantation due to anatomical anomalies, high fat content, medical history, etc. Hepatocytes were isolated from encapsulated liver sections by a modified two-step perfusion technique. Isolated cells were cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen for one to twelve months. The total yield of freshly isolated hepatocytes averaged 3.7x10(7) cells per gram of wet tissue. Based on trypan blue exclusion, fresh preparations contained an average of 85% viable hepatocytes vs. 70% in cryopreserved samples. The plating efficiencies of cells seeded immediately after isolation ranged from 87% to 98%, while those of cryopreserved/thawed cells were markedly lower. Flow cytometry analysis of cells labeled with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) showed that there was no significant difference in viability compared with trypan blue staining. Both freshly isolated hepatocytes and those recovered from cryopreservation showed typical and intact morphology as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. The product of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reaction was always expressed more intensely in cultures of freshly

  8. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs.

  9. A novel platform device for rodent echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Kutschka, Ingo; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Sista, Ramachandra; Hendry, Stephen L; Chun, Hyung J; Hoyt, Grant; Kutschka, Werner; Pelletier, Marc P; Quertermous, Tom; Wu, Joseph C; Robbins, Robert C

    2007-06-06

    Acquisition of echocardiographic data from rodents is subject to wide variability due to variations in technique. We hypothesize that a dedicated imaging platform can aid in standardization of technique and improve the quality of images obtained. We constructed a device consisting of a boom-mounted steel platform frame (25 x 35 x 3 cm) on which a transparent polyethylene membrane is mounted. The animal is placed onto the membrane and receives continual inhaled anesthesia via an integrated port. The membrane allows for probe positioning from beneath the animal to obtain standard echo-views in left lateral decubitus or prone positions. The frame can be set at any desired angle ranging from 0 to 360 degrees along either the long or short axis. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5) underwent echocardiography (General Electric, Vivid 7, 14 MHz) using the platform. The device allowed for optimal positioning of animals for a variety of standard echocardiographic measurements. Evaluations among all animals showed minimal variability between two different operators and time points. We tested the feasibility of the device for supporting the assessment of cardiac function in a disease model by evaluating a separate cohort of adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (n = 5) that underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Serial echocardiography demonstrated statistically significant decreases of fractional shortening and ejection fraction (p < 0.01) 240 days after surgery. Our novel imaging platform allowed for consistent collection of high-quality echocardiographic data from rats. Future studies will focus on improving this technology to allow for standardized high-throughput echocardiographic analysis in small animal models of disease.

  10. Identification of Novel Rosavirus Species That Infects Diverse Rodent Species and Causes Multisystemic Dissemination in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Chan, Brandon C. C.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    While novel picornaviruses are being discovered in rodents, their host range and pathogenicity are largely unknown. We identified two novel picornaviruses, rosavirus B from the street rat, Norway rat, and rosavirus C from five different wild rat species (chestnut spiny rat, greater bandicoot rat, Indochinese forest rat, roof rat and Coxing's white-bellied rat) in China. Analysis of 13 complete genome sequences showed that “Rosavirus B” and “Rosavirus C” represent two potentially novel picornavirus species infecting different rodents. Though being most closely related to rosavirus A, rosavirus B and C possessed distinct protease cleavage sites and variations in Yn-Xm-AUG sequence in 5’UTR and myristylation site in VP4. Anti-rosavirus B VP1 antibodies were detected in Norway rats, whereas anti-rosavirus C VP1 and neutralizing antibodies were detected in Indochinese forest rats and Coxing's white-bellied rats. While the highest prevalence was observed in Coxing's white-bellied rats by RT-PCR, the detection of rosavirus C from different rat species suggests potential interspecies transmission. Rosavirus C isolated from 3T3 cells causes multisystemic diseases in a mouse model, with high viral loads and positive viral antigen expression in organs of infected mice after oral or intracerebral inoculation. Histological examination revealed alveolar fluid exudation, interstitial infiltration, alveolar fluid exudate and wall thickening in lungs, and hepatocyte degeneration and lymphocytic/monocytic inflammatory infiltrates with giant cell formation in liver sections of sacrificed mice. Since rosavirus A2 has been detected in fecal samples of children, further studies should elucidate the pathogenicity and emergence potential of different rosaviruses. PMID:27737017

  11. External-beam radiotherapy as preparative regimen for hepatocyte transplantation after partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Koenig, Sarah; Krause, Petra; Hermann, Robert Michael; Rave-Frank, Margret; Proehl, Thomas; Becker, Heinz; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The transplantation of donor hepatocytes is considered a promising option to correct chronic liver failure through repopulation of the diseased organ. This study describes a novel selective external-beam irradiation technique as a preparative regimen for hepatocyte transplantation. Methods and Materials: Livers of dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-deficient rats were preconditioned with external-beam single-dose irradiation (25 Gy) delivered to two thirds of the liver. Four days later, a one-third partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed to resect the untreated liver section, and 15 million wild-type (DPPIV{sup +}) hepatocytes were transplanted via the spleen into the recipient livers. The degree of donor-cell integration and growth was studied 8 h, 3 days, and 5 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Results: Transplanted hepatocytes integrated rapidly into the irradiated liver and proliferated as clusters, finally repopulating the host liver to approximately 20% hepatocyte mass. After 12 weeks, donor cells and their numerous descendents were fully integrated and expressed functional markers to the same extent as host hepatocytes. Conclusions: We demonstrate that external-beam liver irradiation is sufficient to achieve partial repopulation of the host liver after hepatocyte transplantation, under the additional stimulus of one-third PH. The method described has potentially good prospects for its application in a clinically viable form of treatment.

  12. Cell therapy from bench to bedside: Hepatocytes from fibroblasts - the truth and myth of transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is an alternative to liver transplantation in certain disorders such as inherited liver diseases and liver failure. It is a relatively less complicated surgical procedure, and has the advantage that it can be repeated several times if unsuccessful. Another advantage is that hepatocytes can be isolated from partly damaged livers which are not suitable for liver transplantation. Despite these advantages hepatocyte transplantation is less popular. Important issues are poor engraftment of the transplanted cells and the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. Generation of “hepatocyte like cells”/iHeps from embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by directed differentiation is an emerging solution to the latter issue. Direct conversation or trans-differentiation of fibroblasts to “hepatocyte like cells” is another way which is, being explored. However this method has several inherent and technical disadvantages compared to the directed differentiation from ES or iPSC. There are several methods claiming to be “highly efficient” for generating “highly functional” “hepatocyte like cells”. Currently different groups are working independently and coming up with differentiation protocols and each group claiming an advantage for their protocol. Directed differentiation protocols need to be designed, compared, analyzed and tweaked systematically and logically than empirically. There is a need for a well-coordinated global initiative comparable to the Human Genome Project to achieve this goal in the near future. PMID:26074681

  13. Depression of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in rat hepatocyte culture by dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Mezey, E; Potter, J J; Diehl, A M

    1986-01-15

    Hepatocytes harvested from castrated rats retained a higher alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) activity than hepatocytes harvested from normal rats during 7 days of culture. Dihydrotestosterone (1 microM) decreased the enzyme activity, after 2 and 5 days of culture, in hepatocytes from castrated and control animals respectively. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the enzyme activity to similar values in both groups of hepatocytes by the end of 7 days of culture. Testosterone (1 microM) had no effect on the enzyme activity in normal hepatocytes and only a transitory effect in decreasing the enzyme activity in hepatocytes from castrated animals. The increases in alcohol dehydrogenase activity after castration and their suppression by dihydrotestosterone were associated with parallel changes in the rate of ethanol elimination. Additions of substrates of the malate-aspartate shuttle or dinitrophenol did not modify ethanol elimination. These observations indicate that dihydrotestosterone has a direct suppressant effect on hepatocyte alcohol dehydrogenase and that the enzyme activity is a major determinant of the rate of ethanol elimination.

  14. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in "humanized" mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer.

  15. Cell therapy from bench to bedside: Hepatocytes from fibroblasts - the truth and myth of transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-06-07

    Hepatocyte transplantation is an alternative to liver transplantation in certain disorders such as inherited liver diseases and liver failure. It is a relatively less complicated surgical procedure, and has the advantage that it can be repeated several times if unsuccessful. Another advantage is that hepatocytes can be isolated from partly damaged livers which are not suitable for liver transplantation. Despite these advantages hepatocyte transplantation is less popular. Important issues are poor engraftment of the transplanted cells and the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. Generation of "hepatocyte like cells"/iHeps from embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by directed differentiation is an emerging solution to the latter issue. Direct conversation or trans-differentiation of fibroblasts to "hepatocyte like cells" is another way which is, being explored. However this method has several inherent and technical disadvantages compared to the directed differentiation from ES or iPSC. There are several methods claiming to be "highly efficient" for generating "highly functional" "hepatocyte like cells". Currently different groups are working independently and coming up with differentiation protocols and each group claiming an advantage for their protocol. Directed differentiation protocols need to be designed, compared, analyzed and tweaked systematically and logically than empirically. There is a need for a well-coordinated global initiative comparable to the Human Genome Project to achieve this goal in the near future.

  16. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha controls the development of a hepatic epithelium and liver morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Fereshteh; Matullo, Christine; Garrison, Wendy D; Savatski, Laura; Adamson, John W; Ning, Gang; Kaestner, Klaus H; Rossi, Jennifer M; Zaret, Kenneth S; Duncan, Stephen A

    2003-07-01

    Although advances have been made in understanding cell differentiation, only rudimentary knowledge exists concerning how differentiated cells form tissues and organs. We studied liver organogenesis because the cell and tissue architecture of this organ is well defined. Approximately 60% of the adult liver consists of hepatocytes that are arranged as single-cell anastomosing plates extending from the portal region of the liver lobule toward the central vein. The basal surface of the hepatocytes is separated from adjacent sinusoidal endothelial cells by the space of Disse, where the exchange of substances between serum and hepatocytes takes place. The hepatocyte's apical surface forms bile canaliculi that transport bile to the hepatic ducts. Proper liver architecture is crucial for hepatic function and is commonly disrupted in disease states, including cirrhosis and hepatitis. Here we report that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (Hnf4alpha) is essential for morphological and functional differentiation of hepatocytes, accumulation of hepatic glycogen stores and generation of a hepatic epithelium. We show that Hnf4alpha is a dominant regulator of the epithelial phenotype because its ectopic expression in fibroblasts induces a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Most importantly, the morphogenetic parameters controlled by Hnf4alpha in hepatocytes are essential for normal liver architecture, including the organization of the sinusoidal endothelium.

  17. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced functions of three-dimensional hepatocyte aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy T.; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture of hepatocytes leads to improved and prolonged synthetic and metabolic functions, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In order to investigate the role of 3D cell-cell interactions in maintaining hepatocyte differentiated functions ex vivo, primary mouse hepatocytes were cultured either as monolayers on tissue culture dishes (TCD) or as 3D aggregates in rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors. Global gene expression analyses revealed that genes upregulated in 3D culture were distinct from those upregulated during liver development and liver regeneration. Instead, they represented a diverse array of hepatocyte-specific functional genes with significant over-representation of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (Hnf4a) binding sites in their promoters. Expression of Hnf4a and many of its downstream target genes were significantly increased in RWV cultures as compared to TCD. Conversely, there was concomitant suppression of mesenchymal and cytoskeletal genes in RWV cultures that were induced in TCDs. These findings illustrate the importance of 3D cell-cell interactions in maintaining fundamental molecular pathways of hepatocyte function and serve as a basis for rational design of biomaterials that aim to optimize hepatocyte functions ex vivo for biomedical applications. PMID:24332390

  18. Bile acids initiate cholestatic liver injury by triggering a hepatocyte-specific inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonglin; Soroka, Carol J.; Wang, Juxian; Mennone, Albert; Wang, Yucheng; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Jain, Dhanpat; Boyer, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms of bile acid–induced (BA-induced) liver injury in cholestasis are controversial, limiting development of new therapies. We examined how BAs initiate liver injury using isolated liver cells from humans and mice and in-vivo mouse models. At pathophysiologic concentrations, BAs induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in mouse and human hepatocytes, but not in nonparenchymal cells or cholangiocytes. These hepatocyte-specific cytokines stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis. Inflammatory injury was mitigated in Ccl2–/– mice treated with BA or after bile duct ligation, where less hepatic infiltration of neutrophils was detected. Neutrophils in periportal areas of livers from cholestatic patients also correlated with elevations in their serum aminotransferases. This liver-specific inflammatory response required BA entry into hepatocytes via basolateral transporter Ntcp. Pathophysiologic levels of BAs induced markers of ER stress and mitochondrial damage in mouse hepatocytes. Chemokine induction by BAs was reduced in hepatocytes from Tlr9–/– mice, while liver injury was diminished both in conventional and hepatocyte-specific Tlr9–/– mice, confirming a role for Tlr9 in BA-induced liver injury. These findings reveal potentially novel mechanisms whereby BAs elicit a hepatocyte-specific cytokine-induced inflammatory liver injury that involves innate immunity and point to likely novel pathways for treating cholestatic liver disease. PMID:28289714

  19. Progenitor cell expansion and impaired hepatocyte regeneration in explanted livers from alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubuquoy, Laurent; Louvet, Alexandre; Lassailly, Guillaume; Truant, Stéphanie; Boleslawski, Emmanuel; Artru, Florent; Maggiotto, François; Gantier, Emilie; Buob, David; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Cannesson, Amélie; Dharancy, Sébastien; Moreno, Christophe; Pruvot, François-René; Bataller, Ramon; Mathurin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective In alcoholic hepatitis (AH), development of targeted therapies is crucial and requires improved knowledge of cellular and molecular drivers in liver dysfunction. The unique opportunity of using explanted livers from patients with AH having undergone salvage liver transplantation allowed to perform more in-depth molecular translational studies. Design We studied liver explants from patients with AH submitted to salvage transplantation (n=16), from patients with alcoholic cirrhosis without AH (n=12) and fragments of normal livers (n=16). Hepatic cytokine content was quantified. Hepatocyte function and proliferation and the presence of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blot or quantitative PCR. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Results Livers from patients with AH showed decreased cytokine levels involved in liver regeneration (tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin-6), as well as a virtual absence of markers of hepatocyte proliferation compared with alcoholic cirrhosis and normal livers. Electron microscopy revealed obvious mitochondrial abnormalities in AH hepatocytes. Importantly, livers from patients with AH showed substantial accumulation of HPCs that, unexpectedly, differentiate only into biliary cells. AH livers predominantly express laminin (extracellular matrix protein favouring cholangiocyte differentiation); consequently, HPC expansion is inefficient at yielding mature hepatocytes. Conclusions AH not responding to medical therapy is associated with lack of expression of cytokines involved in liver regeneration and profound mitochondrial damage along with lack of proliferative hepatocytes. Expansion of HPCs is inefficient to yield mature hepatocytes. Manoeuvres aimed at promoting differentiation of HPCs into mature hepatocytes should be tested in AH. PMID:25731872

  20. Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Hepatocyte Transplantation: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charlotte A; Dhawan, Anil; Smith, Richard A; Mitry, Ragai R; Fitzpatrick, Emer

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) is emerging as a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with certain liver-based metabolic disease and acute liver failure. Hepatocytes are generally infused into the portal venous system, from which they migrate into the liver cell plates of the native organ. One of the major hurdles to the sustained success of this therapy is early cell loss, with up to 70% of hepatocytes lost immediately following infusion. This is largely thought to be due to the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), resulting in the activation of complement and coagulation pathways. Transplanted hepatocytes produce and release tissue factor (TF), which activates the coagulation pathway, leading to the formation of thrombin and fibrin clots. Thrombin can further activate a number of complement proteins, leading to the activation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and subsequent hepatocyte cell death. Inflammatory cells including granulocytes, monocytes, Kupffer cells, and natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to cluster around transplanted hepatocytes, leading to their rapid clearance shortly after transplantation. Current research aims to improve cell engraftment and prevent early cell loss. This has been proven successful in vitro using pharmacological interventions such as melagatran, low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Effective inhibition of IBMIR would significantly improve hepatocyte engraftment, proliferation, and function, providing successful treatment for patients with liver-based metabolic diseases.

  1. U. v. -enhanced reactivation of u. v. -irradiated herpes virus by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, J.; Yager, J.D. )

    1984-04-01

    Carcinogen treatment of cultured mammalian cells prior to infection with u.v.-irradiated virus results in enhanced virus survival and mutagenesis suggesting the induction of SOS-type processes. The development of a primary rat hepatocyte culture system is reported to investigate cellular responses to DNA damage which may be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis in vivo. Enhanced reactivation of u.v.-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) occurred in hepatocytes irradiated with u.v. Cultured hepatocytes were pretreated with u.v. at the time of enhanced DNA synthesis. These treatments caused an inhibition followed by a recovery of DNA synthesis. At various times after pretreatment, the hepatocytes were infected with control or u.v.-irradiated HSV-1 at low multiplicity, and virus survival was measured. U.v.-irradiated HSV-1 exhibited the expected two-component survival curve in control or u.v. pretreated hepatocytes. The magnitude of enhanced reactivation of HSV-1 was dependent on the u.v. dose to the hepatocytes, the time of infection following u.v. pretreatment, and the level of DNA synthesis at the time of pretreatment. These results suggest that u.v. treatment of rat hepatocytes causes the induction of SOS-type functions tht may have a role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  2. Circadian Rhythms of PER2::LUC in Individual Primary Mouse Hepatocytes and Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Penny C.; Yu, Jimmy K.; Li, Alexander S.; Leise, Tanya L.; Harrington, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. Results In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2−/− Per2Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. Conclusions Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals. PMID:24498336

  3. CYP2E1-dependent hepatotoxicity and oxidative damage after ethanol administration in human primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lie-Gang; Yan, Hong; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Wen; Zou, Li-Jun; Song, Fang-Fang; Li, Ke; Sun, Xiu-Fa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity, in order to address if inhibition of CYP2E1 could attenuate ethanol-induced cellular damage. METHODS: The dose-dependent (25-100 mmol/L) and time-dependent (0-24 h) exposures of primary human cultured hepatocytes to ethanol were carried out. CYP2E1 activity and protein expression were detected by spectrophotometer and Western blot analysis respectively. Hepatotoxicity was investigated by determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) level in hepatocyte culture supernatants, as well as the intracellular formation of malondialdehyde (MDA). RESULTS: A dose-and time-dependent response between ethanol exposure and CYP2E1 activity in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Moreover, there was a time-dependent increase of CYP2E1 protein after 100 mmol/L ethanol exposure. Meanwhile, ethanol exposure of hepatocytes caused a time-dependent increase of cellular MDA level, LDH, and AST activities in supernatants. Furthermore, the inhibitor of CYP2E1, diallyl sulfide (DAS) could partly attenuate the increases of MDA, LDH, and AST in human hepatocytes. CONCLUSION: A positive relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and CYP2E1 activity was exhibited, and the inhibition of CYP2E1 could partly attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative damage. PMID:16052683

  4. Determination of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Lipogenesis in Mouse Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Akie, Thomas E; Cooper, Marcus P

    2015-08-27

    Lipid metabolism in liver is complex. In addition to importing and exporting lipid via lipoproteins, hepatocytes can oxidize lipid via fatty acid oxidation, or alternatively, synthesize new lipid via de novo lipogenesis. The net sum of these pathways is dictated by a number of factors, which in certain disease states leads to fatty liver disease. Excess hepatic lipid accumulation is associated with whole body insulin resistance and coronary heart disease. Tools to study lipid metabolism in hepatocytes are useful to understand the role of hepatic lipid metabolism in certain metabolic disorders. In the liver, hepatocytes regulate the breakdown and synthesis of fatty acids via β-fatty oxidation and de novo lipogenesis, respectively. Quantifying metabolism in these pathways provides insight into hepatic lipid handling. Unlike in vitro quantification, using primary hepatocytes, making measurements in vivo is technically challenging and resource intensive. Hence, quantifying β-fatty acid oxidation and de novo lipogenesis in cultured mouse hepatocytes provides a straight forward method to assess hepatocyte lipid handling. Here we describe a method for the isolation of primary mouse hepatocytes, and we demonstrate quantification of β-fatty acid oxidation and de novo lipogenesis, using radiolabeled substrates.

  5. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  6. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  7. Serovars of Leptospira isolated from dogs and rodents.

    PubMed

    Suepaul, S M; Carrington, C V F; Campbell, M; Borde, G; Adesiyun, A A

    2010-07-01

    We determined the frequency of isolation of Leptospira from dogs and rodents, the serovars of Leptospira, and the clinical, gross and histological manifestations in dogs with leptospirosis in Trinidad. From dogs, samples of urine, blood and kidney were collected while only kidney and blood samples of trapped rodents were used. Isolates were cultured and serotyped using a panel of 23 international serovars and monoclonal antibodies. The risk factors for leptospirosis were also determined in owned dogs using a standard questionnaire. Of a total of 468 animals investigated for Leptospira, 70 (15.0%) were positive, comprising nine (18.0%) of 50 suspected canine leptospirosis cases, seven (3.4%) of 207 stray dogs and 54 (25.6%) of 211 rodents. The observation that rodents have a statistically (P<0.05, chi2) higher frequency of isolation emphasizes the importance of rodents as reservoirs of leptospirosis in the country. Copenhageni was the predominant serovar found in 100.0% (7/7), 33.3% (2/6) and 68.5% (37/54) of isolates from suspected canine leptospirosis cases, stray dogs and rodents, respectively. Serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola, the two serovars present in the commercial vaccines used locally, were detected in one (1.5%) and zero (0.0%) isolates respectively of the 67 tested. Data provided suggest that the apparent vaccine failure may be a consequence of the fact that the predominant serovar (Copenhageni) detected in sick, apparently healthy dogs and in rodents is not contained in the vaccines used locally to protect dogs against canine leptospirosis.

  8. A Maximum NEC Criterion for Compton Collimation to Accurately Identify True Coincidences in PET

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new method to increase the accuracy of identifying true coincidence events for positron emission tomography (PET). This approach requires 3-D detectors with the ability to position each photon interaction in multi-interaction photon events. When multiple interactions occur in the detector, the incident direction of the photon can be estimated using the Compton scatter kinematics (Compton Collimation). If the difference between the estimated incident direction of the photon relative to a second, coincident photon lies within a certain angular range around colinearity, the line of response between the two photons is identified as a true coincidence and used for image reconstruction. We present an algorithm for choosing the incident photon direction window threshold that maximizes the noise equivalent counts of the PET system. For simulated data, the direction window removed 56%–67% of random coincidences while retaining > 94% of true coincidences from image reconstruction as well as accurately extracted 70% of true coincidences from multiple coincidences. PMID:21317079

  9. A multievent study of the coincidence of heliospheric current sheet and stream interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Liu, Yong C.-M.; Qi, Zhaohui; Klecker, Berndt; Marghitu, Octav; Galvin, Antoinette B.; Farrugia, Charles J.; Li, Xiaoyu

    2016-11-01

    Generally, the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is separated from the stream interface (SI) at about 1 AU. A recent study found an event where the HCS coincides with the SI, and in which the HCS is separated from the true sector boundary (TSB), defined by the switch of suprathermal electron pitch angle distributions. We present a multievent study by using STEREO, ACE, and Wind data during 2007 to 2010 to investigate whether other classes of such coincidence cases exist, as well as their stability. We find coincidence cases related to ideal HCSs, separated TSB and HCS, or heat flux dropouts in the vicinity; therefore, we define them as types I, II, and III. Among the nine coincidence cases, there are seven type I, one type II, and one type III. For each type, a possible schematic origin is presented. We also compared the observations on different spacecraft. Only two out of nine cases are observed by several spacecraft with a large separation, indicating that the coincidence structures are usually unstable. The study also shows that the coincidence cases have a variable connection with pseudostreamers. Interchange reconnection and pseudostreamers could play a role in forming these coincidence cases and lead to different configurations in different situations.

  10. Effects of Aronia melanocarpa Fruit Juice on Isolated Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Valcheva-Kuzmanova, Stefka; Markova, Tsvetelina; Mitcheva, Mitka; Belcheva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aronia melanocarpa (Michx.) Elliot fruits are very rich in polyphenols – procyanidins, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Objective: On rat hepatocytes, isolated by two-stepped collagenase perfusion, we investigated the effect of A. melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) in two models of liver toxicity caused by (i) metabolic bioactivation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and (ii) tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH)-induced oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Isolated rat hepatocytes are a suitable model for hepatotoxicity studies. We determined the main parameters of the functional and metabolic status of rat hepatocytes: Cell viability (measured by trypan blue exclusion) and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). These parameters were used to investigate the protective effects of AMFJ in the two toxicity models. The effects of AMFJ were compared with those of silymarin. The cells were treated either with AMFJ or silymarin at increasing concentrations of 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, 30 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, and 100 μg/ml which were used for measuring of IC50. Results: In both toxicity models – CCl4 and t-BuOOH, AMFJ showed statistically significant cytoprotective and antioxidant activities. AMFJ prevented the loss of cell viability and GSH depletion, decreased LDH leakage and MDA production. The effects of AMFJ at the concentrations of 5, 10, 30, and 50 μg/ml were similar to those of the same concentrations of silymarin, while the effect of the highest AMFJ concentration of 100 μg/ml was higher than that of the same silymarin concentration. The effects were concentration-dependent and more prominent in the t-BuOOH model, compared to those in the CCl4 model. Conclusion: The cytoprotective and antioxidant effects of AMFJ established in this study might be due to its polyphenolic ingredients, which could influence the cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of the experimental hepatotoxic substances (CCl4 and t

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hemodialysis: physiopathology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Libetta, Carmelo; Esposito, Pasquale; Martinelli, Claudia; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Gregorini, Marilena; Rampino, Teresa; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine which exerts a variety of effects on several cells, being involved in the regulation of many biological processes, such as inflammation, tissue repair, morphogenesis, angiogenesis, tumour propagation, immunomodulation of viral infections and cardio-metabolic activities. Patients undergoing regular hemodialysis (HD) present elevated levels of HGF, mainly due to the leukocyte activation associated with HD treatment. High HGF levels might account for specific clinical features of HD patients, i.e. mild liver damage in course of HCV-infection and high cardiovascular risk profile. Moreover, in patients with acute kidney injury, the induction of HGF may represent a crucial step to promote renal recovery, which can have important prognostic consequences in the short and long-term. In this review we discuss the mechanisms underlying HGF production in HD patients, the role of HGF in this particular patient population and the potential clinical implications derived from the study of HGF in HD patients.

  12. Spontaneous hepatic repopulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant human α1-antitrypsin by wild-type donor hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jianqiang; Yannam, Govardhana R; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Hidvegi, Tunda; Basma, Hesham; Rennard, Stephen I; Wong, Ronald J; Avsar, Yesim; Guha, Chandan; Perlmutter, David H; Fox, Ira J; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2011-05-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited condition that causes liver disease and emphysema. The normal function of this protein, which is synthesized by the liver, is to inhibit neutrophil elastase, a protease that degrades connective tissue of the lung. In the classical form of the disease, inefficient secretion of a mutant α1-antitrypsin protein (AAT-Z) results in its accumulation within hepatocytes and reduced protease inhibitor activity, resulting in liver injury and pulmonary emphysema. Because mutant protein accumulation increases hepatocyte cell stress, we investigated whether transplanted hepatocytes expressing wild-type AAT might have a competitive advantage relative to AAT-Z-expressing hepatocytes, using transgenic mice expressing human AAT-Z. Wild-type donor hepatocytes replaced 20%-98% of mutant host hepatocytes, and repopulation was accelerated by injection of an adenovector expressing hepatocyte growth factor. Spontaneous hepatic repopulation with engrafted hepatocytes occurred in the AAT-Z-expressing mice even in the absence of severe liver injury. Donor cells replaced both globule-containing and globule-devoid cells, indicating that both types of host hepatocytes display impaired proliferation relative to wild-type hepatocytes. These results suggest that wild-type hepatocyte transplantation may be therapeutic for AAT-Z liver disease and may provide an alternative to protein replacement for treating emphysema in AAT-ZZ individuals.

  13. Binding kinetics of monomeric and aggregated IgG to Kupffer cells and hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    The binding kinetics of human monomeric IgG and stable heat-aggregated IgG (A-IgG) to Fc receptors of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells isolated from mice was studied. After injection of radiolabelled proteins the 60-70% of hepatic uptake was recovered in parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). In experiments in vitro the A-IgG bound in larger amounts to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells than monomeric IgG. The association rate constants of aggregates were somewhat higher for Kupffer cells than for hepatocytes whereas the percentage uptake of aggregates by Kupffer cells was only 5-15% of that of hepatocytes. The equilibrium constants of aggregates binding to both cells amounted to 0.4-1 X 10(8) M-1 for A-IgG compared with an equilibrium constant for monomeric IgG of 1-2 X 10(7)M-1. The maximum number of IgG and A-IgG molecules bound per cell was higher on hepatocytes (mean 14 X 10(6)) than on Kupffer cells (mean 2 X 10(5)) which is in agreement with the higher binding capacity of hepatocytes for these proteins observed in vivo and in vitro experiments. The ability to compete for receptor binding seemed to reside exclusively in the Fc portion of IgG since F(ab')2 fragments of IgG failed to inhibit labelled monomeric IgG or A-IgG. The receptor seems to be specific for IgG since unlabelled monomeric IgA demonstrated no binding inhibition of labelled IgG or A-IgG on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The overall results further suggest that hepatocytes might through Fc receptors play a collaborative role with the mononuclear phagocytic system in the clearance of circulating immune complexes. PMID:6237982

  14. Expression of liver alpha-amylase in obese mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Afsartala, Zohreh; Savabkar, Sanaz; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Tanha, Shima; Bijangi, Khosro; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the relation between the expression of liver alpha-amylase and obesity. Background: Alpha-amylase catalyses the hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-glucosidic linkages in polysaccharides and has three main subtypes, including: salivary, pancreatic, and hepatic. Hepatic alpha-amylase is involved in glycogen metabolism, and has a role in obesity and its management. In this study, we aimed to analyze the expression of liver alpha-amylase in overweight and obese mouse. Material and methods: In this study, NMRI male mice were randomly divided into two groups. The sample group (obese) took a high-fat and carbohydrate diet, while the control group (normal) took a laboratory pellet chow for eight weeks. During this period, their weight was measured. After eight weeks, liver hepatocytes were isolated using an enzymatic digestion method. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and flow cytometry analysis were performed to measure alpha amylase protein expression in mouse liver hepatocyte cells. Results: A significant difference in the body weight was observed between the two groups (p<0.05). The qualitative protein expression of liver alpha-amylase was found to be higher in the obese group in both tests (immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry). Animals from the test group presented higher alpha-amylase expression, which suggests that this hepatic protein may constitute a potential indicator of susceptibility for fat tissue accumulation and obesity. The present data demonstrates an increased expression of liver amylase in obese mice. Conclusion: These results suggest that liver amylase secretion might be useful for predicting susceptibility to obesity induced by consumption of a high-fat and carbohydrate diet. PMID:27895853

  15. Interaction of propionate and carnitine metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Brass, E.P.; Beyerinck, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Propionate (P) and its metabolic products P-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA can disrupt normal hepatic metabolism. Carnitine (Cn) has been shown to partially restore cellular function in the presence of P. This effect of Cn may result from removal of propionyl groups as propionylcarnitine (P-Cn). The present study examined the kinetics of P-Cn formation in rat hepatocytes, and the consequence of P-Cn formation on P and Cn metabolism. /sup 14/C-P was converted to CO/sub 2/, glucose and P-Cn in the hepatocyte system. Increasing concentrations of Cn up to 10.0 mM increased P-Cn formation from P without affecting CO/sub 2/ or glucose formation. Thus, 10.0 mM Cn increased total P metabolism by 40%. Metabolism of P was associated with a decrease in Cn concentration and an increase in short chain acylcarnitines (SCCn). In the absence of added Cn, 60 min incubation with P decreased Cn from 6.8 to 2.5 ..mu..M with a corresponding increase in SCCn. This effect of P to deplete free Cn was not seen to the same degree with butyrate in place of P. Similar increases in the formation of SCCn in the presence of P at the expense of free Cn were seen when the incubation Cn concentration was increased to 50 ..mu..M or 150 ..mu..M. HPLC methodologies to study specific acylcarnitines demonstrated the accumulation of large amounts of P-Cn in the incubations containing P, accounting for the depletion of free Cn.

  16. Role of apoptotic hepatocytes in HCV dissemination: regulation by acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Murali; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhang, Jinjin; Mott, Justin L; Poluektova, Larisa I; McVicker, Benita L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Osna, Natalia A

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis and promotes disease progression, although the mechanisms are not quite clear. We have previously observed that acetaldehyde (Ach) continuously produced by the acetaldehyde-generating system (AGS), temporarily enhanced HCV RNA levels, followed by a decrease to normal or lower levels, which corresponded to apoptosis induction. Here, we studied whether Ach-induced apoptosis caused depletion of HCV-infected cells and what role apoptotic bodies (AB) play in HCV-alcohol crosstalk. In liver cells exposed to AGS, we observed the induction of miR-122 and miR-34a. As miR-34a has been associated with apoptotic signaling and miR-122 with HCV replication, these findings may suggest that cells with intensive viral replication undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, when AGS-induced apoptosis was blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor, the expression of HCV RNA was not changed. AB from HCV-infected cells contained HCV core protein and the assembled HCV particle that infect intact hepatocytes, thereby promoting the spread of infection. In addition, AB are captured by macrophages to switch their cytokine profile to the proinflammatory one. Macrophages exposed to HCV(+) AB expressed more IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with those exposed to HCV(-) AB. The generation of AB from AGS-treated HCV-infected cells even enhanced the induction of aforementioned cytokines. We conclude that HCV and alcohol metabolites trigger the formation of AB containing HCV particles. The consequent spread of HCV to neighboring hepatocytes via infected AB, as well as the induction of liver inflammation by AB-mediated macrophage activation potentially exacerbate the HCV infection course by alcohol and worsen disease progression.

  17. Application of length vernier in phase coincidence detection and precision frequency measurement.

    PubMed

    Miao, Miao; Wei, Zhou; Bin, Wang

    2012-02-01

    For comparison of arbitrary frequency signals, the paper proposed two levels of length vernier based on the time-space relationship are used in three levels of phase coincidence detecting circuits to extract the phase coincidence information by proper logic calculation. The length∕phase of each vernier is respectively corresponding to the accuracy and the resolution of detecting circuit. The time-space relationship is based on high-stability, high-accuracy, and high-speed of signal transmission. The method is effective to reduce the fuzzy region in the phase coincidence information and reach a higher measuring precision.

  18. Role of Nuclear Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Regulation of Hepatocyte Proliferation and Hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, Y A; Pustylnyak, Y A; Pustylnyak, V O

    2016-04-01

    Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in hepatocytes occurs as a body adaptation in response to a number of external influences, and its functional activity is primarily related to induction of enzymes detoxifying xenobiotics. However, special attention was recently given to CAR due to the fact that its key role becomes unveiled in various physiological and pathophysiological processes occurring in the liver: gluconeogenesis, metabolism of fatty acids and bilirubin, hormonal regulation, proliferation of hepatocytes, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Here we review the main pathways and mechanisms that elevate hepatocyte proliferative activity related to CAR and whose disturbance may be a pivotal factor in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  19. Treatment of surgically induced acute liver failure with transplantation of highly differentiated immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Miyazaki, M; Fukaya, K; Inoue, Y; Sakaguchi, M; Noguchi, H; Matsumura, T; Watanabe, T; Totsugawa, T; Tanaka, N; Namba, M

    2000-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source of hepatic function in bioartficial liver (BAL), but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, primary human fetal hepatocytes were immortalized using simian virus 40 large T antigen. One of the immortal cell lines, OUMS-29, showed highly differentiated liver functions. Intrasplenic transplantation of OUMS-29 cells protected 90% hepatectomized rats from hyperammonemia and significantly prolonged their survival. Essentially unlimited availability of OUMS-29 cells supports their clinical use for BAL treatment.

  20. Nanofabricated Collagen-Inspired Synthetic Elastomers for Primary Rat Hepatocyte Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Kulig, Katherine M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic substrates that mimic the properties of extracellular matrix proteins hold significant promise for use in systems designed for tissue engineering applications. In this report, we designed a synthetic polymeric substrate that is intended to mimic chemical, mechanical, and topological characteristics of collagen. We found that elastomeric poly(ester amide) substrates modified with replica-molded nanotopographic features enhanced initial attachment, spreading, and adhesion of primary rat hepatocytes. Further, hepatocytes cultured on nanotopographic substrates also demonstrated reduced albumin secretion and urea synthesis, which is indicative of strongly adherent hepatocytes. These results suggest that these engineered substrates can function as synthetic collagen analogs for in vitro cell culture. PMID:18847357

  1. Development of scaffold architectures and heterotypic cell systems for hepatocyte transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzebdeh, Dalia Abdelrahim

    In vitro assembly of functional liver tissue is needed to enable the transplantation of tissue-engineered livers. In addition, there is an increasing demand for in vitro models that replicate complex events occurring in the liver. However, tissue engineering of sizable implantable liver systems is currently limited by the difficulty of assembling three dimensional hepatocyte cultures of a useful size, while maintaining full cell viability, an issue which is closely related to the high metabolic rate of hepatocytes. In this study, we first compared two designs of highly porous chitosan-heparin scaffolds seeded with hepatocytes in dynamic perfusion bioreactor systems. The aim was to promote cell seeding efficiency by effectively entrapping 100 million hepatocytes at high density. We found that scaffolds with radially tapering pore architecture had highly efficient cell entrapment that maximized donor hepatocyte utilization, compared to alternate pore structures. Hepatocytes showed higher seeding efficiency and metabolic function when seeded as single cell suspensions as opposed to pre-formed, 100microm aggregates. Seeding efficiency was found to increase with flow rate, with single cell and aggregate suspension exhibiting different optimal flow rates. However, metabolic performance results indicated significant shear damage to cells at high efficiency flow rates. To better maintain hepatocyte basement membrane and cell polarity, spheroid co-cultures with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were investigated. Hepatocytes and MSCs were seeded in three different architectures in an effort to optimize the spatial arrangement of the two cell types. MSC co-culture greatly enhanced hepatocyte metabolic function in agitated cultures. Interestingly, the effects of diffusion limitations in spheroid culture, coupled with shear damage and subsequent removal of outer hepatocyte layers produced a defined oscillation of urea production rates in certain co-culture arrangements. A

  2. In vitro drug metabolism of green tea catechins in human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy W; Qin, Geng-Yao; Zhang, Ting; Feng, Wan-Yong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic fate of green tea catechins [(-)-epicatechin ((-)-EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) (-)- epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)] in cryopreserved human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes was studied. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation and isomerization pathways of (-)-EC in all five species were found. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, hydrolysis, isomerization and glucosidation pathways of ECG were found. Species differences in metabolism of (-)-EC or ECG were observed. Surprisingly, no metabolites of EGC or EGCG were detected, but chemical oxidation and polymerization were observed under these experimental conditions. It appeared that enzymatic reactions and chemical reactions were differentiated by an additional hydroxyl group on the B-ring between (-)-EC/ECG and EGC/EGCG. For (-)-EC, thirty-five metabolites including isomerized (M6. M10 and M25), glucuronidated (M3, M5 and M11), sulfated (M7, M15, M16, M18, M20, M23, M26), methylated (M2, M9, M12, M17, M19, M21, M27, M30, M32), glucuronated/methylated (M4, M8, M13, M14), sulfated/methylated (M22, M24, M28, M29, M31, M33, M34, M35) and diglucuronidate (M1), were detected and characterized. M11, M18, M19 and M23 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M10, M20, M22, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M5, M6 and M10 were major metabolites in rat hepatocytes; and M5, M6 and M13 were major metabolites in mouse hepatocytes. For ECG, twelve metabolites including isomerized (M1), hydrolyzed (M3), glucosidated (M2), glucuronidated (M4 and M6), sulfated (M9, M11 and M12), methylated (M7), sulfated/glucuronidated/methylated (M8 and M10) and diglucuronidated (M5), were detected and characterized. M4, M11 and M12 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11 and M12 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M3 and M11 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M4, M6 and

  3. Hypergravity Effects on Rodent Pregnancy and Parturition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Mills, N. A.; Wade, C. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    No mammal has yet undergone birth, or parturition, in the microgravity of space. Previous studies (Ronco & Alberts, 2000) have shown that mid-pregnant rat dams exposed to spaceflight (0-g) and landed 48-72 hrs before term successfully delivered robust, healthy offspring Microgravity-exposed dams exhibited twice the expected numbers of labor contractions whereas length of pregnancy, duration of labor, fetal wastage, number of neonates born and litter gender ratios were identical to controls. In the present study, we report the results of rodent pregnancy and parturition at the opposite end of the gravity spectrum, in hypergravity. Dams exposed to either: 1.0-g, 1.5-g, 1.75-g or 2.0-g from Gestational day (G) 11 and throughout the births of their litters had comparable pregnancy and labor durations, fetal wastage, numbers of neonates born and litter Tender ratios. During parturition, hypergravity-exposed dams exhibited significantly fewer labor contractions as compared to 1.0-g controls. Dams that underwent birth in hypergravity had significantly fewer offspring surviving the immediate postpartum period (P1: 1.0-g, 11.92 +/- 2.84; 1.5-g, 10.88 +/- 2.17; 1.75-g, 9.22 +/-1.99; 2.0-g, 8.83 +/- 3.31). Within 24 hrs postpartum, neonatal survival was further diminished in hypergravity [P2: 100% (1.0-g); 96% (1.5-g); 96% (1.75-g); 73% (2.0-g)] and continued to decline (P10: 100%(1.0-g.); 90%(1.5-g); 87%(1.75-g), 40%(2.0-g)]. Neonatal losses stabilized by P5 for the 1.5-g andl.75-g conditions but continued until P9 for the 2.0-g condition. Together, these findings show that postnatal, but not prenatal, survival is compromised following birth in hypergravity, Maternal and neonatal factors that contribute to peri-parturitional vulnerability to altered gravity environments will be discussed.

  4. Comparison of satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a in a temperate reservoir using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense coincident surface observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed 10 established and 4 new satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in a temperate reservoir in southwest Ohio using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense water truth collected within one hour of image acquisition to develop si...

  5. Preincubation of rat and human hepatocytes with cytoprotectants prior to cryopreservation can improve viability and function upon thawing.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Lehec, Sharon C; Hughes, Robin D

    2005-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human hepatocytes is important for the treatment of liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation and also for the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model of the liver. One factor in the success of cryopreservation is the quality of cells before freezing. Preincubation of hepatocytes with cytoprotective compounds to allow recovery from the isolation process prior to cryopreservation, such as those that will boost cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content or antioxidants, may improve the viability and function of cells upon thawing. Rat hepatocytes were used to investigate the effects of preincubation with 10 compounds: precursors (glucose, fructose, glutathione, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine), antioxidants (ascorbic acid and alpha-lipoic acid), and compounds with multiple effects (N-acetylcysteine, pentoxifylline, prostaglandin E(1), and tauroursodeoxycholic acid). Human hepatocytes were then used to investigate 5 of the original 10 compounds (glucose, fructose, alpha-lipoic acid, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and pentoxifylline). Glucose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the viability and reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage of human hepatocytes. Fructose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the attachment efficiency of human hepatocytes. alpha-lipoic acid preincubation (0.5-5 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of both rat and human hepatocytes. At a concentration of 2.5 mM alpha-lipoic acid also improved the albumin production of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, preincubation of hepatocytes prior to cryopreservation can improve the viability and function of thawed cells and may provide a method of obtaining better-quality cryopreserved hepatocytes for transplantation.

  6. Global parasite and Rattus rodent invasions: The consequences for rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Morand, Serge; Bordes, Frédéric; Chen, Hsuan-Wien; Claude, Julien; Cosson, Jean-François; Galan, Maxime; Czirják, Gábor Á; Greenwood, Alex D; Latinne, Alice; Michaux, Johan; Ribas, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    We summarize the current knowledge on parasitism-related invasion processes of the globally invasive Rattus lineages, originating from Asia, and how these invasions have impacted the local epidemiology of rodent-borne diseases. Parasites play an important role in the invasion processes and successes of their hosts through multiple biological mechanisms such as "parasite release," "immunocompetence advantage," "biotic resistance" and "novel weapon." Parasites may also greatly increase the impact of invasions by spillover of parasites and other pathogens, introduced with invasive hosts, into new hosts, potentially leading to novel emerging diseases. Another potential impact is the ability of the invader to amplify local parasites by spillback. In both cases, local fauna and humans may be exposed to new health risks, which may decrease biodiversity and potentially cause increases in human morbidity and mortality. Here we review the current knowledge on these processes and propose some research priorities.

  7. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  8. Fibroblasts From Long-Lived Rodent Species Exclude Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Dostál, Lubomír; Kohler, William M.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Miller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the lethal effects of cellular stressors, including the toxic heavy metal cadmium (Cd), is characteristic of fibroblast cell lines derived from long-lived bird and rodent species, as well as cell lines from several varieties of long-lived mutant mice. To explore the mechanism of resistance to Cd, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy to measure the rate of Cd uptake into primary fibroblasts of 15 rodent species. These data indicate that fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have slower rates of Cd uptake from the extracellular medium than those from short-lived species. In addition, fibroblasts from short-lived species export more zinc after exposure to extracellular Cd than cells from long-lived species. Lastly, fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have lower baseline concentrations of two redox-active metals, iron and copper. Our results suggest that evolution of longevity among rodents required adjustment of cellular properties to alter metal homeostasis and to reduce the toxic effects of heavy metals that accumulate over the course of a longer life span. PMID:24522391

  9. Fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species exclude cadmium.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Lubomír; Kohler, William M; Penner-Hahn, James E; Miller, Richard A; Fierke, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the lethal effects of cellular stressors, including the toxic heavy metal cadmium (Cd), is characteristic of fibroblast cell lines derived from long-lived bird and rodent species, as well as cell lines from several varieties of long-lived mutant mice. To explore the mechanism of resistance to Cd, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy to measure the rate of Cd uptake into primary fibroblasts of 15 rodent species. These data indicate that fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have slower rates of Cd uptake from the extracellular medium than those from short-lived species. In addition, fibroblasts from short-lived species export more zinc after exposure to extracellular Cd than cells from long-lived species. Lastly, fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have lower baseline concentrations of two redox-active metals, iron and copper. Our results suggest that evolution of longevity among rodents required adjustment of cellular properties to alter metal homeostasis and to reduce the toxic effects of heavy metals that accumulate over the course of a longer life span.

  10. Plant Secondary Metabolites as Rodent Repellents: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sabine C; Stolter, Caroline; Imholt, Christian; Jacob, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The vast number of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) produced by higher plants has generated many efforts to exploit their potential for pest control. We performed a systematic literature search to retrieve relevant publications, and we evaluated these according to PSM groups to derive information about the potential for developing plant-derived rodent repellents. We screened a total of 54 publications where different compounds or plants were tested regarding rodent behavior/metabolism. In the search for widely applicable products, we recommend multi-species systematic screening of PSMs, especially from the essential oil and terpenoid group, as laboratory experiments have uniformly shown the strongest effects across species. Other groups of compounds might be more suitable for the management of species-specific or sex-specific issues, as the effects of some compounds on particular rodent target species or sex might not be present in non-target species or in both sexes. Although plant metabolites have potential as a tool for ecologically-based rodent management, this review demonstrates inconsistent success across laboratory, enclosure, and field studies, which ultimately has lead to a small number of currently registered PSM-based rodent repellents.

  11. Distribution and characteristics of rodent picornaviruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Lu, Liang; Liu, Feng; Su, Haoxiang; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Ren, Xianwen; Yang, Fan; Guo, Fei; Liu, Qiyong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rodents are important reservoir hosts of many important zoonotic viruses. The family Picornaviridae contains clinically important pathogens that infect humans and animals, and increasing numbers of rodent picornaviruses have recently been associated with zoonoses. We collected 574 pharyngeal and anal swab specimens from 287 rodents of 10 different species from eight representative regions of China from October 2013 to July 2015. Seven representative sequences identified from six rodent species were amplified as full genomes and classified into four lineages. Three lineage 1 viruses belonged to a novel genus of picornaviruses and was more closely related to Hepatovirus than to others genera of picornaviruses based on aa homology. Lineage 2, lineage 3, and lineage 4 viruses belonged to the genera Rosavirus, Hunnivirus, and Enterovirus, respectively, representing new species. According to both phylogenetic and identity analyses, Lineage 2 viruses had a close relationship with rosavirus 2 which was recovered from the feces of a child in Gambia and Lineage 3 viruses had a close relationship with domestic animal Hunnivirus. Lineage 4 viruses provide the first evidence of these enteroviruses and their evolution in rodent hosts in China. PMID:27682620

  12. Effects of lersivirine on canine and rodent thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Houle, Christopher D; Finch, Gregory L; Mauthe, Robert J; Potter, David M; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Gardner, Iain B; DeWit, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Lersivirine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) being developed for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Like other NNRTIs, lersivirine is a potent enzyme inducer in rodents capable of inducing a number of hepatic enzymes including those involved in its own metabolism. Preclinically lersivirine has been associated with hepatocellular hypertrophy and thyroid gland follicular cell hypertrophy in rats, mice, and dogs. In rodents, we show that development of thyroid hypertrophy is related to the classic mechanism, namely increased thyroxine (T4) clearance secondary to induction of uridine-diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT) in the liver and a resulting increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone. Similarly, lersivirine-exposed dogs exhibit a significant increase in hepatic UDPGT enzyme activity along with increased T4 clearance although clear effects on serum thyroid hormone levels were less apparent. These effects on thyroid hormonal clearance in the dog suggest that thyroid gland hypertrophy in this species is due to the same mechanism shown to occur in rodents although, as expected, dogs better adapt to these effects and therefore maintain relatively normal thyroid hormonal balance. It is also notable that the minimal thyroid follicular hypertrophy that occurs in dogs does not progress as is seen in rodents. As is the case with rodents, these adaptive changes in the dog are not considered indicative of a human health risk.

  13. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in urban rodents: a survey in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Aurélien; Garba, Madougou; Bonnabau, Henri; Kane, Mamadou; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2013-01-01

    A serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii was conducted on 766 domestic and peridomestic rodents from 46 trapping sites throughout the city of Niamey, Niger. A low seroprevalence was found over the whole town with only 1.96% of the rodents found seropositive. However, differences between species were important, ranging from less than 2% in truly commensal Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus and Mus musculus, while garden-associated Arvicanthis niloticus displayed 9.1% of seropositive individuals. This is in line with previous studies on tropical rodents - that we reviewed here - which altogether show that Toxoplasma seroprevalence in rodent is highly variable, depending on many factors such as locality and/or species. Moreover, although we were not able to decipher statistically between habitat or species effect, such a contrast between Nile grass rats and the other rodent species points towards a potentially important role of environmental toxoplasmic infection. This would deserve to be further scrutinised since intra-city irrigated cultures are extending in Niamey, thus potentially increasing Toxoplasma circulation in this yet semi-arid region. As far as we are aware of, our study is one of the rare surveys of its kind performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the first one ever conducted in the Sahel. PMID:23828008

  14. Thieving rodents as substitute dispersers of megafaunal seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Hirsch, Ben T.; Emsens, Willem-Jan; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica; Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropics have many plant species that seem to be adapted for seed dispersal by megafauna that went extinct in the late Pleistocene. Given the crucial importance of seed dispersal for plant persistence, it remains a mystery how these plants have survived more than 10,000 y without their mutualist dispersers. Here we present support for the hypothesis that secondary seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents has facilitated the persistence of these large-seeded species. We used miniature radio transmitters to track the dispersal of reputedly megafaunal seeds by Central American agoutis, which scatter-hoard seeds in shallow caches in the soil throughout the forest. We found that seeds were initially cached at mostly short distances and then quickly dug up again. However, rather than eating the recovered seeds, agoutis continued to move and recache the seeds, up to 36 times. Agoutis dispersed an estimated 35% of seeds for >100 m. An estimated 14% of the cached seeds survived to the next year, when a new fruit crop became available to the rodents. Serial video-monitoring of cached seeds revealed that the stepwise dispersal was caused by agoutis repeatedly stealing and recaching each other’s buried seeds. Although previous studies suggest that rodents are poor dispersers, we demonstrate that communities of rodents can in fact provide highly effective long-distance seed dispersal. Our findings suggest that thieving scatter-hoarding rodents could substitute for extinct megafaunal seed dispersers of tropical large-seeded trees. PMID:22802644

  15. Ectoparasites of commensal rodents in Talkha Center, Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Kady, Gamal A; El Shazly, Atef M; Mikhail, Micheal W; Bahgat, Iman M

    2007-12-01

    The ecto-parasites infesting commensally rodents were collected from the different localities in Talkha Center (Dakahlia Governorate) from April 2006 to March 2007. The seasonal abundance of rodent number and rat index was 52 (0.58) in spring, 27 (0.3) in summer, 39 (0.22) in autumn and 17 (0.05) in winter. From 135 rodent species and rat index was Rattus norvegicus N=33 (0.24), R. r. frugivorous N=39 (0.29); R. r. alexandrinus N=48 (0.36) and Mus musculus N=15 (0.11). From 388 ecto-parasite infested rodent collected number and ecto index was fleas N= 114 (0.84 flea/rat), Lice N=93 (0.69 lice/rat), Mites N = 165 (1.2 mite/rat) and larva of ticks N=16 (0.12 tick/rat). No doubt, rodents and their ectoparasites played a serious role in spreading and transmission of zoonotic diseases to human and animal.

  16. Methodological considerations for measuring spontaneous physical activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Teske, Jennifer A; Perez-Leighton, Claudio E; Billington, Charles J; Kotz, Catherine M

    2014-05-15

    When exploring biological determinants of spontaneous physical activity (SPA), it is critical to consider whether methodological factors differentially affect rodents and the measured SPA. We determined whether acclimation time, sensory stimulation, vendor, or chamber size affected measures in rodents with varying propensity for SPA. We used principal component analysis to determine which SPA components (ambulatory and vertical counts, time in SPA, and distance traveled) best described the variability in SPA measurements. We compared radiotelemetry and infrared photobeams used to measure SPA and exploratory activity. Acclimation time, sensory stimulation, vendor, and chamber size independently influenced SPA, and the effect was moderated by the propensity for SPA. A 24-h acclimation period prior to SPA measurement was sufficient for habituation. Principal component analysis showed that ambulatory and vertical measurements of SPA describe different dimensions of the rodent's SPA behavior. Smaller testing chambers and a sensory attenuation cubicle around the chamber reduced SPA. SPA varies between rodents purchased from different vendors. Radiotelemetry and infrared photobeams differ in their sensitivity to detect phenotypic differences in SPA and exploratory activity. These data highlight methodological considerations in rodent SPA measurement and a need to standardize SPA methodology.

  17. Old World hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Cross, Robert W; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G; Bausch, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured--all brown rats--were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans.

  18. Rodent models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Imajo, Kento; Yoneda, Masato; Kessoku, Takaomi; Ogawa, Yuji; Maeda, Shin; Sumida, Yoshio; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Wada, Koichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2013-11-04

    Research in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), has been limited by the availability of suitable models for this disease. A number of rodent models have been described in which the relevant liver pathology develops in an appropriate metabolic context. These models are promising tools for researchers investigating one of the key issues of NASH: not so much why steatosis occurs, but what causes the transition from simple steatosis to the inflammatory, progressive fibrosing condition of steatohepatitis. The different rodent models can be classified into two large groups. The first includes models in which the disease is acquired after dietary or pharmacological manipulation, and the second, genetically modified models in which liver disease develops spontaneously. To date, no single rodent model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression, but individual models can imitate particular characteristics of human disease. Therefore, it is important that researchers choose the appropriate rodent models. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the metabolic abnormalities present in the currently available rodent models of NAFLD, summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the established models and the key findings that have furthered our understanding of the disease's pathogenesis.

  19. Public health importance of rodents in South America

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Indigenous South American rodents are abundant, varied, and adaptable, and occupy most of the available natural habitats. Knowledge of their taxonomy and biology is generally superficial. Near human habitations the introduced Rattus and Mus are common and their contacts with man are often close. Cities in South America are expanding to keep pace with increases in the human population and hitherto virgin land is being settled or cleared for food production. Thus domestic rodents are brought into contact with indigenous species and the inevitable exchange of parasites may then produce unpredictable threats to human health. The role of both wild and domestic rodents in the transmission of certain infectious diseases, such as plague, sylvatic Venezuelan encephalitis, South American haemorrhagic fevers, murine typhus, and cutaneous leishmaniasis, is well established. The involvement of rodents in some other diseases, such as leptospirosis, American trypanosomiasis, South American hydatid disease, and vesicular stomatitis, is less well understood. In certain other infections, including bartonellosis and the South American spotted fevers, a wild rodent reservoir is inferred but not yet identified. PMID:4539412

  20. Exposure of primary rat hepatocytes in long-term DMSO culture to selected transition metals induces hepatocyte proliferation and formation of duct-like structures.

    PubMed

    Cable, E E; Isom, H C

    1997-12-01

    We previously showed that primary rat hepatocytes plated on a rat-tail collagen coated dish and fed a chemically-defined medium supplemented with 2% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) can be maintained in a well-differentiated, non-replicating state for periods of several months. In this study, we show that the addition of copper, iron, and zinc to the DMSO-containing chemically defined medium induced DNA synthesis and cell replication during the first two months in culture without loss of hepatic differentiation. DNA synthesis occurred throughout the hepatocyte population without regard to cellular size. No changes were observed in properties indicative of well-differentiated hepatocytes, including cellular morphology, ultrastructure, albumin, or cytokeratin-8 expression. During the third month in culture, after the hepatocytes had become confluent, pseudoduct structures became apparent. Examination of cells lining the ducts by immunohistochemistry showed that these cells lost the ability to express albumin and stained more intensely for cytokeratin 19 and laminin. The ultrastructure of the cells lining the ducts was altered and became more characteristic of bile duct cells. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that connexin 43, a marker of bile-duct proliferation, was expressed in the duct-like cells. We conclude that under these specific nutritive conditions, primary rat hepatocytes proliferate and, with time, begin to form duct-like structures with altered gene expression and ultrastructural properties.