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Sample records for rodent mesenteric bed

  1. Acrolein induces vasodilatation of rodent mesenteric bed via an EDHF-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, S.O.; Adeagbo, A.S.O.; D'Souza, S.E.; Bhatnagar, A.; Conklin, D.J. . E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu

    2006-12-15

    Acrolein is generated endogenously during lipid peroxidation and inflammation and is an environmental pollutant. Protein adducts of acrolein are detected in atherosclerotic plaques and neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease. To understand vascular effects of acrolein exposure, we studied acrolein vasoreactivity in perfused rodent mesenteric bed. Acrolein induced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation that was more robust and more sensitive than dilation induced by 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, trans-2-hexenal, or propionaldehyde. Acrolein-induced vasodilatation was mediated by K{sup +}-sensitive components, e.g., it was abolished in 0 [K{sup +}]{sub o} buffer or in 3 mM tetrabutylammonium, inhibited 75% in 50 {mu}M ouabain, and inhibited 64% in 20 mM K{sup +} buffer. Moreover, combined treatment with the Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channel inhibitors 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34, 100 nM) and apamin (5 {mu}M) significantly reduced vasodilatation without altering sensitivity to acrolein. However, acrolein-induced % dilation was unaffected by L-NAME or indomethacin pretreatment indicating mechanistic independence of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, acrolein induced vasodilatation in cirazoline-precontracted mesenteric bed of eNOS-null mice confirming eNOS independence. Pretreatment with 6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl) hexanoic acid (PPOH 50 {mu}M), an epoxygenase inhibitor, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol (100 {mu}M) significantly attenuated acrolein-induced vasodilatation. Collectively, these data indicate that acrolein stimulates mesenteric bed vasodilatation due to endothelium-derived signal(s) that is K{sup +}-, ouabain-, PPOH-, and Tempol-sensitive, and thus, a likely endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These data indicate that low level acrolein exposure associated with vascular oxidative stress or inflammation stimulates vasodilatation via EDHF release in medium-sized arteries - a novel function.

  2. Vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the rat mesenteric arterial bed in cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ralevic, V.; Mathie, R. T.; Moore, K. P.; Burnstock, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of cirrhosis on mesenteric vascular reactivity were assessed in constantly perfused mesenteric arterial beds isolated from cirrhotic rats (carbon tetrachloride with phenobarbitone, n = 6), and from phenobarbitone-treated and untreated age-matched controls (n = 4,5). 2. At a constant flow rate of 5 ml min-1 there was no difference in basal perfusion pressure between the groups. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 4-32 Hz, 90V, 1 ms, 30 s) of perivascular nerves caused frequency-dependent increases in perfusion pressure which were not different between the groups. Dose-dependent vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous noradrenaline (NA), methoxamine (an alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and vasopressin were also similar between the groups. 3. The nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 30 microM) augmented constrictor responses to NA, EFS, methoxamine and vasopressin in all groups, and as shown for EFS and NA, this was reversed by L-arginine (300 microM). However, the maximum constrictor responses of cirrhotic preparations in the presence of L-NAME were significantly lower than those of both groups of control animals at the highest frequency of EFS (32 Hz) and highest doses of NA (0.15 and 0.5 mumol) and, compared to phenobarbitone-treated controls, methoxamine (5 mumol). Responses to ATP were significantly augmented by L-NAME only in the cirrhotic group. 4. A step-wise increase in perfusate flow to 10, 15 and 20 ml min-1 produced a broadly similar increase in perfusion pressure within each group. At increased flow rates, cirrhotic preparations were hyporesponsive to NA (15 nmol) compared to the phenobarbitone-treated animals but not the untreated controls. Glibenclamide (5 microM) or L-NAME (30 microM) had no significant effect on the relationship between flow and perfusion pressure or on responses to NA at the different flow rates. 5. We conclude that sympathetic neurotransmission is

  3. Effect of chronic lithium administration on endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric bed: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Afsharimani, Banafsheh; Moezi, Leila; Sadeghipour, Hamed; Rahimzadeh-Rofouyi, Bahareh; Nobakht, Maliheh; Sanatkar, Mehdi; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hosein; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2007-10-01

    The mechanism of action of lithium, an effective treatment for bipolar disease, is still unknown. In this study, the mesenteric vascular beds of control rats and rats that were chronically treated with lithium were prepared by the McGregor method, and the mesenteric vascular bed vasorelaxation responses were examined. NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry was used to determine the activity of NOS (nitric oxide synthase) in mesenteric vascular beds. We demonstrated that ACh-induced vasorelaxation increased in the mesenteric vascular bed of rats treated with lithium. Acute No-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) administration in the medium blocked ACh-induced vasorelaxation in the control group more effectively than in lithium-treated rats, while the vasorelaxant response to sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, was not different between lithium-treated and control groups. Acute aminoguanidine administration blocked ACh-induced vasorelaxation of lithium-treated rats, but had no effect in the control rats. Furthermore, NOS activity, determined by NADPH-diaphorase staining, was significantly greater in the mesenteric vascular beds from chronic lithium-treated rats than in those from control rats. These data suggest that the enhanced ACh-induced endothelium-derived vasorelaxation in rat mesenteric bed from chronic lithium-treated rats might be associated with increased NOS activity, likely via iNOS. Simultaneous acute L-NAME and indomethacin administration suggests the possible upregulation of EDHF (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor) in lithium-treated rats.

  4. A sympathetic reflex elicited by distension of the mesenteric venous bed

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, C. J. H.; Andrews, W. H. H.; Orbach, J.

    1972-01-01

    1. The proximal ends of the distal portions of severed nerves coming from the small intestine were monitored for nerve impulses. When the mesenteric venous pressure was increased by mechanical obstruction of the portal vein there was a proportional increase in the frequency of afferent action potentials, the frequency falling immediately the venous pressure was reduced. The stimulus for the increased rate of nerve discharge appeared to be pressure within the mesenteric venous bed and not anoxia, for obstruction of the arterial supply to the gastrointestinal tract did not activate the same fibres. 2. Obstruction of the portal vein led to an increased efferent nervous discharge to the intestines. The reflex increase persisted after bilateral vagotomy, after transection of the spinal cord at the level of C7 and after section of the hepatic nerves, but was abolished by section of the intestinal nerves. 3. It is suggested that the spinal reflex is concerned with local distribution of blood and that the mesenteric venous `volume' or `stretch' receptors which initiate the reflex are similar to those described elsewhere in the body. PMID:4507800

  5. Vascular responses to compound 48/80 in rat mesenteric vascular beds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Li, Zhen; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Jin, Xin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Sun, Pengyuan

    2016-06-01

    A further investigation was performed on the vascular effect of endogenous histamine using the histamine releaser, compound 48/80, in rat mesenteric vascular beds with active tone. In preparations with intact endothelium, low concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-5) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-5) mg/mL) perfusion for 1 min only induced a small vasodilation. High concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-4) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-2) mg/mL) induced a biphasic vascular responses, an initial vasoconstriction followed a subsequent long-lasting vasodilation. The vasodilation induced by low concentrations of compound 48/80 and the vasoconstriction induced by high concentration of compound 48/80 was inhibited by olopatadine. However, cimetidine did not affect the responses induced by compound 48/80. Endothelium removal enlarged the compound 48/80-induced phase-2 vasoconstriction, while it attenuated the phase-3 vasodilation. Additionally, indomethacin and seratrodast significantly inhibited vasoconstriction but it did not affect the long-lasting vasodilation induced by high concentrations of compound 48/80. Ruthenium red inhibited the vasodilation induced by low concentrations and high concentrations of compound 48/80. These results suggest that the vasoconstriction induce by high concentrations of compound 48/80 is mediated by endogenous histamine released from mast cells. It is also suggested that thromboxane A2 released from mast cells is related to the vasoconstriction. PMID:26991394

  6. The Manufacture, Shipping and Receiving and Quality Control of Rodent Bedding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Lisbeth M.

    1980-01-01

    The criteria for rodent bedding and nesting materials are discussed. The literature is reviewed regarding sources of bedding materials, manufacturing methods, quality control, procedures (microbiological, physical and chemical), storage, methods, shipment, methods of use and disposal, current knowledge concerning bedding effects on animals as related to research and testing and legal aspects. Future needs, especially with respect to the promulgation of standards, also are addressed.

  7. Amylin-induced relaxation of the perfused mesenteric arterial bed: meditation by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Westfall, T C; Curfman-Falvey, M

    1995-12-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide that shares considerable homology with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Both peptides exert glycoregulatory actions and produce vasodilation of the cardiovascular system. We wished to determine if amylin exerts vasodilatory action in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed in a manner similar to that of CGRP and if so, to determine if amylin and CGRP share a common mechanism of action. Amylin 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6)M produced significant decreases in perfusion pressure by 18, 34, and 45 mm Hg, respectively, of the perfused mesenteric arterial bed pretreated with guanethidine (7 x 10(-6)M) and precontracted with methoxamine (10(-6)-10(-5)M). Amylin was approximately 10 times less potent than CGRP. This vasodilatory effect was not antagonized by atropine in a concentration (10(-6)M) that blocked the vasodilatory action of acetylcholine (ACh) or of nadolol in a concentration that blocked the response to isoproterenol (ISO 10(-6)M). In contrast, the CGRP receptor antagonist [8-37]hCGRP blocked the response of both amylin and CGRP while failing to block the effect of ISO. The depressor effects of CGRP (10(-8)M), amylin (10(-6)M), and ISO (10(-5)M) were 38, 43, and 42 mm Hg without and 5, 12, and 44 mm Hg with [8-37]hCGRP (10(-7)M), respectively. Simultaneous administration of CGRP and amylin failed to produce an additive effect. The depressor effects of CGRP (10(-8)M), amylin (10(-7)M), and CGRP (10(-8)M) plus amylin (10(-7)M) were 50, 32, and 45 mm Hg, respectively. We conclude that amylin exerts a vasodilator action in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed by acting on CGRP1 receptors and suggest that this glycoregulatory hormone may also exert regulatory actions in the vasculature in a manner similar to that of CGRP.

  8. Characterization and modulation of EDHF-mediated relaxations in the rat isolated superior mesenteric arterial bed

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Audrey I; Bottrill, Fiona E; Randall, Michael D; Robin Hiley, C

    1997-01-01

    We have used the isolated, buffer-perfused, mesenteric arterial bed of the rat (preconstricted with methoxamine or 60 mM K+) to characterize nitric oxide (NO)-independent vasorelaxation which is thought to be mediated by the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF).The muscarinic agonists carbachol, acetylcholine (ACh) and methacholine caused dose-related relaxations in preconstricted preparations with ED50 values of 0.18±0.04 nmol (n=8), 0.05±0.02 nmol (n=6) and 0.26±0.16 nmol (n=5), respectively. In the same preparations NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM) significantly (P<0.05) decreased the potency of all the agents (ED50 values in the presence of L-NAME: carbachol, 0.66±0.11 nmol; ACh, 0.28±0.10 nmol; methacholine, 1.97±1.01 nmol). The maximal relaxation to ACh was also significantly (P<0.05) reduced (from 85.3±0.9 to 73.2±3.7%) in the presence of L-NAME. The vasorelaxant effects of carbachol were not significantly altered by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM; n=4).The K+ channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA, 10 mM) also significantly (P<0.001) reduced both the potency of carbachol (ED50=1.97±0.14 nmol in presence of TEA) and the maximum relaxation (Rmax=74.6±3.2% in presence of TEA, P<0.05, n=3). When TEA was added in the presence of L-NAME (n=4), there was a further significant (P<0.001) decrease in the potency of carbachol (ED50=22.4±13.5 nmol) relative to that in the presence of L-NAME alone, and Rmax was also significantly (P<0.05) reduced (74.6±4.2%). The ATP-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor, glibenclamide (10 μM), had no effect on carbachol-induced relaxation (n=9).High extracellular K+ (60 mM) significantly (P<0.01) reduced the potency of carbachol (n=5) by 5 fold (ED50: control, 0.16±0.04 nmol; high K+, 0.88±0.25 nmol) and the Rmax was also significantly (P<0.01) reduced (control, 83.4±2.7%; high K+, 40.3±9.2%). The residual vasorelaxation to carbachol in the

  9. Anandamide induces endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction and CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation in the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Chihiro; Nawa, Hideki; Takatori, Shingo; Oda, Sakiko; Sendo, Toshiaki; Zamami, Yoshito; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    An endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamide) has been shown to cause vasodilatation in vitro and a brief vasoconstriction followed by prolonged depressor response in vivo. This study investigated the vascular effects of anandamide and underlying mechanisms in rat mesenteric vascular beds. In preparations with an intact endothelium and active tone, anandamide at low concentrations (0.1 - 1 nM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in perfusion pressure due to vasodilatation, but at high concentrations (10 nM - 1 µM) elicited an initial and sharp increase in perfusion pressure due to vasoconstriction followed by long-lasting vasodilatation in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with SR141716A [cannabinoid-1 (CB(1))-receptor antagonist] blunted both the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator responses. Also, removal of the endothelium and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), but not adrenergic denervation with 6-hydoxydopamine (adrenergic neurotoxin), markedly inhibited the vasoconstrictor response to anandamide, while these treatments did not affect vasodilatation. The vasodilatation, but not vasoconstriction, in response to anandamide was markedly attenuated by capsazepine [selective antagonist for transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1)], pretreatment with capsaicin [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)ergic-nerve depletor], or cold-storage denervation. These results suggest that in rat mesenteric vascular beds, anandamide causes CB(1)-receptor- and prostanoid-mediated endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction and perivascular capsaicin-sensitive CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation.

  10. Fasudil evokes vasodilatation of rat mesenteric vascular bed via Ca(2+) channels and Rho/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cai; Yuan, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Wang, Dan-Shu; Niu, Zi-Ran; Li, Li; Fang, Lian-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-10-01

    As a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, fasudil has been used in clinical trials of several cardiovascular diseases. This study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of fasudil on resistance arterial rings including mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery. We also examined the potential mechanisms of its vasodilatory action using mesenteric artery rings. A DMT multiwire myograph system was used to test the tension of isolated small arteries. K(+) channel blockers, NO-cGMP pathway blockers and Ca(2+)-free physiological salt solution (PSS) were employed to verify the underlying mechanisms. Fasudil (10(-7)-10(-4)M) relaxed four types of small artery rings pre-contracted by 60mmol/l KCl (pEC50: 6.01±0.09, 5.47±0.03, 5.54±0.04, and 5.72±0.10 for mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery rings, respectively). Pre-incubation with fasudil (1, 3, or 10μmol/l) attenuated KCl (10-60mmol/l) and angiotensin II (Ang II; 1μmol/l)-induced vasoconstriction in mesenteric artery rings. Fasudil at the concentration of 10(-6)mol/l showed different relaxant potency in endothelium intact (pEC50:6.01±0.09) or denued (5.75±0.06) mesenteric artery. The influx and release of Ca(2+) were inhibited by fasudil. In addition, fasudil could block the increased phosphorylation level of myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT1) induced by Ang II. However, pretreatment with various K(+) channel blockers did not affect the relaxant effects of fasudil remarkably. The present results demonstrate that fasudil has a vasorelaxant effect on isolated rat resistance arteries, including mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery, and may exert its action through the endothelium, Ca(2+) channels, and the Rho/ROCK pathway. PMID:27346833

  11. Fasudil evokes vasodilatation of rat mesenteric vascular bed via Ca(2+) channels and Rho/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cai; Yuan, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Wang, Dan-Shu; Niu, Zi-Ran; Li, Li; Fang, Lian-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-10-01

    As a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, fasudil has been used in clinical trials of several cardiovascular diseases. This study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of fasudil on resistance arterial rings including mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery. We also examined the potential mechanisms of its vasodilatory action using mesenteric artery rings. A DMT multiwire myograph system was used to test the tension of isolated small arteries. K(+) channel blockers, NO-cGMP pathway blockers and Ca(2+)-free physiological salt solution (PSS) were employed to verify the underlying mechanisms. Fasudil (10(-7)-10(-4)M) relaxed four types of small artery rings pre-contracted by 60mmol/l KCl (pEC50: 6.01±0.09, 5.47±0.03, 5.54±0.04, and 5.72±0.10 for mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery rings, respectively). Pre-incubation with fasudil (1, 3, or 10μmol/l) attenuated KCl (10-60mmol/l) and angiotensin II (Ang II; 1μmol/l)-induced vasoconstriction in mesenteric artery rings. Fasudil at the concentration of 10(-6)mol/l showed different relaxant potency in endothelium intact (pEC50:6.01±0.09) or denued (5.75±0.06) mesenteric artery. The influx and release of Ca(2+) were inhibited by fasudil. In addition, fasudil could block the increased phosphorylation level of myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT1) induced by Ang II. However, pretreatment with various K(+) channel blockers did not affect the relaxant effects of fasudil remarkably. The present results demonstrate that fasudil has a vasorelaxant effect on isolated rat resistance arteries, including mesenteric, renal, ventral tail and basilar artery, and may exert its action through the endothelium, Ca(2+) channels, and the Rho/ROCK pathway.

  12. Effect of the administration of Solanum nigrum fruit on blood glucose, lipid profiles, and sensitivity of the vascular mesenteric bed to phenylephrine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabipour, Shahla; Kharazmi, Fatemah; Soltani, Nepton; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Solanum nigrum fruit is traditionally used in Asia to manage, control, and treat diabetes but there is no scientific evidence of the efficacy of Solanum nigrum fruit in treatment of diabetes. We designed this study to investigate the effect of the administration of oral doses of aqueous extract from Solanum nigrum fruit on plasma glucose, lipid profiles, and the sensitivity of the vascular mesenteric bed to Phenylephrine in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Material/Methods Animals were divided into 5 groups (n=10): 2 groups served as non-diabetic controls (NDC), and the other groups had diabetes induced with a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Solanum nigrum-treated chronic diabetic (CD-SNE) and Solanum nigrum-treated controls (ND-SNE) received 1g/l of Solanum nigrum added to drinking water for 8 weeks. The mesenteric vascular beds were prepared using the McGregor method. Results Administration of Solanum nigrum caused Ca/Mg ratio, plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations to return to normal levels, and was shown to decrease alteration in vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that Solanum nigrum could play a role in the management of diabetes and the prevention of vascular complications in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:23660828

  13. Rapid nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) triggered by endotoxin in rat mesenteric arterial bed.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Wu, Z.; Tang, Y.; Fiscus, R. R.; Han, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Our objective was to determine whether endotoxin (ETX) could directly trigger the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from perivascular sensory nerves in the isolated mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) of the rat and to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs) are involved. 2. ETX caused time- and concentration-dependent release of CGRP, and as much as a 17 fold increase in CGRP levels in the perfusate at 10-15 min after the administration of ETX (50 micrograms ml-1). 3. CGRP-like immunoreactivity in the perfusate was shown to co-elute with synthetic rat CGRP by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. 4. Pretreatment of MAB with capsaicin or ruthenium red inhibited ETX-induced CGRP release by 90% and 71%, respectively. ETX-evoked CGRP release was decreased by 84% during Ca2(+)-free perfusion. 5. The release of CGRP evoked by ETX was enhanced by L-arginine by 43% and inhibited by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) and methylene blue by 37% and 38%, respectively. L-Arginine reversed the effect of L-NOARG. 6. Indomethacin and ibuprofen also inhibited the ETX-induced CGRP release by 34% and 44%, respectively. No additive inhibition could be found when L-NOARG and indomethacin were concomitantly incubated. 7. The data suggest that ETX triggers the release of CGRP from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves innervating blood vessels. The ETX-induced CGRP release is dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx and involves a ruthenium red-sensitive mechanism. Both NO and PGs appear to be involved in the ETX-induced release of CGRP in the rat mesenteric arterial bed. PMID:8864557

  14. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  15. Mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2013-08-01

    This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of the various forms of mesenteric ischemia, including acute and chronic ischemia. In addition, nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia and median arcuate ligament compressive syndrome are covered. The goals are to provide a structured and evidence-based framework for the evaluation and management of patients with these intestinal ischemia syndromes. Special attention is given to avoiding typical pitfalls in the diagnostic and treatment pathways. Operative techniques are also briefly discussed, including an evidence-based review of newer endovascular techniques.

  16. Acute mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sise, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is uncommon and always occurs in the setting of preexisting comorbidities. Mortality rates remain high. The 4 major types of acute mesenteric ischemia are acute superior mesenteric artery thromboembolic occlusion, mesenteric arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis, and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia, including ischemic colitis. Delays in diagnosis are common and associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis requires attention to history and physical examination, a high index of suspicion, and early contract CT scanning. Selective use of nonoperative therapy has an important role in nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia of the small bowel and colon.

  17. Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting for acute mesenteric arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie; Wisniewski, Paul; Sarmiento, Jose; Vo, Trung; Aka, Paul K; Hsu, Jeffrey H; Tayyarah, Majid

    2010-08-01

    Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting (ROMS) represents a significant development in the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia. Compared to traditional surgical mesenteric bypass, ROMS is a less invasive technique that avoids many complications associated with emergent mesenteric bypass. This case report illustrates that retrograde superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenting is an option for the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia for patients in extremis.

  18. Retroperitoneal and mesenteric cysts.

    PubMed

    Alwan, M H; Eid, A S; Alsharif, I M

    1999-03-01

    Retroperitoneal and mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumours. This report is a presentation of three cases. One patient had large retroperitoneal cyst which was accidentally discovered, another patient had mesenteric cyst presenting with abdominal pain, and the third patient had emergency admission due to infection of a large mesenteric cyst. The literature on this condition is reviewed.

  19. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hmoud, Bashar; Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S

    2014-09-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation is the treatment of choice for acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. Thrombolysis using systemic or transcatheter route is another option. Patients with peritoneal signs or refractory to initial measures require surgical exploration. Increasing recognition of mesenteric venous thrombosis and use of anticoagulation for treatment has resulted in reduction in the need for surgery with improvement in survival.

  20. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. R.; Taylor, I.

    1997-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and controversial form of upper intestinal obstruction in which the third part of the duodenum is compressed by the overlying superior mesenteric artery. Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. The aetiology, presentation, investigation and management of this unusual condition are discussed. PMID:9497945

  1. Biphasic effect of Solanum nigrum fruit aqueous extract on vascular mesenteric beds in non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabipour, Shahla; Kharazmi, Fatemah; Soltani, Nepton; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Asia, Solanum nigrum fruit is traditionally used to manage, control, and treat diabetes. Objective: This study was carried out to investigate the endothelium and nitric oxide roles in Solanum nigrum-induced vasorelaxation in non-diabetic and diabetic rat vessels. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin. Eight weeks later, superior mesenteric arteries of non-diabetic and diabetic groups were isolated and perfused according to the McGregor method. Solanum nigrum fruit extract (SNE) at concentrations of 0.00001 to 0.6 mg/ml was added to the medium and perfusion pressure was recorded. Results: Baseline perfusion pressure of diabetic group was significantly higher than non-diabetic rats in both intact and denuded endothelium. The low concentrations of SNE have vasodilatory effect in the diabetic and non-diabetic, but high concentrations of SNE produce initial significant contractions, followed by secondary relaxations in normal and diabetic rats. We observed vasorelaxation at low and high concentrations of SNE in both diabetic and non-diabetic groups after endothelium denudation. SNE-induced vasorelaxation in diabetic group is mediated by both endothelium and smooth muscle, but the relaxatory effect of SNE in non-diabetic group is not mediated by endothelium, and SNE has direct action on the smooth muscle. Conclusion: Although the part of SNE-induced relaxation in diabetic vessel was mediated by endothelium, nitric oxide didn’t play any role in this action, and maybe we can use SNE in the management of diabetes vessel complications in future. PMID:24761120

  2. Mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Kamath, Patrick S; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of mesenteric venous thrombosis has increased over the past 2 decades with the routine use of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in patients presenting with abdominal pain and those with portal hypertension. Concurrent with increasing recognition, routine and frequent use of anticoagulation has reduced the need for surgical intervention and improved outcome in these patients. Acute thrombosis often presents with abdominal pain, whereas chronic disease manifests either as an incidental finding on CT or with features of portal hypertension. Contrast-enhanced CT diagnoses about 90% of cases. The presence of collateral circulation and cavernoma around a chronically thrombosed vein differentiates chronic from acute disease. The superior mesenteric vein is often involved, whereas involvement of the inferior mesenteric vein is rare. Associated portal venous thrombosis can be seen if the disease originates in the major veins instead of the small vena rectae. Thrombophilia and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common causes. Management is aimed at preventing bowel infarction and recurrent thrombosis. Anticoagulation, the mainstay of management, has also been safely used in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. This review discusses the pathogenesis of thrombosis of mesenteric veins, the diagnosis and differentiation from arterial ischemia, the emergence of the JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) sequence variation as a marker of thrombophilia and myelodysplastic neoplasms, and new anticoagulants. Algorithms for the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis are provided to help readers understand and remember the approach to the management of acute and chronic mesenteric venous thrombosis.

  3. Mesenteric cysts in children.

    PubMed

    Chung, M A; Brandt, M L; St-Vil, D; Yazbeck, S

    1991-11-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intraabdominal lesions of childhood that may vary in presentation from an asymptomatic mass to an acute abdomen. From 1970 to 1990, 15 children were diagnosed and treated for mesenteric cysts at Ste Justine Hospital in Montreal. The ages ranged from birth to 18 years (average age, 6 years). There were 9 boys and 6 girls. Ten patients required emergency surgery and five underwent elective surgery. The main presenting symptom was abdominal pain. Ten patients had preoperative ultrasounds that were diagnostic for a cystic mass in all patients. The second most frequent preoperative diagnosis was appendicitis. The cysts were located in the small bowel mesentery in 5 cases, the base of the mesentery with retroperitoneal extension in 4 cases, the transverse mesocolon in 4 cases, and the gastrocolic ligament in 2 cases. Operative procedures performed included complete cyst excision (9 patients), complete excision with intestinal resection (5 patients), and drainage of the cyst (1 patient). The only recurrence in this series occurred after drainage. One other patient had recurrence of a mesenteric cyst following resection performed elsewhere. Mesenteric cysts are rare in children, are usually symptomatic, and are most commonly misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is possible with current ultrasonographic imaging techniques. Complete cyst resection is the procedure of choice and results in an excellent outcome.

  4. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric – inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  5. Mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, R J; Heimann, T M; Holt, J; Beck, A R

    1986-01-01

    Mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts are rare intra-abdominal tumors. Ten new patients are presented as well as 152 other cases reported in the English literature. These 162 cases were then analyzed for significant trends. Patients under 10 years of age were significantly different from the older group with respect to a shorter duration of symptoms, a higher number of patients requiring an emergency operation, a lower number of recurrences and the location of the cyst. Patients with retroperitoneal cysts were more likely to have incomplete excision of the cyst and therefore had a higher incidence of recurrence. They also required marsupialization more often. Retroperitoneal cysts should be considered a different entity from mesenteric cysts even though they present clinically in a similar fashion. The outcome of surgical treatment is less satisfactory in patients with retroperitoneal cysts.

  6. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  7. [Management of mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Keck, T

    2014-07-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is secondary to acute embolic disease or thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery. Further pathologies that manifest themselves with the same clinical presentation are thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein and non-occlusive disease. The patients are admitted to the emergency room with an acute abdomen. Most patients are more than 70 years old. Known risk factors for mesenteric ischemia are cardiac diseases as atrial fibrillation, aneurysms of the aorta and the visceral arteries, occlusive arterial diseases, tumorigenic compression of the vessel and several diseases that result in a reduction of the flow and intravascular volume in the superior mesenteric artery. The golden standard in the diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is CT-angiography of the abdominal vessels with 3 D reconstruction. The therapy is different and dependent from the underlying pathology. A statistically significantly elevated mortality of more than 95% is associated with a delay of surgical or interventional therapy of more than 12 hours after the initial symptoms and non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia. Because of the advanced age of the patients and the co-morbidities a non-surgical interventional re-canalisation of the superior mesenteric vessels is recommended. A laparotomy is necessary in all patients with peritonitis and/or bowel necrosis or perforation.

  8. CT appearance of mesenteric saponification.

    PubMed

    Paris, A; Willing, S J

    1991-01-01

    Although saponification of the pancreas is a frequent finding on computed tomography, saponification of extrapancreatic mesenteric sites has not been previously recognized. A case is presented of acute pancreatitis in which serial scans over a four-year period documented calcifications in old extrapancreatic phlegmons. Saponification from pancreatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric calcifications.

  9. [Retroperitoneal and mesenteric cysts].

    PubMed

    Vasilev, N; Kirov, G; Avramov, T

    1990-01-01

    Experience is recorded with the diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of 5 patients with retroperitoneal and mesenterial cysts. According to available data in the literature, one patients with retroperitoneal or mesenteric cyst falls among an average of 34,000-105,000 in-lying patients. Basic symptom on physical examination was a palpable tumor mass in the abdomen. In recent years correct preoperative diagnosis of these diseases has been established in 85-95 per cent of the cases with the help of echography and computer tomography. The surgical approach was determined from the possibility for total or partial removal of the cyst, which was sometimes accompanied by partial or total removal of abdominal organs involved in the pathologic process.

  10. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  11. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  12. Laparoscopic treatment of mesenteric cysts.

    PubMed

    Asoglu, O; Igci, A; Karanlik, H; Parlak, M; Kecer, M; Ozmen, V; Muslumanoglu, M

    2003-05-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intraabdominal tumors. We review the diagnosis, laparoscopic management, patient's outcome and follow-up of evaluation for three cases of mesenteric cyst that presented to Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical School, Department of Surgery, from 1999 to 2002. All of the patients presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms such as constipation, abdominal discomfort, and anorexia. Preoperative evaluation for differentiating mesenteric cyst from malignancy is made by abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography. The procedure was completed laparoscopically using three trocars in three patients. In one patient retroperitoneal resection was performed. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 36 months, and there were no recurrences. Currently, the surgical treatment of mesenteric cyst should be performed by laparoscopy, which offers significant advantages in terms of reduced morbidity and hospital stay. For appropriate cases in which cyst arises from mesenterium of colon, the retroperitoneal approach should be applied.

  13. Retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and omental cysts.

    PubMed

    Vanek, V W; Phillips, A K

    1984-07-01

    Retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and omental cysts are rare abdominal tumors occurring in approximately one of 105,000 hospitalized patients. These cysts have a similar pathogenesis that primarily may be ectopic lymphatic tissue. Retroperitoneal and mesenteric cysts can occur anywhere in the area between the duodenum and rectum but are most common in the small-bowel mesentery, especially the ileum. They can appear as chronic abdominal pain, a painless abdominal mass, or acute abdomen. The most common physical finding of a retroperitoneal or mesenteric cyst is a compressible abdominal mass, movable transversely but not longitudinally; omental cysts are freely movable. Diagnostic aids include abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound. The upper gastro-intestinal (GI) tract series, barium enema examination, and intravenous pyelogram exclude GI and genitourinary cysts and tumors. Treatment of choice is enucleation; resection of the adjacent bowel may occasionally be necessary. Morbidity and mortality should be very low because of modern surgical techniques and follow-up procedures.

  14. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, John C.; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Laine, Glen A.; Stewart, Randolph H.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min−1; Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min−1) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min−1; Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min−1) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  15. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quick, Christopher M; Criscione, John C; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H

    2014-06-15

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min(-1); Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min(-1)) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min(-1); Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min(-1)) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity.

  16. Challenges in diagnosing mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    van den Heijkant, Teun C; Aerts, Bart AC; Teijink, Joep A; Buurman, Wim A; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is challenging. The wide variability in clinical presentation challenges providers to make an early accurate diagnosis. Despite major diagnostic and treatment advances over the past decades, mortality remains high. Arterial embolus and superior mesenteric artery thrombosis are common causes of AMI. Non-occlusive causes are less common, but vasculitis may be important, especially in younger people. Because of the unclear clinical presentation and non-specific laboratory findings, low clinical suspicion may lead to loss of valuable time. During this diagnostic delay, progression of ischemia to transmural bowel infarction with peritonitis and septicemia may further worsen patient outcomes. Several diagnostic modalities are used to assess possible AMI. Multi-detector row computed tomographic angiography is the current gold standard. Although computed tomographic angiography leads to an accurate diagnosis in many cases, early detection is a persistent problem. Because early diagnosis is vital to commence treatment, new diagnostic strategies are needed. A non-invasive simple biochemical test would be ideal to increase clinical suspicion of AMI and would improve patient selection for radiographic evaluation. Thus, AMI could be diagnosed earlier with follow-up computed tomographic angiography or high spatial magnetic resonance imaging. Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies show promise for alpha glutathione S transferase and intestinal fatty acid binding protein as markers for AMI. Future research must confirm the clinical utility of these biochemical markers in the diagnosis of mesenteric ischemia. PMID:23538325

  17. Retroperitoneoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T; Shimomatsuya, T; Uchinami, M; Yoshida, M; Amaya, H; Aotake, T; Chiba, Y; Imamura, Y

    2000-02-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intra-abdominal lesions. We present a case of a mesenteric cyst that was discovered by abdominal computed tomography (CT) and excised by retroperitoneoscopic surgery. There have been 10 reports of excision of mesenteric cysts by laparoscopy in the literature, but retroperitoneoscopic resection of such cysts has not been reported. This case suggests that when a mesenteric cyst arises from the ascending or descending colon, the retroperitoneal approach has a lower risk of traumatizing the bowel than does the laparoscopic intra-abdominal approach, and it does not have to compress other intra-abdominal organs.

  18. Rodent repellency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Bellack, E.

    1950-01-01

    In the course of studies involving more than 2,500 chemical repellents, it has been found that certain groups of- compounds containing nitrogen or sulfur are repellent to rats under the , test conditions and it appears probable that some of these compounds might be used for the protection of packaged goods against rodent attacks. Additional tests to determine optimum methods of application will be necessary before final evaluation of these compounds will be possible and extensive field trials will be required to establish the degree of protection which may be afforded by the use of these materials. Pending such final evaluation, it may be assumed that the results,to date offer a means of selecting the most promising types of'materials for further trial....On the basis of the test data, it appears that some amine derivative, such as a salt of some organic, acid, or a complex with trinitrobenzene or with a metallic salt of a dialkyl dithiocarbamic acid might offer promise of protection of packaging materials against rodent attacks....Protection might be obtained through the use of certain 'physical deterrents' such as plastics, waxes or drying oils.

  19. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  20. Simultaneous thrombosis of superior mesenteric artery and superior mesenteric vein following chemotherapy: MDCT findings.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Deniz Cebi; Bakan, Selim; Samanci, Cesur; Tutar, Onur; Demiryas, Suleyman; Korkmazer, Bora; Kantarci, Fatih

    2014-02-01

    A case of acute mesenteric ischemia due to thrombosis of superior mesenteric artery and vein in a 44-year-old woman following chemotherapy for invasive laryngeal carcinoma was diagnosed on a multi-detector CT scan. Although the link between malignancy and thromboembolism is widely recognized in patients with cancer, chemotherapy further elevates the risk of thrombosis. Acute mesenteric ischemia associated or not associated with chemotherapy rarely occurs in patients with cancer. Moreover, co-occurrence of superior mesenteric artery and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis is reported for the first time.

  1. Childhood giant omental and mesenteric lipoma.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Rasouly, Najibullah; Khpalwak, Hayatullah; Malikzai, Mohammad Omer; Faizi, Ahmad Reshad; Hoshang, Mer Mahmood Shah; Maroof, Sahar; Nasery, Mohammad Nawaz; Farzam, Farhad; Salehzai, Mohibullah; Sadiqi, Jamshid

    2016-03-01

    Omental and mesenteric lipomas are very rare benign lesions of mature adipose tissue. They are well-defined, noninvasive, and encapsulated masses that can be discovered in asymptomatic patients or may cause variable nonspecific symptoms depending on their size and location. The omental and mesenteric lipoma has confusing features in ultrasound; however, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can well characterize and demarcate these lesions. Though few cases of mesenteric and omental lipomas have been reported in the literature, but because of its large size and childhood presentation, the case we present, can be one of the largest childhood omental and mesenteric lipomas ever reported. A 6-year-old girl presented with slowly progressing abdominal distension and repeated dull abdominal pain for last 4 years. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography examination revealed a huge mesenteric and omental lipoma that was resected surgically without any complications. PMID:26973731

  2. A Case of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Arising from the Superior Mesenteric Artery in a Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Jin; Ku, Min Jung; Cho, Sa Sun

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the inferior mesenteric artery are extremely uncommon, since the inferior mesenteric artery is regularly diverged at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. We found a rare case in which the inferior mesenteric artery arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The findings were made during a routine dissection of the cadaver of an 82-yr-old Korean woman. This is the tenth report on this anomaly, the second female and the first Korean. The superior mesenteric artery normally arising from abdominal aorta sent the inferior mesenteric artery as the second branch. The longitudinal anastomosis vessels between the superior mesenteric artery and inferior mesenteric artery survived to form the common mesenteric artery. This anatomical variation concerning the common mesenteric artery is of clinical importance, performing procedures containing the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:22022194

  3. Incidental Finding and Management of Mesenteric Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Tohme, Maroon; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 45 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric fibromatosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgical removal of the mesenteric fibromatosis Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Mesenteric fibromatosis, also known as mesenteric desmoids, is part of the clinical-pathologic spectrum of deep fibromatosis, which encompasses a group of benign fibro-proliferative processes that are locally aggressive and have the capacity to infiltrate or recur without metastasis. Case Report: Case of a 45-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and lung fibrosis, presenting for a left abdominal mass, which was found incidentally during his lung fibrosis imaging. He complained of constipation due to pressure upon his bowel leading to difficulty in defecation. Conclusions: Although there are many overlapping criteria between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mesenteric fibromatosis, making it difficult to discriminate between the two, there are differences that are unique to mesenteric fibromatosis that should be noticed during the diagnosis. In this case, mesenteric fibromatosis was unusual as it is not associated with Gardner’s syndrome, desmoid tumors, nor familial adenomatous polyposis, but was an incidental finding. PMID:27279600

  4. Infusion of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery in the treatment of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; de Oliveira Sousa, Wilson; Grillo, Luiz Sérgio Pereira; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2011-08-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is an uncommon condition that is usually treated with systemic anticoagulation. Catheter-directed thrombolysis through the superior mesenteric artery may be a viable adjunct to treat this morbid condition. In the present article, we have described a case of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis treated with catheter-directed infusion of tissue plasminogen activator through the superior mesenteric artery.

  5. Mesenteric lymph node cavitation in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, G K

    1986-01-01

    A patient with coeliac disease and mesenteric lymph node cavitation is reported. This is a rare occurrence and has received very little attention in the English literature. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3721297

  6. Urogenital mesenteric cyst with fallopian tubal features.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, N; Gellman, E

    1987-01-01

    Urogenital cysts are retroperitoneal or mesenteric cysts that are derived from vestigial remnants of the embryonic urogenital apparatus. Although their precise embryonic origins are usually obscure, occasionally they display histologic features indicative of a mesonephric or metanephric origin. This report describes an unusual mesenteric müllerian cyst consisting of an endosalpingial lining and two-layered smooth muscle walls, probably representing a müllerian duct duplication cyst.

  7. Endothelium-dependent and-independent relaxation induced by resveratrol in rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Xu, Cangbao; Wei, Yahui; Zhang, Yaping; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a specific agonist of sirtuin 1, and has many cardioprotective effects. Although Res is able to relax various vascular beds, its pharmacological properties in rat superior mesenteric arteries and the underlying mechanism are not well clarified. The aim of present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Res on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro using myography. It was found that Res concentration-dependently relaxed endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride (Emax, 97.66±0.79%; pD2, 4.30±0.14) or KCl (Emax, 101.3±0.6%; pD2, 4.12±0.03). The vasorelaxant effect of Res on the superior mesenteric artery rings was partially endothelium-dependent. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited the Res-induced vasorelaxant effect. However, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM) each had no effect on the Res-induced vasorelaxation. In artery rings without endothelium, the vasorelaxation induced by Res was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM) and glibenclamide (10 µM). However, barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM) and tetraethylammonium chloride (1 mM) did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by Res. Moreover, Res also inhibited the contraction induced by an increase in external calcium concentration in Ca2+-free medium plus KCl (60 mM). These results suggest that Res induces relaxation in superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release, and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, with opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx. PMID:27698719

  8. Endothelium-dependent and-independent relaxation induced by resveratrol in rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Xu, Cangbao; Wei, Yahui; Zhang, Yaping; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a specific agonist of sirtuin 1, and has many cardioprotective effects. Although Res is able to relax various vascular beds, its pharmacological properties in rat superior mesenteric arteries and the underlying mechanism are not well clarified. The aim of present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Res on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro using myography. It was found that Res concentration-dependently relaxed endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride (Emax, 97.66±0.79%; pD2, 4.30±0.14) or KCl (Emax, 101.3±0.6%; pD2, 4.12±0.03). The vasorelaxant effect of Res on the superior mesenteric artery rings was partially endothelium-dependent. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited the Res-induced vasorelaxant effect. However, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM) each had no effect on the Res-induced vasorelaxation. In artery rings without endothelium, the vasorelaxation induced by Res was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM) and glibenclamide (10 µM). However, barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM) and tetraethylammonium chloride (1 mM) did not affect the vasorelaxation induced by Res. Moreover, Res also inhibited the contraction induced by an increase in external calcium concentration in Ca2+-free medium plus KCl (60 mM). These results suggest that Res induces relaxation in superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release, and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, with opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx.

  9. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  10. Changes in mesenteric, renal, and aortic flows with +Gx acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. L.; Erickson, H. H.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in man and dogs have indicated that the splanchnic bed might contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration. Eight mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented with Doppler flow probes around the superior mesenteric (SMA) and renal arteries (RA) as well as the terminal aorta (TA). A solid-state pressure transducer was placed in the aorta distal to the flow probe. Using alpha-chloralose anesthesia following a 2-4 week recovery period, the animals were subjected to 120 sec at levels of 5, 10 and 15 +Gx acceleration on a 7.6-m radius centrifuge. The results indicate that both an active component and a mechanical component contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration.

  11. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Laparoscopic resection of a jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: case report

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; TARTARINI, D.; FABBRI, N.; BIANCHINI, E.; ANANIA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and can occur at any age. They can manifest with abdominal pain or compressive mass effect. The exact etiology is unknown. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and laparoscopy are used in diagnosing mesenteric cysts. Laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst is possible and should be considered as the treatment of choice. We present a case of mesenteric pseudocyst of small bowel treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:25644729

  13. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  14. Color Duplex evaluation of the mesenteric artery☆

    PubMed Central

    Catalini, R.; Alborino, S.; Giovagnoli, A.; Zingaretti, O.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is the most common form of intestinal ischemia. Diagnosis is made at clinical examination and endoscopy and completed by vascular imaging, but color Doppler US may become a first-line imaging technique for the evaluation of the mesenteric circulation. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman hospitalized for recurrent ischemic colitis of the sigmoid. At a previous hospitalization, color Doppler US examination showed medium to severe stenosis at the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery. However, CT angiography was negative and the condition was therefore misdiagnosed. Eight months later the patient was admitted again with abdominal pain and rectal hemorrhage. Rectosigmoidoscopy documented the presence of ischemia of the sigmoid mucosa. Angiography showed the presence of severe stenosis at the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery so revascularization was carried out by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) during the same session. Follow-up showed normal patency of the inferior mesenteric artery after revascularization, and subsequent endoscopic evaluation documented gradual colonic mucosal ischemia resolution. Blood flow at the level of the inferior mesenteric artery was assessed using color Doppler US. The presented case confirms that color Doppler US is a valid first-line imaging technique in the assessment of ischemic intestinal lesions. It is reliable in the evaluation of the mesenteric arterial circulation, and it also allows assessment of blood flow alterations caused by stenosis and identification of localized hemodynamic stenosis which may be missed at CT-angiography or MR-angiography. Arteriography remains the examination of choice in case of discrepancy between first-and second-line imaging techniques and in all cases which offer the possibility of endovascular revascularization. PMID:23396804

  15. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  16. [Mesenteric infarct in primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kurz, R; Eder, A; Buck, J; Heinkelein, J

    1997-09-01

    The mesenteric infarction is a rare but life threatening cause of acute abdomen. A 55-year-old woman was referred to the hospital because of acute mesenteric infarction and in the history claudication. In the absence of risk factors (atrial fibrillation, atherosclerosis, nicotin abusus) a postoperative work up was started to identify the cause of the arterial occlusions. A primary antiphospholipid-antibody syndrome was found. The patient is now receiving low-dose aspirin and anticoagulation therapy. The follow-up over now 14 months shows no further events. PMID:9432819

  17. Laparoscopic resection of a giant mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Saw, E C; Ramachandra, S

    1994-02-01

    Laparoscopic resection of a giant retroperitoneal, mesenteric cyst in a 38-year-old man who presented with abdominal distension and pedal edema is described. The diagnosis was made by abdominal computed tomography, which revealed a large cystic mass that was causing extrinsic compression of the inferior vena cava and the right ureter. The hospital course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged 2 days postoperatively. This new endoscopic approach offers a useful alternative to the traditional transabdominal excision of a mesenteric cyst and may have some theoretical advantages, including less postoperative pain and shorter convalescence.

  18. Laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, D J; Shapiro, S J; Gordon, L A; Ress, R

    1993-06-01

    Benign abdominal cystic tumors are rare. They include retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and omental cysts. Most of these lesions present with vague abdominal pain and nausea. Less commonly they will present with bowel obstruction due to external compression. The diagnosis of these tumors is by abdominal ultrasound or computed tomography. Surgical enucleation is the treatment of choice. Laparoscopic surgical techniques are replacing or complimenting open abdominal surgical procedures. As the indications for these techniques increase, newer applications will arise. Presented here is a case of laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst.

  19. Mesenteric cyst--an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S K; Bal, R K; Maudar, K K

    1998-05-01

    Mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts develop from ectopic lymphatic tissue. Most of them present as symptomless abdominal swellings or are found coincidentally during abdominal operations. One third of patients may present with acute abdominal pain, and few may present with chronic abdominal pain. However, mesenteric cyst presenting as inguinal hernia is extremely rare. Only four cases have been reported in the English-language literature. The present case is the fifth, and only the second from this subcontinent. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision.

  20. Laparoscopic resection of giant mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Polat, C; Ozaçmak, I D; Yücel, T; Ozmen, V

    2000-12-01

    Benign cystic tumors are rare intra-abdominal lesions that may be retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or omental. Most of them cause nonspecific symptoms, but rarely, they cause serious complications such as volvulus, rupture, or bowel obstruction. The diagnosis of these tumors can be made by abdominal ultrasonography or CT. Their only treatment is surgical excision, which can be done by either laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery. In last decade, laparoscopic surgical approaches have replaced open procedures in many surgical abdominal diseases. In this paper, a patient with laparoscopically excised mesenteric cyst is presented along with a literature review.

  1. Case Report: Ischaemic appendicitis post mesenteric biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Zukiwskyj, Marianna; Tun, June; Desai, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    A common indication for laparoscopic mesenteric lymph node biopsy is to provide a tissue diagnosis in the absence of palpable peripheral nodes via a minimally invasive approach.  There are no reports to date of ischaemia to the appendix as a complication of this procedure.   We report the case of a 34-year-old lady who underwent a mesenteric biopsy for a lesion found incidentally on CT to investigate longstanding abdominal pain, and 2 days later required an appendicectomy for ischaemic appendicitis. PMID:26937277

  2. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome.

  3. Endovascular stent implantation in the coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries in the treatment of chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Srimannarayana, J; Babu, K Jagadeesh; Ramesh, K G; Raju, P V R; Sharma, Anurag

    2006-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia is a rare but serious cause of abdominal pain.We present the case of a man who had symptomatic mesenteric ischemia, secondary to a superior mesenteric artery stenosis in conjunction with a coeliac artery stenosis. He was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent insertion, and showed good symptomatic improvement. PMID:18989062

  4. Acute mesenteric ischaemia and unexpected death.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Acute mesenteric ischaemia is a vascular emergency that arises when blood flow to the intestine is compromised leading to tissue necrosis. It is primarily a condition of the elderly associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Causes include arterial thromboembolism, venous thrombosis and splanchnic vasoconstriction (so-called nonocclusive mesenteric ischaemia). Reperfusion injury and breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier lead to metabolic derangements, sepsis and death from multiorgan failure. The diagnosis may be difficult to make clinically and numbers of cases are increasing due to ageing of the population. The clinical and pathological features are reviewed with discussion of predisposing conditions. Careful dissection of the mesenteric vasculature is required at autopsy with appropriate histologic sampling and documentation of associated comorbidities. Other organs need to be checked for thrombi and the possibility of testing for inherited thombophilias should be considered. Toxicological evaluation, particularly in younger individuals, may reveal evidence of cocaine use. On occasion no obstructive lesions will be demonstrated, however the confounding effects of post-mortem autolytic and putrefactive changes may mean that nonocclusive mesenteric ischaemia may be difficult to diagnose.

  5. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: diagnosis and noninvasive imaging.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Michelle S; Kavanagh, Peter V; Bechtold, Robert E; Chen, Michael Y; Ott, David J; Regan, John D; Weber, Therese M

    2002-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is an uncommon but potentially lethal cause of bowel ischemia. Several imaging methods are available for diagnosis, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Doppler ultrasonography allows direct evaluation of the mesenteric and portal veins, provides semiquantitative flow information, and allows Doppler waveform analysis of the visceral vessels; however, it is operator dependent and is often limited by overlying bowel gas. Conventional contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) allows sensitive detection of venous thrombosis within the central large vessels of the portomesenteric circulation and any associated secondary findings; however, it is limited by respiratory misregistration, motion artifact, and substantially decreased longitudinal spatial resolution. Helical CT and CT angiography, especially when performed with multi-detector row scanners, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography, enable volumetric acquisitions in a single breath hold, eliminating motion artifact and suppressing respiratory misregistration. Helical CT angiography and three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography should be considered the primary diagnostic modalities for patients with a high clinical suspicion of mesenteric ischemia. Conventional angiography is reserved for equivocal cases at noninvasive imaging and is also used in conjunction with transcatheter therapeutic techniques in management of symptomatic portal and mesenteric venous thrombosis.

  6. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, D. N.; Shaikh, F. M.; Kavanagh, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight. PMID:26421207

  7. Neural programming of mesenteric and renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Reho, John J; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Benjamin, James E; Fisher, Steven A

    2014-08-15

    There is evidence for developmental origins of vascular dysfunction yet little understanding of maturation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of regional circulations. We measured maturational changes in expression of myosin phosphatase (MP) and the broader VSM gene program in relation to mesenteric small resistance artery (SRA) function. We then tested the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in programming of SRAs and used genetically engineered mice to define the role of MP isoforms in the functional maturation of the mesenteric circulation. Maturation of rat mesenteric SRAs as measured by qPCR and immunoblotting begins after the second postnatal week and is not complete until maturity. It is characterized by induction of markers of VSM differentiation (smMHC, γ-, α-actin), CPI-17, an inhibitory subunit of MP and a key target of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, α1-adrenergic, purinergic X1, and neuropeptide Y1 receptors of sympathetic signaling. Functional correlates include maturational increases in α-adrenergic-mediated force and calcium sensitization of force production (MP inhibition) measured in first-order mesenteric arteries ex vivo. The MP regulatory subunit Mypt1 E24+/LZ- isoform is specifically upregulated in SRAs during maturation. Conditional deletion of mouse Mypt1 E24 demonstrates that splicing of E24 causes the maturational reduction in sensitivity to cGMP-mediated vasorelaxation (MP activation). Neonatal chemical sympathectomy (6-hydroxydopamine) suppresses maturation of SRAs with minimal effect on a conduit artery. Mechanical denervation of the mature rat renal artery causes a reversion to the immature gene program. We conclude that the SNS captures control of the mesenteric circulation by programming maturation of the SRA smooth muscle.

  8. Chylous mesenteric cysts: a rare surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Perri, Giampaolo; Freschi, Giancarlo

    2014-03-01

    A mesenteric cyst is defined as a cyst that is located in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract and may extend from the base of the mesentery into the retroperitoneum. It is often asymptomatic and therefore it is usually found as an incidental finding. Preoperative diagnosis may be possible with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the correct diagnosis can only be made with histology. The first-choice therapy is the complete removal of the cyst, which must be accurately planned according to the anatomy of the lesion, its dimensions and its relationships with major abdominal structures. We present two clinical cases: the one of a 30-year-old man with a mesenteric cyst that was removed by laparoscopy and the other of a 61-year-old woman who underwent open excision of a huge retroperitoneal cyst.

  9. Bacterial translocation in cirrhotic rats stimulates eNOS-derived NO production and impairs mesenteric vascular contractility

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, R.; Das, S.; Cadelina, G.; Garcia-Tsao, G.; Milstien, S.; Groszmann, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the arterial vasodilation and associated vascular hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors observed in liver cirrhosis. Bacteria, potent activators of NO and TNF-α synthesis, are found in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of ascitic cirrhotic rats. Here, we investigated the impact of bacterial translocation (BT) to MLNs on TNF-α production, vascular NO release, and contractility in the mesenteric vasculature of ascitic cirrhotic rats. Vascular response to the α-adrenoagonist methoxamine, which is diminished in the superior mesenteric arterial beds of cirrhotic rats, is further blunted in the presence of BT. BT promoted vascular NO release in cirrhotic rats, an effect that depended on pressure-induced shear stress and was blocked by the NO inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine. Removing the endothelium had the same effect. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), but not the inducible isoform (iNOS), was present in mesenteric vasculature of cirrhotic rats with and without BT, and its expression was enhanced compared with controls. TNF-α was induced in MLNs by BT and accumulated in parallel in the serum. This TNF-α production was associated with elevated levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a TNF-α–stimulated cofactor and enhancer of eNOS-derived NO biosynthesis and NOS activity in mesenteric vasculature. These findings establish a link between BT to MLNs and increased TNF-α production and elevated BH4 levels enhancing eNOS-derived NO overproduction, further impairing contractility in the cirrhotic mesenteric vasculature. PMID:10545521

  10. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: clinical and therapeutical approach.

    PubMed

    Hotoleanu, C; Andercou, O; Andercou, A

    2008-12-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), an unusual location of deep venous thrombosis, occurs especially on a predisposing terrain. Recently, hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to be associated with venous thrombosis, often recurrent and located in an uncommon site. Hyperhomocysteinemia is mainly due to genetic causes (mutations 677C>T and 1298A>C of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) and vitamins B deficiencies. MVT may present as acute, subacute or chronic form. The clinical supposition of mesenteric thrombosis is based on the discrepancy between the abdominal pain and the physical examination. The nonspecific character of the pain, mimicking peptic ulceration in some cases, and the possibility of an initial normal clinical examination may delay the diagnosis. The occurrence of the fever, rebound tenderness and guarding suggests progression to bowel infarction. MVT leads to peritonitis in 1/3 to 2/3 of cases. Laboratory blood tests are not helpful in confirming the diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Leukocytosis and metabolic acidosis are considered to be the most specific laboratory findings in patients with mesenteric ischemia. Abdominal computed tomography is the test of choice for the diagnosis. However, most of the cases are diagnosed during laparotomy or autopsy. Anticoagulant therapy administrated early increases the survival rate. Surgery is indicated in cases with bowel infarction or peritonitis.

  11. Fetal and postnatal ovine mesenteric vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Nielsen, Lori C.; Caty, Michael G.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal circulation and mesenteric arterial (MA) reactivity may play a role in preparing the fetus for enteral nutrition. We hypothesized that MA vasoreactivity changes with gestation and vasodilator pathways predominate in the postnatal period. METHODS Small distal MA rings (0.5-mm diameter) were isolated from fetal (116-d, 128-d, 134-d, and 141-d gestation, term ~ 147 d) and postnatal lambs. Vasoreactivity was evaluated using vasoconstrictors (norepinephrine (NE) after pretreatment with propranolol and endothelin-1(ET-1)) and vasodilators (NO donors A23187 and s-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP)). Protein and mRNA assays for receptors and enzymes (endothelin receptor A, alpha-adrenergic receptor 1A (ADRA1A), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5)) were performed in mesenteric arteries. RESULTS MA constriction to NE and ET-1 peaked at 134 d. Relaxation to A23187 and SNAP was maximal after birth. Basal eNOS activity was low at 134 d. ADRA1A mRNA and protein increasedsignificantlyat134danddecreasedpostnatally.sGC and PDE5 protein increased from 134 to 141 d. CONCLUSION Mesenteric vasoconstriction predominates in late-preterm gestation (134 d; the postconceptional age with the highest incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)) followed by a conversion to vasodilatory influences near the time of full-term birth. Perturbations in this ontogenic mechanism, including preterm birth, may be a risk factor for NEC. PMID:26672733

  12. Transient Mesenteric Ischemia Leads to Remodeling of Rat Mesenteric Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Romo, Mónica; Márquez-Martín, Ana; Dantas, Ana P.; Vila, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. We studied the effect of mesenteric I/R on structural and mechanical properties of rat mesenteric resistance artery (MRA) that, once disrupted, might impact the outcome of this devastating clinical condition. Superior mesenteric artery from Wistar–Kyoto rats was occluded (90 min) and reperfused (24 h). The effect of tezosentan, a dual endothelin (ET)-receptor antagonist, was studied in ischemic (IO) and sham-operated (SO) animals. MRA structure and mechanics were assessed by pressure myography. Nuclei distribution, elastin content and organization, collagen I/III and ET-1 expression, ET-1 plasma levels, superoxide anion (O2⋅−) production, and mRNA levels of NAD(P)H-oxidase subunits were measured. To assess ET-1 effects on O2⋅− production, MRA from non-operated rats were incubated in culture medium with ET-1. Mesenteric I/R increased MRA wall thickness (P < 0.05) and cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) but decreased wall stiffness (P < 0.05). Arterial remodeling was paralleled by enhancement of: (i) collagen I/III expression (P < 0.01), ET-1 expression (P < 0.05), and O2⋅− formation (P < 0.01) in the vessel wall; (ii) number of internal elastic lamina (IEL) fenestrae (P < 0.05); and (iii) plasma levels of ET-1 (P < 0.05). Moreover, ET-1 increased O2⋅− (P < 0.05) production in cultured MRA. Tezosentan prevented hypertrophic remodeling and collagen I/III deposition, and enhanced O2⋅− production, but it did not affect the decreased wall stiffness after mesenteric I/R. These results indicate that 90 min occlusion/24 h reperfusion induces hypertrophic remodeling of MRA linked to ET-1-mediated increase of collagen and O2⋅−. Decreased stiffness may be associated with increased number of IEL fenestrae. The resulting MRA remodeling, initially adaptive, might become maladaptive contributing to the pathology and poor

  13. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: An Infrequent Complication of Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Turgut; Bayraktar, Adem; Dikici, Fatih; Balık, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare condition that causes a proximal small intestinal obstruction due to contraction of the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta. Scoliosis surgery is one of the 15 reasons for superior mesenteric artery syndrome, which can present with acute or chronic manifestations. Although conservative treatment is usually possible, surgical treatment is required in certain cases that cannot be treated using conservative methods. In this paper, we describe a patient who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome after scoliosis surgery and was treated with duodenojejunostomy due to failure and complications of conservative treatment. PMID:25405053

  14. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Katelee Barrett; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension.

  15. Superior mesenteric vein aneurysm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuan; Vu, Jonathan-Hien; Matteo, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was found to have a saccular superior mesenteric vein (SMV) aneurysm on computed tomography (CT) scan during workup for abdominal pain. It measured 3.5 cm in diameter. The SMV aneurysm was successfully resected, and the SMV was repaired with femoral vein patch angioplasty. She was placed on coumadin for 3 months. At follow-up, the vein patch repair was patent and the patient was doing well with complete resolution of her abdominal pain. PMID:22156158

  16. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  17. [Laparoscopic approach excision of mesenteric cysts].

    PubMed

    Bosco, L; Clerico, G; Galetto, P V; Jon, G

    1997-11-01

    The authors reports a case of a young woman suffering from mesenteric cyst. The incidence of these lesions is 1 to 100,000 admissions in adult patients and 1 to 20,000 admissions in pediatric age. These cysts, with retroperitoneal and omental cysts, have a similar etiopathogenesis as lymphatic ectopic tissue. In the majority of cases these cysts are asymptomatic and often the diagnosis is intraoperative. In this case the cyst was removed successfully with laparoscopic approach. This mini-invasive method allows a complete and radical excision of the cyst and reduces postoperative hospital stay and morbidity.

  18. [Aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery in a child].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2000-12-01

    A case report of the ruptured aneurysma of the superior mesenteric artery at 12-year-old girl which was successfully treated by resection and substitution by means of venous graft. There is illustrated good long-term result more than 7 years after operation. Superior mesenteric artery aneurysma diagnosis in childhood is very rare.

  19. Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery for a mesenteric teratoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Koyama, Shinsuke; Shiki, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Mature cystic teratomas are benign neoplasms of germ cell tumors that occur most frequently in gonadal sites. The tumors usually contain 2 or 3 well-differentiated elements of endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal origin. Although relatively uncommon, teratomas can be composed of mature tissue originating from only 1 germ cell layer. This is known as a monodermal teratoma. Extragonadal teratomas, especially mesenteric teratomas, are extremely rare. Currently, only 21 cases of mesenteric teratoma have been described in the English literature. Mesenteric teratomas are rarely diagnosed preoperatively because pathological examination is necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. We herein report a rare case of mesenteric monodermal teratoma and review the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of mesenteric teratoma treated with hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery. PMID:24680163

  20. Mesenteric arterial vasopressin in cats: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lote, K.; Folling, M.; Lekven, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1981-05-01

    The administration of intraaterial mesenteric vasopressin to induce small intestinal ischemia was evaluated in the cat. Small intestinal blood flow was measured by carbonized microsphere distribution and electromagnetic flowmetry. Injection of 99mTc labeled isotope into the superior mesenteric artery was monitored by gamma camera, and isotope kinetics were evaluated as indicators of small intestinal blood flow. Superior mesenteric arterial and small intestinal mucosal blood flow could maximally be reduced to 15%-20% of control by vasopressin administration. 99mTcO4 mesenteric-cardiac transit time was doubled in all animals when small intestinal mucosal blood flow was reduced to less than one-third of control. However, significant blood flow reductions were induced in other abdominal organs, most importantly in retroperitoneal lymph nodes and adipose tissue. Intraarterial mesenteric vasopressin administration does not induce sufficiently severe and specific intestinal ischemia to provide optimal conditions for selective small intestinal hypoxic radioprotection.

  1. The middle suprarenal artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Honma, Satoru; Kudo, Motoi

    2012-01-01

    We observed a rare case of the middle suprarenal artery branching out from the superior mesenteric artery in a 78-year-old male. This atypical artery enters the right suprarenal gland that was also supplied by the superior and the inferior suprarenal arteries as usual. In embryonic stages, vasculature of the vitelline system and the gonadal system is differentially organized. The superior mesenteric artery has been generally thought to be pure vitelline, since there has been no evidence that the superior mesenteric artery supplies other organs than digestive. We then speculate that the present middle suprarenal artery is a remnant of the embryonic gonadal artery from the superior mesenteric artery, whereas a stem artery to the testis disappeared. Surgeons should take notice of the middle suprarenal artery when operations are conducted around the superior mesenteric artery.

  2. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  3. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem. PMID:25577850

  4. Laparoscopic Management of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fenoglio, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The differential diagnosis of intestinal obstruction includes mechanical obstruction, obstruction secondary to systemic disease, and idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. The causes of these are extensive; however, the majority of cases involve a mechanical cause. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare and controversial form of mechanical obstruction with just over 300 well-defined cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish, even after surgery. In addition, this syndrome sometimes may be managed conservatively, leaving a definitive diagnosis unproven. We describe herein 2 patients with SMAS successfully treated with laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy. Methods: Two cases of SMAS occurred in young men ages 23 and 34. The workup included a consultation with a gastroenterologist, an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, upper GI series with small bowel follow-through, computed tomography scan, ultrasound of the abdomen, and abdominal aortogram. This diagnosis was established after consultation with the surgeon and the gastroenterologist in each case. Results: Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy was performed in each case, and both patients have had complete resolution of their preoperative symptoms. Conclusions: A laparoscopic approach to the management of superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a reasonable and successful way of treating these patients. PMID:12856847

  5. Common rodent procedures.

    PubMed

    Klaphake, Eric

    2006-05-01

    Rodents are commonly owned exotic animal pets that may be seen by veterinary practitioners. Although most owners presenting their animals do care about their pets, they may not be aware of the diagnostic possibilities and challenges that can be offered by rodents to the veterinarian. Understanding clinical anatomy, proper hand-ling technique, realistic management of emergency presentations,correct and feasible diagnostic sampling, anesthesia, and humane euthanasia procedures is important to enhancing the doctor-client-patient relationship, especially when financial constraints may be imposed by the owner. PMID:16759953

  6. Atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis resulting in large intestinal hypoperfusion: a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lotun, Kapildeo; Shetty, Ranjith; Topaz, On

    2012-11-01

    Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia results from intestinal hypoperfusion and is classically thought to result from involvement of two or more mesenteric arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery are most frequently implicated in this disease process, and their involvement usually results in symptoms of small intestinal ischemia. Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia resulting predominantly from inferior mesenteric artery involvement has largely been overlooked but does gives rise to its own, unique clinical presentation with symptoms resulting from large intestinal ischemia. We present four patients with atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis with symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia that have unique clinical presentations consistent with large intestinal ischemia that resolved following percutaneous endovascular treatment of the inferior mesenteric artery stenosis. These cases represent a novel approach to the diagnosis and management of this disease process and may warrant a further subclassification of chronic mesenteric ischemia into chronic small intestinal ischemia and chronic large intestinal ischemia.

  7. The new NO donor Terpy induces similar relaxation in mesenteric resistance arteries of renal hypertensive and normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Alice V; Pereira, Amanda C; Grando, Marcella D; da Silva, Roberto S; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2013-11-30

    The present work aimed to investigate the cellular mechanisms involved on the vasorelaxation induced by the new nitric oxide donor [Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO](3+) (Terpy) in isolated mesenteric resistance artery and to compare the vascular responses in isolated vessels from 2K and 2K-1C hypertensive rats. We have used this artery because it is important to the control of vascular resistance and consequently to the blood pressure control. The NO donor Terpy induced relaxation in a concentration-dependent way in mesenteric resistance arteries. There were no differences between renal hypertensive (2K-1C) and normotensive (2K) in Terpy-induced relaxation neither in NO released. The relaxation induced by Terpy was inhibited by the soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ both in 2K and in 2K-1C with similar amplitude. In agreement with these data, the protein expression of the subunits α1 and β1 of the enzyme sGC was not different between 2K-1C and 2K mesenteric bed. The relaxation induced by Terpy was inhibited by the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G kinase) inhibitor or by the non-selective K(+) channel blocker tetraethylamonium (TEA), but with no difference between 2K-1C and 2K arteries. The relaxation induced by Terpy was also inhibited by the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin in both groups. Taken together, these results show that the vascular relaxation induced by the NO donor [Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO](3+) involves the activation of NO/sGC/cGMP/GK pathway, activation of K(+) channels sensitive to TEA and SERCA in normotensive and renal hypertensive rat mesenteric resistance arteries. Surprisingly, Terpy-induced vasorelaxation is similar in mesenteric resistance arteries of renal hypertensive and normotensive rats.

  8. Cannabinoid-induced mesenteric vasodilation through an endothelial site distinct from CB1 or CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Járai, Z; Wagner, J A; Varga, K; Lake, K D; Compton, D R; Martin, B R; Zimmer, A M; Bonner, T I; Buckley, N E; Mezey, E; Razdan, R K; Zimmer, A; Kunos, G

    1999-11-23

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand arachidonyl ethanolamide (anandamide), elicit not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, have been cloned, and studies with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A have implicated peripherally located CB1 receptors in the hypotensive action of cannabinoids. In rat mesenteric arteries, anandamide-induced vasodilation is inhibited by SR141716A, but other potent CB1 receptor agonists, such as HU-210, do not cause vasodilation, which implicates an as-yet-unidentified receptor in this effect. Here we show that "abnormal cannabidiol" (Abn-cbd) is a neurobehaviorally inactive cannabinoid that does not bind to CB1 receptors, yet causes SR141716A-sensitive hypotension and mesenteric vasodilation in wild-type mice and in mice lacking CB1 receptors or both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Hypotension by Abn-cbd is also inhibited by cannabidiol (20 microgram/g), which does not influence anandamide- or HU-210-induced hypotension. In the rat mesenteric arterial bed, Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is unaffected by blockade of endothelial NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, or capsaicin receptors, but it is abolished by endothelial denudation. Mesenteric vasodilation by Abn-cbd, but not by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, or capsaicine, is blocked by SR141716A (1 microM) or by cannabidiol (10 microM). Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is also blocked in the presence of charybdotoxin (100 nM) plus apamin (100 nM), a combination of K(+)-channel toxins reported to block the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These findings suggest that Abn-cbd and cannabidiol are a selective agonist and antagonist, respectively, of an as-yet-unidentified endothelial receptor for anandamide, activation of which elicits NO-independent mesenteric vasodilation, possibly by means of the release of EDHF.

  9. Rodent models of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Idris, Aymen I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to provide a detailed description of male and female rodent models of osteoporosis. In addition to indications on the methods of performing the surgical procedures, the choice of reliable and safe anaesthetics is also described. Post-operative care, including analgesia administration for pain management, is also discussed. Ovariectomy in rodents is a procedure where ovaries are surgically excised. Hormonal changes resulting from ovary removal lead to an oestrogen-deprived state, which enhances bone remodelling, causes bone loss and increases bone fracture risk. Therefore, ovariectomy has been considered as the most common preclinical model for understanding the pathophysiology of menopause-associated events and for developing new treatment strategies for tackling post-menopausal osteoporosis. This protocol also provides a detailed description of orchidectomy, a model for androgen-deficient osteoporosis in rodents. Endocrine changes following testes removal lead to hypogonadism, which results in accelerated bone loss, increasing osteoporosis risk. Orchidectomised rodent models have been proposed to mimic male osteoporosis and therefore remain a valuable tool for understanding androgen deficiency in aged men. Although it would have been particularly difficult to assemble an internationally acceptable description of surgical procedures, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing ovariectomy and orchidectomy in laboratory rodents. Research scientists are reminded that they should follow their own institution's interpretation of such guidelines. Ultimately, however, all animal procedures must be overseen by the local Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body and conducted under licences approved by a regulatory ethics committee. PMID:25852854

  10. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring.

  11. [Widespread mesenteric venous thrombosis and cirrhosis diagnosed with autopsy].

    PubMed

    Kömür, İlhami; Özdemirel, Rifat Özgür; Başpınar, Bünyamin; Şam, Bülent; Anık Karayel, Ferah

    2015-09-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare disorder with a high mortality rate. Since patients remain asymptomatic, diagnosis of the disease is difficult. Diagnosis can be mainly made with either laparotomy or autopsy. Many factors are considered in the etiology of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Liver cirrhosis and chronic pyelonephritis, which we detected in the autopsy and histologic examination of our case, are considered as two of the factors. In our study, it was aimed to present a case with near-total intestinal necrosis caused by portal vein thrombosis which spread to the lineal vein, pancreatic vein and to the branches of superior mesenteric veins.

  12. Superior mesenteric artery thrombosis after abrupt discontinuation of rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher B; Acquisto, Nicole M; Rotoli, Jason M; LoStracco, Thomas; Shamaskin, Ann R; Pasternack, Joel S

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis after the abrupt discontinuation of rivaroxaban in a 59-year-old male patient. The initial presentation was of sudden onset abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and hematochezia in the setting of recently holding rivaroxaban anticoagulation for an atrial flutter ablative procedure. Imaging revealed thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery and acute mesenteric ischemia requiring emergent surgical intervention for embolectomy. Upon exploratory laparotomy, the bowel was found to be viable, and an embolectomy with patch angioplasty was successful without complication. This case illustrates the need for emergency medicine clinician familiarity with this possible medication adverse event with rivaroxaban.

  13. Laparoscopic Excision of a Mesenteric Cyst During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic management of mesenteric cysts during pregnancy has not been reported before. Case Report: A young woman with a mesenteric cyst associated with a crossed ectopic kidney, underwent laparoscopic excision of the cyst in the second trimester of pregnancy. The procedure was completed without complications, and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day. Thereafter, the pregnancy progressed uneventfully, and she delivered a healthy baby at term. Conclusions: Laparoscopic management of mesenteric cysts during pregnancy is feasible, safe, and less invasive than laparotomy when performed in select patients by experienced surgeons. PMID:12723004

  14. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  15. Mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Wojskowicz, Piotr; Kiśluk, Joanna; Fil, Dawid; Kemona, Andrzej; Dadan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniosis is an acute or chronic, zoonotic disease caused by infection of Gram-negative rods Yersinia enterocolitica. It can be transmitted by the consumption of originally contaminated food products (pork, unpasteurized milk) or secondarily contaminated with animal or vegetable products. The clinical picture of infection may have a variable course is related to the age and physical condition of the patient, or pathogenic properties of microorganisms. Infection caused by Y. enterocolitica can occur in different clinical forms: food poisoning, colitis, mesentric lymphadenitis, erythema nodosum, arthritis, pharyngitis, pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis. The aim of this study was to present a rare case of infection with Y. enterocolitica mesenteric lymph nodes coexistent with appendicitis. PMID:26557944

  16. Relationships between Rodent White Adipose Fat Pads and Human White Adipose Fat Depots

    PubMed Central

    Chusyd, Daniella E.; Wang, Donghai; Huffman, Derek M.; Nagy, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to compare and contrast the physiological and metabolic profiles of rodent white adipose fat pads with white adipose fat depots in humans. Human fat distribution and its metabolic consequences have received extensive attention, but much of what has been tested in translational research has relied heavily on rodents. Unfortunately, the validity of using rodent fat pads as a model of human adiposity has received less attention. There is a surprisingly lack of studies demonstrating an analogous relationship between rodent and human adiposity on obesity-related comorbidities. Therefore, we aimed to compare known similarities and disparities in terms of white adipose tissue (WAT) development and distribution, sexual dimorphism, weight loss, adipokine secretion, and aging. While the literature supports the notion that many similarities exist between rodents and humans, notable differences emerge related to fat deposition and function of WAT. Thus, further research is warranted to more carefully define the strengths and limitations of rodent WAT as a model for humans, with a particular emphasis on comparable fat depots, such as mesenteric fat. PMID:27148535

  17. Computed tomography of mesenteric involvement in fulminant pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, R.B.; Federle, M.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1983-04-01

    Although extension into the mesentery has been recognized as a frequent pathway of extrapancreatic spread in acute pancreatitis, it has received relatively little attention in the computed tomography (CT) literature. The medical records and CT scans of 55 patients with severe pancreatitis were reviewed in this study; of these patients, 19 (35%) had mesenteric abnormalities, which in 11 patients (20%) represented the most extensive extrapancreatic site of the most extensive extrapancreatic site of involvement. In fulminant pancreatitis, dissection along the mesentery is an important pathway for spread of pancreatic abscesses or phlegmons. Clinical correlation suggests that a combination of mesenteric with lesser sac and anterior pararenal space involvement is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 19 patients with mesenteric involvement, two died and 14 (74%) required surgery for abscesses, pseudocysts, or, in one case, a colonic fistula. The CT features of the normal mesentery and CT criteria for diagnosing mesenteric inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  18. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Rebecca L.; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  19. Mesenteric panniculitis presenting with acute non-occlusive colonic ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of positron emission tomography (PET) of the mesentery as a diagnostic modality in cases of mesenteric panniculitis is unclear. Case presentation A 67-year-old woman presented with rectal bleeding due to nonocclusive colonic ischemia. Abdominal CT showed features of mesenteric panniculitis. PET-CT demonstrated no abnormal fluorine-18 fluordeoxyglucose uptake in the affected mesentery or any surrounding lymph nodes. Laparoscopic biopsies from a thickened segment of mesenteric fat excluded neoplastic infiltration. Conclusions In cases of unexplained ischemic colitis, panniculitis should be considered a possible diagnosis. PET-CT may be negative for fluorine-18 fluordeoxyglucose uptake in this condition. As of known false-negative PET-CT results in mesenteric panniculitis, PET-CT has a limited role in the diagnostic work-up. PMID:21696596

  20. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Burns, Rebecca L; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  1. A patient with combined mediastinal, mesenteric and retroperitoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Graal, M B; Lustermans, F A

    1994-06-01

    We report a patient with combined mediastinal, mesenteric and retroperitoneal fibrosis who first presented with signs of a superior vena cava syndrome. She was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The aetiology, clinical picture, and possible therapy of idiopathic fibrosclerosis are discussed.

  2. Mesenteric chylous cysts simulating a pelvic disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Covarelli, Piero; Arena, Saverio; Badolato, Marco; Canonico, Silvia; Rondelli, Fabio; Luzi, Giuseppe; Cristofani, Roberto; Affronti, Giuseppe; Noya, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Mesenteric chylous cysts, also known as retroperitoneal chylomatous cysts, mesenteric lymphangiomas or chyloma of the mesentery, are extremely rare and their aspecific clinical presentation can mimic other diseases. In addition, imaging techniques, which are rarely helpful in the correct diagnosis, can demonstrate aspecific features. The Authors report the case of a 62-year-old woman admitted to the hospital for two incidental abdominal masses diagnosed during a yearly monitoring examination and considered to be large adnexal masses. The abdominal masses were removed at laparotomy. Both frozen section and final histopathological examination showed mesenteric chylous cysts. Mesenteric chylous cysts are usually a benign abdominal pathology. As illustrated by this case, even if they are extremely rare, they should be not underrated. The Authors review the literature, confirming the rarity of the disease and defining its characteristics.

  3. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  4. Limited systemic sclerosis initially presenting with mesenteric panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Vilá, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis pertains to a group of uncommon disorders named sclerosing mesenteritis that present with different levels of inflammation and fibrosis of the small bowel mesentery. It is associated with abdominal surgeries, trauma, malignancies, infections and connective tissue diseases. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of sclerosing mesenteritis have been reported in patients with systemic sclerosis. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman who had incidental CT findings of mesenteric panniculitis. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy that showed fat necrosis. On further review she had a 1-year history of Raynaud's phenomenon. Physical examination showed sclerodactyly. She had elevated anticentromere antibodies and skin biopsy was consistent with scleroderma. She was diagnosed with limited systemic sclerosis and was treated with D-penicillamine. After 6 years of follow-up, the mesenteric panniculitis and systemic sclerosis both remained stable. This case highlights the importance of considering rheumatic diseases in the differential diagnosis of sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:25326572

  5. Mesenteric air embolism following enteroscopic small bowel tattooing procedure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Natalie; Lamba, Ramit; Lee, John; Lall, Chandana

    2012-01-01

    Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is a revolutionary procedure in which the entire small bowel can be visualized endoscopically. DBE has the advantage of both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in the setting of small bowel neoplasms and vascular malformations. We present a unique case of a 76-year-old female who underwent small bowel DBE tattoo marking of a distal small bowel tumor complicated by development of severe abdominal pain postprocedure secondary to bowel air embolism into the mesenteric veins. Mesenteric air can be seen after other endoscopic procedures such as biopsy, mucosal clip placement and polypectomy, or following a colonoscopy. Mesenteric air embolism following small bowel tattooing procedure has not been previously reported in the literature. Mesenteric air when present may be attributed to mesenteric ischemia and can subject the patient to unnecessary surgical intervention if misdiagnosed. Thus, this report holds significance for the radiologist as computed tomography (CT) findings of mesenteric air embolism must be evaluated in the context of appropriate clinical history before treatment decisions are made. PMID:23393642

  6. Identification of Mouse Mesenteric and Subcutaneous in vitro Adipogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yugo; Otsuki, Michio; Kita, Shunbun; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fat accumulation and the dysfunction of visceral white adipose tissue (WAT), but not subcutaneous WAT, cause abnormalities in whole body metabolic homeostasis. However, no current drugs specifically target visceral WAT. The primary reason for this is that a practical in vitro culture system for mesenteric adipocytes has not been established. To resolve this issue, we sought to identify in vitro adipogenic cells in mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs. First, we examined the expression pattern of surface antigens in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from mouse mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs, and found the expression of 30 stem cell-related surface antigens. Then, to evaluate the adipogenic ability of each fraction, we performed in vitro screening, and identified five candidate markers for mesenteric adipogenic cells and one candidate marker for subcutaneous adipogenic cells. To investigate whether in vitro adipogenic ability accurately reflects the conditions in vivo, we performed transplantation experiments, and identified CD9− CD201+ Sca-1− cells and CD90+ cells as mesenteric and subcutaneous in vitro adipogenic cells, respectively. Furthermore, mature adipocytes derived from mesenteric and subcutaneous adipogenic cells maintained each characteristic phenotype in vitro. Thus, our study should contribute to the development of a useful culture system for visceral adipocytes. PMID:26884347

  7. Histamine H(3) receptor-mediated modulation of perivascular nerve transmission in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Jin, Xin; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Li, Simin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-03-25

    The rat mesenteric artery has been shown to be innervated by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of histamine H(3) receptors in the neurotransmission of perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves. The mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with Krebs solution and perfusion pressure was measured. In preparations with resting tension, the selective H(3) receptor agonist (R)-α-methylhistamine (α-methylhistamine; 10-100nM) significantly reduced periarterial nerve stimulation (2-8Hz)-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release in the perfusate without an effect on the vasoconstriction induced by exogenously injected noradrenaline (0.5, 1.0nmol). In preparations with active tone produced by methoxamine (2μM) and in the presence of guanethidine (5μM), the periarterial nerve stimulation (1, 2Hz)-induced vasodilator response was inhibited by α-methylhistamine (0.1-1μM) perfusion without affecting vasodilation induced by exogenously injected CGRP (5pmol). Clobenpropit (histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, 1μM) canceled the α-methylhistamine-induced decrease in the periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release and periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasodilation. These results suggest that the stimulation of H(3) receptors located in rat perivascular nerves inhibits presynaptically the neurotransmission of not only adrenergic nerves, but also CGRP nerves, by decreasing neurotransmitters.

  8. Percutaneous Retrograde Recanalization of the Celiac Artery by Way of the Superior Mesenteric Artery for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, George Chacko, Sujith Thomas

    2013-02-15

    A 52-year-old man presented with recurrent postprandial abdominal pain, sitophobia, and progressive weight loss. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) due to subtotal occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and flush occlusion of the celiac artery (CA) was diagnosed. Retrograde recanalization of the CA by way of a collateral channel from the SMA was performed using contemporary recanalization equipment. The CA and SMA were then stented, resulting in sustained resolution of CMI-related symptoms.

  9. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  10. Porto-spleno-mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Battistelli, S; Coratti, F; Gori, T

    2011-02-01

    Porto-spleno-mesenteric (PSM) venous thrombosis is a rare clinical condition that, while being mostly unrecognized, is nonetheless often severe with a high morbidity and mortality. PSM venous thrombosis is the cause of as many as 5-10% of all abdominal ischemic events, and it presents with a highly variable and non-specific pattern of abdominal symptoms. Such complex and non-specific presentation can delay diagnosis, determining the poor clinical outcome of this condition. This review article discusses the information available on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and general management of PSM venous thrombosis, with a focus on a number of some clinical issues that remain unaddressed. In particular, the current understanding of the predisposing factors and the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of this condition are described in detail. The recent advances in imaging techniques, which are leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy and facilitate an early diagnosis are also presented. Further, the indications and limits of both pharmacological and surgical treatment options are discussed.

  11. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  12. Environmental enrichment for laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Eric; Avery, Anne; Vandewoude, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Modernization of housing and husbandry techniques for rodents has minimized confounding variables. The result has been vastly improved health maintenance and reproducibility of research findings, advances that have decreased the numbers of animals needed to attain statistically significant results. Even though not all aspects of rodent manipulation have been strictly defined, as housing and handling procedures have become increasingly standardized, many animal care personnel have recognized the lack of complexity of the rodents' environment. Concern for this aspect of animal well-being has led many research facilities to provide "environmental enrichment" for rodents. Additionally, regulatory agencies in the United States and Europe have also been increasingly concerned about this issue relative to laboratory animal husbandry. However, little is known about the influence such husbandry modifications may have on biological parameters. In this article, laws and guidelines relating to rodent enrichment are reviewed, the natural behaviors of select rodent species are discussed, and an overview of widely used types of enrichment in laboratory rodent management is provided. The literature evaluating effects of rodent enrichment is reviewed both in terms of neurological development and as an experimental variable, and results of a study evaluating the effect of enrichment on immune and physiological parameters are reported. Survey data on current enrichment practices in a large multi-institutional organization are presented, and practical aspects requiring consideration when devising a rodent enrichment program are discussed.

  13. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation.

  14. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  15. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  16. Rodent carcinogens: Setting priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Stern, B.R.; Manley, N.B.; Ames, B.N. )

    1992-10-09

    The human diet contains an enormous background of natural chemicals, such as plant pesticides and the products of cooking, that have not been a focus of carcinogenicity testing. A broadened perspective that includes these natural chemicals is necessary. A comparison of possible hazards for 80 daily exposures to rodent carcinogens from a variety of sources is presented, using an index (HERP) that relates human exposure to carcinogenic potency in rodents. A similar ordering would be expected with the use of standard risk assessment methodology for the same human exposure values. Results indicate that, when viewed against the large background of naturally occurring carcinogens in typical portions of common foods, the residues of synthetic pesticides or environmental pollutants rank low. A similar result is obtained in a separate comparison of 32 average daily exposures to natural pesticides and synthetic pesticides residues in the diet. Although the findings do not indicate that these natural dietary carcinogens are important in human cancer, they cast doubt on the relative importance for human cancer of low-dose exposures to synthetic chemicals.

  17. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 and M3 subtypes mediate acetylcholine-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Tangsucharit, Panot; Takatori, Shingo; Zamami, Yoshito; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Takayama, Fusako

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated pharmacological characterizations of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtypes involving ACh-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. Changes in perfusion pressure to periarterial nerve stimulation and ACh were measured before and after the perfusion of Krebs solution containing muscarinic receptor antagonists. Distributions of muscarinic AChR subtypes in mesenteric arteries with an intact endothelium were studied using Western blotting. The expression level of M1 and M3 was significantly greater than that of M2. Endothelium removal significantly decreased expression levels of M2 and M3, but not M1. In perfused mesenteric vascular beds with intact endothelium and active tone, exogenous ACh (1, 10, and 100 nmol) produced concentration-dependent and long-lasting vasodilatations. In endothelium-denuded preparations, relaxation to ACh (1 nmol) disappeared, but ACh at 10 and 100 nmol caused long-lasting vasodilatations, which were markedly blocked by the treatment of pirenzepine (M1 antagonist) or 4-DAMP (M1 and M3 antagonist) plus hexamethonium (nicotinic AChR antagonist), but not methoctramine (M2 and M4 antagonist). These results suggest that muscarinic AChR subtypes, mainly M1, distribute throughout the rat mesenteric arteries, and that activation of M1 and/or M3 which may be located on CGRPergic nerves releases CGRP, causing an endothelium-independent vasodilatation.

  18. [Syndromes of venous mesenteric ischemia: infarction and transient ischemia].

    PubMed

    Cardot, F; Borg, J Y; Guédon, C; Lerebours, E; Colin, R

    1992-01-01

    The reports of 8 patients with acute or subacute abdominal pain related to venous mesenteric ischemia were reviewed. None of the patients presented local or regional predisposing factors for venous thrombosis. In 4 patients, a localized segment of ischemic small bowel (median length 125 cm; range: 30-350) was resected without immediate anastomosis and postoperative anticoagulation therapy was given. Two of these patients developed recurrent ischemia involving the bowel adjacent to the stoma, treated successfully in 1 case by a repeat resection. The 4 other patients hospitalized with intestinal obstructive symptoms (1 case) or abdominal angina (3 cases) were treated by long term anticoagulation in 3 cases and artificial nutrition in 2 cases. None of them developed mesenteric infarction with a median follow up of 34 months. In 7 of the 8 patients, a coagulopathy was found: primary myeloproliferative disorder (1 case), hypercoagulation state (5 cases), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1 case). These observations suggest that venous mesenteric ischemia included two different entities on the basis of clinical and morphological criteria: mesenteric infarction and subacute transient ischemia without bowel infarction. Most of apparently idiopathic cases of acute or subacute venous mesenteric ischemia are related to hypercoagulation states requiring a long term anticoagulation.

  19. Aquaporins in desert rodent physiology.

    PubMed

    Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-01

    Desert rodents face a sizeable challenge in maintaining salt and water homeostasis due to their life in an arid environment. A number of their organ systems exhibit functional characteristics that limit water loss above that which occurs in non-desert species under similar conditions. These systems include renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, nasal, and skin epithelia. The desert rodent kidney preserves body water by producing a highly concentrated urine that reaches a maximum osmolality nearly three times that of the common laboratory rat. The precise mechanism by which urine is concentrated in any mammal is unknown. Insights into the process may be more apparent in species that produce highly concentrated urine. Aquaporin water channels play a fundamental role in water transport in several desert rodent organ systems. The role of aquaporins in facilitating highly effective water preservation in desert rodents is only beginning to be explored. The organ systems of desert rodents and their associated AQPs are described.

  20. Endocrine diseases of rodents.

    PubMed

    Collins, Bobby R

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of documented endocrine diseases in rodents and other small mammals varies considerably among the species maintained as pets, biomedical research animals, or display animals in zoos. The clinical diagnosis of endocrine diseases almost never occurs in free-ranging animals in their native habitat. Feral animals that have clinical endocrine disease, such as neoplasia, adrenal cortical hyperplasia, or diabetes, would exhibit clinical signs of altered behavior that would result in their removal by predators. The diagnosis of endocrine disease thus takes place in the relatively protective environment of captivity. This observation should forewarn pet owners and clinicians caring for these animals that the environment contributes to the development of endocrine diseases in these animals.

  1. I. Effect of Trichinella spiralis infection on the migration of mesenteric lymphoblasts and mesenteric T lymphoblasts in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Parrott, D M; Bruce, R G

    1976-11-01

    The migration of [125I]UdR-labelled mesenteric lymph node cells in NIH strain mice at various times after inis produced an enhanced accumulation of mesenteric immunoblasts in the small intestine at 2 and 4 days after infection but not at later times. The enhanced migration occurred when using cells from both uninfected and infected donors, denoting an absence of antigenic specificity. This effect is not secondary to a reduced arrival of cells at sites away from the gut in infected mice, but to a primary increase of the arrival in the small intestine. Mesenteric T lymphoblasts (separated on a nylon-wool column) migrated to the small intestine of uninfected recipients and appear to be a major portion of the population which migrate to the gut of infected recipients. Our results were confirmed using 51Cr to label mesenteric cells. We conclude that the parasite causes the small intestine to become more attractive or retentive for mesenteric blast cells early during infection.

  2. Rare case of sclerosing mesenteritis and low grade follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema; Mahy, Gillian; Roche, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of long standing sclerosing mesenteritis; initially presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a mesenteric mass with surrounding fat oedema and stranding with a pseudocapsule and fat ring sign were clearly visualised on the initial computed tomography scan. Laparotomy showed diffuse thickening at the root of the mesentery and histology from this specimen revealed fat necrosis and reactive lymphoid tissue consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. Initial treatment with steroids and tamoxifen relieved the symptoms and the mass. He was maintained on tamoxifen. Three years later he developed a recurrence of his symptoms and abdominal mass that responded to a course of steroids. Two years following this, he developed a follicular Hodgkin’s lymphoma. PMID:27099861

  3. Superior mesenteric vein rotation: a CT sign of midgut malrotation

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.M.; Li, D.K.

    1983-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the pancreas, with its excellent display of peripancreatic anatomy, allows visualization of the major vessels entering the mesenteric root. In scans of the normal upper abdomen obtained at or just below the level of the uncinate process of the pancreas, the proximal superior mesenteric vein (SMV) easily can be identified lying on the right ventral aspect of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The authors have observed a characteristic abnormality in this normal vascular arrangement on CT scans of the pancreas in three adult patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis who were subsequently proved to have midgut malrotation. They called this the SMV rotation sign and believe that its detection even on CT scans limited to the level of the pancreas should alert the radiologist to the presence of a midgut malrotation that may have been unsuspected.

  4. Chronic mesenteric ischemia: efficacy and outcome of endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, Romaric; Guiu, Boris; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krausé, Denis

    2010-06-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia is a rare condition caused by occlusive disease of the mesenteric vessels and manifested most commonly as abdominal pain. While the traditional therapy in symptomatic patients has been surgery, recent improvements in interventional devices and refinement in techniques have increased the popularity of endovascular treatment. The high procedural success and the low complication rate make the catheter-based approach an interesting alternative to surgery. Percutaneous angioplasty and stenting is now recognized as a minimally invasive means of obtaining good long-term results and is consequently suggested for the primary treatment of chronic mesenteric ischemia. This article presents a review of the literature on indications and technical aspects of endovascular treatment, with emphasis on short- and long-term outcomes.

  5. Congenital Mesenteric Defect: An Uncommon Cause of Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Benyamini, Pouya; Lopez, Sarah; Cooper, Matthew; Mohamad, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Congenital mesenteric defects can lead to internal hernias which may result in a bowel obstruction. They are very rare among the adult population, comprising only 0.2%–0.9% incidence rate of all small bowel obstructions. A 40 year old woman presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain.Computed tomography scan was obtained and showed a small bowel obstruction.After failed conservative management with bowel rest and nasogastric tube decompression, the patient underwentdiagnostic laparoscopy.An internal hernia was identified though a congenital mesenteric defect at the level of the sigmoid colon. The hernia was reduced and the defect closed. When a patient presents with abdominal pain the diagnosis of a congenital mesenteric defect with internal hernia should be considered with subsequent emergent surgical exploration. PMID:26918208

  6. [Mesenteric cyst: case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Casarotto, A; Cerofolini, A; Denitto, F; Invernizzi, L; Chiappetta, A; Di Prima, F; Landoni, L; Rebonato, M

    2010-05-01

    Mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts are rare intra-abdominal tumours with an incidence of 1/140.000 in surgery departments and 1/20.000 in paediatric departments. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms for the cysts. In the differential diagnosis lymphangiomas, sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and intestinal duplications should be considered. Diagnostic includes abdominal computed tomography, ultrasound and MRI. Barium enema examination or intravenous pyelogram may be used in special cases. Surgical treatment is indicated also in asymptomatic patients; laparoscopic approach is the "gold standard". Laparotomic approach should be used in the cases of impossibility of total enucleation or in the cases of malignant degeneration. Complete enucleation is the treatment of choice for retroperitoneal and mesenteric cysts. If this cannot be accomplished, the alternative should be the excision of the cyst or the marsupialization. In this paper we present a case of young man with a mesenteric cyst mimicking acute appendicitis.

  7. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management.

  8. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Lucas; Sarhan, Mohammad; Ahmed, Leaque

    2013-08-01

    Laparoscopic procedures for morbid obesity are becoming standard of care which, in experienced hands, has a very low mortality and morbidity. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis has been reported in the literature after different bariatric and nonbariatric laparoscopic procedures. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a relatively new procedure in the treatment of morbid obesity; its complications being well-known including staple line leak, bleeding, and stricture among others. We present a case of superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy successfully managed conservatively with therapeutic anticoagulation, and propose a different hypothesis for the development of such a complication.

  9. Mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangioma in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Yavuz; Albayrak, Fatih; Arslan, Serdar; Calik, Ilknur

    2011-06-01

    Abdominal cystic lymphangiomas are rare congenital benign malformations of the lymphatic system. To the best of our knowledge, only 6 mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangiomas have ever been reported. We herein describe a woman who presented to our hospital with stomachache that had been continuous for approximately 8 months. An abdominal computed tomography showed a cystic lesion. In the exploration, the cyst was totally excised. Based on the histomorphological data, a case of "calcified cystic lymphangioma" was diagnosed. Although mesenteric lymphangiomas are rare, especially in adults, they should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain. Treatment is surgical with resection of the mass, sometimes including resection of adjacent bowel.

  10. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Results in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chahid, Tamam; Alfidja, Agaicha T.; Biard, Marie; Ravel, Anne; Garcier, Jean Marc; Boyer, L.

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated immediate and long-term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement to treat stenotic and occluded arteries in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Fourteen patients were treated by 3 exclusive celiac artery (CA) PTAs (2 stentings), 3 cases with both Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and CA angioplasties, and 8 exclusive SMA angioplasties (3 stentings). Eleven patients had atheromatous stenoses with one case of an early onset atheroma in an HIV patient with antiphospholipid syndrome. The other etiologies of mesenteric arterial lesions were Takayashu arteritis (2 cases) and a postradiation stenoses (1 case). Technical success was achieved in all cases. Two major complications were observed: one hematoma and one false aneurysm occurring at the brachial puncture site (14.3%). An immediate clinical success was obtained in all patients. During a follow-up of 1-83 months (mean: 29 months), 11 patients were symptom free; 3 patients had recurrent pain; in one patient with inflammatory syndrome, pain relief was obtained with medical treatment; in 2 patients abdominal pain was due to restenosis 36 and 6 months after PTA, respectively. Restenosis was treated by PTA (postirradiation stenosis), and by surgical bypass (atheromatous stenosis). Percutaneous endovascular techniques are safe and accurate. They are an alternative to surgery in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia due to short and proximal occlusive lesions of SMA and CA.

  13. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms.

  14. The effect of morphine in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Ozdem, Sadi S; Batu, Ozlem; Tayfun, Fatma; Yalcin, Ozlem; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the effect of morphine in phenylephrine (PE)- or KCl-precontracted rat small mesenteric arteries. Morphine (10(-6)-10(-4) M) administration caused concentration-dependent relaxation responses in small mesenteric arteries precontracted by PE or KCl. Removal of endothelium did not significantly alter the relaxation responses to morphine. The relaxant responses to morphine were partially inhibited by pre-treatment of tissues with naloxone (NAL, 10(-5) M) for 20 min. The inhibitory effect of NAL on relaxant responses to morphine in PE- or KCl-precontracted arteries did not differ significantly between endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded preparations. Incubation of endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded arterial segments with NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) or cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin (10(-5) M) or histamine H(1)-receptor blocker diphenhydramine (10(-6) M), for 20 min did not inhibit the relaxation responses to morphine. Small mesenteric arterial segment contractions induced by stepwise addition of calcium to high KCl solution with no calcium were almost completely inhibited by morphine. These findings suggested that morphine-induced relaxation responses in isolated rat small mesenteric arteries were neither dependent on endothelium nor blocked by NOS or COX inhibition but they rather seem to depend on an interaction of morphine with calcium influx pathways. PMID:15939674

  15. Ileocolic Arteriovenous Fistula with Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurism: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorio, Miguel Angel de; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Medrano, Joaquin; Schoenholz, Caudio; Rodriguez, Juan; D'Agostino, Horacio

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of a venous aneurysm secondary to an acquired ileocolic arteriovenous fistula in a 64-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain and history of appendectomy. The aneurysm was diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography. Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula between ileocolic branches of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. This vascular abnormality was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  16. [Mesenteric artery occlusion as a rare complication of thromboangiitis obliterans].

    PubMed

    Pfitzmann, R; Nüssler, N C; Heise, M; Neuhaus, P; Settmacher, U

    2002-01-01

    Mesenteric artery occlusions are rare complications of Thrombangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease). We report on a 30-year old male with Thrombangiitis obliterans and mesenteric occlusion as a complication of this disease. Because of unclear abdominal pain, laparoscopy was performed which showed small bowel infarction and reduced liver perfusion. After small bowel resection and a second examination, ischemia of the intestinum continued. Angiography was performed, which showed central occlusion of the celiac trunk and the superior mesenteric artery. Relaparotomy with the embolectomy of the superior mesenteric artery, venous bypass from the sup.mes.art. to the hepatic arteries and repeated small bowel resection was performed. The patient recovered completely and was discharged from hospital after 3 weeks. After a further admission to the hospital 3 weeks later with abdominal pain caused by acute occlusion of the right colonic artery and severe ischemia of the right hemicolon, a right hemicolectomy was performed. Now, one year after the last hospital admission, the patient shows no sign of having any abdominal problems.

  17. Mesenteric cysts and intra-abdominal cystic lymphangiomas.

    PubMed

    Takiff, H; Calabria, R; Yin, L; Stabile, B E

    1985-11-01

    Although mesenteric cysts and intra-abdominal cystic lymphangiomas are uncommon and clinically confusing lesions, histologic and ultrastructural evidence suggests that they are pathologically distinct. Differentiation of these lesions is important since lymphangiomas may follow a proliferative and invasive course. Of 28 cases documented at laparotomy, histologically eight patients (29%) had cystic lymphangiomas and 20 patients (71%) had mesenteric cysts. Lymphangioma was found to be exclusively a disease of childhood and young adulthood (mean age, 10 years); mesenteric cyst was found in all age groups (mean age, 44 years), and two thirds of these patients were over 40 years old. Patients with lymphangiomas more frequently were male (75% vs 30%), symptomatic (88% vs 35%), and had ascites (50% vs 0%) and larger lesions (mean, 8.8 vs 4.7 cm) when compared with patients with mesenteric cysts. Complete excision was possible in all but four patients, with no operative deaths and a postoperative complication rate of 7%. After a mean follow-up period of four years, there were no recurrences among 16 patients who had undergone complete excision.

  18. Recurrent retroperitoneal mesenteric cyst. A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Chirathivat, S; Shermeta, D

    1979-04-15

    A mesenteric cyst is an uncommon cause of a palpable abdominal mass. A correct preoperative diagnosis can be made by the combined use of radiographic and sonographic examinations in conjunction with the clinical features. A patient with a retroperitoneal cyst extending into the leaves of the mesentery is presented. The cyst recurred 4 years after surgery.

  19. Prolonged idiopathic gastric dilatation following revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Julia L; Stoven, Samantha; Szarka, Lawrence; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old female presented with nausea, emesis, early satiety, and abdominal distension following revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia. Computed tomography angiogram showed gastric dilatation. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, small bowel follow through, and paraneoplastic panel were negative. Gastric emptying was delayed. Despite conservative management, she required a percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy. The development of a prolonged gastroparetic state has not been previously described. PMID:24975870

  20. Prolonged idiopathic gastric dilatation following revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Julia L.; Stoven, Samantha; Szarka, Lawrence; Papadakis, Konstantinos A.

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old female presented with nausea, emesis, early satiety, and abdominal distension following revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia. Computed tomography angiogram showed gastric dilatation. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, small bowel follow through, and paraneoplastic panel were negative. Gastric emptying was delayed. Despite conservative management, she required a percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy. The development of a prolonged gastroparetic state has not been previously described. PMID:24975870

  1. Mesenteric artery contraction and relaxation studies using automated wire myography.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Lakeesha E; Williams, Cicely L; Pointer, Mildred A; Awumey, Emmanuel M

    2011-09-22

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. These small vessels of between 100-400 μm in diameter function primarily in directing blood flow to various organs according to the overall requirements of the body. The rat mesenteric artery has a diameter greater than 100 μm. The myography technique, first described by Mulvay and Halpern(1), was based on the method proposed by Bevan and Osher(2). The technique provides information about small vessels under isometric conditions, where substantial shortening of the muscle preparation is prevented. Since force production and sensitivity of vessels to different agonists is dependent on the extent of stretch, according to active tension-length relation, it is essential to conduct contraction studies under isometric conditions to prevent compliance of the mounting wires. Stainless steel wires are preferred to tungsten wires because of oxidation of the latter, which affects recorded responses(3).The technique allows for the comparison of agonist-induced contractions of mounted vessels to obtain evidence for normal function of vascular smooth muscle cell receptors. We have shown in several studies that isolated mesenteric arteries that are contracted with phenylyephrine relax upon addition of cumulative concentrations of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(e;)). The findings led us to conclude that perivascular sensory nerves, which express the G protein-coupled Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR), mediate this vasorelaxation response. Using an automated wire myography method, we show here that mesenteric arteries from Wistar, Dahl salt-sensitive(DS) and Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats respond differently to Ca(2+)(e;). Tissues from Wistar rats showed higher Ca(2+)-sensitivity compared to those from DR and DS. Reduced CaR expression in mesenteric arteries from DS rats correlates with reduced Ca(2+)(e;)-induced relaxation of isolated, pre-contracted arteries. The data

  2. [Hemolytic thrombectomy and stenting of the superior mesenteric artery in acute mesenteric thrombosis (a clinical case report)].

    PubMed

    Shipovskiĭ, V N; Tsitsiashvili, M Sh; Khuan, Ch; Piliposian, E A

    2010-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report concerning successful rheolytic thrombectomy (using the AngioJet catheter) followed by stenting and having yielded a good angiographic and clinical outcome in a female patient suffering from thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery.

  3. Bed Bugs FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Bed Bugs FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... are bed bugs treated and prevented? What are bed bugs? Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic ...

  4. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  5. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  6. The median arcuate ligament syndrome: a mimicker of mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Johnson C; Arroyo, Ramon A

    2013-08-01

    The median arcuate ligament syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by the triad of postprandial abdominal pain, unintentional weight loss, and an epigastric bruit. This condition is diagnostically challenging and patients often undergo extensive laboratory, radiographic, and invasive evaluations before it is identified. Physicians should consider this syndrome in the differential diagnoses of chronic abdominal pain and mesenteric vasculitis. Once diagnosed, treatment is generally surgical with known predictors of favorable and unfavorable outcomes. Surgical candidates should be selected carefully. We describe the cases of two young active duty patients diagnosed with median arcuate ligament syndrome after suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Both were referred to our rheumatology department to evaluate for mesenteric vasculitis. Each had a different therapeutic outcome.

  7. Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Right Posterior Superior Mesenteric Artery "First" Approach.

    PubMed

    Pittau, Gabriella; Sànchez-Cabùs, Santiago; Laurenzi, Andrea; Gelli, Maximiliano; Cunha, Antonio Sa

    2015-12-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is considered one of the most challenging abdominal operations for several reasons, including the anatomy, which is surrounded by vital vascular structures and also because of the serious complications that are possible in the postoperative period. Nowadays, thanks to the development of minimally invasive surgery and improvement of patients' selection, laparoscopic pancreatic resections have been proven to be technically feasible and safe especially in the case of left pancreatectomies. More recently, many series of laparoscopic PD for adenocarcinoma have been published demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. In pancreatic cancer, the advantage of superior mesenteric artery "first approach" is already known to achieve an oncological resection. The purpose of this video is to describe the different technical aspects of the laparoscopic superior mesenteric artery first approach in the right posterior fashion.

  8. The rationale for surgical treatment of mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts.

    PubMed

    Burkett, J S; Pickleman, J

    1994-06-01

    Mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts are rare, usually asymptomatic lesions. Because of this, several recommendations in the literature caution against operative therapy in the absence of symptoms. During a recent 10 year period, six patients presented to our hospital with symptomatic mesenteric or retroperitoneal cysts; two of these patients were septic and had infection within the cyst. All six patients underwent excision with complete resolution of symptoms and no morbidity. With the advent of frequent abdominal CT scanning for a variety of reasons, it is likely that more of these lesions will be noted in the future. In view of the potential for development of symptoms and complications, we feel that any good risk patient found to harbor such a cyst should undergo complete excision.

  9. Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula embolisation complicated by bowel ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Maher; Issa, Ghada; Muhsen, Shirin; Haydar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistulas are rare, especially when iatrogenic in origin. Management of these fistulas can be surgical or endovascular. Endovascular embolisation is the preferred modality with a low rate of complications. Among the reported complications, bowel ischaemia is considered an unlikely occurrence. We report a case of a complex iatrogenic arterioportal fistula that was managed by endovascular embolisation and controlled through both its inflow and outflow, and was later complicated by bowel ischaemia. PMID:23682091

  10. Small bowel stricture complicating superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Shen, Laigen; Zheng, Xueyong; Zhu, Yuefeng; Liu, Zhengjie

    2012-02-01

    Superior mesenteric vein (SMV) thrombosis is a relatively rare disease. Most patients may be successfully treated with anti-coagulation alone. However, bowel stricture may develop due to intestinal ischemia which may require surgical treatment. This report describes a rare case of small bowel stricture occurring one month after successful treatment of SMV thrombosis. After segmental resection of strictured bowel, the patient's post-operative course was uneventful.

  11. Postsurgical segmental mesenteric ischemic thrombosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cuervo, María; Gracia, Luis A; Vieitez, Verónica; Jiménez, Joquin; Durán, Esther; Ezquerra, Luis J

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old, Lusitanian stallion was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 12-hour history of signs of abdominal pain. Exploratory celiotomy was performed due to an inguinal hernia, and a second celiotomy was performed in response to the abdominal pain. The horse was euthanized and mesenteric venous thrombosis was diagnosed and considered likely due to peritonitis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

  12. Mesenteric lymph nodes at the center of immune anatomy.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Smith, Karen

    2006-03-20

    The surface of the intestinal mucosa is constantly assaulted by food antigens and enormous numbers of commensal microbes and their products, which are sampled by dendritic cells (DCs). Recent work shows that the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) are the key site for tolerance induction to food proteins and that they also act as a firewall to prevent live commensal intestinal bacteria from penetrating the systemic immune system. PMID:16533891

  13. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  14. Postsurgical segmental mesenteric ischemic thrombosis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cuervo, María; Gracia, Luis A.; Vieitez, Verónica; Jiménez, Joquin; Durán, Esther; Ezquerra, Luis J.

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old, Lusitanian stallion was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 12-hour history of signs of abdominal pain. Exploratory celiotomy was performed due to an inguinal hernia, and a second celiotomy was performed in response to the abdominal pain. The horse was euthanized and mesenteric venous thrombosis was diagnosed and considered likely due to peritonitis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). PMID:23814308

  15. Rodent nutrition: digestive comparisons of 4 common rodent species.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerrin

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the literature regarding digestive strategies and captive diets of common rodent pocket pets. A comparison is made between the 2 suborders in which chinchillas, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils occur, highlighting digestive anatomy and dietary adaptations. Recommended captive diets are provided, as well as common nutritionally related health issues that may be presented to veterinary clinics.

  16. Rodent nutrition: digestive comparisons of 4 common rodent species.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerrin

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the literature regarding digestive strategies and captive diets of common rodent pocket pets. A comparison is made between the 2 suborders in which chinchillas, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils occur, highlighting digestive anatomy and dietary adaptations. Recommended captive diets are provided, as well as common nutritionally related health issues that may be presented to veterinary clinics. PMID:25155666

  17. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction.

    PubMed

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  18. [Spontaneous dissolution of isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Na, Byung Soo; John, Byung Min; Kim, Ki Bum; Lee, Je Soo; Jo, Hyun Woo; Seock, Chang Hyeon; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Ki Sung

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in many vascular complications in both artery and vein. Venous complication usually occurs as a form of splenic or portal vein thrombosis, and also can simultaneously occur in superior mesenteric vein as well. Rarely, isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis occurs as a venous complication. Although it is uncommon, mesenteric vein thrombosis is an important clinical entity because of the possibility of mesenteric ischemia and infarction of small bowel. The treatments of mesenteric venous thrombosis include anticoagulation therapy, transcatheter therapy and surgical intervention. We report a case of 45-year- old man who had acute pancreatitis with isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, which was spontaneously dissolved with the resolution of underlying inflammation without anticoagulation or surgical intervention.

  19. [Spontaneous dissolution of isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Na, Byung Soo; John, Byung Min; Kim, Ki Bum; Lee, Je Soo; Jo, Hyun Woo; Seock, Chang Hyeon; Kim, Dong Hui; Lee, Ki Sung

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in many vascular complications in both artery and vein. Venous complication usually occurs as a form of splenic or portal vein thrombosis, and also can simultaneously occur in superior mesenteric vein as well. Rarely, isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis occurs as a venous complication. Although it is uncommon, mesenteric vein thrombosis is an important clinical entity because of the possibility of mesenteric ischemia and infarction of small bowel. The treatments of mesenteric venous thrombosis include anticoagulation therapy, transcatheter therapy and surgical intervention. We report a case of 45-year- old man who had acute pancreatitis with isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, which was spontaneously dissolved with the resolution of underlying inflammation without anticoagulation or surgical intervention. PMID:21258200

  20. Natural infection of wild rodents by Schistosoma mansoni. Parasitological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues e Silva, R; Machado e Silva, J R; Faerstein, N F; Lenzi, H L; Rey, L

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of the role of rodents as natural hosts of Schistosoma mansoni was studied at the Pamparrão Valley, Sumidouro, RJ, with monthly captures and examination of the animals. Twenty-three Nectomys squamipes and 9 Akodon arviculoides with a schistosomal infection rate of 56.5% and 22.2% respectively eliminated a great majority of viable eggs. With a strain isolated from one of the naturally infected N. squamipes, we infected 75% of simpatric Biomphalaria glabrata and in 100% of albino Mus musculus mice. The adult worms, isolated from N. squamipes after perfusion were located mainly in the liver (91.5%) and the mesenteric veins (8.5%). The male/female proportion was of 2:1. The eggs were distributed on small intestine segments (proximal, medial and distal portions) and the large intestine without any significant differences in egg concentration of these segments. In A. arviculoides, the few eggs eliminated by the stools were viable and there was little egg retention on intestinal segments. Considering the ease to complete S. mansoni biological cycle in the Nectomys/Biomphalaria/Nectomys system under laboratory conditions, probably the same is likely to occur in natural conditions. In support to this hypothesis there are also the facts that human mansonic schistosomiasis has a very low prevalence in Sumidouro and endemicity among the rodents has not changed even after repeated treatments of the local patients. Based on our experiments, we conclude that N. squamipes has become a natural host of S. mansoni and possibly may participate in keeping the cycle of schistosomiasis transmission at Pamparrão Valley. PMID:1343794

  1. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping the mesenteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation

  3. Allometric disparity in rodent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, allometric trajectories for 51 rodent species, comprising equal representatives from each of the major clades (Ctenohystrica, Muroidea, Sciuridae), are compared in a multivariate morphospace (=allometric space) to quantify magnitudes of disparity in cranial growth. Variability in allometric trajectory patterns was compared to measures of adult disparity in each clade, and dietary habit among the examined species, which together encapsulated an ecomorphological breadth. Results indicate that the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents is characterized by different features in sciurids compared with muroids and Ctenohystrica. Sciuridae was found to have a reduced magnitude of inter-trajectory change and growth patterns with less variation in allometric coefficient values among members. In contrast, a greater magnitude of difference between trajectories and an increased variation in allometric coefficient values was evident for both Ctenohystrica and muroids. Ctenohystrica and muroids achieved considerably higher adult disparities than sciurids, suggesting that conservatism in allometric trajectory modification may constrain morphological diversity in rodents. The results provide support for a role of ecology (dietary habit) in the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents. PMID:23610638

  4. Case Report of Percutaneous Retrograde Transcollateral Recanalization of the Superior Mesenteric Artery via the Celiac Artery for Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Smith, Brigitte K.; Yamanouchi, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Revascularization for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be achieved through a bypass from the aorta or iliac arteries, embolectomy, open exposure of SMA and retrograde recanalization and stent, or percutaneous antegrade stenting. Flush occlusion of the SMA can make antegrade recanalization very challenging and is usually unsuccessful. We present a novel approach for recanalization of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) via the celiac artery for acute mesenteric ischemia. A 69-year-old lady with previous endarterectomy of SMA and extensive small bowel resection presented with severe abdominal pain, emesis, leukocytosis, and imaging finding of new SMA flush occlusion. She refused to consent for a laparotomy. Percutaneous retrograde transcollateral recanalization of SMA was performed via the celiac artery through the pancreaticoduodenal arcade, and the SMA then stented. This resulted in subsequent resolution of patient's symptoms and discharge. SMA revascularization with retrograde transcollateral wiring technique is an important tool in the armamentarium of the vascular care specialist when antegrade percutaneous approach and open exposure via laparotomy are not an option. PMID:26683911

  5. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-08-14

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection.

  6. Segmental "misty mesentery" on FDG PET/CT: an uncommon manifestation of mesenteric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Ameya D; Purandare, Nilendu C; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric lymphomas are commonly seen as bulky hypermetabolic nodal masses on F-FDG PET/CT. Very rarely, these are seen as mesenteric haziness due to localized hyperattenuation of fat, known as "misty mesentery", which morphological imaging-wise has other differentials as well. We report a unique imaging finding of segmental misty mesentery with hypermetabolic mesenteric nodes on FDG PET/CT in a patient who was kept on observation due to inconclusive biopsy, which on follow-up imaging progressed to extensive lymphomatous involvement. Thus, in retrospect, this imaging feature on baseline PET/CT was diagnostic for mesenteric lymphoma. PMID:23797224

  7. Extensive Sclerosing Mesenteritis of the Rectosigmoid Colon Associated with Erosive Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, C.; Degrate, L.; Caprotti, R.; Franciosi, C.; Leone, B. E.; Romano, F.; Dinelli, M.; Uggeri, Fr.

    2009-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare, idiopatic, usually benign, inflammatory process of the mesenteric adipose tissue. The most common site of involvement is the small bowel mesentery. We present a case of sclerosing mesenteritis of the rectosigmoid colon as a cause of severe abdominal pain, abdominal obstruction, and ischemic colic mucosal lesions. Contrast enema, colonoscopy, angiography, and CT were the imaging modalities used. A 20 cm diameter, fibrotic mass causing extensive compression of rectosigmoid colon was found at laparotomy. Histological examination showed extended fibrosis, inflammatory cells infiltration, lipophages, and granulomas within the mesenteric adipose tissue associated with erosive colitis. Clinical presentation and treatment are discussed. PMID:19365585

  8. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  9. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  10. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  11. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  12. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  13. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  14. Involvement of perivascular nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vascular responses to histamine in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-04-01

    A previous report showed that histamine in denuded mesenteric vascular beds produced a triphasic response; an initial small histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation, a transient histamine H(1) receptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and finally a long-lasting vasodilation. We further investigated the vascular effect of histamine in mesenteric preparations without an endothelium to clarify the possible involvement of perivascular nerves. Male Wistar rat mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium were perfused with Krebs solution containing methoxamine to produce active tone and lafutidine to block histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation. Histamine (1-100μM) was perfused for 1min and perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. Histamine caused a biphasic vascular response; initial vasoconstriction followed vasodilation. Tetrodotoxin (a neurotoxin, 1μM) and procaine (a local anesthetic, 100μM) significantly inhibited the vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, 1μM) also significantly inhibited both phases of the response. Pretreatment with capsaicin (a depletor of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves, 5μM) significantly inhibited the vasodilation without affecting the initial vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, 0.5μM) and seratrodast (a thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist, 0.1μM) abolished the histamine-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent vasodilation. These results suggest that histamine-induced vasoconstriction and long-lasting vasodilation are mediated by activation of TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive and capsaicin-insensitive nerves. They also suggest that perivascular nerves and prostanoids, probably thromboxane A(2), are responsible for the vascular response to histamine.

  15. Mesenteric Arteriovenous Dysplasia/Vasculopathy Is Distinct From Fibromuscular Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepa T; Kissiedu, Juliana; Rodriguez, E Rene; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Liu, Xiuli; Rybicki, Lisa A; Tan, Carmela D

    2016-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic vasculopathy that usually affects the carotid and renal arteries. We have observed FMD-like vascular changes in specimens resected for ischemia or Crohn's disease (CD). On the basis of a systematic clinicopathologic review of these 11 cases identified between 1982 and 2014, we describe a distinct mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins [mesenteric arteriovenous dysplasia/vasculopathy (MAVD/V)] and is characterized by (1) concentric/eccentric smooth muscle collarette around the tunica media of both the artery and the vein in ≥2 foci, (2) varying degrees of intimal and medial hyperplasia and adventitial fibrosis, and (3) lack of inflammation or thrombi. MAVD/V cases were clinically diagnosed as CD (45%), mass/lesion (27%), ischemia (9%), obstruction (9%), or rectal prolapse (9%). Abdominal pain for >1 year was the most common symptom. Most patients were women (M:F=1:2.7; mean age, 63 y). Mucosal changes mimicking CD, such as architectural distortion (55%), multifocal ulcers (73%), and pyloric gland metaplasia (64%), were common; however, no granulomas or transmural lymphoid aggregates were identified. Ischemic pattern of injury was seen in 4 cases. Upon follow-up (mean, 31.2 mo), 8 patients were found to be asymptomatic, 2 had died of unrelated causes, and 1 was lost to follow-up. We propose the name MAVD/V for a distinct noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic, localized form of mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins, distinct from FMD. Unlike FMD, surgical resection appears to be curative, with a favorable clinical outcome. Awareness of this vascular entity is important as patients may be potentially misdiagnosed as having CD and ischemic bowel disease. PMID:27487739

  16. Noradrenaline contractions in rabbit mesenteric arteries skinned with saponin.

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, G; Richards, J G; Thorens, S

    1981-01-01

    1. In rings of small rabbit mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline induced oscillatory contractions. After depolarization with potassium, which produced in this preparation only a transient contraction, the arteries responded to noradrenaline with tonic contraction. 2. Artery rings, skinned for 6 min with saponin (0.5 mg/ml.), were highly sensitive to calcium (half-maximum contraction at 4 x 10(-7) M-Ca2+). In the skinned preparations, a contraction was still elicited by noradrenaline. 3. Treatment with saponin renders virtually all smooth muscle cells of the mesenteric artery preparation hyperpermeable as indicated by both physiological and morphological criteria. 4. While the Ca stores responsible for the noradrenaline-induced contraction of skinned arteries were depleted at a slow rate by 0.1 mM-EGTA, they were completely emptied by a 4 min exposure to 10 mM-EGTA. After release of intracellular Ca by noradrenaline, the Ca stores could be partially replenished by incubating the preparation in 10(-6) M-Ca2+ for 4 min. 5. Noradrenaline failed to contract skinned arteries after part of the intracellular Ca had been released by caffeine but not after Ca release by the ionophore X-537 A. 6. The mitochondrial uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions of skinned arteries. 7. Noradrenaline had no effect on 45Ca translocation in either membrane vesicles or mitochondria isolated from mesenteric arteries. 8. The present results show that in vascular smooth muscle a certain degree of structural integrity of the cell membrane, but not its selective permeability, is required for the coupling between alpha-adrenoceptors and Ca release from intracellular stores; the data also suggest that alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation results in release of Ca bound to the plasma membrane rather than indirect release of Ca accumulated in intracellular organelles. Images Plate 1 PMID:6802959

  17. Superior mesenteric artery dissection after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bakoyiannis, Christos; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Fragiadis, Evangelos; Felesaki, Eleni; Kafeza, Marina; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Tsigris, Christos

    2012-01-01

    The use of shockwave lithotripsy is currently the mainstay of treatment in renal calculosis. Several complications including vessel injuries have been implied to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. We report an isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery in a 60-year-old male presenting with abdominal pain which occurred three days after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The patient was treated conservatively and the abdominal pain subsided 24 hours later. The patient's history, the course of his disease, and the timing may suggest a correlation between the dissection and the ESWL.

  18. Chronic mesenteric ischemia: time to remember open revascularization.

    PubMed

    Keese, Michael; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Schmandra, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia is caused by stenosis or occlusion of one or more visceral arteries. It represents a therapeutic challenge and diagnosis and treatment require close interdisciplinary cooperation between gastroenterologist, vascular surgeon and radiologist. Although endovascular treatment modalities have been developed, the number of restenoses ultimately resulting in treatment failure is high. In patients fit for open surgery, the visceral arteries should be revascularized conventionally. These patients will then experience long term relief from the symptoms, a better quality of life and a better overall survival. PMID:23539677

  19. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  20. Mesenteric venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milne, P Y; Thomas, R J

    1976-05-01

    Small-bowel infarction resulting from mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication to which young women taking oral contraceptives are liable. The patient characteristically presents with an "acute abdomen" after a variable prodromal period of vague abdominal pain. The correct diagnosis can be made from the macroscopic appearance at laparotomy, provided the surgeon is alert to the condition. An accurate diagnosis is important, as anticoagulation measures must be instituted early to counter the commonly associated thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:1067070

  1. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  2. Occasional finding of mesenteric lipodystrophy during laparoscopy: A difficult diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vettoretto, Nereo; Diana, Domenico Roberto; Poiatti, Roberto; Matteucci, Armando; Chioda, Caterina; Giovanetti, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric lipodystrophy is a rare pathological condition affecting the mesentery. Its initial presentation is typically asymptomatic. Pathological characteristics are unspecific, and generally attributed to inflammation, unless the diagnosis is suspected. Laparoscopy done for other reasons has been, as in this case, unsuccessful in providing evidence for the correct diagnosis, thus requiring laparotomy due to lack of diagnostic tissue. After 6 mo no further medical therapy is required, as the patient remains asymptomatic. Discussion of this case and a brief review of the literature are presented in the following paragraphs. PMID:17879414

  3. Left atrial ball thrombus with acute mesenteric ischemia: anesthetic management and role of transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeti; Malankar, Dhananjay; Singh, Pooja; Goyal, Sameer; Patel, Kartik; Jagia, Priya

    2014-01-01

    A 62 year old female with severe mitral stenosis, large left atrial ball thrombus and acute mesenteric ischemia emergently underwent mitral valve replacement, left atrial clot removal and emergency laparotomy for mesenteric ischemia. Peri-operative management issues, particularly, the anesthetic challenges and the role of transesophageal echocardiography are discussed.

  4. TRPM8 Channel Activation Induced by Monoterpenoid Rotundifolone Underlies Mesenteric Artery Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Darizy Flavia; de Almeida, Monica Moura; Chaves, Cinthia Guedes; Braz, Ana Letícia; Gomes, Maria Aparecida; Pinho-da-Silva, Leidiane; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Andrade, Viviane Aguiar; Leite, Maria de Fátima; de Albuquerque, José George Ferreira; Araujo, Islania Giselia Albuquerque; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Correia, Nadja de Azevedo; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our aims were to investigate transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channels (TRPM8) involvement in rotundifolone induced relaxation in the mesenteric artery and to increase the understanding of the role of these thermosensitive TRP channels in vascular tissue. Thus, message and protein levels of TRPM8 were measured by semi-quantitative PCR and western blotting in superior mesenteric arteries from 12 week-old Spague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isometric tension recordings evaluated the relaxant response in mesenteric rings were also performed. Additionally, the intracellular Ca2+ changes in mesenteric artery myocytes were measured using confocal microscopy. Using PCR and western blotting, both TRPM8 channel mRNA and protein expression was measured in SD rat mesenteric artery. Rotundifolone and menthol induced relaxation in the isolated superior mesenteric artery from SD rats and improved the relaxant response induced by cool temperatures. Also, this monoterpene induced an increase in transient intracellular Ca2+. These responses were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with capsazepine or BCTC, both TRPM8 channels blockers. The response induced by rotundifolone was not significantly attenuated by ruthenium red, a non-selective TRP channels blocker, or following capsaicin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1. Our findings suggest that rotundifolone induces relaxation by activating TRPM8 channels in rat superior mesenteric artery, more selectively than menthol, the classic TRPM8 agonist, and TRPM8 channels participates in vasodilatory pathways in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. PMID:26599698

  5. [Multiloculated mesenteric and retroperitoneal tumour - lymphatic malformation - in a 4-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Obuchowicz, Anna; Łoboda, Magdalena; Madziara, Wojciech; Jarecka, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and mostly benign abdominal tumours in children. Majority of them are lymphangiomas (lymphatic malformations). We diagnosed a broad, multiloculated mesenteric and retroperitoneal cyst, associated with intensive inflammation, in a 4-year-old girl. Surgical therapy was fully successful.

  6. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  7. Coexistence of rare arteries in the human celiaco-mesenteric system.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Mabuchi, M; Giuvarasteanu, I; Kikuta, A; Ohtsuka, A

    1998-10-01

    Some rare anomalies of the celiaco-mesenteric system were observed postmortem in a Japanese adult male: a) The left gastric, common hepatic, splenic and superior mesenteric arteries arose independently from the abdominal aorta. b) The anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery of the superior mesenteric artery issued a hepatic artery which ascended along the anterior surface of the pancreas and gave off the right gastroepiploic, right gastric and cystic arteries. c) The common hepatic artery gave off an anastomosing branch to the superior mesenteric artery. d) The left gastric artery gave off the left accessory hepatic artery. e) The splenic artery issued the accessory middle colic artery. f) The left inferior phrenic artery gave off the esophageal branch. These anomalies are discussed in light of a typological system which we proposed in a previous paper for the celiaco-mesenteric system. PMID:9810433

  8. Lymph transport in rat mesenteric lymphatics experiencing edemagenic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Akl, Tony; Coté, Gerard L.; Moore, James E.; Zawieja, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess lymphatic flow adaptations to edema, we evaluated lymph transport function in rat mesenteric lymphatics under normal and edemagenic conditions in situ. Methods Twelve rats were infused with saline (intravenous infusion, 0.2 ml/min/100g body weight) to induce edema. We intravitally measured mesenteric lymphatic diameter and contraction frequency, as well as immune cell velocity and density before, during and after infusion. Results A 10-fold increase in lymph velocity (0.1–1 mm/s) and a 6-fold increase in flow rate (0.1–0.6 μL/min), were observed post-infusion, respectively. There were also increases in contraction frequency and fractional pump flow 1-minute post-infusion. Time-averaged wall shear stress increased 10 fold post-infusion to nearly 1.5 dynes/cm2. Similarly, maximum shear stress rose from 5 dynes/cm2 to 40 dynes/cm2. Conclusions Lymphatic vessels adapted to edemagenic stress by increasing lymph transport. Specifically, the increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity, and shear stress were significant. Lymph pumping increased post-infusion, though changes in lymphatic diameter were not statistically significant. These results indicate that edemagenic conditions stimulate lymph transport via increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity and flow. These changes, consequently, resulted in large increases in wall shear stress, which could then activate NO pathways and modulate lymphatic transport function. PMID:24397756

  9. A Case of Idiopathic Mesenteric Phlebosclerosis with Progressive Intestinal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kayano, Hajime; Nomura, Eiji; Hiraiwa, Shinichiro; Kuramoto, Toru; Yatabe, Kentaro; Machida, Takashi; Tajiri, Takuma; Mukai, Masaya; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 39-year-old woman who was referred to our department from her previous doctor with a 2-day history of right abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed wall thickening associated with calcification in the ascending colon. Contrast enhancement in the same portion of the intestinal wall was rather poor. Fluid accumulation was also seen around the intestine, so emergency surgery was performed under a provisional diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. Intestinal necrosis due to idiopathic mesenteric phlebosclerosis was diagnosed from postoperative histopathological tests. Idiopathic mesenteric phlebosclerosis displays a chronic course and in most cases conservative treatment is indicated. Bowel obstruction is common among patients who require surgical treatment, but rare cases such as the present one are also seen in which intestinal necrosis occurs. In recent years, an association with herbal medicine has been indicated as one potential cause of this disease, and this entity should be kept in mind when patients with acute abdomen and a history of taking herbal medicines are encountered. PMID:27344996

  10. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  11. Phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Inoshita, Naoko; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An 80-year-old woman visited the hospital emergency department with the chief complaints of epigastric pain and vomiting. She was hospitalized urgently following the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome based on abdominal computed tomography findings. Conservative therapy was not effective, and phlegmonous gastritis was diagnosed based on the findings of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy performed on the 12th day of the disease. Undernutrition and reduced physical activity were observed on hospital admission, and proactive nutritional therapy with enteral nutrition was started. An upper gastrointestinal series, performed approximately 1 month later, confirmed the persistence of strictures and impaired gastric emptying. Because conservative therapy was unlikely to improve oral food intake, open total gastrectomy was performed on the 94th day of the disease. Examination of surgically resected specimens revealed marked inflammation and fibrosis, especially in the body of the stomach. Following a good postoperative recovery, the patient was able to commence oral intake and left our hospital on foot approximately 1 month after surgery.

  12. Modification by choline of adrenergic transmission in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Malik, K. U.; McGiff, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    1. The action of choline on the vasoconstrictor responses of the perfused mesenteric arteries of the rat to sympathetic nerve stimulation and to injected noradrenaline has been investigated. 2. The infusion of choline (500 μg/ml), for periods of 15 s, increased the response to sympathetic nerve stimulation, whereas the infusion of the same concentration for 20 min greatly reduced the response to nerve stimulation. Choline (up to 500 μg/ml), infused either for short or long periods, did not alter the response to injected noradrenaline. 3. The inhibitory action of choline on the response to nerve stimulation was abolished either by an increase in the calcium concentration from 1·8 to 5·4 mM or by simultaneous infusion of (+)-amphetamine or atropine. 4. The results suggest that choline in concentrations of 500 μg/ml has the same effect on adrenergic transmission in mesenteric arteries as acetylcholine at concentrations of 5 ng/ml. PMID:4339884

  13. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.

    1996-10-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Clinical hematology of rodent species.

    PubMed

    Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-09-01

    Pet rodents, such as rats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas, differ from more traditional companion animal species in many aspects of their hematologic parameters. Animals within this order have much diversity in size, anatomy, methods of restraint, and blood collection technique. Appropriate sample collection is often the most challenging aspect of the diagnostic protocol, and inappropriate restraint may cause a stress response that interferes with blood test results. For many of these patients, sedation is required and can also affect results as well. In most cases, however, obtaining a standard database is necessary and very possible when providing medical care for this popular group of pets. PMID:18675732

  15. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to acetylcholine and phenylephrine in cirrhotic rats challenged with endotoxin: the role of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Tavangar, Seyed-Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Eftekhari, Golnar; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with vascular dysfunction and endotoxemia. These experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the administration of a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) worsens vascular dysfunction in rats subjected to bile-duct ligation (BDL), and to determine whether LPS initiates changes in vascular Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Four weeks after BDL, the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or LPS (1.0 mg/kg body mass). Three hours later, the superior mesenteric artery was isolated, perfused, and then subjected to the vasoconstriction and vasodilatation effects of phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. Our results show that phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction decreased in the cirrhotic vascular bed (BDL rats) compared with the vascular bed of the sham-operated animals, and that the LPS injections in the cirrhotic (BDL) rats worsened this response. LPS injection administered to the sham-operated animals had no such effect. On the other hand, both the BDL procedure and the LPS injection increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, but LPS administration to the BDL rats had no effect on this response. The mRNA levels of TLR4 did not change, but immunohistochemical studies showed that TLR4 localization switched from the endothelium to vascular smooth muscle cells following chronic BDL. In conclusion, acute endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats is associated with hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and tolerance to the effects of acetylcholine. Altered localization of TLR4 may be responsible for these effects.

  16. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 2902.15 Section 2902... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that group of woven cloth products used as coverings on a bed. Bedding includes products such as...

  17. Mesenteric ischemia--a complex disease requiring an interdisciplinary approach. A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Florian, Anca; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Lupescu, Ioana; Grasu, M; Croitoru, M; Ginghină, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia is caused by a reduction in intestinal blood flow with potential catastrophic clinical consequences: sepsis, bowel infarction, and death. In the recent years, the incidence of mesenteric ischemia increased, now accounting for 0.1% of hospital admissions. Among the multiple factors responsible for this change is the heightened awareness for the diagnoses, the advanced mean age of the population and the increasing number of critically ill patients. Acute mesenteric ischemia is a potentially fatal vascular emergency, with overall mortality of 60-80%; prompt diagnosis and treatment are paramount. A high index of suspicion in the setting of a compatible history and physical examination serves as the cornerstone to early diagnosis of mesenteric ischemia. Restoration of intestinal blood flow, as rapidly as possible, is the main goal of treatment in patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. This may be achieved by medical means, endovascular procedures and by surgery. Chronic mesenteric ischemia is an uncommon process that occurs only when severe atherosclerotic narrowing of a major splanchnic vessel exists in association with occlusion of one or two of the remaining vessels. Its diagnosis is mainly based on the characteristic clinical picture, on the presence of an occlusive lesion in the splanchnic vessels and on the absence of other common causes of abdominal pain. The means available for mesenteric revascularization are the surgical techniques of flow restoration and the more recently developed percutaneous transluminal procedures.

  18. Heart function in magnetic resonance imaging and the mesenteric artery reactivity in rats receiving lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Skoczynska, A; Skórka, T; Wojakowska, A; Nowacki, D; Turczyn, B; Poręba, R; Tyrankiewicz, U; Byk, K; Szuba, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb)-contaminated drinking water on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-estimated cardiac function, vascular reactivity, and serum lipids in rats. For 3 months, male Wistar rats, aged 4-6 weeks, were given drinking water with the addition of lead acetate at a concentration of 100 ppm Pb (10 rats) or water free from Pb (8 control rats). The cardiac MRI was performed at rest and under β-adrenergic stimulation on a 4.7 T scanner using electrocardiogram-triggered gradient echo (FLASH) cine sequence. After 1-2 weeks of the MRI test, experiments were performed ex vivo. After stabilization of perfusion pressure (PP), norepinephrine at doses from 0.01 to 5.0 μg was dissolved in Krebs solution, injected in a volume of 100 μl, and next infused at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml into the isolated mesenteric artery. In this manner, preconstricted mesenteric bed was used to determine PP changes induced by acetylcholine, given at doses from 0.05 to 5.0 μg, before and during the infusion of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (1.0 μg/ml). At the end, dobutamine (5 mg), followed by potassium chloride (10.5 mg), was injected. Lipid levels were determined enzymatically, blood Pb level was measured by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This study showed that Pb impairs the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pb-induced changes in response to resistance of vessels to vasoactive agents may be secondary to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. The high-density lipoprotein subfraction 2 (HDL2) is involved in the cardiovascular effect of Pb.

  19. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOEpatents

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P.; Matthews, Francis T.

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  20. Effect of perturbations and a meal on superior mesenteric artery flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, J.; Camilleri, M.; Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Our aims were to evaluate to role of superior mesenteric blood flow in the pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension in patients with generalized autonomic failure. METHODS: Twelve patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and 12 healthy controls underwent superior mesenteric artery flow measurements using Doppler ultrasonography during head-up tilt and tilt plus meal ingestion. Autonomic failure was assessed using standard tests of the function of the sympathetic adrenergic, cardiovagal and postganglionic sympathetic sudomotor function. RESULTS: Superior mesenteric flow volume and time-averaged velocity were similar in patients and controls at supine rest; however, responses to cold pressor test and upright tilt were attenuated (p < 0.05) in patients compared to controls. Head-up tilt after the meal evoked a profound fall of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the patients; the reduction of mesenteric blood flow correlated (r = 0.89) with the fall of blood pressure in these patients, providing another manifestation of failed baroreflexes. We make the novel finding that the severity of postprandial orthostatic hypotension regressed negatively with the postprandial increase in mesenteric flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension. CONCLUSION: Mesenteric flow is under baroreflex control, which when defective, results in, or worsens orthostatic hypotension. Its large size and baroreflexivity renders it quantitatively important in the maintenance of postural normotension. The effects of orthostatic stress can be significantly attenuated by reducing the splanchnic-mesenteric volume increase in response to food. Evaluation of mesenteric flow in response to eating and head-up tilt provide important information on intra-abdominal sympathetic adrenergic function, and the ability of the patient to cope with orthostatic stress.

  1. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  2. Non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis using spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tod, Laura; Ghosh, Jonathan; Lieberman, Ilan; Baguneid, Mohamed

    2013-08-05

    We report the use of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) for non-surgical management of superior mesenteric artery thrombosis. A 59-year-old woman with polycythaemia rubra vera presented with extensive superior mesenteric artery thrombosis not amenable to surgical or endovascular revascularisation. A SCS was implanted for analgesia thereby allowing enteral feeding to be tolerated during the acute period. Four months later the patient developed a focal ischaemic jejunal stricture and underwent resection of a short segment of small bowel with primary anastomosis that healed without complication. Spinal cord stimulation can facilitate non-surgical management of mesenteric ischaemia.

  3. Portal vein thrombosis secondary to embolization of superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuliang; Li, Zhengyan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Bo; Zeng, Xiaoxi; Fu, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare vascular disorder. Endovascular embolization has been widely used to treat this disease. Patients receiving successful fistula embolization generally have good prognoses. We present a man with iatrogenic superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula who received endovascular embolization. Portal thrombus was detected on postoperative day 2, and the patient eventually died of multiple organ failure on postoperative day 13 despite having received antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapy. We identified portal thrombosis as a serious complication of transcatheter superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula embolization.

  4. Wilkie's Syndrome or Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Fact or Fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Vera; Deeb, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome (known as Wilkie's syndrome) is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. It is an acquired disorder in which acute angulation of the SMA causes compression of the third part of the duodenum between the SMA and the aorta. This is commonly due to loss of fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions. We report a 17-year-old female who presented with intermittent abdominal pain and intractable vomiting following significant weight loss after hospitalization for pneumonia. Symptoms persisted for 2 years and the patient underwent extensive invasive and non-invasive tests, but to no avail. Thereafter she developed acute high intestinal obstruction, which unraveled her diagnosis. This case emphasizes the challenges in the diagnosis of SMA syndrome and the need for increased awareness of this entity. This will improve early recognition in order to reduce irrelevant tests and unnecessary treatments. PMID:26120301

  5. Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance arterial function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Ground studies indicate that spaceflight may diminish vascular contraction. To examine that possibility, vascular function was measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats immediately after an 18-day shuttle flight. Isolated mesenteric resistance arterial responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were measured using wire myography within 17 h of landing. After flight, maximal contraction to norepinephrine was attenuated (P < 0.001) as was relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (P < 0.05). At high concentrations, acetylcholine caused vascular contraction in vessels from flight animals but not in vessels from vivarium control animals (P < 0.05). The results are consistent with data from ground studies and indicate that spaceflight causes both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent alterations in vascular function. The resulting decrement in vascular function may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

  6. Endovascular Management of Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Barbery, Katuska; Lamus, Daniel; Nanavati, Kunal

    2008-11-15

    The uncommon presentation of an arterioportal fistula (APF) involving the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with a pseudoaneurysm represents a therapeutic challenge. We present the case of a 24-year-old female admitted to the hospital after multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen; the patient underwent multiple surgeries and, in the process, developed a SMA pseudoaneurysm and fistula. The vascular interventional radiology team was consulted for treatment of the pseudoaneurysm and fistula. A covered stent was inserted percutaneously to exclude the APF and the pseudoaneurysm in a single procedure. The patient returned to our service after 21 months for a follow-up CT scan, which demonstrated the stent and the distal vasculature to be patent.

  7. Cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Kalyan, Jiten P; Jonas, Attila; Hanif, Muhammad A; Prionidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms as a result of arterial degenerative disease are rare (0.1-2%), and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) accounts for 3.2% of all reported series. However, mycotic SMA aneurysms (SMAAs) are even rarer, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of SMA by Enterococcus faecalis (EF). We report a case of 77-year-old man with 6-week history of supra pubic/left iliac fossa pain, weight loss and fever. The computed tomography demonstrated an incidental finding of 4.4 × 3-cm SMAA with no primary foci. The subsequent serology and specimen confirmed EF. Aneurysmectomy without bypass grafting along with antimicrobial therapy resulted in full recovery of the patient. PMID:26276703

  8. A mesenteric hernia complicated with a triple necrotic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Davide; Santoro, Stefano; Bernardi, Filippo; Lima, Mario

    2012-09-24

    A 6-year-old girl was admitted to the paediatric emergency department with colicky abdominal pain. She had a significant medical history, with four previous admissions due to recurrent abdominal pain in the past year. On examination the abdomen was soft, there was no rebound tenderness and Rovsing's sign was negative. Her blood tests revealed a raised white cells count, although her C reactive protein was within the normal range. Abdominal x-ray revealed small bowel obstruction. During her assessment the patient rapidly deteriorated and seemed to go into shock. Her clinical state in addition to the radiological findings meant that she was taken to theatre for surgical exploration. This showed a triple volvulus with necrotic bowel loops that had herniated through a mesenteric defect. The necrotic bowel was subsequently resected.

  9. Endovascular management of superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm and fistula.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Mohin, Geetika; Barbery, Katuska; Lamus, Daniel; Nanavati, Kunal; Yrizarry, Jose M

    2008-01-01

    The uncommon presentation of an arterioportal fistula (APF) involving the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with a pseudoaneurysm represents a therapeutic challenge. We present the case of a 24-year-old female admitted to the hospital after multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen; the patient underwent multiple surgeries and, in the process, developed a SMA pseudoaneurysm and fistula. The vascular interventional radiology team was consulted for treatment of the pseudoaneurysm and fistula. A covered stent was inserted percutaneously to exclude the APF and the pseudoaneurysm in a single procedure. The patient returned to our service after 21 months for a follow-up CT scan, which demonstrated the stent and the distal vasculature to be patent.

  10. Isolated superior mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis with acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Mohsen Mohamed; Abdalla, Mohaed Fahmy; Bedair, Said

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated superior mesentericveinous thrmbophlebitis is a rarely recognised condition associated with a high morbidity. It usually develops secondary to infection in the drainage area of the portal venous system, like appendix. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of neglected perforated acute appendicitis complicated by superior mesenteric venous pyelephlebitis patiant represented with a vague pain to right of umlicus, which is atypical this why cat scan was done and showed obstructed superiormesentric vein, portal vein was free with acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, anticoagulation, and platelets led to a full recovery. Follow-up imaging after one month revealed complete canalization of superior mesentric vein. DISCUSSION Abdominal pain if atypical like our case report need imaging diagnosis. Modern diagnostic imaging techniques help the early diagnosis of acute phase pylephlebitis. CT can detect primary source of infection, extent of pylephlebitis, CT scan is the most reliable initially. Ultrasound scan with color flow Doppler is also a sensitive test for confirming partial patency of the portal vein and portal vein thrombosis accidentally discovered complete obliteration of superior mesenteric vein with thrombosis which remained not propagated by serial Doppler ultrasound of liver. Appropriate treatment should be initiated as soon as possible. To avoid extension to portal vein. The principal treatment for pylephlebitis is to remove the source of infection as appendicectomy. Anticoagulants must be used. Regarding the treatment of portal thrombosis, post operative use of heparin has been advocated. CONCLUSION Cat scan play an important role in case of atypical abdominal pain. PMID:23500734

  11. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  12. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  13. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    MedlinePlus

    ... their development. Bed-wetting is more common among boys than girls. What causes bed-wetting? A number of things ... valves in boys or in the ureter in girls or boys Abnormalities in the spinal cord A small bladder ...

  14. Rodents as agents of ecological change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rodents have the potential to exert a wide array of ecological pressures in any given ecosystem. The negative impacts to plant communities in general, especially cultivated crops, are typically cited as examples of rodent grazing pressure. Considerable research has been conducted on the negative imp...

  15. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully trapping rodents in and around the home. Seal Up! Seal up holes inside and outside the home to ... infested areas. Before cleaning, trap the rodents and seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents ...

  16. Making a Bed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Anthony; Stein, Sherman

    2005-01-01

    The origins of this paper lay in making beds by putting pieces of plywood on a frame: If beds need to be 4 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 3 inches, and plywood comes in 4-foot by 8-foot sheets, how should one cut the plywood to minimize waste (and have stable beds)? The problem is of course generalized.

  17. Exposure to rodents and rodent-borne viruses among persons with elevated occupational risk.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Curtis L; Fulhorst, Charles F; Enge, Barryett; Winthrop, Kevin L; Glaser, Carol A; Vugia, Duc J

    2002-10-01

    Persons who have frequent contact with rodents as part of their occupation may be at increased risk of exposure to rodent-borne viruses such as Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWA), a New World arenavirus. Eighty-one persons with possible occupational exposure to rodents completed questionnaires and provided specimens for serologic testing. Seventy-two participants reported handling rodents as part of their job. The mean total number of rodents handled during participants' careers was approximately 2200. IgG antibody to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was detected in serum from one (1.2%) participant. IgG antibody to SNV, WWA, and Amapari viruses was not detected in any of the serum specimens. Despite considerable exposure to rodents, participants did not have significant serological evidence of exposure to rodent-borne viruses. PMID:12391776

  18. Mesenteric Panniculitis in a Thirteen-Year-Old Korean Boy Treated with Prednisolone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Ji Soo

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric mesenteric panniculitis is an extremely rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation, fat necrosis, and fibrosis in the mesenteric adipose tissue. A previously healthy 13-year-old boy was admitted because of right upper abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed increased attenuation and enhancement in the left upper abdominal omental fat and anterior peritoneal wall thickening. A laparoscopic biopsy showed mesenteric panniculitis with chronic inflammation, adiponecrosis, and septal fibrosis. Serological tests for autoimmune diseases, nested polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and special immunohistochemical stains for malignancy were all negative. Symptomatic improvement and improved abnormal findings were achieved after an 8-month treatment with prednisolone according to a follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan. Here, we report a case of pediatric mesenteric panniculitis treated with prednisolone. PMID:27437192

  19. Massive mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis secondary to hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, D G; Shapter, O; Mittapalli, D; Murray, W G

    2013-11-01

    Hormone replacement therapy increases risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly in the extremities and lungs. There are reports of mesenteric ischemia secondary to oral contraceptive pills but no reports on hormone replacement therapy and mesenteric thrombosis. The authors present a case of a 44-year-old obese (BMI 32) woman, on long-term hormone replacement therapy, presented with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins. She underwent surgical resection of ischemic bowel and planned re-look laparotomies with further resections and jejuno-ileal anastomosis at final laparotomy. Thorough haematological investigations were normal. The authors conclude that hormone replacement therapy in obese patients with no other risk factors can cause a catastrophic mesenteric thrombosis. Aggressive surgical resection with re-look laparotomies and further resections can be lifesaving.

  20. JAK2 V617F mutation, mesenteric vein thrombosis, and myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Owens, Christopher D

    2010-07-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is a rare disorder that is often the first manifestation of a systemic condition such as a hypercoagulable state or cancer. In particular, myeloproliferative disorders can present as mesenteric vein thrombosis even in the setting of relatively normal peripheral blood counts. A recent novel mutation in the Janus activated kinase 2 gene involving a gain-of-function substitute of valine to phenylalanine at position 617 (JAK2 V617F) has been discovered to be prevalent in patients with mesenteric vein thrombosis and myeloproliferative disorders. This article reports a patient who presented with mesenteric vein thrombosis and relatively normal peripheral blood counts. He was diagnosed with essential thrombocythemia after he tested positive for the JAK2 V617F mutation.

  1. Mesenteric Panniculitis in a Thirteen-Year-Old Korean Boy Treated with Prednisolone: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sun Hwan; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Ji Soo

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric mesenteric panniculitis is an extremely rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation, fat necrosis, and fibrosis in the mesenteric adipose tissue. A previously healthy 13-year-old boy was admitted because of right upper abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed increased attenuation and enhancement in the left upper abdominal omental fat and anterior peritoneal wall thickening. A laparoscopic biopsy showed mesenteric panniculitis with chronic inflammation, adiponecrosis, and septal fibrosis. Serological tests for autoimmune diseases, nested polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and special immunohistochemical stains for malignancy were all negative. Symptomatic improvement and improved abnormal findings were achieved after an 8-month treatment with prednisolone according to a follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan. Here, we report a case of pediatric mesenteric panniculitis treated with prednisolone.

  2. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, Yoshiki E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy.

  3. Massive mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis secondary to hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, D G; Shapter, O; Mittapalli, D; Murray, W G

    2013-11-01

    Hormone replacement therapy increases risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly in the extremities and lungs. There are reports of mesenteric ischemia secondary to oral contraceptive pills but no reports on hormone replacement therapy and mesenteric thrombosis. The authors present a case of a 44-year-old obese (BMI 32) woman, on long-term hormone replacement therapy, presented with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins. She underwent surgical resection of ischemic bowel and planned re-look laparotomies with further resections and jejuno-ileal anastomosis at final laparotomy. Thorough haematological investigations were normal. The authors conclude that hormone replacement therapy in obese patients with no other risk factors can cause a catastrophic mesenteric thrombosis. Aggressive surgical resection with re-look laparotomies and further resections can be lifesaving. PMID:24215058

  4. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed Bugs — Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control — Pesticides to Control Bed Bugs Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse ... Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems ...

  5. Rupture of an Aneurysm of a Small Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arer, Ilker Murat; Gedikoglu, Murat; Yabanoglu, Hakan; Noyan, Mustafa Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) is an uncommon vascular disorder. Complications such as rupture have been reported. Once complication has been encountered both surgical and endovascular treatment techniques can be considered. Case Report We present a case of 68-year old male patient with SMAA rupture treated by endovascular modality. Conclusions Endovascular therapy is an effective and less invasive option for rupture of superior mesenteric artery aneurysm. PMID:27536338

  6. Aortic, celiac axis, and superior mesenteric artery thrombosis associated with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state.

    PubMed

    Serck, Luke C; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    A patient with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state developed acute visceral ischemia secondary to thrombus involving the suprarenal aorta, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. A large, laminated fibrin thrombus was removed via supraceliac aortotomy. Attempts to clear thrombus from branches of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery by open and catheter-based techniques were of limited success. Extensive visceral infarction ensued and the patient died.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Volvulus through Mesenteric Defect in Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Scott; Al-Qaraghouli, Mohammed; Hussain, Naveed; Finck, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal midgut volvulus is a rare surgical emergency in which bowel is severely compromised. Rarely the etiology is a mesenteric defect. Early diagnosis is essential and lifesaving in the immediate newborn period. Typically upper gastrointestinal or ultrasound imaging can be suggestive of the diagnosis of volvulus in the neonate. Sometimes, however, the diagnosis may be elusive. Herein, we report on the use of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose a midgut volvulus that occurred through a congenital mesenteric defect. PMID:27551577

  8. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents Mesenteric Fat Deposition and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Chi H. L.; Szabo, Alexander; Yu, Yinghua; Camer, Danielle; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric fat belongs to visceral fat. An increased deposition of mesenteric fat contributes to obesity associated complications such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We have investigated the therapeutic effects of bardoxolone methyl (BARD) on mesenteric adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6J mice were administered oral BARD during HFD feeding (HFD/BARD), only fed a high-fat diet (HFD), or fed low-fat diet (LFD) for 21 weeks. Histology and immunohistochemistry were used to analyse mesenteric morphology and macrophages, while Western blot was used to assess the expression of inflammatory, oxidative stress, and energy expenditure proteins. Supplementation of drinking water with BARD prevented mesenteric fat deposition, as determined by a reduction in large adipocytes. BARD prevented inflammation as there were fewer inflammatory macrophages and reduced proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha). BARD reduced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, suggesting an antioxidative stress effect. BARD upregulates energy expenditure proteins, judged by the increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) proteins. Overall, BARD induces preventive effect in HFD mice through regulation of mesenteric adipose tissue. PMID:26618193

  9. Review article: diagnosis and management of mesenteric ischaemia with an emphasis on pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, P L; Brandt, L J

    2005-02-01

    Mesenteric ischaemia results from decreased blood flow to the bowel, causing cellular injury from lack of oxygen and nutrients. Acute mesenteric ischaemia (AMI) is an uncommon disorder with high morbidity and mortality, but outcomes are improved with prompt recognition and aggressive treatment. Five subgroups of AMI have been identified, with superior mesenteric artery embolism (SMAE) the most common. Older age and cardiovascular disease are common risk factors for AMI, excepting acute mesenteric venous thrombosis (AMVT), which affects younger patients with hypercoaguable states. AMI is characterized by sudden onset of abdominal pain; a benign abdominal exam may be observed prior to bowel infarction. Conventional angiography and more recently, computed tomography angiography, are the cornerstones of diagnosis. Correction of predisposing conditions, volume resuscitation and antibiotic treatment are standard treatments for AMI, and surgery is mandated in the setting of peritoneal signs. Intra-arterial vasodilators are used routinely in the treatment of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia (NOMI) and also are advocated in the treatment of occlusive AMI to decrease associated vasospasm. Thrombolytics have been used on a limited basis to treat occlusive AMI. A variety of agents have been studied in animal models to treat reperfusion injury, which sometimes can be more harmful than ischaemic injury. Chronic mesenteric ischaemia (CMI) usually is caused by severe obstructive atherosclerotic disease of two or more splanchnic vessels, presents with post-prandial pain and weight loss, and is treated by either surgical revascularization or percutaneous angioplasty and stenting.

  10. CASE REPORT An Unusual Case of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Following Resection of Extensive Posttraumatic Mesenteric Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Nabulyato, William M.; Alsahiem, Hebah; Hall, Nigel R.; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Heterotopic mesenteric ossification is an extremely rare condition, which often follows trauma and is frequently symptomatic. To date, there are no reports in the literature of abdominal compartment syndrome occurring after surgical resection of mesenteric calcification. The present report documents an unusual case of compartment syndrome complicating resection of extensive mesenteric calcification despite abdominal closure with the components-separation technique. Method: A 48-year-old man undergoing components-separation technique for posttraumatic laparostomy hernia repair (ileostomy reversal and sigmoid stricture correction) was found to have extensive heterotopic mesenteric calcification, which needed resection. Results: Resection of the mesenteric calcification was complicated by intraoperative hemorrhage and unplanned small bowel resection. Later the patient developed secondary hemorrhage leading to an abdominal compartment syndrome, which was successfully treated by decompression, hemostasis, and Permacol-assisted laparotomy wound closure. The patient remains symptom-free more than 2 years after surgery. Discussion: The case herein reported gives an account of the rare occurrence of abdominal compartment syndrome following resection of posttraumatic ectopic mesenteric ossifications. It is highly unusual in that it occurred because of “secondary hemorrhage” and despite abdominal closure with the components-separation technique, which had been undertaken precisely to prevent compartment syndrome with direct closure. It therefore highlights the need for continued clinical vigilance in complex posttraumatic cases. PMID:23573333

  11. Binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites in rat mesenteric lymph

    SciTech Connect

    Dueland, S.; Bouillon, R.; Van Baelen, H.; Pedersen, J.I.; Helgerud, P.; Drevon, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    A protein with high affinity for vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in rat mesenteric lymph has been studied. Mesenteric lymph was collected after duodenal instillation of radiolabeled vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. As previously described, approximately 10% of vitamin D3 and 95% of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 recovered in mesenteric lymph were associated with the alpha-globulin fractions. The radioactive vitamin D3 recovered in the lymph fraction with d greater than 1.006 (free of chylomicrons) coeluted with purified rat serum binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites (DBP) from an antirat DBP column. The results obtained by immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that this protein in mesenteric lymph had molecular weight and immunological properties identical with purified serum DBP. Purified serum DBP labeled with /sup 125/I was injected intravenously and mesenteric lymph was collected. results suggesting that DBP may be transferred from blood to mesenteric lymph and that plasma and lymph DBP may have a similar origin.

  12. Anatomical Description and Clinical Relevance of a Rare Variation in the Mesenteric Arterial Arcade Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hansdak, Ranjeeta; Thakur, Avinash; Mehta, Vandana; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    Solitary vascular variations of the mesenteric arteries are extremely rare and have been seldom reported in the past. The aim of this study is to emphasize the anatomical and clinical relevance of one such rare variation of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). The current case anomaly was incidentally observed while guiding the undergraduate medical students in the dissection of the mesenteric region of the abdomen in an Indian cadaver. An Accessory left colic artery was seen to be branching off from the Inferior Mesenteric artery and further dividing into two transverse branches which took part in the formation of arterial arc for the perfusion of the transverse and the descending colon. Awareness of such aberrant branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery helps in optimal selection of the mode of treatment or operative planning. Additionally, this knowledge minimizes possible iatrogenic injuries resulting from surgeries. Moreover, surgical anatomy of anomalous branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery is extremely essential for planning and successfully executing reconstructive procedures using these branches as pedicles for the transposed part of the colon. PMID:26435936

  13. Prevalence of swine viral and bacterial pathogens in rodents and stray cats captured around pig farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Seo, Tae Won; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Han, Jeong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2013-12-30

    In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs.

  14. Rho Kinase Enhances Contractions of Rat Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Moor, Andrea N.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1–10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5–50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1–10 μM H1152 or 25–50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose

  15. Rho kinase enhances contractions of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Kristine H; Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Moor, Andrea N; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1-10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5-50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1-10 μM H1152 or 25-50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose that

  16. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  17. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chee-Huan; Tzeng, Shiau-Tzu; Chen, Chiang-Sang; Chen, Po-Quang

    2007-02-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare complication following correction of scoliosis with either nonoperative or operative methods. If the patient diagnosed with this syndrome is not managed timely and adequately, mortality may result. We report two cases of SMAS complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis using modern segmental derotation instrumentation system. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical presentations, laboratory findings, radiologic features, and management of the syndrome. The first patient had the syndrome after two-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between two stages, and the second patient after three-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between the first and second surgeries. The first patient responded well to conservative treatment. However, the second patient failed to respond to conservative treatment and needed a gastrojejunostomy operation to bypass the duodenal obstruction. Clinicians treating post scoliosis surgery patients should always have a high index of suspicion for this potential life-threatening condition. Early diagnosis will enable a multidisciplinary team approach to be initiated early to provide optimal care for the patient. Nutritional and fluid supplementation is mandatory during conservative treatment. The duration for trial of conservative treatment should not exceed 1 week.

  18. Robotic duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Bütter, Andreana; Jayaraman, Shiva; Schlachta, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) involves vascular compression of the third part of the duodenum, eventually leading to gastrointestinal obstruction. Duodenojejunostomy is indicated after failure of conservative management and in chronic cases. We report a case of a cachetic 16-year-old girl with dyskeratosis congenita who suffered from SMA syndrome for 18 months. Upper endoscopy and preoperative imaging (upper GI series and abdominal CT scan) confirmed the diagnosis. A da Vinci-assisted duodenojejunostomy was performed after obtaining informed consent from the patient and her parents. Intraoperatively, a dilated duodenum to the level of D3 was noted. A side-to-side two-layer handsewn anatomosis was performed. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day #3. She gained 1.4 kg within 1 month. Twenty-one months later, she remains asymptomatic with a total weight gain of 3.2 kg. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a robot-assisted duodenojejunostomy for SMAS. PMID:27627956

  19. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  20. Fluidized bed combustor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Rengarajan, P.; Krishnan, R.; Wen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    A general mathematical model for the prediction of performance of a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBC) is developed. The basic elements of the model consist of: (1) hydrodynamics of gas and solids in the combustor; (2) description of gas and solids contacting pattern; (3) kinetics of combustion; and (4) absorption of SO2 by limestone in the bed. The model is capable of calculating the combustion efficiency, axial bed temperature profile, carbon hold-up in the bed, oxygen and SO2 concentrations in the bubble and emulsion phases, sulfur retention efficiency and particulate carry over by elutriation. The effects of bed geometry, excess air, location of heat transfer coils in the bed, calcium to sulfur ratio in the feeds, etc. are examined. The calculated results are compared with experimental data. Agreement between the calculated results and the observed data are satisfactory in most cases. Recommendations to enhance the accuracy of prediction of the model are suggested.

  1. Fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sowards, N.K.; Murphy, M.L.

    1991-10-29

    This patent describes a vessel. It comprises a fluid bed for continuously incinerating fuel comprising tire segments and the like which comprise metallic wire tramp and for concurrently removing tramp and bed materials at a bottom effluent exit means of the vessel, the vessel further comprising static air distributor means at the periphery of the bed comprising a substantially centrally unobstructed relatively large central region in which the fluid bed and fuel only are disposed and through which bed material and tramp migrate without obstruction to and through the effluent exit means, downwardly and inwardly stepped lower vessel wall means and a plurality of peripherally located centrally directed vertically and horizontally offset spaced air influent means surrounding the central region and associated with the stepped lower vessel wall means by which the bed is supported and fluidized.

  2. [A case of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis due to protein C deficiency in a patient with duodenal ulcer bleeding].

    PubMed

    Woo, Jae Gon; Lee, Ji Eun; Kwon, Oh Un; Jung, Kyoung Won; Jung, Chang Wook; Cho, Dae Hyeon; Yu, Kil Jong; Shim, Sang Goon

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a clinically very rare disease, and may cause bowel infarction and gangrene. Difficulty in the diagnosis the disease due to its non-specific symptoms and low prevalence can cause a clinically fatal situation. Mesenteric venous thrombosis may be caused by both congenital and acquired factors, and protein C deficiency, which is a very rare genetic disorder, is one of many causes of mesenteric thrombosis. The authors experienced a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis caused by protein C deficiency in a patient with duodenal ulcer bleeding, so here we report a case together with literature review.

  3. Rodent-borne diseases in Thailand: targeting rodent carriers and risky habitats

    PubMed Central

    Herbreteau, Vincent; Bordes, Frédéric; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Supputamongkol, Yupin; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparative analysis, which aims at investigating ecological and evolutionary patterns among species, may help at targeting reservoirs of zoonotic diseases particularly in countries presenting high biodiversity. Here, we developed a simple method to target rodent reservoirs using published studies screening microparasite infections. Methods We compiled surveys of microparasites investigated in rodents trapped in Thailand. The data comprise a total of 17,358 rodents from 18 species that have been investigated for a total of 10 microparasites (viruses, bacteria and protozoans). We used residual variation of microparasite richness controlled for both rodent sample size and pathogens’ screening effort to identify major rodent reservoirs and potential risky habitats. Results Microparasite species richness was positively related to rodent sample size and pathogens’ screening effort. The investigation of the residual variations of microparasite species richness showed that several rodent species harboured more pathogens than expected by the regression model. Similarly, higher pathogen richness than expected was observed in rodents living in non-flooded lands, forests and paddy fields. Conclusion Our results suggest to target some rodent species that are not commonly investigated for pathogen screening or surveillance such as R. adamanensis or B. savilei, and that non-flooded lands and forests should be more taken into caution, whereas much surveys focused on paddy rice fields and households. PMID:22957129

  4. Bed rest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Catherine; Stone, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The use of bed rest in medicine dates back to Hippocrates, who first recommended bed rest as a restorative measure for pain. With the formalization of prenatal care in the early 1900s, maternal bed rest became a standard of care, especially toward the end of pregnancy. Antepartum bed rest is a common obstetric management tool, with up to 95% of obstetricians utilizing maternal activity restriction in some way in their practice. Bed rest is prescribed for a variety of complications of pregnancy, from threatened abortion and multiple gestations to preeclampsia and preterm labor. Although the use of bed rest is pervasive, there is a paucity of data to support its use. Additionally, many well-documented adverse physical, psychological, familial, societal, and financial effects have been discussed in the literature. There have been no complications of pregnancy for which the literature consistently demonstrates a benefit to antepartum bed rest. Given the well-documented adverse effects of bed rest, disruption of social relationships, and financial implications of this intervention, there is a real need for scientific investigation to establish whether this is an appropriate therapeutic modality. Well-designed randomized, controlled trials of bed rest versus normal activity for various complications of pregnancy are required to lay this debate to rest once and for all. PMID:21425272

  5. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control.

  6. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control. PMID:23971813

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of the innervation of human colonic mesenteric and submucosal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    De Fontgalland, D; Wattchow, D A; Costa, M; Brookes, S J H

    2008-11-01

    The aim was to characterize quantitatively the classes of nerves innervating human mesenteric and submucosal vessels. Specimens of uninvolved normal human mesentery and colon were obtained with prior informed consent from patients undergoing elective surgery for bowel carcinoma. Mesenteric and submucosal vessels were processed for double-labelling immunohistochemical localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), somatostatin (SOM), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and enkephelin (ENK), each compared to the pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5. Branching patterns of individual nerve fibres were investigated using in vitro anterograde tracing. Sympathetic neurons containing TH and NPY were the largest population, accounting for more than 85% on all vessels. Extrinsic sensory axons, containing SP but not CGRP comprised a second major population on mesenteric vessels: these axons generally lacked TH, NPY and VAChT. On submucosal, but not mesenteric vessels, an additional population of SOM-immunoreactive fibres was present: these axons did not co-localize with TH. Major similarities and differences with enteric vessel innervation in laboratory animals were identified. Sympathetic neurons comprise the largest input. Extrinsic sensory neurons in humans largely lack CGRP but contain SP. Submucosal vessels receive an additional source of innervation not present in mesenteric vessels, which contain SOM, but are rarely cholinergic. These results have significant implications for understanding the control of blood flow to the human gut.

  8. Successfully-treated mesenteric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving hepatic mass--a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Ryuzaburo; Takeda, Ryoji; Sakata, Shingo; Yamamoto, Michihiro; Nishizaki, Daisuke; Takamatsu, Teruyuki; Iwasa, Yoko

    2007-05-01

    A mesenteric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma which also involves the liver is very rare. We describe herein a mesenteric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with hepatic involvement successfully treated by the combination of surgical resection and multiagent chemotherapy. A 77-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a right lower abdominal tumor. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass in the mesenterium at the ileocoecal region and multiple mass in the liver. Gallium scintigram showed focal hot uptake at the ileocoecal region and multiple areas of increased Gallium uptake in the liver. With the diagnosis of a mesenteric tumor with liver metastases, a laparotomy was performed. By an intraoperative pathological examination, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was suggested. The mesenteric mass was completely resected, but additional operative procedures were not done to the liver. After the operation, the patient was determined to have Stage IVB diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and chemotherapy based on the CHOP-like regimen was given. After the 8th course of such chemotherapy, he was confirmed to have achieved a complete remission by abdominal computed tomography and Gallium scintigram.The Stage IV mesenteric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the liver seems to be an indication for combination therapy of surgical resection and multiagent chemotherapy.

  9. Fluidized bed calciner apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas J.; Klem, Jr., Michael J.; Cash, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

  10. The Fecal Viral Flora of Wild Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tung G.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunlin; Rose, Robert K.; Lipton, Howard L.; Delwart, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat) collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in mammals. PMID:21909269

  11. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord.

    PubMed

    Balmaseda, M T; Gordon, C; Cunningham, M L; Clairmont, A C

    1987-09-01

    Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. This unusual type of intestinal obstruction known as superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity. It is diagnosed radiologically by an abrupt, vertical cutoff of barium flow in the third portion of the duodenum. The management is primarily medical but occasionally surgical correction is required. Herein, the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome was made in an incomplete quadriplegic woman who had recently undergone surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord. This case was managed successfully with gastrointestinal decompression, proper positioning in the side-lying position, and adequate nutrition. PMID:3631039

  12. Mesenteric vein thrombosis caused by secondary polycythaemia from AndroGel

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Heather; Popov, Eugene; Bray, Natasha; Berman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is a rare but potentially lethal cause of abdominal pain. It is usually caused by prothrombotic states that can either be hereditary or acquired. Testosterone supplementation causes an acquired prothrombotic state by promoting erythropoeisis thus causing a secondary polycythaemia. We report a case of a 59-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) stage III, who presented with abdominal pain. Evaluation revealed an elevated haemoglobin and haematocrit, a superior mesenteric vein thrombosis on CT and a negative Janus kinase 2 mutation. The patient is currently being treated with 6 months of anticoagulation with rivaroxiban. Although a well-known side effect of testosterone is thrombosis, the present case is used to document in the literature the first case of mesenteric vein thrombosis due to secondary polycythaemia from Androgel in the setting of COPD. PMID:25336553

  13. [Step-up strategy for diagnosis and treatment of acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuofei; Wu, Xingjiang; Li, Jieshou

    2014-05-01

    Acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis is rare. With advance in CT venography, angiography and diagnostic laparoscopy, the incidence of acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis has increased worldwide with more access to early diagnosis. The use of anticoagulation medication, interventional radiology, and damage control approach has resulted in better clinical outcomes. At present, the new step-up approach for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis includes CT venography as the main diagnostic technique, anticoagulation as the cornerstone of therapy, local transcatheter thrombolytic therapy as the key recanalization method, and adjunctive use of arterial spasmolysis and various endovascular manipulation and damage control surgery by intestinal resection plus jejunostomy and ileostomy or open abdomen. This strategy may further improve clinical outcomes. This review will present the most recent advance in this strategy.

  14. Mesenteric vein thrombosis caused by secondary polycythaemia from AndroGel.

    PubMed

    Katz, Heather; Popov, Eugene; Bray, Natasha; Berman, Barry

    2014-10-21

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis is a rare but potentially lethal cause of abdominal pain. It is usually caused by prothrombotic states that can either be hereditary or acquired. Testosterone supplementation causes an acquired prothrombotic state by promoting erythropoeisis thus causing a secondary polycythaemia. We report a case of a 59-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) stage III, who presented with abdominal pain. Evaluation revealed an elevated haemoglobin and haematocrit, a superior mesenteric vein thrombosis on CT and a negative Janus kinase 2 mutation. The patient is currently being treated with 6 months of anticoagulation with rivaroxiban. Although a well-known side effect of testosterone is thrombosis, the present case is used to document in the literature the first case of mesenteric vein thrombosis due to secondary polycythaemia from Androgel in the setting of COPD.

  15. [Mesenteric infarction of the small bowel in the course of portal vein thrombosis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Iyluk, Andrzej; Jagielski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a rare entity, usually concomitant with hepatic cirrhosis and malignancies. Spontaneous disease occurs very rarely, and it presents with venous small bowel mesenteric infarction, causing intestinal ischaemia extremely rarely. We present a patient who was operated on because of symptoms and signs of "acute abdomen" and in whom segmental ischaemia of the small bowel and mesenteric thrombosis were found intraoperatively. The correct diagnosis, mesenteric infarction of the small bowel in the course of portal vein thrombosis, was made after performing an abdominal computer tomography scan a week after surgery. The course of the treatment, complications, and data from the literature are presented about this very rare condition, which may constitute a difficult diagnostic problem for a surgeon.

  16. Sonographic findings of superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing massive gastric dilatation in a young healthy girl.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, F M; Hefny, A F; Saadeldinn, Y A; El-Ashaal, Y I

    2010-11-01

    Acute gastric dilatation due to superior mesenteric artery syndrome in healthy individuals is extremely rare. A 17-year-old girl who complained of epigastric pain for two days following excessive eating was admitted to our hospital. She was nauseated but was unable to vomit. Succussion splash was positive. Bedside ultrasonography revealed a hyperactive duodenum, a distended stomach compressing on the inferior vena cava and a narrowed angle between the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the aorta. Abdominal computed tomography imaging confirmed the above findings. The angle between the aorta and SMA was only eight degrees. Gastrograffin follow-through showed complete obstruction of the third part of the duodenum. 3,500 ml of fluid was immediately drained through the nasogastric tube. Another gastrograffin study conducted five days later showed normal results. Bedside ultrasonography thus proved to be useful for both the diagnosis and management of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. PMID:21140106

  17. Effects of exercise and excitement on mesenteric and renal dynamics in conscious, unrestrained baboons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to measure arterial pressure and mesenteric and renal blood flows from nine unrestrained, conscious baboons during periods of rest, moderate exercise, and extreme excitement. A description of the experiments hardware is presented, including artificial depressants phenylcyclidine hydrochloride, 0.5-1.0 mg/kg, and pentobarbital sodium, 15 mg/kg, and an ultrasonic telemetry flow meter. Results showed rising heart rate and arterial pressure coupled with a reduction of mesenteric and renal flows as the level of exercise was increased. These findings are compared with mesenteric and renal flows somewhat above control level, but relatively stable heart rate and arterial pressure, postprandially. Attention is given to a quantitative analysis of the experimental results.

  18. Uterus-innervating neurones in porcine inferior mesenteric ganglion: an immunohistochemical characteristic.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, K

    2003-06-01

    The presence of tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, galanin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide was studied with immunohistochemistry in uterus-innervating neurones found in the inferior mesenteric ganglia after fluorescent tracer (Fast Blue) injection into different regions of the porcine uterus (uterine cervix, paracervical, middle and paraoviductal part of the uterine horn). Virtually all Fast Blue-positive neurones found in the inferior mesenteric ganglia after tracer injection into all studied parts of the uterus contained tyrosine hydroxylase and ca. 45% of them contained neuropeptide Y. Single galanin-positive/Fast Blue-positive cells were found in the ganglia only after tracer injections into uterine cervix. No other studied substances were found in the Fast-Blue positive neurones of the inferior mesenteric ganglia. PMID:12823101

  19. A rare cause of childhood ileus: giant mesenteric lipoma and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turk, Erdal; Edirne, Yesim; Karaca, Fahri; Memetoglu, Mehmet Erdal; Unal, Emel; Ermumcu, Ozgur

    2013-10-01

    Mesenteric lipomas are benign tumors of mature fat cells. They are usually asymptomatic and create a clinical picture that depends on the localization and size of the lipoma. Although rare, unusually large mesenteric giant lipomas can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction. Lipomas resulting in partial bowel obstruction can present with symptoms such as intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distention. With complete obstruction, a child can present with an acute abdomen. Treatment is the excision of the mass along with the affected portion of bowel. In this case study, a 2-year-old female presented with a bowel obstruction due to the presence of a giant mesenteric lipoma. Clinical features of 16 cases published in the English literature to date are presented.

  20. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Bed bath; Sponge bath ... Some patients cannot safely leave their beds to bathe. For these people, daily bed baths can help keep their skin healthy, control odor, and increase comfort. If moving the ...

  1. A Case of a 4-Year-Old Boy with a Mesenteric Chylous Cyst Infected with Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Apiyo, Mirraim; Olika, Biratu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon entities and chyle- (lymph-) containing cysts are the rarest of this group. This is a case report of a 4-year-old boy with a mesenteric chylous cyst who was later found to have Histoplasma capsulatum infection. PMID:26881169

  2. A new technique for complete portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Song, Sanghyun; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Shin, Milljae; Kim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Sanghoon; Moon, Hyung Hwan; Park, Jae Berm; Kim, Sung Joo; Joh, Jae-Won; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2014-02-01

    We describe a deceased-donor liver transplant recipient with grade 3 complete portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thromboses, which was successfully managed with an extensive thrombectomy through the venotomy site of superior mesenteric vein. In this case report, we suggest our method as an option for grade 3 portal vein thromboses, and discuss other options available for recipients with portal vein thromboses.

  3. Traumatic lumbar hernias: do patient or hernia characteristics predict bowel or mesenteric injury?

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Raptis, Constantine; Lonsford, Chad; Lin, Michael; Schuerer, Douglas

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernias are rare but important injuries to diagnose in blunt abdominal trauma, both because of delayed complications of the hernia itself and because of well-documented association with bowel and mesenteric injuries. No study to our knowledge has determined whether specific features of the hernia-size of the wall defect, inferior or superior location, or the side of the hernia-bear any predictive value on the presence of underlying bowel and mesenteric injury. A retrospective query of the radiology information system yielded 21 patients with lumbar hernias which were diagnosed on CT. These were reviewed by three radiologists to confirm the presence of an acute lumbar hernia and to determine the size and location of the hernia. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine the presence of operatively confirmed bowel and/or mesenteric injuries, which occurred in 52 % of patients. A significant (p < 0.001) difference was found in the frequency of bowel and/or mesenteric injury with hernia defects greater than 4.0 cm (100 %) and those less than 4.0 cm (17 %). Larger hernias also resulted in more procedures (p = 0.042) and a trend towards longer ICU stay, but no difference in injury severity score (ISS) or overall hospital stay. No significant difference was seen in the frequency of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries based on side or location of the hernia, though distal colonic injuries were more commonly seen with left-sided hernias (50 %) compared to right-sided hernias (18 %). Although based on a small patient population, these results suggest that larger traumatic lumbar hernias warrant particularly close evaluation for an underlying bowel and/or mesenteric injury.

  4. The mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model: application to the assessment of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-03-06

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained.

  5. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; Kelly, Richard; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague-Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system. PMID:26817976

  6. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; III, Richard Kelly; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague–Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system. PMID:26817976

  7. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; Kelly, Richard; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague-Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system.

  8. Laparoscopic excision of mesenteric duplication enteric cyst embedded in sigmoid mesocolon mimicking retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor in adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Ho; Lin, Jen-Tai; Hsu, Chao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumors with an incidence of 1/105,000 to 250,000 hospitalized adult surgical patients. These cysts may occur in every part of the mesentery, from duodenum to rectum. Most frequently, cysts are localized in small bowel mesentery. They usually present during the first decade of life, mostly occurring in pediatric patients. These lesions characteristically arise from the mesenteric border of the bowel. The majority are asymptomatic and, if found, are discovered incidentally during abdominal exploration or radiologic examination. Traditionally, the treatment of mesenteric cyst is surgical excision by laparotomy. However, in 1993, Mackenzie described the first laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst. Since then, several cases have been reported but mainly in small intestine. Here, we reported an adult patient of a mesenteric duplication enteric cyst embedded in sigmoid mesocolon mimicking retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor, which was completely excised using the laparoscopic approach (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/SLE/A73).

  9. Primary mesenteric lymphangioma in a young adult with intestinal malrotation and ‘counter-clockwise barber pole sign’

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neha; Singh, Ragini; Maheswari, Udbhav; Aga, Pallavi

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric lymphangiomas are uncommon benign lesions that usually occur in isolation but rarely may be associated with gastrointestinal (GI) malrotation. Malrotation may cause chronic and recurrent volvulus leading to chronic venous congestion and lymphatic engorgement. Interference with lymphatic drainage may result in formation of a lymphangioma or a chylous mesenteric cyst. In our case, mesenteric lymphangioma was present with partial malrotation of small and large bowel. There was no radiological and surgical evidence of volvulus, favouring the hypothesis that lymphangioma may be a primary congenital association of GI malrotation. Another interesting finding was the counter-clockwise twisting of the superior mesenteric vein around the superior mesenteric artery which has been reported only seven times in the literature. PMID:23761495

  10. Delayed reconstruction of the superior mesenteric vein with autogenous femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Tulip, Hans H; Smith, Sumona V; Valentine, R James

    2012-06-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent ligation of the superior mesenteric vein due to traumatic disruption. He developed severe bowel edema with large fluid losses through the open abdominal incision. On postoperative day 9, a superior mesenteric vein bypass was performed with autogenous femoral vein, and this resulted in prompt resolution of the bowel edema and allowed abdominal wound closure. He was able to resume a normal diet and was discharged on postinjury day 39. A magnetic resonance imaging scan performed 1 year later showed a patent graft.

  11. [A case of adenosquamous carcinoma of the sigmoid colon with inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryota; Maruyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Akinari; Sato, Yayoi; Sazuka, Tetsutaro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Kanada, Yoko; Yanagihara, Akitoshi; Yokoyama, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shinichiro

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old man who had been admitted to another institute with sepsis and renal failure was referred to our hospital after computed tomography (CT) findings showed thickening of the walls in the sigmoid colon and a defect in contrast enhancement in the portal and inferior mesenteric veins. Emergency sigmoid colon resection with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed after detection of perforation due to sigmoid colon cancer. The histopathological diagnosis was adenosquamous carcinoma, pSS, int, INF b, ly1, v0, pN2, pStage IIIband inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis. He was discharged on day 12, and we administered anticoagulant warfarin therapy.

  12. Beyond decreased bowel enhancement: acute abnormalities of the mesenteric and portal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Claire K; Ingraham, Christopher R; Monroe, Eric J; Johnson, Guy E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a potentially life-threatening condition with an associated high mortality. Prompt diagnosis is crucial to achieve a favorable outcome. The radiologist plays a central role in the initial evaluation of a patient with suspected AMI. In this pictorial essay, we review the appropriate imaging evaluation of a patient with suspected AMI, and we review both the common and uncommon etiologies of mesenteric ischemia. With each etiology presented, relevant clinical and imaging findings, as well as potential treatments, are reviewed.

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of embolism and thrombosis of abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kentaro; Obara, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-07-01

    Although acute aortic occlusion (AAO) and acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) are relatively rare condition, it is very important to know clinical features and managements for these because a delay in diagnosis and appropriate interventions results in high morbidity and mortality. AAO can result from aortic saddle embolus, acute thrombosis of an atherosclerotic aorta, and so on. Superior mesenteric artery embolism and thrombosis are main cause of AMI. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. The latest information in this article may help readers to promptly make the diagnosis and effectively manage it in a timely manner.

  14. Seatbelt syndrome with superior mesenteric artery syndrome: leave nothing to chance!

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Singla, Apresh A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of seatbelts to legislation has dramatically reduced mortality and morbidity from motor vehicle accidents. However, overtime evidence has emerged of ‘seatbelt syndrome’ (SBS), particularly in the paediatric population. The report describes the diagnosis and management of this rare injury in a 12-year-old boy who sustained a chance lumbar fracture and mesenteric tear resulting in small bowel obstruction. His stay was subsequently complicated by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. This is the first documented case of SBS with SMA syndrome. High index of suspicion and continuity of care, particularly in the setting of a ‘seatbelt sign’, is paramount to timely diagnosis and management. PMID:26564612

  15. Surgical Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Congenital Solitary Pelvic Kidney and Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takaaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Sano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare case of a 54-year-old man with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension, who was found to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm with congenital solitary pelvic kidney and superior mesenteric artery stenosis. A single renal artery branched from aneurysmal aortic bifurcation, and both the renal artery and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) had severe stenosis at their origins. The aneurysm was repaired with a bifurcated Dacron graft, to which the renal artery was anastomosed. SMA bypass was created between the graft’s left limb and the SMA using another Dacron graft. The operation was successful, with improvement in renal functions and control of hypertension. PMID:27738466

  16. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Celiac Axis Occlusion Treated Using Endovascular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Biswajit; Kuhan, Ganesh; Johnson, Brian; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2006-10-15

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery and associated celiac axis occlusion is presented. The patient was successfully treated with celiac artery recanalization and placement of a covered stent within the superior mesenteric artery. Follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months and 3 years demonstrated patency of the covered stent and continued exclusion of the aneurysm. Although the long-term success of this procedure is unknown this management option should be considered where facilities are available, to reduce the increased morbidity associated with open surgical procedure.

  17. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  18. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Associated with Rapid Weight Loss Attributed to Amphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Richard M.; Chen, On; Eldarawy, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome arises from a reduction in the angle formed between the SMA and the aorta, thereby compressing the third portion of the duodenum. This phenomenon may be caused by a number of factors, one of which being acute weight loss. We report a case of a female patient presenting with abdominal pain and vomiting who developed superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome as a result of rapid weight loss, thought to be secondary to amphetamine abuse. This association can often be overlooked and, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. PMID:26351593

  19. The MAM rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Rodent models of human disease are essential to obtain a better understanding of disease pathology, the mechanism of action underlying conventional treatments, as well as for the generation of novel therapeutic approaches. There are a number of rodent models of schizophrenia based on either genetic manipulations, acute or sub-chronic drug administration, or developmental disturbances. The prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model is a developmental disruption model gaining increased attention because it displays a number of histological, neurophysiological, and behavioral deficits analogous to those observed in schizophrenia patients. This unit describes the procedures required to safely induce the MAM phenotype in rats. In addition, we describe a simple behavioral procedure, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, which can be utilized to verify the MAM phenotype.

  20. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  1. Relaxation of human isolated mesenteric arteries by vasopressin and desmopressin.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M C; Vila, J M; Aldasoro, M; Medina, P; Flor, B; Lluch, S

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of vasopressin and deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, desmopressin) were studied in artery rings (0.8-1 mm in external diameter) obtained from portions of human omentum during the course of abdominal operations (27 patients). 2. In arterial rings under resting tension, vasopressin produced concentration-dependent, endothelium-independent contractions with an EC50 of 0.59 +/- 0.12 nM. The V1 antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM) and the mixed V1-V2 antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (0.01 microM) displaced the control curve to vasopressin to the right in a parallel manner without differences in the maximal responses. In the presence of indomethacin (1 microM) the contractile response to vasopressin was significantly increased (P < 0.01). 3. In precontracted arterial rings, previously treated with the V1 antagonist, d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM), vasopressin produced endothelium-dependent relaxation. This relaxation was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) by indomethacin (1 microM) and unaffected by the V1-V2 receptor antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (1 microM) or by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 mM). 4. The selective V2 receptor agonist, DDAVP, caused endothelium-independent, concentration-dependent relaxations in precontracted arterial rings that were inhibited by the mixed V1-V2 receptor antagonist, but not by the V1 receptor antagonist or by pretreatment with indomethacin or L-NAME. 5. Results from this study suggest that vasopressin is primarily a constrictor of human mesenteric arteries by V1 receptor stimulation; vasopressin causes dilatation only during V1 receptor blockade. The relaxation appears to be mediated by the release of vasodilator prostaglandins from the endothelial cell layer and is independent of V2 receptor stimulation or release of nitric oxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834191

  2. Chronic infection of rodents by Machupo virus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Mackenzie, R B; Webb, P A; Kuns, M L

    1965-12-17

    Machupo virus, the etiologic agent of human hemorrhagic fever in Bolivia, induced chronic asymptomatic infection in laboratory hamsters and colonized individuals of the peridomestic, wild, South American rodent, Calomys callosus. Viruria was detected for more than 500 and 150 days, respectively, in the two species. Chronic viremia was shown only for Calomys. Virus-neutralizing substances were present in parenterally infected adult animals, but not in animals born to, and in contact with, an infected female. Chronic infection in wild rodents may be an important mechanism in the natural history of Machupo and related virus infections.

  3. Tapered bed bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  4. Test Bed For Telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, Jacob R.; Zimmerman, Wayne F.; Dolinsky, Shlomo

    1990-01-01

    Assembly of electromechanical and electronic equipment (including computers) constitutes test bed for development of advanced robotic systems for remote manipulation. Combines features not found in commercial systems. Its architecture allows easy growth in complexity and level of automation. System national resource for validation of new telerobotic technology. Intended primarily for robots used in outer space, test bed adapted to development of advanced terrestrial telerobotic systems for handling radioactive materials, dangerous chemicals, and explosives.

  5. Bed exit alarms.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Bed-exit alarms alert caregivers that a patient who should not get out of bed unassisted is doing so. These alarms can help reduce the likelihood of falls and can promote speedy assistance to patients who have already fallen. But as we described in our May 2004 Guidance Article on bed-exit alarms, they don't themselves prevent falls. They are only effective if used as part of an overall fall-prevention program and with a clear understanding of their limitations. This Evaluation examines the effectiveness of 16 bed-exit alarms from seven suppliers. Our ratings focus primarily on each product's reliability in detecting bed-exit events and alerting caregivers, its ability to minimize nuisance alarms (alarms that sound even though the patient isn't leaving the bed or that sound while a caregiver is helping the patient to leave the bed), and its resistance to deliberate or inadvertent tampering. Twelve of the products use pressure-sensor-activated alarms (mainly sensor pads placed on or under the mattress); three use a cord that can attach to the patient's garment, alarming if the cord is pulled loose from the control unit; and one is a position-sensitive alarm attached to a leg cuff. All the products reliably detect attempted or successful bed exits. But they vary greatly in how effectively they alert staff, minimize nuisance alarms, and resist tampering. Ease of use and battery performance also vary for many units. Of the pressure-sensor units, three are rated Preferred. Those units meet most of our criteria and have no significant disadvantages. Five of the other pressure-sensor products are Acceptable, and the remaining four are Not Recommended. All three cord-activated alarms are rated Acceptable, as is the patient-worn alarm.

  6. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  7. Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system

    DOEpatents

    Mehta, Gautam I.; Rogers, Lynn M.

    1983-12-20

    In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

  8. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  9. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect vasoactivity of these compounds. Objectives were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in mesenteric artery and vein and determine if previous exposure to endophyte-infected tall fescue affec...

  10. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect the vasoactivity of these compounds. The objectives of this study were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in bovine mesenteric artery (MA) and vein (MV) and determine if previous exposure ...

  11. Relaxation effect of a novel Danshensu/tetramethylpyrazine derivative on rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Rachel Wai-Sum; Yang, C; Shan, Luchen; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Kwan, Y W; Lee, Simon M Y; Hoi, Maggie P M; Chan, S W; Cheung, Alex Chun; Cheung, K H; Leung, George P H

    2015-08-15

    Danshen (Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae) and ChuanXiong (Ligusticum wallichii) are two traditional herbal medicines commonly used in China for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The active components in Danshen and ChuanXiong are Danshensu (DSS, (R)-3, 4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid) and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), respectively. In the present study, a new compound named ADTM, which is a conjugation of DSS and TMP, was synthesized and its effect on the contractility of rat mesenteric arteries was examined. The relaxation effect of ADTM on rat mesenteric arteries was studied using myography. The effects of ADTM on Ca(2+) channels were measured by Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that ADTM caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries. This relaxation effect was not affected by the removal of endothelium or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase, guanylyl cyclase and adenylyl cyclase. Potassium channel blockers including tetraethylammonium, iberiotoxin, apamin, 4-aminopyridine, BaCl2 and glibenclamide also failed to inhibit the relaxation response to ADTM. ADTM inhibited CaCl2-induced contractions and reduced the Ca(2+) influx in isolated mesenteric arterial muscle cells. Our results suggest that ADTM may be a novel relaxing agent. Its mechanism of action involves the direct blockade of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, resulting in a decrease in Ca(2+) influx into the cells. PMID:25952729

  12. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  13. Very late mesenteric bare metal stent thrombosis in the setting of cessation of antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Ait-Mokhtar, O; Bayet, G; Benamara, S; Brunet, J; Hager, F X; Sainsous, J

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of a 73 year-old man admitted for acute mesenteric ischaemia. Eight years before, he had a first mesenteric ischaemic event treated by left colectomy and angioplasty of both main coeliac artery (MCA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA); the patient was discharged on lifelong clopidogrel and aspirin. One month before his admission for the index event, he had a major haematuria; clopidogrel was stopped first, then aspirin because of recurrent haematuria. Five days after withdrawal of both antiplatelet drugs, the patient presented with acute mesenteric ischaemia. Urgent aortography showed in-stent occlusion of SMA and in-stent restenosis of MCA; we performed ad hoc thrombus aspiration of SMA and balloon angioplasty of MCA. The patient was discharged seven days after, without complications. This case shows that very late stent thrombosis in digestive artery can occur in the setting of antiplatelet arrest and urgent endovascular intervention constitutes a seductive alternative for surgery when performed early after symptoms onset.

  14. Adaptation of Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatic Pump Function Following Acute Alcohol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Kurtz, Kristine M.; Molina, Patricia E.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Acute alcohol intoxication increases intestinal lymph flow by unknown mechanisms, potentially impacting mucosal immunity. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced intrinsic pump function of mesenteric lymphatics contributes to increased intestinal lymph flow during alcohol intoxication. Methods Acute alcohol intoxication was produced by intragastric administration of 30% alcohol to concious, unrestrained rats through surgically-implanted catheters. Time-matched controls received either no bolus, vehicle, or isocaloric dextrose. Thirty minutes after alcohol administration, rats were anesthetized and mesenteric collecting lymphatics were isolated and cannulated to study intrinsic pumping parameters. In separate experiments, mesenteric lymphatics were isolated to examine direct effects of alcohol on intrinsic pump activity. Results Lymphatics isolated from alcohol-intoxicated animals displayed slgnificantly decreased contraction frequency (CF) than the dextrose group, elevated stroke volume index (SVI) versus all other groups, and decreased myogenic responsiveness compared to sham. Elevating pressure from 2 to 4 cm H2O increased the volume flow index 2.4-fold in the alcohol group versus 1.4-fold for shams. Isolated lymphatics exposed to 20 mM alcohol had reduced myogenic tone, without changes in CF or SVI. Conclusions Alcohol intoxication enhances intrinsic pumping by mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Alcohol directly decreases lymphatic myogenic tone, but effects on phasic contractions occur by an unidentified mechanism. PMID:21040117

  15. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  16. Superior Mesenteric Vein Occlusion Causing Severe Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Two Paediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anna L.; Jones, Matthew; Healey, Andrew; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports about superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in childhood are very rare and have not been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. We describe two cases of severe bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract in children who had undergone complex abdominal surgery at considerable time before. The first child had a tracheoesophageal fistula, corrected by division, gastrostomy insertion, and repair of duodenal rupture. The child presented with severe bleeding from the gastrostomy site and was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the proximal superior mesenteric vein. The second child had a gastroschisis and duodenal atresia, and required duodenoplasty, gastrostomy insertion, hemicolectomy, and adhesiolysis. The child presented with intermittent severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, resulting from collateral vessels at location of the surgical connections. He was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein. In both children, the extensive previous surgery and anastomosis were considered the cause of the mesenteric thrombosis. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis in both cases, in addition to characteristic findings on endoscopy. Paediatricians should suspect this condition in children with severe gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly in children with previous, complex abdominal surgery. PMID:23198238

  17. Arteriovenous Fistula of a Colic Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard D. Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy; Bhat, Rajesh

    2010-08-15

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) of the superior mesenteric artery and its branches are exceedingly rare. We report an unusual case of a patient who was found to be symptomatic from such an AVF, with diarrhea and terminal ileal thickening. We describe the findings from magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and catheter angiography and discuss the endovascular management.

  18. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mohammed H; Chan, Wilson W; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  19. Mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated, neurogenic vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries of toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Donald, John A

    2010-03-01

    This study determined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neurogenic vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries of the toad Bufo marinus. NO synthase (NOS) was anatomically demonstrated in perivascular nerves, but not in the endothelium. ACh and nicotine caused TTX-sensitive neurogenic vasodilation of mesenteric arteries. The ACh-induced vasodilation was endothelium-independent and was mediated by the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling pathway, inasmuch as the vasodilation was blocked by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one and the NOS inhibitors N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine. Furthermore, the ACh-induced vasodilation was significantly decreased by the more selective neural NOS inhibitor N(5)-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine. The nicotine-induced vasodilation was endothelium-independent and mediated by NO and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inasmuch as pretreatment of mesenteric arteries with a combination of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine and the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP-(8-37) blocked the vasodilation. Clotrimazole significantly decreased the ACh-induced response, providing evidence that a component of the NO vasodilation involved Ca(2+)-activated K(+) or voltage-gated K(+) channels. These data show that NO control of mesenteric resistance arteries of toad is provided by nitrergic nerves, rather than the endothelium, and implicate NO as a potentially important regulator of gut blood flow and peripheral blood pressure. PMID:20071617

  20. [Various cases of direct connections between the celiac artery and the superior mesenteric].

    PubMed

    Bertelli, E; Di Gregorio, F; Civeli, L

    1991-01-01

    The authors produce three cases in which an anastomotic arterial trunk between the coeliac artery and the superior mesenteric artery was present. Although this finding is rather rare (0.4% in vivo) it is important for the surgeons who operate upon the pancreas.

  1. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; González, Maria Carmen; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% ± 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% ± 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% ± 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% ± 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain.

  2. Aberrant arterial supply to uterine fibroids from branches of the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Song, Christopher I; McDermott, Meredith; Sclafani, Teresa; Charles, Hearns W

    2014-12-01

    Two patients, aged 48 and 45 years, were treated for symptomatic uterine fibroids with not only embolization of both uterine but also both ovarian arteries. Note was made of other collateral arterial supply via branches of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The two identified SMA branches were embolized for the first patient, but no embolization was deemed necessary for the other patient.

  3. Chylous mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts of developmental origin amongst Ethiopians: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Jain, S P

    1992-10-01

    Chylous mesenteric and retroperitoneal cysts of developmental origin are unusual and rarely diagnosed with accuracy before laparotomy. They may produce compression of viscera and may rupture with haemorrhage. This is the first report of four cases, with varied presentations, from an African country.

  4. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  5. Mesenteric lymph return is an important contributor to vascular hyporeactivity and calcium desensitization after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Gang; Niu, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Si, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Jing

    2012-08-01

    Vascular hyporeactivity is an important factor in irreversible shock, whereas calcium desensitization is one of the mechanisms of vascular hyporeactivity, and the intestinal lymphatic pathway plays an important role in multiple organ injury after severe hemorrhagic shock (HS). In this study, our aims were to determine the effects of mesenteric lymph on vascular reactivity during HS and the mechanisms involved. First, the in vivo pressor response was observed by intravenous injection of norepinephrine (3 μg/kg) at different time points after HS. We found that mesenteric lymph duct ligation (MLDL) and mesenteric lymph drainage (MLD) enhanced the pressor response at multiple time points after shock. Next, vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity in superior mesenteric artery (SMA) vascular rings were examined using an isolated organ perfusion system. Vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity were higher for SMA rings from rats that had undergone HS plus MLDL or MLD that those from rats that had undergone only HS. The effects of MLDL and MLD on vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity were significantly increased following incubation with the calcium sensitizer angiotensin II and were reduced after incubation with the calcium sensitivity inhibitor insulin. When SMA rings from normal rats were incubated with mesenteric lymph from rats subjected to HS, lymph obtained 0 to 0.5 h after shock enhanced vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity, whereas lymph obtained 1 to 3 h after shock blunted these effects. We finally examined vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity in HS rats subjected to MLD at 0 to 3 h or 1 to 3 h after shock. We found that contractile activity of SMAs in response to norepinephrine or Ca was higher in HS rats subjected to MLD at 1 to 3 h after shock compared with rats subjected to MLD at 0 to 3 h after shock. These results indicate that mesenteric lymph return plays an important role in biphasic changes in vascular reactivity during HS

  6. In situ perfusion in rodents to explore intestinal drug absorption: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stappaerts, Jef; Brouwers, Joachim; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2015-01-30

    The in situ intestinal perfusion technique in rodents is a very important absorption model, not only because of its predictive value, but it is also very suitable to unravel the mechanisms underlying intestinal drug absorption. This literature overview covers a number of specific applications for which the in situ intestinal perfusion set-up can be applied in favor of established in vitro absorption tools, such as the Caco-2 cell model. Qualities including the expression of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes relevant for human intestinal absorption and compatibility with complex solvent systems render the in situ technique the most designated absorption model to perform transporter-metabolism studies or to evaluate the intestinal absorption from biorelevant media. Over the years, the in situ intestinal perfusion model has exhibited an exceptional ability to adapt to the latest challenges in drug absorption profiling. For instance, the introduction of the mesenteric vein cannulation allows determining the appearance of compounds in the blood and is of great use, especially when evaluating the absorption of compounds undergoing intestinal metabolism. Moreover, the use of the closed loop intestinal perfusion set-up is interesting when compounds or perfusion media are scarce. Compatibility with emerging trends in pharmaceutical profiling, such as the use of knockout or transgenic animals, generates unparalleled possibilities to gain mechanistic insight into specific absorption processes. Notwithstanding the fact that the in situ experiments are technically challenging and relatively time-consuming, the model offers great opportunities to gain insight into the processes determining intestinal drug absorption.

  7. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  8. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  9. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  10. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  11. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  12. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  13. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  14. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  15. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  16. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  17. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  18. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  19. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  20. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  1. The role of CT in predicting the need for surgery in patients diagnosed with mesenteric phlebosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos; Liao, Chun-Han; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Chen, Chun-Ming; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine if imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) can predict the need of surgery in patients with idiopathic mesenteric phlebosclerosis (IMP). This retrospective study included 28 patients with IMP. Abdominal CT images were reviewed to determine the extent and severity of mesenteric calcifications and the presence of findings related to colitides. We compared the number of colonic segments with mesenteric venous calcification, a total calcification score, and the rate of colonic wall thickening, pericolic fat stranding, and bowel loop dilatation between patients undergoing surgery (surgery group) and patients without surgery (nonsurgery group). Comparisons were made using the Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher exact test. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was also performed. Inter-reader agreement for the calcification scores was analyzed using kappa statistics. The number of colonic segments with mesenteric venous calcification and the total calcification scores were both significantly higher in the surgery group than the nonsurgery group (4.33 vs 2.96, P = 0.003; and 15.00 vs 8.96, P <0.001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristics to identify patients who need surgery were 0.96 and 0.92, respectively. The prevalence of bowel loop dilatation in the surgery group was also significantly higher than that in the nonsurgery group (16% vs 100%, P = 0.011). Evaluation of the severity and extent of IMP based on the total mesenteric venous calcification score, number of involved colonic segments, and the presence bowel loop dilatation on CT may be useful to indicate the outcomes of conservative treatment and need for surgery. PMID:27741142

  2. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Dominguez, James M.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Following exposure to microgravity, there is a reduced ability of astronauts to augment peripheral vascular resistance, often resulting in orthostatic hypotension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mesenteric arteries and veins will exhibit diminished vasoconstrictor responses after spaceflight. Mesenteric arteries and veins from female mice flown on the Space Transportation System (STS)-131 (n=11), STS-133 (n=6), and STS-135 (n=3) shuttle missions and respective ground-based control mice (n=30) were isolated for in vitro experimentation. Vasoconstrictor responses were evoked in arteries via norepinephrine (NE), potassium chloride (KCl), and caffeine, and in veins through NE across a range of intraluminal pressures (2–12 cmH2O). Vasoconstriction to NE was also determined in mesenteric arteries at 1, 5, and 7 d postlanding. In arteries, maximal constriction to NE, KCl, and caffeine were reduced immediately following spaceflight and 1 d postflight. Spaceflight also reduced arterial ryanodine receptor-3 mRNA levels. In mesenteric veins, there was diminished constriction to NE after flight. The results indicate that the impaired vasoconstriction following spaceflight occurs through the ryanodine receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ release mechanism. Such vascular changes in astronauts could compromise the maintenance of arterial pressure during orthostatic stress.—Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis, R. T., III, Dominguez, J. M., II, Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice. PMID:23099650

  3. Mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy and risk of gastrointestinal complications in infants undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Ilias; Branco, Ricardo G; Brinkhuis, Nadine; Furck, Anke; LaRovere, Joan; Cooper, David S; Pathan, Nazima

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesised that lower mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy values would be associated with a greater incidence of gastrointestinal complications in children weighing <10 kg who were recovering from cardiac surgery. We evaluated mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy, central venous oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases for 48 hours post-operatively. Enteral feeding intake, gastrointestinal complications, and markers of organ dysfunction were monitored for 7 days. A total of 50 children, with median age of 16.7 (3.2-31.6) weeks, were studied. On admission, the average mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy value was 71±18%, and the systemic oxygen saturation was 93±7.5%. Lower admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy correlated with longer time to establish enteral feeds (r=-0.58, p<0.01) and shorter duration of feeds at 7 days (r=0.48, p<0.01). Children with gastrointestinal complications had significantly lower admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy (58±18% versus 73±17%, p=0.01) and higher mesenteric arteriovenous difference of oxygen at admission [39 (23-47) % versus 19 (4-27) %, p=0.02]. Based on multiple logistic regression, admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy was independently associated with gastrointestinal complications (Odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.97; p=0.03). Admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76 to identify children who developed gastrointestinal complications, with a suggested cut-off value of 72% (78% sensitivity, 68% specificity). In this pilot study, we conclude that admission mesenteric near-infrared spectroscopy is associated with gastrointestinal complications and enteral feeding tolerance in children after cardiac surgery.

  4. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  5. Evaluation of cage micro-environment of mice housed on various types of bedding materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, E.; Stockwell, J.D.; Schweitzer, I.; Langley, S.H.; Smith, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors can affect the outcomes of studies using laboratory rodents. One such factor is bedding. Several new bedding materials and processing methods have been introduced to the market in recent years, but there are few reports of their performance. In the studies reported here, we have assessed the cage micro-environment (in-cage ammonia levels, temperature, and humidity) of mice housed on various kinds of bedding and their combinations. We also compared results for bedding supplied as Nestpaks versus loose bedding. We studied C57BL/6J mice (commonly used) and NOD/LtJ mice (heavy soilers) that were maintained, except in one study, in static duplex cages. In general, we observed little effect of bedding type on in-cage temperature or humidity; however, there was considerable variation in ammonia concentrations. The lowest ammonia concentrations occurred in cages housing mice on hardwood bedding or a mixture of corncob and alpha cellulose. In one experiment comparing the micro-environments of NOD/LtJ male mice housed on woodpulp fiber bedding in static versus ventilated caging, we showed a statistically significant decrease in ammonia concentrations in ventilated cages. Therefore, our data show that bedding type affects the micro-environment in static cages and that effects may differ for ventilated cages, which are being used in vivaria with increasing frequency.

  6. Superior Mesenteric Artery Stent-graft Placement in a Patient with Pseudoaneurysm Developing from a Pancreatic Pseudocyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, H.; Banno, T.; Sato, Y.; Hara, M.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2004-01-15

    Pseudoaneurysm is a relatively rare but serious complication of pancreatitis which is often fatal. We report successful stent-graft placement in the superior mesenteric artery in a 45-year-old man with a pancreatic pseudocyst that grew during therapy for chronic pancreatitis and developed into a pseudoaneurysm. After a stent graft was inserted in the superior mesenteric artery, the pseudoaneurysm disappeared and no further complications developed. Stent-graft placement was considered to be a useful therapy for pseudoaneurysms in the superior mesenteric arterial region.

  7. Cooling of debris beds

    SciTech Connect

    Barleon, L.; Thomauske, K.; Werie, H.

    1984-04-01

    The dependence of the dryout heat flux for volume-heated particulate beds on bed height (less than or equal to40 cm), particle diameter (0.06 to 16 mm), stratification and boundary conditions (saturated and subcooled liquid, adiabatic and cooled bottom and sidewalls) has been determined for water and Freon-113. Channel penetration through subcooled layers and ''downward boiling'' due to capillarity effects have been observed. Different types of bed disturbances have been identified, and their effect on dryout has been studied. Using existing theoretical models, which have been verified by the experiments, the upper limit of the thermal load on support structures has been calculated as a function of the particle size and bottom temperature for reactor accident conditions (Pu/U-oxide particles in sodium).

  8. Treatment bed microbiological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, Gilbert E.; Fitzpatrick, Timothy W.; Kril, Michael B.; Wilber, Georgia A.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of microbial fouling on treatment bed (TB) performance are being studied. Fouling of activated carbon (AC) and ion exchange resins (IEX) by live and devitalized bacteria can cause decreased capacity for selected sorbates with AC and IEX TB. More data are needed on organic species removal in the trace region of solute sorption isotherms. TB colonization was prevented by nonclassical chemical disinfectant compositions (quaternary ammonium resins) applied in suitable configurations. Recently, the protection of carbon beds via direct disinfectant impregnation has shown promise. Effects (of impregnation) upon bed sorption/removal characteristics are to be studied with representative contaminants. The potential need to remove solutes added or produced during water disinfection and/or TB microbiological control must be investigated.

  9. Effects of trientine, a metal chelator, on defective endothelium-dependent relaxation in the mesenteric vasculature of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Inkster, Melanie E; Cotter, Mary A; Cameron, Norman E

    2002-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus compromises endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels. This has been linked to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which neutralise nitric oxide (NO) and interfere with vasodilator function. Experiments using chelators have emphasised the importance of ROS produced by transition metal catalysed reactions. However, particularly for the small arteries and arterioles that control microcirculatory blood flow, NO is not the only endothelium-derived mediator; endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) has a major role. EDHF-mediated vasodilation is severely curtailed by diabetes; however, little information exists on the underlying pathophysiology. Deficits in the EDHF system, alone or in combination with the NO system, are crucial for the development of diabetic microvascular complications. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved, the aim was to examine the effects of diabetes and preventive and intervention chelator therapy with trientine on a preparation that has well-defined NO and EDHF-mediated responses, the rat mesenteric vascular bed. In phenylephrine-preconstricted preparations, maximum vasodilation to acetylcholine was reduced by 35 and 44% after 4 and 8 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, respectively. Trientine treatment over the first 4 weeks gave 72% protection; intervention therapy over the final 4 weeks prevented deterioration and corrected the initial deficit by 68%. These responses depend on both NO and EDHF. When the latter mechanism was isolated by NO synthase inhibition, diabetic deficits of 53.4 (4 weeks) and 65.4% (8 weeks) were revealed, that were 65% prevented and 50% corrected by trientine treatment. Neither diabetes nor trientine altered vascular smooth muscle responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Thus, the data suggest that metal catalysed ROS production makes a substantial contribution to defects in both the EDHF and NO endothelial mechanisms in diabetes, which has

  10. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  11. Staged fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    The invention relates to oil shale retorting and more particularly to staged fluidized bed oil shale retorting. Method and apparatus are disclosed for narrowing the distribution of residence times of any size particle and equalizing the residence times of large and small particles in fluidized beds. Particles are moved up one fluidized column and down a second fluidized column with the relative heights selected to equalize residence times of large and small particles. Additional pairs of columns are staged to narrow the distribution of residence times and provide complete processing of the material.

  12. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of paramyxoviruses in Zambian wild rodents and shrews.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michihito; Muleya, Walter; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Moonga, Ladslav; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-01

    Rodents and shrews are known to harbour various viruses. Paramyxoviruses have been isolated from Asian and Australian rodents, but little is known about them in African rodents. Recently, previously unknown paramyxovirus sequences were found in South African rodents. To date, there have been no reports related to the presence and prevalence of paramyxoviruses in shrews. We found a high prevalence of paramyxoviruses in wild rodents and shrews from Zambia. Semi-nested reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to detect paramyxovirus RNA in 21 % (96/462) of specimens analysed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these viruses were novel paramyxoviruses and could be classified as morbillivirus- and henipavirus-related viruses, and previously identified rodent paramyxovirus-related viruses. Our findings suggest the circulation of previously unknown paramyxoviruses in African rodents and shrews, and provide new information regarding the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of paramyxoviruses. PMID:24189618

  14. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  15. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  16. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  17. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Barbara A; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E; Drake, John M

    2015-06-01

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States.

  18. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  19. Genetic detection of hantaviruses in rodents, Albania.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Rogozi, Elton; Velo, Enkelejda; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Bino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In order to have a first insight into the epidemiology of hantaviruses in Albania, 263 small mammals (248 rodents, 15 insectivores) were captured in 352 locations in 29 districts and tested for hantavirus infection. Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) was detected in 10 of 148 (6.7%) Apodemus flavicollis rodents. DOBV-positive A. flavicollis were detected in six districts (Diber, Korce, Kolonje, Librazhd, Pogradec, and Vlore). The obtained nucleotide sequences were highly similar to each other and to DOBV sequences from northwestern Greece. Understanding the epidemiology of hantaviruses and identifying the endemic foci enables the public health strategies to minimize the risk of human infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1309-1313, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27249068

  20. Models of Oxygen Induced Retinopathy in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Gammons, Melissa V; Bates, David O

    2016-01-01

    Much of the knowledge we have gained into the development of pathological ocular angiogenesis has come from the development of in vivo models that enable functional assessment of key components of signaling pathways in disease progression. Indeed, rodent models have facilitated identification of several therapeutics that target pathological angiogenesis. Two of the most widely used rodent models of oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR), Smith's mouse model and Penn's rat model reproducibly induce neovascularization reminiscent of the disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this chapter we discuss development of ROP in humans and compare features with that of the rat and mouse models, focusing both on the benefits and caveats of using such models. Furthermore, we discuss in detail the methodology of both procedures and discuss the importance of various features of the model. PMID:27172964

  1. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective superior mesenteric artery urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao Qiang; Guo, Li Ping; Lin, Han Ying; Liu, Feng Yong; Duan, Feng; Wang, Zhi Jun

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 +/- 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 +/- 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 +/- 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  2. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  3. Sclerosing Mesenteritis and Disturbance of Glucose Metabolism: A New Relationship? A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, João Pedro Tavares; Romão, Vera; Eulálio, Margarida; Jorge, Rita; Breda, Filipe; Calretas, Suzana; Leitão, Sara; Eugénio, Gisela; Santos, Rui; Carvalho, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 51 • Male, 70 • Male, 63 • Male, 67 • Female, 76 Final Diagnosis: Sclerosing mesenteritis Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colcicine Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Sclerosing mesenteritis is an idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic disease that affects the mesentery. It is a rare disease, with the total number of reported cases in the literature ranging from 122 to 300. It mainly affects men in the sixth decade of life, and its etiology remains unknown. Clinical presentation is variable, but it is frequently asymptomatic. Diagnosis is often made by computed tomography (CT) scan, although biopsy may be needed for confirmation. An association between other diseases (e.g., neoplasms) and sclerosing mesenteritis has been described, but the relationship between the latter and glucose changes is not disclosed in the currently available literature. Case Report: Five cases of sclerosing mesenteritis and glucose metabolism disorders (impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus) were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 65±9.3 years, 80% were male, and all patients were white. Three patients were asymptomatic and the other 2 (40%) had non-specific chronic abdominal pain. Blood tests revealed normal inflammatory parameters (mean HbA1c was 6.4% and fasting blood glucose was 140 mg/dL). The diagnosis was made by abdominal CT scan. The 2 symptomatic patients underwent therapy with colchicine 1 mg/day, with clinical improvement. During the mean 43-month follow-up period, there was no symptomatic progression, thereby maintaining the usual benign course of this condition. Conclusions: Sclerosing mesenteritis has only been described in small series and isolated cases, but its diagnosis is becoming more common due to greater access to diagnostic methods and higher awareness of the disease in the medical community

  4. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  5. Evidence for Novel Hepaciviruses in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly; Coutard, Bruno; Adam, Alexander; Ritz, Daniel; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van Riel, Debby; Kallies, Rene; Klose, Stefan M.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Rupp, Daniel; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schlegel, Mathias; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Krüger, Detlev H.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Hemachudha, Thiravat; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Osterrieder, Klaus; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Matthee, Sonja; Beer, Martin; Kuiken, Thijs; Reusken, Chantal; Leroy, Eric M.; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species); and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species). Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8%) of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and 10 (1.9%) of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio). Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%). Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage efforts to

  6. Technology test bed review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, H. V.

    1992-07-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) technology test bed (TTB) history; (2) TTB objectives; (3) TTB major accomplishments; (4) TTB contributions to SSME; (5) major impacts of 3001 testing; (6) some challenges to computational fluid dynamics (CFD); (7) the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP); and (8) 3001 lessons learned in design and operations.

  7. Technology test bed review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) technology test bed (TTB) history; (2) TTB objectives; (3) TTB major accomplishments; (4) TTB contributions to SSME; (5) major impacts of 3001 testing; (6) some challenges to computational fluid dynamics (CFD); (7) the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP); and (8) 3001 lessons learned in design and operations.

  8. Bed rest during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for support groups, bulletin boards, and chat rooms online for moms-to-be who are also on bed rest. Expect emotional ups and downs. Share your hopes and worries with your partner. Let each other vent if needed. If sex is not allowed, look for other ways to ...

  9. Changes of loading tensile force-stretch relationships of rabbit mesenteric vein after 21 days of head-down rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Jie; Sun, Hui-Pin; Yue, Yong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Wu, Xing-Yu

    Changes of venous compliance may contribute to postflight orthostatic intolerance; however, direct animal studies to address the changes of venous compliance to microgravity have been rare. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance changes of mesenteric veins of rabbits after 21 days of head-down rest (HDR). Twenty-four healthy male New Zealand Rabbits were randomly divided into 21 days of HDR group, horizontal immobilization group (HIG) and control group (Ctrl), with eight in each. Loading tensile force-stretch relationships of mesenteric vein segments were constructed after 21 d HDR. With the increase of loading tensile force, both longitudinal and circumferential stretches of vein samples increased significantly. Under the same loading tensile force, mesenteric vein of the HDR showed significant increase both in circumferential stretch and longitudinal stretches compared to those of Ctrl group and HIG group. These results indicate that, a 21-day simulated weightlessness leads to increase of mesenteric venous compliance.

  10. Progressing Sclerosing Mesenteritis (Mesenteric Panniculitis) Mimics Progression of Malignancy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma on Serial 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William

    2016-04-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma in the proximal stomach. A staging 18F-FDG PET/CT showed an intensely FDG-avid gastric mass, as well as a mildly FDG-avid misty nodular mesentery. After 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a follow-up PET/CT showed partial response of the gastric primary, with increase in the size of nodules in the mesentery and increased FDG uptake, raising concern of secondary malignancy. Biopsy of the mesentery revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation, consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:26359565

  11. The Vascular Effects of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulphonate in Rodent and Human Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Po-Yin; Baker, Philip; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2015-01-01

    Danshen, in particular its derivative tanshinone IIA (TS), is a promising compound in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and has been used for many years in traditional Chinese medicine. Although many actions of TS have been researched, its vasodilator effects in pregnancy remain unknown. There have been a few studies that have shown the ability of TS to reduce blood pressure in women with hypertensive pregnancies; however, there are no studies which have examined the vascular effects of TS in the pregnant state in either normal or complicated pregnancies. Our aim was to determine the vasoactive role of TS in multiple arteries during pregnancy including: rat resistance (mesenteric and uterine) and conduit (carotid) arteries. Further, we aimed to assess the ability of TS to improve uterine blood flow in a rodent model of intrauterine growth restriction. Wire myography was used to assess vascular responses to the water-soluble derivative, sodium tanshinone IIA sulphonate (STS) or to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator, methylcholine. At mid-pregnancy, STS caused direct vasodilation of rat resistance (pEC50 mesenteric: 4.47±0.05 and uterine: 3.65±0.10) but not conduit (carotid) arteries. In late pregnancy, human myometrial arteries responded with a similar sensitivity to STS (pEC50 myometrial: 3.26±0.13). STS treatment for the last third of pregnancy in eNOS-/- mice increased uterine artery responses to methylcholine (Emax eNOS-/-: 55.2±9.2% vs. eNOS-/- treated: 75.7±8.9%, p<0.0001). The promising vascular effects, however, did not lead to improved uterine or umbilical blood flow in vivo, nor to improved fetal biometrics; body weight and crown-rump length. Further, STS treatment increased the uterine artery resistance index and decreased offspring body weight in control mice. Further research would be required to determine the safety and efficacy of use of STS in pregnancy. PMID:25811628

  12. Systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiple metastases in a dog.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Tominaga, Makiko; Hirayama, Kazuko; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-02-01

    A 5-year-old female miniature dachshund presenting with persistent vomiting and diarrhea had two concurrent rare pathological conditions: systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiorgan metastases. Neoplastic mast cells formed mass in the mesentery of the cecal-colonic region and were also found in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, adrenal grands, ovaries, bone marrow and other tissues. The cells had intracytoplasmic granules with metachromasia and were immunohistochemically positive for c-kit and histamine. Granulomatous lesions with fungal organisms were present in the heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, subserosal and surrounding adipose tissue of the duodenum, thyroid glands and mesenteric mass, and phagocytosed organisms were detected in the liver and bone marrow. Bacteriologically and immunohistochemically, the fungi were consistent with Candida albicans. PMID:19262039

  13. Paralytic Ileus due to Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Transarterial Injection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kanno, Yukiko; Gunji, Naohiko; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Manabu; Okai, Ken; Abe, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. In the four years prior to his presentation, he had undergone repeated transarterial chemoembolizations and injections for hepatocellular carcinoma. He underwent his 8th transcatheter arterial therapy one month prior to admission. Abdominal X-rays and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed large amounts of small intestinal gas and venous thrombosis from the portal vein to the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The thrombosis was reduced after anticoagulation therapy (heparin, antithrombin III, danaparoid sodium and warfarin). This is the first case report of paralytic ileus due to superior mesenteric venous thrombosis after transcatheter arterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with an arterioportal shunt.

  14. Isolated injury of the superior mesenteric artery caused by a lap belt in a child.

    PubMed

    La Greca, Gaetano; Castello, Giorgio; Barbagallo, Francesco; Grasso, Emanuele; Latteri, Saverio; Scala, Vincenzo; Russello, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Isolated vascular injuries are rare in cases of blunt abdominal trauma, and superior mesenteric artery injury is extremely rare but potentially lethal. The incidence of this kind of life-threatening injury has increased in recent years. The diagnosis of these isolated injuries is difficult, and its delay is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality. The authors report on the case of a child with an isolated injury of the superior mesenteric artery caused by a lap belt, during a motor-vehicle crash which was successfully managed. Correct use of all types of restraints is to be recommended. The diagnosis of this rare intraabdominal vascular injury is possible especially when the major signs are evident, but an awareness of this rare possibility is essential for the outcome.

  15. [Mesenteric venous trombosis and pregnancy--a case report and a short review of the problem].

    PubMed

    Terzhumanov, R; Uchikova, E; Paskaleva, V; Milchev, N; Uchikov, A

    2005-01-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is extremely rare surgical pathology during pregnancy and frequently is associated with hemoglobinopathies beta-thalassemia, congenital defects of the coagulation and antiphospholipide syndrome. It has nontypical clinical appearance, which hardens the timely diagnosis and the adequate surgical treatment. We present a case of a 22 year-old girl with hemozygote form of beta thalassemia, pregnant in ml II, with mesenteric venose thrombosis. The diagnosis was made on the 24th hour from the beginning of the disease. The patient was operated successfully by a resection of the necrotic changed part of the intestine. She noticed vaginal bleeding due to a missed abortion on the 22nd day after the operation.

  16. Paralytic Ileus due to Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis after Transarterial Injection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kanno, Yukiko; Gunji, Naohiko; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Manabu; Okai, Ken; Abe, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain. In the four years prior to his presentation, he had undergone repeated transarterial chemoembolizations and injections for hepatocellular carcinoma. He underwent his 8th transcatheter arterial therapy one month prior to admission. Abdominal X-rays and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed large amounts of small intestinal gas and venous thrombosis from the portal vein to the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The thrombosis was reduced after anticoagulation therapy (heparin, antithrombin III, danaparoid sodium and warfarin). This is the first case report of paralytic ileus due to superior mesenteric venous thrombosis after transcatheter arterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with an arterioportal shunt. PMID:26726083

  17. Spontaneous superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Watring, Nicole J; Smith, Corbett M; Stokes, Gordon K; Counselman, Francis L

    2010-11-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department with a 4-day history of severe, sharp left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting. She had been seen 3 days prior at another Emergency Department, and had a negative work-up including a normal non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis for possible kidney stone. Vital signs were: temperature 36.3°C (97.3°F), pulse 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure 141/80 mm Hg. Physical examination was remarkable for marked tenderness in the left upper and middle quadrants and voluntary guarding. Bowel sounds were normal. Although laboratory studies were normal, a CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast suggested a superior mesenteric artery dissection. This was confirmed with arteriography. The clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of superior mesenteric artery dissection are reviewed.

  18. Hepatopancreatic arterial ring: bilateral symmetric typology in human celiaco-mesenteric arterial system.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Motohiro; Horiuchi, Kanji; Nishida, Keiichiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Murakami, Takuro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2002-10-01

    The celiac and mesenteric arterial system including the left gastric, splenic, common hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries shows various types of origins, courses, ramifications and anastomoses. In order to explain the various expressions of this system, we have proposed a typological model, in which celiacomesenteric arteries develop as paired or bilaterally symmetrical primordial vessels originated from the anterior aspect of the aorta, and these vessels anastomose each other with longitudinal and horizontal pathways. Here, we report 3 unusual cases characterized by arterial rings, formed by the left gastric, left accessory hepatic, proper hepatic, anterior pancreaticoduodenal, and dorsal pancreatic arteries. The dorsal pancreatic and anterior pancreaticoduodenal arteries are located to the right and left of the embryonic pancreas developing in the dorsal mesentery, respectively. Such hepatopancreatic arterial rings simultaneously containing right and left elements can only be explained using our typological model, in which the concept of paired arteries or bilateral symmetry is introduced. PMID:12530508

  19. [Development of mycotic aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery after septic embolism].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F; Dinkel, H P

    2002-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the aorta and the visceral arteries are life-threatening diseases, due to potential rupture and organ or limb ischemia. They occur in endocarditis, immunodeficiency, bacteremia and fungemia, and have a poor prognosis. We report on a case of a 54-year-old male patient suffering from abdominal angina after mitral valve replacement for septic mycotic endocarditis. In presence of a mycotic-embolic occlusion of the left popliteal artery and multiple septic organ infarctions a mycotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery was found in abdominal spiral-CT. Based on sequential spiral-CT examinations, this case demonstrates the development of a septic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery.

  20. A Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Healthy Active Duty Marine.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Portouw, Steven J; Bruner, David I

    2015-10-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon disorder that can lead to small bowel obstructions or perforations. Typical populations include young females with anorexia. However, there have been a few reports of healthy males with acute vomiting reported to have SMA syndrome. Our case report highlights an active duty Marine who developed SMA syndrome and the importance of recognizing this disease given the severity in delay of diagnosis in population of young healthy active duty members.

  1. Inhibition of the active lymph pump by flow in rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Davis, Michael J.; Zawieja, David C.; Delp, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the influence of imposed flow on an active lymph pump under conditions of controlled intraluminal pressure. Thus, the mechanisms are not clearly defined. Rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic ducts were isolated, cannulated and pressurized. Input and output pressures were adjusted to impose various flows. Lymphatic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured and used to determine contraction frequency and pump flow indices. Imposed flow inhibited the active lymph pump in both mesenteric lymphatics and in the thoracic duct. The active pump of the thoracic duct appeared more sensitive to flow than did the active pump of the mesenteric lymphatics. Imposed flow reduced the frequency and amplitude of the contractions and accordingly the active pump flow. Flow-induced inhibition of the active lymph pump followed two temporal patterns. The first pattern was a rapidly developing inhibition of contraction frequency. Upon imposition of flow, the contraction frequency immediately fell and then partially recovered over time during continued flow. This effect was dependent on the magnitude of imposed flow, but did not depend on the direction of flow. The effect also depended upon the rate of change in the direction of flow. The second pattern was a slowly developing reduction of the amplitude of the lymphatic contractions, which increased over time during continued flow. The inhibition of contraction amplitude was dependent on the direction of the imposed flow, but independent of the magnitude of flow. Nitric oxide was partly but not completely responsible for the influence of flow on the mesenteric lymph pump. Exposure to NO mimicked the effects of flow, and inhibition of the NO synthase by N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine attenuated but did not completely abolish the effects of flow.

  2. Effects of portal hypertension on responsiveness of rat mesenteric artery and aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T; Geraghty, J; Osborne, H; Docherty, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of pre-hepatic portal hypertension on the responsiveness of rat small mesenteric arteries and aorta. Rats were made portal hypertensive by creating a calibrated portal vein stenosis, or sham-operated. 2. In rat mesenteric arteries, there was no significant difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile potency of noradrenaline (NA), but the maximum contractile responses to NA, U46619 and KCl were significantly increased in vessels from portal hypertensive animals. This altered maximum contractile response was not due to alterations in smooth muscle mass. 3. In rat mesenteric arteries, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). The difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated rats in the maximum response to U46619 was maintained following a combination of methylene blue (1 microM) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (100 microM), suggesting that any differences in endothelial function do not explain differences in the response to vasoconstrictors. 4. In rat aorta, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile response to NA or KCl or in the endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh. 5. In pithed rats, there was no difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the pressor potency of NA. 6. It is concluded that portal hypertension produces an increase in the contractile response to the vasoconstrictors NA, U46619 and KCl in rat mesenteric arteries but not in the aorta. This suggests that the diminished responsiveness to vasoconstrictors reported in portal hypertensive rats in vivo is not due to a diminished responsiveness at the level of the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:7773539

  3. Recurrent superior mesenteric artery (Wilkie’s) syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Raissi, Babak; Taylor, Brian M.; Taves, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare condition. The diagnosis is usually made by exclusion. A previously healthy 20-year-old woman who had recurrent SMAS is described. Diagnosis of the condition was difficult. Initially, small-bowel enteroclysis, upper gastrointestinal series and endoscopy, biopsy of gastric and duodenal mucosa, abdominal computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography were used to make the diagnosis. Abdominal CT suggested pancreatitis causing compressive obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery. Conservative management was helpful at first, but cramping and projectile emesis recurred. Upper gastrointestinal series suggested duodenal distension and a filling defect in the region of the superior mesenteric artery. Repeat endoscopy showed a lateral pulsatile compression in the region of the distal duodenum and SMAS was diagnosed. Medical therapy was not helpful so duodenojejunostomy was carried out. The operation was successful and the patient was symptom-free for 1 year, when the syndrome recurred, with symptoms of periumbilical pain, intermittent episodes of vomiting and loose stools. At reoperation the duodenojejunal anastomosis was found to be displaced to the left of the superior mesenteric artery pedicle causing recurrent obstruction. The duodenojejunostomy was converted to a Roux-en-Y duodenojejunostomy. The patient has since remained well. A MEDLINE search of the literature for the period 1961 to October 1994 revealed that there were no reported cases of a recurrence of SMAS in an otherwise healthy adult patient. In spite of the difficulty in diagnosing this condition, heightened awareness can lead to early diagnosis and avoid unnecessary suffering for the patient. PMID:8857992

  4. Histamine-dependent prolongation by aldosterone of vasoconstriction in isolated small mesenteric arteries of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Schjerning, Jeppe; Uhrenholt, Torben R; Svenningsen, Per; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Skøtt, Ole; Jensen, Boye L; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2013-04-15

    In arterioles, aldosterone counteracts the rapid dilatation (recovery) following depolarization-induced contraction. The hypothesis was tested that this effect of aldosterone depends on cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived products and/or nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibition. Recovery of the response to high K(+) was observed in mesenteric arteries of wild-type and COX-2(-/-) mice but it was significantly diminished in preparations from endothelial NOS (eNOS)(-/-) mice. Aldosterone pretreatment inhibited recovery from wild-type and COX-2(-/-) mice. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) restored recovery in arteries from eNOS(-/-) mice, and this was inhibited by aldosterone. Actinomycin-D abolished the effect of aldosterone, indicating a genomic effect. The effect was blocked by indomethacin and by the COX-1 inhibitor valeryl salicylate but not by NS-398 (10(-6) mol/l) or the TP-receptor antagonist S18886 (10(-7) mol/l). The effect of aldosterone on recovery in arteries from wild-type mice and the SNP-mediated dilatation in arteries from eNOS(-/-) mice was inhibited by the histamine H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. RT-PCR showed expression of mast cell markers in mouse mesenteric arteries. The adventitia displayed granular cells positive for toluidine blue vital stain. Confocal microscopy of live mast cells showed loss of quinacrine fluorescence and swelling after aldosterone treatment, indicating degranulation. RT-PCR showed expression of mineralocorticoid receptors in mesenteric arteries and in isolated mast cells. These findings suggest that aldosterone inhibits recovery by stimulation of histamine release from mast cells along mesenteric arteries. The resulting activation of H2 receptors decreases the sensitivity to NO of vascular smooth muscle cells. Aldosterone may chronically affect vascular function through paracrine release of histamine.

  5. Eugenol dilates mesenteric arteries and reduces systemic BP by activating endothelial cell TRPV4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Wang, Qian; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eugenol, a vanilloid molecule found in some dietary plants, relaxes vasculature in part via an endothelium-dependent process; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we investigated the endothelial cell-mediated mechanism by which eugenol modulates rat mesenteric artery contractility and systemic BP. Experimental Approach The isometric tension of rat mesenteric arteries (size 200–300 μm) was measured using wire myography; non-selective cation currents (ICat) were recorded in endothelial cells using patch clamp electrophysiology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were determined in anaesthetized rats. Key Results Eugenol relaxed endothelium-intact arteries in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was attenuated by endothelium denudation. L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, a combination of TRAM-34 and apamin, selective blockers of intermediate and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and HC-067047, a TRPV4 channel inhibitor, but not indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, reduced eugenol-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact arteries. Eugenol activated HC-067047-sensitive ICat in mesenteric artery endothelial cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TRPV4 knockdown abolished eugenol-induced ICat activation. An i.v. injection of eugenol caused an immediate, transient reduction in both MAP and HR, which was followed by prolonged, sustained hypotension in anaesthetized rats. This sustained hypotension was blocked by HC-067047. Conclusions and Implications Eugenol activates TRPV4 channels in mesenteric artery endothelial cells, leading to vasorelaxation, and reduces systemic BP in vivo. Eugenol may be therapeutically useful as an antihypertensive agent and is a viable molecular candidate from which to develop second-generation TRPV4 channel activators that reduce BP. PMID:25832173

  6. Transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic mesenteric bleeding: a 15-year, single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong Soo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for mesenteric bleeding following trauma. METHODS From 2001 to 2015, 12 patients were referred to our interventional unit for mesenteric bleeding following trauma, based on clinical decisions and computed tomography (CT) images. After excluding one patient with no bleeding focus and one patient who underwent emergency surgery, a total of 10 patients (male:female ratio, 9:1; mean age, 52.1 years) who underwent super selective TAE of visceral arteries were included in this study. Technical and clinical success, complications, and 30-day mortality rate were analyzed. RESULTS In 10 patients who underwent TAE, the types of trauma were motor vehicle collision (n=6), fall (n=2), assault (n=1), and penetrating injury (n=1), and the bleeding arteries were in the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade (n=4), jejunal artery (n=3), colic artery (n=2), and sigmoid artery (n=1). N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (n=2), microcoils (n=2), and combinations of NBCA, microcoils, or gelatin sponge particles (n=6) were used as embolic agents. Technical success was achieved in all 10 patients, with immediate cessation of bleeding. Clinical success rate was 90% (9/10), and all patients were discharged with no further treatment required for mesenteric bleeding. However, one patient showed rebleeding 10 days later and underwent repeated TAE with successful result. There were no TAE-related ischemic complications such as bowel infarction. The 30-day mortality rate was 0%. CONCLUSION Our clinical experience suggests that TAE used to control mesenteric bleeding following trauma is safe and effective as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery. PMID:27306658

  7. Mechanisms of simvastatin-induced vasodilatation of rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Independent of its lipid-lowering properties, simvastatin (Sim) induces vasorelaxation; however, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Sim on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro on a myograph. The results showed that Sim concentration-dependently relaxed the superior mesenteric artery rings with endothelium pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride [maximum relaxation (Emax)=51.05±4.09%; negative logarithm of the concentration that caused 50% of the maximum response (pD2)=4.17±0.18] or KCl (Emax=41.65±1.32%; pD2=3.55±0.1). Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited this effect, while it was not affected by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM). In artery rings without endothelium, vasorelaxation induced by Sim was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM), but was not affected by barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM), glibenclamide (10 µM) and traethylammonium chloride (1 mM). Moreover, Sim also inhibited the contraction induced by increasing external calcium in Ca2+-free medium with added KCl (60 mM). These results suggested that Sim induces relaxation of superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, involving the opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx.

  8. Mechanisms of simvastatin-induced vasodilatation of rat superior mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cao, Ailan

    2016-01-01

    Independent of its lipid-lowering properties, simvastatin (Sim) induces vasorelaxation; however, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the vasorelaxant effects of Sim on rat superior mesenteric arteries and the mechanisms involved. The isometric tension of rat superior mesenteric arterial rings was recorded in vitro on a myograph. The results showed that Sim concentration-dependently relaxed the superior mesenteric artery rings with endothelium pre-contracted by phenylephrine hydrochloride [maximum relaxation (Emax)=51.05±4.09%; negative logarithm of the concentration that caused 50% of the maximum response (pD2)=4.17±0.18] or KCl (Emax=41.65±1.32%; pD2=3.55±0.1). Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) significantly inhibited this effect, while it was not affected by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM) and indomethacin (5 µM). In artery rings without endothelium, vasorelaxation induced by Sim was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine (100 µM), but was not affected by barium chloride dehydrate (10 µM), glibenclamide (10 µM) and traethylammonium chloride (1 mM). Moreover, Sim also inhibited the contraction induced by increasing external calcium in Ca2+-free medium with added KCl (60 mM). These results suggested that Sim induces relaxation of superior mesenteric arterial rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, involving nitric oxide release and also through an endothelium-independent pathway, involving the opening of voltage-dependent K+ channels and blockade of extracellular Ca2+ influx. PMID:27699019

  9. Changes in lymphocyte subsets in the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes in caprine paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J A; Ramis, G; Seva, J; Pallarés, F J; Sánchez, J

    1998-02-01

    Changes in the number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets were investigated in the intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes of three goats with natural paratuberculosis, comparisons being made with a single uninfected control animal. Lesions in the naturally infected goats varied from small granulomata with scarce epithelioid or multinucleated giant cells, containing few or no bacilli, in the intestine (tuberculoid type) to an extensive, diffuse epithelioid cell infiltrate containing numerous bacilli in the gut and mesenteric lymph nodes (lepromatous type). The number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets in the control were consistent with data reported from other non-infected goats. However, in the goats with paratuberculosis, significant changes were observed in the number and distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, the changes being related to the severity of the lesions. In the intestinal mucosa of the goat with tuberculoid lesions no significant changes were observed, but in the cortical area of mesenteric lymph nodes the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes decreased and the number of CD8+ T lymphocytes increased. In the two goats with lepromatous lesions, there was a decrease in the CD4+ T subpopulation and an increase of CD8+ T lymphocytes in the lamina propria of the intestine and particularly in the cortical area of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the CD4:CD8 ratio (< 1) being the opposite of that observed in healthy goats. Because of the small numbers of animals, further studies including additional animals are needed to confirm these preliminary results, which suggest that the progression of paratuberculous lesions may be due to an ineffective host immune response attributable to the CD8+ T lymphocyte subset that "downregulates" the activity of the CD4+ T lymphocytes required for macrophage activation.

  10. Endosomal proteolysis regulates calcitonin gene-related peptide responses in mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    McNeish, AJ; Roux, BT; Aylett, S-B; Van Den Brink, AM; Cottrell, GS

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator, implicated in the pathogenesis of migraine. CGRP activates a receptor complex comprising, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). In vitro studies indicate recycling of CLR•RAMP1 is regulated by degradation of CGRP in early endosomes by endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1). However, it is not known if ECE-1 regulates the resensitization of CGRP-induced responses in functional arterial tissue. Experimental Approach CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1 expression in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (RMA-SMCs) and mesenteric arteries was analysed by RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. CGRP-induced signalling in cells was examined by measuring cAMP production and ERK activation. CGRP-induced relaxation of arteries was measured by isometric wire myography. ECE-1 was inhibited using the specific inhibitor, SM-19712. Key Results RMA-SMCs and arteries contained mRNA for CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1. ECE-1 was present in early endosomes of RMA-SMCs and in the smooth muscle layer of arteries. CGRP induced endothelium-independent relaxation of arteries. ECE-1 inhibition had no effect on initial CGRP-induced responses but reduced cAMP generation in RMA-SMCs and vasodilation in mesenteric arteries responses to subsequent CGRP challenges. Conclusions And Implications ECE-1 regulated the resensitization of responses to CGRP in RMA-SMCs and mesenteric arteries. CGRP-induced relaxation did not involve endothelium-derived pathways. This is the first report of ECE-1 regulating CGRP responses in SMCs and arteries. ECE-1 inhibitors may attenuate an important vasodilatory pathway, implicated in primary headaches and may represent a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of migraine. PMID:22881710

  11. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  12. L-Carnitine supplementation impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from rats.

    PubMed

    Valgas da Silva, Carmem P; Rojas-Moscoso, Julio A; Antunes, Edson; Zanesco, Angelina; Priviero, Fernanda B M

    2014-07-01

    L-Carnitine (L-Car) is taken as fat burner. The risks of L-Car supplementation for the cardiovascular system are unclear. We evaluated the relaxing responses of the mesenteric and aorta rings from rats after four weeks of L-Car supplementation and/or physical training. Concentration response curves to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), as well as cyclic GMP levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated. Physical training decreased body weight gain that was potentiated by L-Car. In mesenteric rings, L-Car impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation whereas endothelium independent relaxation was increased. In aorta, exercise improved endothelium-dependent relaxation; however, it was partially inhibited by L-Car. SNP-induced relaxation was similar in aorta of all groups. Basal cGMP were increased in aorta of exercised rats. SOD activity and MDA levels were unaltered. In conclusion, L-Car and physical exercise promotes body weight loss; however, it impairs endothelium-dependent vaso-relaxation possibly involving alterations in muscarinic receptors/eNOS/NO signalling pathway in mesenteric artery.

  13. Dynamic Changes in Rat Mesenteric Lymph Proteins Following Trauma Using Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Peltz, Erik D.; Moore, Ernest E.; Jordan, Janeen R.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2014-01-01

    Early events triggered by post-trauma/hemorrhagic shock currently represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The causative agents of these events have been associated with increased neutrophil priming secondary to shock-dependent alterations of mesenteric lymph. Previous studies have suggested that unknown soluble components of the post-shock mesenteric lymph are main drivers of these events. In the present study, we applied a label free proteomics approach to further delve into the early proteome changes of the mesenteric lymph in response to hemorrhagic shock. Time-course analyses were performed by sampling the lymph every thirty minutes post-shock up until 3h (the time window within which a climax in neutrophil priming was observed). There are novel, transient early post-hemorrhagic shock alterations to the proteome and previously undocumented post-shock protein alterations. These results underlie the triggering of coagulation and pro-inflammatory responses secondary to trauma/hemorrhagic shock, metabolic deregulation and apoptosis, and alterations to proteases/anti-proteases homeostasis, which are suggestive of the potential implication of extracellular matrix proteases in priming neutrophil activation. Finally, there is a likely correlation between early PSML post-shock neutrophil priming and proteomics changes, above all protease/anti-proteases impaired homeostasis (especially of serine proteases and metalloproteases). PMID:25243424

  14. Increasing TRPV4 expression restores flow-induced dilation impaired in mesenteric arteries with aging.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xia; Li, Jie; Guo, Jizheng; Liu, Limei; Yan, Dejun; Yang, Yunyun; Li, Zhongwen; Zhu, Jinhang; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The flow-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) rise in endothelial cells is an important early event leading to flow-induced blood vessel dilation. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4), a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, facilitates the flow-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i rise. To determine whether TRPV4 is involved in age-related flow-induced blood vessel dilation impairment, we measured blood vessel diameter and nitric oxide (NO) levels and performed Ca(2+) imaging, immunoblotting, and immunostaining assays in rats. We found that the flow-induced and TRPV4 activator 4α-PDD-induced dilation of mesenteric arteries from aged rats were significantly decreased compared with those from young rats. The flow- or 4α-PDD-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise was also markedly reduced in primary cultured mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) from aged rats. Immunoblotting and immunostaining results showed an age-related decrease of TRPV4 expression levels in MAECs. Additionally, the 4α-PDD-induced NO production was significantly reduced in aged MAECs. Compared with lentiviral GFP-treated aged rats, lentiviral vector delivery of TRPV4 increased TRPV4 expression level in aged MAECs and restored the flow- and 4α-PDD-induced vessel dilation in aged mesenteric arteries. We concluded that impaired TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) signaling causes endothelial dysfunction and that TRPV4 is a potential target for clinical treatment of age-related vascular system diseases. PMID:26947561

  15. The effect of taurine on mesenteric blood flow and organ injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Sevgili, A M; Akbiyik, F; Atilla, P; Cakar, N; Balkanci, Z D; Iskit, A B; Guc, M O

    2008-08-01

    Endotoxin decreases mesenteric blood flow and inflicts organ injury via free radicals. We investigated whether taurine, an endogenous antioxidant and vasodilator, could attenuate the deleterious effects of endotoxin in a mouse model of sepsis. Swiss albino mice were allocated into four groups and treated either with taurine (150 mg/kg, i.p. at 0(th), 8(th), 16(th) h) or its solvent sterile saline (NaCl 0.9%, w/v) while E. coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or its solvent saline were also given at 8(th) h. At 24(th) h the animals were anaesthetized and the mesenteric blood flow was measured by using perivascular ultrasonic Doppler-flowmeter. The animals were then exsanguinated, the spleen, liver, and kidneys were isolated for histopathological examination. Thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), glutathione, and myeloperoxidase activity were determined in the liver samples. Endotoxin significantly decreased the mesenteric blood flow and glutathione levels in liver while TBARS and myeloperoxidase activity were increased. However, taurine did not block the deleterious effects of endotoxin nor it did attenuate the histopathological injury. Therefore, we concluded that endotoxin-induced organ injury via free radicals is resistant to blockade by taurine. PMID:18163178

  16. A Case of Abdominal Aortic Retroperitoneal and Mesenteric Amyloid Light Chain Amyloidoma

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Kazuhiro; Kishida, Dai; Kayano, Hidekazu; Yazaki, Masahide; Shimada, Yuki; Akiyama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a Japanese woman with amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidoma in the abdominal aortic retroperitoneum and mesentery. Irregular soft tissue mass lesions with calcification in the abdominal aortic retroperitoneum and mesentery were initially detected by computed tomography at another hospital. The lesions gradually compressed the duodenum, causing symptoms of bowel obstruction. The patient was clinically diagnosed with retroperitoneal fibrosis, and prednisolone was administered at a dose of 40 mg/day. However, the lesions did not change in size and her symptoms continued. She was transferred to our hospital and underwent mesenteric biopsy for histopathology using abdominal laparotomy. The histopathological and immunohistological findings of the mesenteric specimen demonstrated lambda light chain deposition. Accordingly, the patient was finally diagnosed with AL amyloidoma with no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. After laparotomy, her general condition worsened because of complications of pneumonia and deep vein thrombosis. She died suddenly from acute myocardial infarction. We have concluded that abdominal aortic retroperitoneal and mesenteric AL amyloidoma may have very poor prognoses in accordance with previous reports. In addition, the size and location of AL amyloidoma directly influence the prognosis. We suggest that early histopathology is important for improving prognosis. PMID:27752386

  17. Orai1 forms a signal complex with BKCa channel in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihua; Li, Jie; Jiang, Feifei; Fu, Jie; Xia, Xianming; Du, Juan; Hu, Min; Huang, Junhao; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Orai1, a specific nonvoltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, has been found to be one of key molecules involved in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Orai1 may associate with other proteins to form a signaling complex, which is essential for regulating a variety of physiological functions. In this study, we studied the possible interaction between Orai1 and large conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (BKC a). Using RNA interference technique, we demonstrated that the SOCE and its associated membrane hyperpolarization were markedly suppressed after knockdown of Orai1 with a specific Orai1 siRNA in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle. Moreover, isometric tension measurements showed that agonist-induced vasocontraction was increased after Orai1 was knocked down or the tissue was incubated with BKC a blocker iberiotoxin. Coimmunoprecipitation data revealed that BKC a and Orai1 could reciprocally pull down each other. In situ proximity ligation assay further demonstrated that Orai1 and BKC a are in close proximity. Taken together, these results indicate that Orai1 physically associates with BKC a to form a signaling complex in the rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle. Ca(2+) influx via Orai1 stimulates BKC a, leading to membrane hyperpolarization. This hyperpolarizing effect of Orai1-BKC a coupling could contribute to reduce agonist-induced membrane depolarization, therefore preventing excessive contraction of the rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle in response to contractile agonists.

  18. Mesenteric Fat Lipolysis Mediates Obesity-Associated Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wueest, Stephan; Item, Flurin; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Challa, Tenagne D; Müller, Werner; Blüher, Matthias; Konrad, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance are among the most prevalent metabolic disorders and are tightly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms linking obesity to hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are incompletely understood. Glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the common signal transducer of all interleukin 6 (IL-6) cytokines. We provide evidence that gp130-mediated adipose tissue lipolysis promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. In obese mice, adipocyte-specific gp130 deletion reduced basal lipolysis and enhanced insulin's ability to suppress lipolysis from mesenteric but not epididymal adipocytes. Consistently, free fatty acid levels were reduced in portal but not in systemic circulation of obese knockout mice. Of note, adipocyte-specific gp130 knockout mice were protected from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis as well as from insulin resistance. In humans, omental but not subcutaneous IL-6 mRNA expression correlated positively with liver lipid accumulation (r = 0.31, P < 0.05) and negatively with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp glucose infusion rate (r = -0.28, P < 0.05). The results show that IL-6 cytokine-induced lipolysis may be restricted to mesenteric white adipose tissue and that it contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis. Therefore, blocking IL-6 cytokine signaling in (mesenteric) adipocytes may be a novel approach to blunting detrimental fat-liver crosstalk in obesity.

  19. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Somarajan, S; Muszynski, N D; Cheng, L K; Bradshaw, L A; Naslund, T C; Richards, W O

    2015-07-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging clinical problem that is difficult to diagnose noninvasively. Diagnosis early in the disease process would enable life-saving early surgical intervention. Previous studies established that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers detect the slow wave changes in the magnetoenterogram (MENG) noninvasively following induction of mesenteric ischemia in animal models. The purpose of this study was to assess functional physiological changes in the intestinal slow wave MENG of patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pre- and postoperative studies were conducted on CMI patients using MENG and intraoperative recordings using invasive serosal electromyograms (EMG). Our preoperative MENG recordings showed that patients with CMI exhibited a significant decrease in intestinal slow wave frequency from 8.9 ± 0.3 cpm preprandial to 7.4 ± 0.1 cpm postprandial (P < 0.01) that was not observed in postoperative recordings (9.3 ± 0.2 cpm preprandial and 9.4 ± 0.4 cpm postprandial, P = 0.86). Intraoperative recording detected multiple frequencies from the ischemic portion of jejunum before revascularization, whereas normal serosal intestinal slow wave frequencies were observed after revascularization. The preoperative MENG data also showed signals with multiple frequencies suggestive of uncoupling and intestinal ischemia similar to intraoperative serosal EMG. Our results showed that multichannel MENG can identify intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in CMI patients.

  20. Fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, P E

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the activities of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center's research and development program in fluidized-bed combustion from October 1, 1987, to September 30, 1989. The Department of Energy program involves atmospheric and pressurized systems. Demonstrations of industrial-scale atmospheric systems are being completed, and smaller boilers are being explored. These systems include vortex, multi-solid, spouted, dual-sided, air-cooled, pulsed, and waste-fired fluidized-beds. Combustion of low-rank coal, components, and erosion are being studied. In pressurized combustion, first-generation, combined-cycle power plants are being tested, and second-generation, advanced-cycle systems are being designed and cost evaluated. Research in coal devolatilization, metal wastage, tube corrosion, and fluidization also supports this area. 52 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Rodents and risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: seroprevalence of selected zoonotic viruses in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Bryant, Juliet E

    2015-01-01

    In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade.

  2. Rodents and Risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: Seroprevalence of Selected Zoonotic Viruses in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade. PMID:25629782

  3. Bartonella infection in rodents and their flea ectoparasites: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella-rodent-flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized.

  4. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  5. Effect of cage bedding on temperature regulation and metabolism of group-housed female mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2004-02-01

    Mice are generally housed in groups in cages lined with an absorbent bedding material at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 to 24 degrees C, which is comfortable for humans, but cool for mice. Little is known about the effects of bedding on thermoregulation of group-housed mice. To determine whether bedding material affects thermoregulatory stability, core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by use of radiotelemetry in female CD-1 mice housed in groups of four in a standard plastic cage at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. Ten groups were tested using three types of bedding material: a deep layer of heat-treated wood shavings (DWS) that allowed mice to burrow, a thin layer of wood shavings (TWS) just covering the bottom of the cage floor, or a layer of beta chips (BC). Mice could not burrow in the TWS or BC. The Tc and MA were affected by bedding type and time of day. Mice housed with DWS maintained a significantly higher Tc (deltaTc = 1.0 degrees C) during the day, compared with that in mice housed with TWS and BC. During the night, Tc and MA were high in all groups and there was no effect of bedding type on Tc or MA. Effect of bedding on metabolic rate (MR) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption for six hours in groups of four mice at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. The Tc was significantly reduced in mice housed on the TWS and BC, but MR was unaffected by bedding type. There was a trend for higher MR in mice on BC. Compared with use of other bedding materials, housing mice on DWS and comparable materials provides an environment to burrow, thus reducing heat loss. The effects of bedding material on temperature regulation may affect rodent health and well being. Moreover, bedding will affect variability in toxicologic and pharmacologic studies whenever an endpoint is dependent on body temperature.

  6. Effect of cage bedding on temperature regulation and metabolism of group-housed female mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2004-02-01

    Mice are generally housed in groups in cages lined with an absorbent bedding material at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 to 24 degrees C, which is comfortable for humans, but cool for mice. Little is known about the effects of bedding on thermoregulation of group-housed mice. To determine whether bedding material affects thermoregulatory stability, core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by use of radiotelemetry in female CD-1 mice housed in groups of four in a standard plastic cage at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. Ten groups were tested using three types of bedding material: a deep layer of heat-treated wood shavings (DWS) that allowed mice to burrow, a thin layer of wood shavings (TWS) just covering the bottom of the cage floor, or a layer of beta chips (BC). Mice could not burrow in the TWS or BC. The Tc and MA were affected by bedding type and time of day. Mice housed with DWS maintained a significantly higher Tc (deltaTc = 1.0 degrees C) during the day, compared with that in mice housed with TWS and BC. During the night, Tc and MA were high in all groups and there was no effect of bedding type on Tc or MA. Effect of bedding on metabolic rate (MR) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption for six hours in groups of four mice at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. The Tc was significantly reduced in mice housed on the TWS and BC, but MR was unaffected by bedding type. There was a trend for higher MR in mice on BC. Compared with use of other bedding materials, housing mice on DWS and comparable materials provides an environment to burrow, thus reducing heat loss. The effects of bedding material on temperature regulation may affect rodent health and well being. Moreover, bedding will affect variability in toxicologic and pharmacologic studies whenever an endpoint is dependent on body temperature. PMID:15027620

  7. Clinical aspects of rodent dental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The order Rodentia is vast, encompassing a large number of species with significant anatomical variations developed during natural adaptation to differing habitats. Many veterinarians have little knowledge of the anatomy of species other than the commoner domestic large herbivores and small carnivores. Clinicians require a basic knowledge of the relevant anatomy of species they are likely to be asked to treat. This article provides sufficient working knowledge of the oral and dental anatomy of those rodents commonly kept as pets to enable veterinarians to interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating suspected dental disease.

  8. Effects of obesity on severity of colitis and cytokine expression in mouse mesenteric fat. Potential role of adiponectin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Sideri, Aristea; Stavrakis, Dimitris; Bowe, Collin; Shih, David Q; Fleshner, Phillip; Arsenescu, Violeta; Arsenescu, Razvan; Turner, Jerrold R; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Karagiannides, Iordanes

    2015-04-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity is associated with worsening of the course of disease. Here, we examined the role of obesity in the development of colitis and studied mesenteric fat-epithelial cell interactions in patients with IBD. We combined the diet-induce obesity with the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis mouse model to create groups with obesity, colitis, and their combination. Changes in the mesenteric fat and intestine were assessed by histology, myeloperoxidase assay, and cytokine mRNA expression by real-time PCR. Medium from human mesenteric fat and cultured preadipocytes was obtained from obese patients and those with IBD. Histological analysis showed inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased histological damage in the intestine and mesenteric fat of obese mice with colitis compared with all other groups. Obesity also increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, while it decreased the TNBS-induced increases in IL-2 and IFN-γ in mesenteric adipose and intestinal tissues. Human mesenteric fat isolated from obese patients and those with and IBD demonstrated differential release of adipokines and growth factors compared with controls. Fat-conditioned media reduced adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) expression in human NCM460 colonic epithelial cells. AdipoR1 intracolonic silencing in mice exacerbated TNBS-induced colitis. In conclusion, obesity worsens the outcome of experimental colitis, and obesity- and IBD-associated changes in adipose tissue promote differential mediator release in mesenteric fat that modulates colonocyte responses and may affect the course of colitis. Our results also suggest an important role for AdipoR1 for the fat-intestinal axis in the regulation of inflammation during colitis.

  9. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  10. [Litomosoides, parasites of rodents; taxonomic consequences].

    PubMed

    Bain, O; Petit, G; Diagne, M

    1989-01-01

    A redescription of the type specimens of the three following species is given: L carinii (Travassos, 1919) from Sciurus sp. in Brazil. L, sigmodontis Chandler, 1931 from Sigmodon hispidus and L. scotti Forrester et Kinsella. 1977 from Oryzomys palustris in North America. A description of two brazilian species is also given: L. galizai n. sp. from (Ecomys trinitatus tapajinus and L. kohnae n. sp. from Nectomys squamipes. The conclusions are: The type species of the genus Litomosoides: L. sigmodontis, and L.carinii are two distinct species. As a result, the filaria which is widely used in drug trials has to be reinstated sigmodontis and not curinii. With the exception of the two parasite species of Geomyid rodents, which show affinities with the genus Litomosa, the species of Litomosoides may be devided into two groups, principally based on the morphology of the spicules: the sigmodontis group, with 13 species; the carinii group, with 8 species. Each group includes parasites of Chiuroptera, Marsupials and Rodents. The two new species (L. galizai and L. kohnae) belong to the group sigmodontis; they are characterised by the shape of the buccal capsule, the size of the spicules, the structure of the female body-wall and the microeilaria.

  11. Context learning in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fuhs, Mark C; Touretzky, David S

    2007-12-01

    We present a Bayesian statistical theory of context learning in the rodent hippocampus. While context is often defined in an experimental setting in relation to specific background cues or task demands, we advance a single, more general notion of context that suffices for a variety of learning phenomena. Specifically, a context is defined as a statistically stationary distribution of experiences, and context learning is defined as the problem of how to form contexts out of groups of experiences that cluster together in time. The challenge of context learning is solving the model selection problem: How many contexts make up the rodent's world? Solving this problem requires balancing two opposing goals: minimize the variability of the distribution of experiences within a context and minimize the likelihood of transitioning between contexts. The theory provides an understanding of why hippocampal place cell remapping sometimes develops gradually over many days of experience and why even consistent landmark differences may need to be relearned after other environmental changes. The theory provides an explanation for progressive performance improvements in serial reversal learning, based on a clear dissociation between the incremental process of context learning and the relatively abrupt context selection process. The impact of partial reinforcement on reversal learning is also addressed. Finally, the theory explains why alternating sequence learning does not consistently result in unique context-dependent sequence representations in hippocampus.

  12. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  13. Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the central nervous system. Patients with ALS develop extensive muscle wasting and atrophy leading to paralysis and death 3 to 5 years after disease onset. The condition may be familial (fALS 10%) or sporadic ALS (sALS, 90%). The large majority of fALS cases are due to genetic mutations in the Superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1, 15% of fALS) and repeat nucleotide expansions in the gene encoding C9ORF72 (∼ 40% to 50% of fALS and ∼ 10% of sALS). Studies suggest that ALS is mediated through aberrant protein homeostasis (i.e., ER stress and autophagy) and/or changes in RNA processing (as in all non-SOD1-mediated ALS). In all of these cases, animal models suggest that the disorder is mediated non-cell autonomously, i.e., not only motor neurons are involved, but glial cells including microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, and other neuronal subpopulations are also implicated in the pathogenesis. Provided in this unit is a review of ALS rodent models, including discussion of their relative advantages and disadvantages. Emphasis is placed on correlating the model phenotype with the human condition and the utility of the model for defining the disease process. Information is also presented on RNA processing studies in ALS research, with particular emphasis on the newest ALS rodent models.

  14. Isolating and Using Sections of Bovine Mesenteric Artery and Vein as a Bioassay to Test for Vasoactivity in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, James L.; Barnes, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian gastrointestinal systems are constantly exposed to compounds (desirable and undesirable) that can have an effect on blood flow to and from that system. Changes in blood flow to the small intestine can result in effects on the absorptive functions of the organ. Particular interest in toxins liberated from feedstuffs through fermentative and digestive processes has developed in ruminants as an area where productive efficiencies could be improved. The video associated with this article describes an in vitro bioassay developed to screen compounds for vasoactivity in isolated cross-sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein using a multimyograph. Once the blood vessels are mounted and equilibrated in the myograph, the bioassay itself can be used: as a screening tool to evaluate the contractile response or vasoactivity of compounds of interest; determine the presence of receptor types by pharmacologically targeting receptors with specific agonists; determine the role of a receptor with the presence of one or more antagonists; or determine potential interactions of compounds of interest with antagonists. Through all of this, data are collected real-time, tissue collected from a single animal can be exposed to a large number of different experimental treatments (an in vitro advantage), and represents vasculature on either side of the capillary bed to provide an accurate picture of what could be happening in the afferent and efferent blood supply supporting the small intestine. PMID:25350042

  15. Isolating and using sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein as a bioassay to test for vasoactivity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Klotz, James L; Barnes, Adam J

    2014-10-07

    Mammalian gastrointestinal systems are constantly exposed to compounds (desirable and undesirable) that can have an effect on blood flow to and from that system. Changes in blood flow to the small intestine can result in effects on the absorptive functions of the organ. Particular interest in toxins liberated from feedstuffs through fermentative and digestive processes has developed in ruminants as an area where productive efficiencies could be improved. The video associated with this article describes an in vitro bioassay developed to screen compounds for vasoactivity in isolated cross-sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein using a multimyograph. Once the blood vessels are mounted and equilibrated in the myograph, the bioassay itself can be used: as a screening tool to evaluate the contractile response or vasoactivity of compounds of interest; determine the presence of receptor types by pharmacologically targeting receptors with specific agonists; determine the role of a receptor with the presence of one or more antagonists; or determine potential interactions of compounds of interest with antagonists. Through all of this, data are collected real-time, tissue collected from a single animal can be exposed to a large number of different experimental treatments (an in vitro advantage), and represents vasculature on either side of the capillary bed to provide an accurate picture of what could be happening in the afferent and efferent blood supply supporting the small intestine.

  16. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  17. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  18. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Comparato, Joseph R.; Jacobs, Martin

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  19. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  20. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  1. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  2. Fluidized-bed sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. In this program, regenerable ZnO-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents are being developed and tested. These include zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-SORB sorbents. The Z-SORB sorbent is a proprietary sorbent developed by Phillips Petroleum Company (PPCo).

  3. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  4. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1996-02-27

    A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  5. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1995-04-25

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  6. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  7. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts.

  8. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S.; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  9. Complicated type B aortic dissection causing ischemia in the celiac and inferior mesenteric artery distribution despite patent superior mesenteric artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Zhu, Youwei; Leake, Samuel S; Kott, Amy; Azizzadeh, Ali; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M

    2015-08-01

    Mortality rates associated with acute type B aortic dissection (ABAD) complicated by malperfusion remains significant. Optimal management of patients with ABAD is still debatable. We present a case report of a 50-year-old man who was admitted due to ABAD. He was treated medically with his pain resolved and he was discharged on oral antihypertensive medications. One month after initial diagnosis, he was readmitted with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. On imaging, an extension of the aortic dissection into the visceral arteries with occlusion of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) was noted. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) and bypass grafting to the SMA. Despite the intervention, the patient developed large bowel, liver, and gastric ischemia and underwent bowel resection. He died from multi-organ failure. In selected cases of uncomplicated ABAD, TEVAR should be considered and when TEVAR fails and visceral malperfusion develops, an aggressive revascularization of multiple visceral arteries should be attempted.

  10. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  11. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  12. Fast fluidized bed steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Bryers, Richard W.; Taylor, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

  13. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  14. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  15. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  16. Successful treatment of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) using the HyperEye Medical System™ for intraoperative visualization of the mesenteric and bowel circulation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nitori, Nobuhiro; Deguchi, Tomoaki; Kubota, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masashi; Kato, Ayu; Kojima, Masayuki; Kadomura, Tomohisa; Okada, Akihiro; Okamura, Juri; Kobayashi, Michiya; Sato, Takayuki; Beck, Yoshifumi; Kitagawa, Yuko; Kitajima, Masaki

    2014-02-01

    Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI), leading to intestinal gangrene without a demonstrable occlusion in the mesenteric artery, is a rare condition with extremely high mortality. We report a case of NOMI diagnosed preoperatively by computed tomography and treated successfully with surgery, assisted by indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence in the HyperEye Medical System (HEMS), a new device that can simultaneously detect color and near-infrared rays under room light. This allowed for precise intraoperative evaluation of the mesenteric and bowel circulation. Although the necrotic bowel wall of the distal ileum and the segmental ischemia of the jejunum were visible, the jejunum was finally preserved because perfusion of ICG fluorescence was confirmed. The patient, an 84-year-old man, had an uneventful postoperative course and is alive without critical illness 8 months after surgery. We report this case to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of HEMS during surgery for NOMI.

  17. Vitamin K Contents of Rodent Diets: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrient intake is critical in the maintenance of normal physiological activity of rodents in biomedical studies. Vitamin K is an essential nutrient in rodent diets and functions as a cofactor for the y-carboxylation of certain proteins involved in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. Dif...

  18. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION MODELING FOR ANTIANDROGEN IMPACTS ON RODENT PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive simulation modeling for antiandrogen impacts on rodent prostate
    HA Barton1, RW Setzer1, LK Potter1,2
    1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC and 2Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC

    Changes in rodent prostate weight and functi...

  19. Visual Landmarks Facilitate Rodent Spatial Navigation in Virtual Reality Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain…

  20. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  1. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n < 2) is likely because stresses in ice are small and flow is transient. Numerical calculations of the bed-normal drag force on a sphere in contact with a flat bed using n = 1 show that this force can reach values several hundred times that on a sphere isolated from the bed, thus drastically increasing frictional resistance. Various estimates of basal friction are obtained from this model. For example, the shear traction at the bed of a glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOEpatents

    Freeman, David H.; Angeles, Rosalie M.; Keller, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  3. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  4. Bartonella Infection in Rodents and Their Flea Ectoparasites: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella–rodent–flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized. PMID:25629778

  5. Prospects of chemosterilant and genetic control of rodents

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rex E.; Howard, Walter E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses some requirements of an ideal rodent chemosterilant, analyses the advantages of chemosterilants over other control methods, and compares the potential values of chemosterilants that affect females, males, and both sexes. Examples are given of specific situations where chemosterilants will be valuable in rodent control, together with suggested methods of applying them. The theory and practicability of using genetics in rodent control are also discussed. Neither the chemosterilant nor the genetic method is expected to become a panacea, but their eventual application will be a significant advance in rodent-control technology. Since both approaches are based on sound biological principles and are relatively safe, they should be helpful in regulating rodent populations in the future. PMID:4583051

  6. The adipokine chemerin amplifies electrical field-stimulated contraction in the isolated rat superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Winner, Brittany M; Charvat, Trevor; Krasinksi, Antoni; Punna, Sreenivas; Watts, Stephanie W

    2016-08-01

    The adipokine chemerin causes arterial contraction and is implicated in blood pressure regulation, especially in obese subjects with elevated levels of circulating chemerin. Because chemerin is expressed in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) that surrounds the sympathetic innervation of the blood vessel, we tested the hypothesis that chemerin (endogenous and exogenous) amplifies the sympathetic nervous system in mediating electrical field-stimulated (EFS) contraction. The superior mesenteric artery, with or without PVAT and with endothelium and sympathetic nerve intact, was mounted into isolated tissue baths and used for isometric contraction and stimulation. Immunohistochemistry validated a robust expression of chemerin in the PVAT surrounding the superior mesenteric artery. EFS (0.3-20 Hz) caused a frequency-dependent contraction in isolated arteries that was reduced by the chemerin receptor ChemR23 antagonist CCX832 alone (100 nM; with, but not without, PVAT), but not by the inactive congener CCX826 (100 nM). Exogenous chemerin-9 (1 μM)-amplified EFS-induced contraction in arteries (with and without PVAT) was blocked by CCX832 and the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin. CCX832 did not directly inhibit, nor did chemerin directly amplify, norepinephrine-induced contraction. Whole mount immunohistochemical experiments support colocalization of ChemR23 with the sympathetic nerve marker tyrosine hydroxylase in superior mesenteric PVAT and, to a lesser extent, in arteries and veins. These studies support the idea that exogenous chemerin modifies sympathetic nerve-mediated contraction through ChemR23 and that ChemR23 may be endogenously activated. This is significant because of the well-appreciated role of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure control. PMID:27371688

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 3 Channels Control the Vascular Contractility of Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Soo-In; Kim, Joo Young; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Muallem, Shmuel; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels are non-selective cation channels and regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We examined the role of TRPC3 channels in agonist-, membrane depolarization (high K+)-, and mechanical (pressure)-induced vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation in mouse mesenteric arteries. Vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of endothelial cells intact mesenteric arteries were measured in TRPC3 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) was measured in isolated arteries from TRPC3 WT and KO mice as well as in the mouse endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrate/nitrite concentrations were also measured in TRPC3 WT and KO mice. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was reduced in TRPC3 KO mice when compared to that of WT mice, but neither high K+- nor pressure-induced vasoconstriction was altered in TRPC3 KO mice. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited in TRPC3 KO mice and by the selective TRPC3 blocker pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine blocked the phenylephrine-induced increase in Ca2+ ratio and then relaxation in TRPC3 WT mice but had little effect on those outcomes in KO mice. Acetylcholine evoked a Ca2+ increase in endothelial cells, which was inhibited by pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine induced increased NO release in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. Acetylcholine also increased the nitrate/nitrite concentration in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. The present study directly demonstrated that the TRPC3 channel is involved in agonist-induced vasoconstriction and plays important role in NO-mediated vasorelaxation of intact mesenteric arteries. PMID:25310225

  8. Optimum level of inferior mesenteric artery ligation for the left-sided colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guraya, Salman Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compares the effectiveness and impact of high inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) versus low IMA ligation on 5-year survival, lymph node yield rates, and peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Methods: The databases of Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC), the Web of Science, EBSCO and MEDLINE were searched using MeSH terms ‘colorectal cancer’, ‘inferior mesenteric artery’, ‘high ligation’, ‘low ligation’, ‘mesenteric lymph nodes’, ‘prognosis’, and ‘survival’. Only clinical studies were selected and review articles and meta-analysis were excluded. In cases of duplicate cohorts, only the latest article was included. Irrelevant articles and the articles on both right and left sided CRC were excluded. The finally selected studies were analysed for the defined end-point outcomes. Results: The published data has shown that high IMA ligation improves the yield of harvested lymph node that allows accurate tumor staging and a more reliable estimation of prognosis. High ligation was not found to be positively correlated with increased anastomotic leakage or impaired genito-urinary function. However, high ligation demands advanced surgical expertise and longer operating time. There was no significant difference in 5-year survival rates for both techniques. Some studies have reported fatal complications of high ligation such as proximal bowel necrosis. Conclusion: Although there is no consensus, this research signals the routine use of high ligation for left-sided CRC. However, the published fatal complications following high ligation and no significant difference in 5-year survival rates demand more studies to establishing a unified protocol. PMID:27381531

  9. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  10. Appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, and subsequent risk of ulcerative colitis: cohort studies in Sweden and Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Bo V; Andersson, Roland E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the repeatedly observed low risk of ulcerative colitis after appendicectomy is related to the appendicectomy itself or the underlying morbidity, notably appendicitis or mesenteric lymphadenitis. Design Nationwide cohort studies. Setting Sweden and Denmark. Participants 709 353 Swedish (1964-2004) and Danish (1977-2004) patients who had undergone appendicectomy were followed up for subsequent ulcerative colitis. The impact of appendicectomy on risk was also studied in 224 483 people whose parents or siblings had inflammatory bowel disease. Main outcome measures Standardised incidence ratios and rate ratios as measures of relative risk. Results During 11.1 million years of follow-up in the appendicectomy cohort, 1192 patients developed ulcerative colitis (10.8 per 100 000 person years). Appendicectomy without underlying inflammation was not associated with reduced risk (standardised incidence ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.15). Before the age of 20, however, appendicectomy for appendicitis (0.45, 0.39 to 0.53) or mesenteric lymphadenitis (0.65, 0.46 to 0.90) was associated with significant risk reduction. A similar pattern was seen in those with affected relatives, whose overall risk of ulcerative colitis was clearly higher than the background risk (1404 observed v 446 expected; standardised incidence ratio 3.15, 2.99 to 3.32). In this cohort, appendicectomy without underlying appendicitis did not modify risk (rate ratio 1.04, 0.66 to 1.55, v no appendicectomy), while risk after appendicectomy for appendicitis was halved (0.49, 0.31 to 0.74). Conclusions In individuals with or without a familial predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis and mesenteric lymphadenitis during childhood or adolescence are linked to a significantly reduced risk of ulcerative colitis in adulthood. Appendicectomy itself does not protect against ulcerative colitis. PMID:19273506

  11. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  12. Mesenteric and splenic contributions to portal venous CT perfusion in hepatic diffuse disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongzan; Lu, Zaiming; Liang, Hongyuan; Xin, Jun; Gao, Yuying; Guo, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the changes and contributions of superior mesenteric venous perfusion (SMVP) and splenic venous perfusion (SpVP) to portal venous CT perfusion in canine model of hepatic diffuse disease. Materials and methods: By selective catheterization in superior mesenteric and splenic arteries respectively after CT perfusion scanning, SMVP and SpVP became available. Sixteen dogs were adopted and induced by carbon tetrachloride after data under normal conditions were collected. After 3, 6, 9 and 12 months from carbon tetrachloride intervention, liver biopsies by puncture or operation were performed after CT perfusion scanning. SMVP and SpVP under different pathologic conditions were compared and analyzed. Results: Three stages of hepatic diffuse lesions were defined according to pathologic changes, namely hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The number of dogs which survived from each stage was: 16 from normal, 12 from hepatitis, 10 from hepatic fibrosis and 4 from cirrhosis. During this progressive period, SpVP ml/(min·100 ml) declined slightly, but there were no significant differences between different stages (P > 0.05). SMVP ml/(min·100 ml) in stage of normal (64.1 ± 8.1) and hepatic fibrosis (44.4 ± 4.5), normal and cirrhosis (42.6 ± 5.4), hepatitis (61.3 ± 6.4) and hepatic fibrosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis was significantly different, but there was no significant difference of SMVP between normal and hepatitis (P = 0.326) or hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis (P = 0.668). Conclusions: With our evidence of interventional CT perfusion, it is mesenteric, not splenic, perfusion that might coincide with hepatic portal venous perfusion during the progressive period of hepatic diffuse disease. PMID:25550855

  13. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  14. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents.

    PubMed

    Burkett, J P; Andari, E; Johnson, Z V; Curry, D C; de Waal, F B M; Young, L J

    2016-01-22

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human.

  15. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, J. P.; Andari, E.; Johnson, Z. V.; Curry, D. C.; de Waal, F. B. M.; Young, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  16. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents.

    PubMed

    Burkett, J P; Andari, E; Johnson, Z V; Curry, D C; de Waal, F B M; Young, L J

    2016-01-22

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  17. Hindlimb unloading: rodent analog for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Globus, Ruth K; Morey-Holton, Emily

    2016-05-15

    The rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) model was developed in the 1980s to make it possible to study mechanisms, responses, and treatments for the adverse consequences of spaceflight. Decades before development of the HU model, weightlessness was predicted to yield deficits in the principal tissues responsible for structure and movement on Earth, primarily muscle and bone. Indeed, results from early spaceflight and HU experiments confirmed the expected sensitivity of the musculoskeletal system to gravity loading. Results from human and animal spaceflight and HU experiments show that nearly all organ systems and tissues studied display some measurable changes, albeit sometimes minor and of uncertain relevance to astronaut health. The focus of this review is to examine key HU results for various organ systems including those related to stress; the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems; vision changes; and wound healing. Analysis of the validity of the HU model is important given its potential value for both hypothesis testing and countermeasure development. PMID:26869711

  18. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  19. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bercu, Zachary L; Sheth, Sachin B; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A; Fischman, Aaron M; Nowakowski, F Scott; Kim, Edward; Patel, Rahul S

    2015-10-01

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  20. Effect of histamine on contractile activity of smooth muscles in bovine mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2012-02-01

    The effects of histamine and mechanisms of its action on the capsular smooth muscle cells of mesenteric lymph nodes were examined on isolated capsular strips under isometric conditions. Histamine (1×10(-8)-5×10(-7) M) decreased the tone of capsular smooth muscle cells and the frequency of phasic contractions. At high concentrations (more than 5×10(-6) M), histamine increased the amplitude and frequency of phasic contractions against the background of increased tonic stress. The effects of histamine were dose-dependent and were realized via direct stimulation of H(1)- and H(2)-receptors on the membrane of smooth muscle cells.

  1. Mesenteric Defect with Internal Herniation: A Rare Cause of Bowel Obstruction in Newborn.

    PubMed

    Adnen, Hakim; Aida, Borgi; Serra, Belhadj; Narjess, Ghali; Asma, Hamdi; Ammar, Khaldi; Khaled, Menif; Said, Jlidi; Nejla, Ben Jaballah

    2015-01-01

    Herniation through a congenital mesenteric defect is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment improves the prognosis. We present a case of a full-term infant who presented with respiratory distress at birth. Enteral feeding was not started because abdominal distension and delayed passage of meconium. Bowel obstruction was suspected. Radiological investigation did not provide a clear diagnosis. Surgical exploration revealed transmesenteric congenital hernia. After surgical repair, enteral feeding was tolerated and patient was discharged with an uneventful outcome. Diagnostic difficulties were discussed. PMID:25978102

  2. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  3. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bercu, Zachary L. Sheth, Sachin B.; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A. Fischman, Aaron M. Nowakowski, F. Scott Kim, Edward Patel, Rahul S.

    2015-10-15

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  4. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  5. Demonstration of bleeding from Meckel's diverticulum by means of selective arteriography of the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Perlberger, R R

    1975-01-01

    The diagnosis of a bleeding Meckel's diverticulum was made in a young man who presented several episodes of rectal bleeding over a period of 3 years. Attempted diagnosis by barium studies did not reveal the diverticulum. Angiography of the superior mesenteric artery revealed a wide and tortuous ileal branch -and at its distal end extravasation of contrast medium, within the walls of the diverticulum. It is suggested that in case of major bleeding from the lower GI tract, arteriography should be performed before other contrast medium studies.

  6. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  7. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Falcone, John L; Garrett, Kevin O

    2010-07-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is a rare cause of bowel obstruction. It is characterized anatomically by a narrowed aortomesenteric angle, causing a mechanical obstruction at the third portion of the duodenum. Patients usually present after prolonged confinement in the supine position, significant acute weight loss, application of body casts, and severe burns with symptoms of a small bowel obstruction. We present the case of a healthy 22-year-old male athlete with SMA syndrome that occurred after blunt abdominal injury in the setting of mild chronic weight loss; he was treated nonoperatively.

  8. Scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly astringent food.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2011-01-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and their seed plants is highly complex yet poorly understood. Plants may benefit from the seed dispersal behavior of rodents, as long as seed consumption is minimized. In parallel, rodents may maximize foraging efficiency and cache high-quality resources for future consumption. Defensive compounds, such as tannins, are thought to be a major mechanism for plant control over rodent behavior. However, previous studies, using naturally occurring seeds, have not provided conclusive evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we test the importance of tannin concentrations on the scatter-hoarding behavior of rodents by using an artificial seed system. We combined feeding trials and field observations to examine the overall impact of seed tannin concentrations on rodent behavior and health. We found that rodents favored seeds with an intermediate amount of tannin (~5%) in the field. Meanwhile, in rodents that were fed a diet with different tannin content, only diets with high tannin content (25%, 15%, and 10%) caused a significant negative influence on rodent survival and health. Significant differences were not found among treatments with tannin levels of 0-5%. In contrast to many existing studies, our results clearly demonstrate that scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly 'astringent' food. In the co-evolutionary arms race between plants and animals, our results suggest that while tannins may play a significant role in reducing general predation levels by the faunal community, they have no precise control over the behavior of their mutualistic partner. Instead, the two partners appear to have reached an evolutionary point where both parties receive adequate benefits, with the year-to-year outcome being dependent on a wide range of factors beyond the control of either partner.

  9. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the neocortex surface. For the statistical analysis, it is important to sample thickness at corresponding points. This is achieved by the particle correspondence algorithm which minimizes entropy between dynamically moving sample points called particles. Since the computational cost of the correspondence algorithm may limit the number of corresponding points, we use thin-plate spline based interpolation to increase the number of corresponding sample points. As a driving application, we measured the thickness difference to assess the effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure that persist into adulthood and performed t-test between the control and exposed rat groups. We found significantly differing regions in both hemispheres.

  10. A Curated Database of Rodent Uterotrophic Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Ceger, Patricia C.; Allen, David G.; Strickland, Judy; Chang, Xiaoqing; Hamm, Jonathan T.; Casey, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Novel in vitro methods are being developed to identify chemicals that may interfere with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, but the results are difficult to put into biological context because of reliance on reference chemicals established using results from other in vitro assays and because of the lack of high-quality in vivo reference data. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-validated rodent uterotrophic bioassay is considered the “gold standard” for identifying potential ER agonists. Objectives: We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify and evaluate data from uterotrophic studies and to analyze study variability. Methods: We reviewed 670 articles with results from 2,615 uterotrophic bioassays using 235 unique chemicals. Study descriptors, such as species/strain, route of administration, dosing regimen, lowest effect level, and test outcome, were captured in a database of uterotrophic results. Studies were assessed for adherence to six criteria that were based on uterotrophic regulatory test guidelines. Studies meeting all six criteria (458 bioassays on 118 unique chemicals) were considered guideline-like (GL) and were subsequently analyzed. Results: The immature rat model was used for 76% of the GL studies. Active outcomes were more prevalent across rat models (74% active) than across mouse models (36% active). Of the 70 chemicals with at least two GL studies, 18 (26%) had discordant outcomes and were classified as both active and inactive. Many discordant results were attributable to differences in study design (e.g., injection vs. oral dosing). Conclusions: This uterotrophic database provides a valuable resource for understanding in vivo outcome variability and for evaluating the performance of in vitro assays that measure estrogenic activity. Citation: Kleinstreuer NC, Ceger PC, Allen DG, Strickland J, Chang X, Hamm JT, Casey WM. 2016. A curated database of rodent uterotrophic bioactivity. Environ

  11. Mesenteric suture granuloma caused by retained fragments of suture material in a girl who had a laparotomy 12 years previously.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunyoung; Park, Woo-Hyun; Choi, Soon-Ok

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a case of a mesenteric suture granuloma in a 12 year-old-girl who had a small bowel resection for a complicated intussusception at the age of 5 months. At later exploration a whitish round tumor located on the anti-mesenteric side of the intestine was found. Several small intestinal loops also abutted on the tumor. Pathologic examination showed fibrosis and a granuloma containing linear colored braided suture material with multinucleated giant cell. As mesenteric suture granulomas have a complex appearance and mimic a soft tissue tumor during imaging, it is important for a surgeon to know about this condition and to consider the history of previous surgery when evaluating the images of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass. Suture granulomas separate from previous suture sites have not been described in the literature.

  12. Renal transplantation with venous drainage through the superior mesenteric vein in cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Aguirrezabalaga, Javier; Novas, Serafín; Veiga, Francisco; Chantada, Venancio; Rey, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Marcelino; Gomez, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Renal transplantation usually is performed by placing the graft in the iliac fossa, anastomosing the renal vein to the iliac vein or, when this is not possible, to the vena cava. When vascular complications occur, particularly on the venous side, the position of the graft may have to be changed. This report describes orthotopic renal grafts and positioning of the organ with anastomosis to the splenic vessels. Venous drainage was established directly into the mesenteric-portal territory, with two cases to the portal vein and one to the inferior mesenteric vein. A new technique for the venous drainage of the renal graft is shown. We have used this model in two cases of infrarenal inferior vena cava thrombosis. The kidney was located in a retroperitoneal position, with venous drainage to the superior mesenteric vein through an orifice in the posterior peritoneum.

  13. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  14. Domestic Rodent Control Training Manual: A Training Aid for the Rodent Control Category for Certification of Pesticide Applicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, William R., Jr.; And Others

    This training manual, designed for training applicants who wish to obtain certification in pesticide application relative to rodent control, covers the following topics: economic factors, public health factors, biological characteristics of domestic rodents, rat and mouse signs, trapping, repellents, poisons, baits, poisoned water, dumps, sewers,…

  15. Dynamic bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stormo, K.E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix. 27 figs.

  16. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Stormo, Keith E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  17. Mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction and hyperhomocysteinemia due to homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype.

    PubMed

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Andercou, Octavian; Andercou, Aurel

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 30-year-old man with bowel infarction due to mesenteric venous thrombosis and multiple risk factors, including mild hyperhomocysteinemia due to methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and recent abdominal surgery, is reported. His clinical manifestation consisted of persistent abdominal pain; complementary examinations showed nonspecific findings such as leukocytosis and dilated loops of the bowel. The diagnosis of mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction was made during laparotomy and confirmed by anatomopathologic examination. He underwent segmental resection associated with lifelong anticoagulant therapy and vitamin B supplementation with a favorable course. PMID:19000982

  18. De-misty-fying the mesentery: an algorithmic approach to neoplastic and non-neoplastic mesenteric abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Taffel, Myles T; Khati, Nadia J; Hai, Nabila; Yaghmai, Vahid; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Mesenteric abnormalities are often incidentally discovered on cross-sectional imaging performed during daily clinical practice. Findings can range from the vague "misty mesentery" to solid masses, and the possible etiologic causes encompass a wide spectrum of underlying pathologies including infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic processes. Unfortunately, the clinical and imaging findings are often non-specific and may overlap. This article discusses the various diseases that result in mesenteric abnormalities. It provides a framework to non-invasively differentiate these entities, when possible. PMID:24633598

  19. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  20. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

  1. LSP Composite Test Bed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Arthur C.; Griess, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides standalone information for the Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) Composite Substrate Test Bed Design. A six-sheet drawing set is reproduced for reference, as is some additional descriptive information on suitable sensors and use of the test bed.

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active lupus mesenteric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Sundaram, V; Tam, M; Parikh, S A

    2015-07-01

    A 33-year-old male with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with acute abdominal pain and was found to have lupus mesenteric vasculitis on imaging and during exploratory laparotomy. Post laparotomy he continued to have persistent nausea and dyspepsia and an electrocardiogram showed evidence of an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Emergency cardiac catheterization showed evidence of thrombotic right coronary artery occlusion. His coronaries were otherwise normal with no evidence of underlying coronary artery disease. Extensive workup with trans-esophageal echo, serologies for antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and bubble study was negative. This effectively ruled out Libman-Sacks endocarditis, APS-induced arterial thrombus and paradoxical emboli as potential causes of his STEMI. By exclusion of other causes, the etiology of his STEMI was felt to be secondary to in-situ coronary artery thrombosis in the setting of active SLE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with SLE presenting with both lupus mesenteric vasculitis and in-situ coronary arterial thrombosis in the absence of APS.

  3. Contemporary results of treatment of acute arterial mesenteric thrombosis: has endovascular treatment improved outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kalra, Manju; Ryer, Evan J; Oderich, Gustavo S; Duncan, Audra A; Bower, Thomas C; Gloviczki, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is an uncommon but highly complex clinical problem and carries a high mortality. Traditional treatment has yielded only modest improvements in mortality and an endovascular first treatment paradigm has been adopted by selected centers over the past decade. However, the technique does not allow for immediate assessment of intestinal viability and availability of the expertise and equipment is mostly limited to tertiary referral centers. Experience gained with endovascular treatment thus far suggests that careful patient selection, procedure planning, and meticulous technique are the key to further improving results. Most important, prolonged attempts at percutaneous intervention should not be allowed to delay laparotomy and bowel assessment. In patients requiring urgent laparotomy, intraoperative retrograde superior mesenteric artery recanalization remains an attractive option and should be given due consideration. Liberal use of second-look laparotomy is to be encouraged for continued bowel assessment and eventual reestablishment of bowel continuity. Early recognition of the problem with expeditious implementation of the appropriate treatment is likely to improve outcomes of this challenging problem in the future.

  4. Sudden death from superior mesenteric artery thrombosis in a cocaine user.

    PubMed

    Edgecombe, Allison; Milroy, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Cocaine-mediated tissue injury is well established, particularly myocardial ischemia and infarction. Gastrointestinal complications including mesenteric ischemia, ischemic colitis and intestinal perforation occur less frequently. Cocaine-induced visceral arterial thrombosis is a rare finding. We report a case of a 49-year-old chronic cocaine user with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) thrombosis. The patient presented with a 24-h history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Physical examination documented tachycardia and a soft, non-rigid abdomen with voluntary guarding. Abdominal X-ray did not show any evidence of peritoneal free air or bowel obstruction. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated white blood cells and a high anion gap; a blood gas analysis was not done. Three hours after initial presentation, the patient had a cardiac arrest and died. At autopsy, the jejunum was ischemic, without obvious infarction. The SMA was occluded at its origin by significant atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombus. The myocardium had fibrosis, without acute infarction, and severe triple coronary artery atherosclerosis. Toxicological blood analysis confirmed cocaine use. This report emphasizes the need to consider chronic stimulant drug abuse in accelerated atheroma and thrombosis of visceral arteries.

  5. Macro and microstructural organization of the dog's caudal mesenteric ganglion complex (Canis familiaris-Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, K M; Guidi, W L; Da Silva, R A; Ribeiro, A A C M

    2003-08-01

    The caudal mesenteric ganglion (CMG) is located ventral to the abdominal aorta involving the initial portion of the caudal mesenteric artery. Its macro and microstructural organization was studied in 40 domestic dogs. From the CMG, there were three nerves: the main hypogastric, the left hypogastric and the right hypogastric. The main hypogastric nerve emits two branches: the left colonic nerve and the cranial rectal nerve. Afterwards they give rise to branches to the descending colon (colonic nerves) and rectum (rectal nerves). The cranial rectal nerve, and left and right hypogastric nerves were directed to the pelvic ganglia. The microscopic study permitted the observation of the histological organization of the CMG, which is a ganglionic complex composed of an agglomeration of ganglionic units. Each ganglionic unit is composed of three major cell types: principal ganglion neurones (PGNs), glial cells and small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells, and they were separated by nerve fibres, septa of connective tissue (types 1 and 3 collagen fibres), fibroblasts and intraganglionic capillaries. Hence, the ganglionic unit is the morphological support for the microstructural organization of the CMG complex. Further, each ganglionic unit is constituted by a cellular triad (SIF cells, PGN and glial cells), which is the cytological basis for each ganglionic unit.

  6. A Case Series of Laparoscopic Duodenojejunostomy for the Treatment of Pediatric Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bohanon, FJ; Nunez Lopez, O; Graham, BM; Griffin, LW; Radhakrishnan, RS

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare, debilitating clinical condition caused by compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery. Common symptoms include intermittent postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, and bilious vomiting. Here we present a case series of three patients with SMAS who were treated with laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy. Patients were females between 12-17 years old. All patients underwent a successful laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy after diagnosis. Mean time to feedings after surgery was 4.00±1.15 days (mean ± SD) and length of stay was 8.6±2.7 days. SMAS remains a complex disease to diagnose and treat. Here we demonstrate that laparoscopic treatment of SMAS is a safe surgical treatment option, and is associated with earlier initiation of enteral feeds and a shorter hospital stay after surgery when compared to medical treatment. This is a safe, effective, and relatively simple procedure for the experienced minimally invasive surgeon [1].

  7. Transcript analysis of a goat mesenteric lymph node by deep next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides a practical and inexpensive alternative for exploring genomic data in non-model organisms. The functional annotation of non-model mammalian genomes, such as that of goats, is still poor compared to that of humans and mice. In the current study, we performed a whole transcriptome analysis of an intestinal mucous membrane lymph node to comprehensively characterize the transcript catalogue of this tissue in a goat. Using an Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing platform, 9.692 GB of raw reads were acquired. A total of 57,526 lymph transcripts were obtained, and the majority of these were mapped to known transcriptional units (42.67%). A comparison of the mRNA expression of the mesenteric lymph nodes during the juvenile and post-adolescent stages revealed 8949 transcripts that were differentially expressed, including 6174 known genes. In addition, we functionally classified these transcripts using Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms. A total of 6174 known genes were assigned to 64 GO terms, and 3782 genes were assigned to 303 KEGG pathways, including some related to immunity. Our results reveal the complex transcriptome profile of the lymph node and suggest that the immune system is immature in the mesenteric lymph nodes of juvenile goats. PMID:27173308

  8. Transcript analysis of a goat mesenteric lymph node by deep next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides a practical and inexpensive alternative for exploring genomic data in non-model organisms. The functional annotation of non-model mammalian genomes, such as that of goats, is still poor compared to that of humans and mice. In the current study, we performed a whole transcriptome analysis of an intestinal mucous membrane lymph node to comprehensively characterize the transcript catalogue of this tissue in a goat. Using an Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing platform, 9.692 GB of raw reads were acquired. A total of 57,526 lymph transcripts were obtained, and the majority of these were mapped to known transcriptional units (42.67%). A comparison of the mRNA expression of the mesenteric lymph nodes during the juvenile and post-adolescent stages revealed 8949 transcripts that were differentially expressed, including 6174 known genes. In addition, we functionally classified these transcripts using Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms. A total of 6174 known genes were assigned to 64 GO terms, and 3782 genes were assigned to 303 KEGG pathways, including some related to immunity. Our results reveal the complex transcriptome profile of the lymph node and suggest that the immune system is immature in the mesenteric lymph nodes of juvenile goats.

  9. CD34 immunoexpression in stromal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and in mesenteric fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Monihan, J M; Carr, N J; Sobin, L H

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether CD34 immunoreactivity can distinguish between different types of gastrointestinal stromal tumour, i.e. smooth muscle and neurogenic. We studied 87 stromal tumours from different sites in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as the omentum and mesentery, using a monoclonal antibody to CD34 (QBEND10). We also determined the immunoexpression of smooth muscle and muscle specific actins, S-100 protein, cytokeratin, desmin and vimentin. In addition, 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis were tested for CD34. Immunoexpression of CD34 was observed in 40 of the 87 stromal tumours and correlated with evidence of differentiation towards a smooth muscle phenotype. Large intestinal stromal tumours were less likely than gastric lesions to be CD34 positive. None of 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis was positive for CD34. We conclude that CD34 immunoexpression is seen in a proportion of stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery and omentum, particularly those of smooth muscle type, and it may be useful as part of an immunohistochemical panel in the differential diagnosis of these neoplasms.

  10. Natural Killer Cells Mediate Protection against Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in the Mesenteric Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheinrich, Maik; Heine, Wiebke; Schmühl, Carina M.; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells play a crucial role in the initial defense against bacterial pathogens. The crosstalk between host cells infected with intracellular pathogens and NK cells has been studied intensively, but not much attention has been given to characterize the role of NK cells in the response to extracellular bacterial pathogens such as yersiniae. In this study we used antibody-mediated NK cell depletion to address the importance of this immune cell type in controlling a Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Analysis of the bacterial counts was used to follow the infection and flow cytometry was performed to characterize the composition and dynamic of immune cells. Depletion of NK cells led to higher bacterial loads within the mesenteric lymph nodes. We further show that in particular CD11b+ CD27+ NK cells which express higher levels of the activation marker CD69 increase within the mesenteric lymph nodes during a Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Moreover, in response to the activation NK cells secrete higher levels of IFNy, which in turn triggers the production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. These results suggest, that NK cells aid in the clearance of Y. pseudotuberculosis infections mainly by triggering the expression of proinflammatory cytokines manipulating the host immune response. PMID:26296209

  11. Minimally invasive surgery for superior mesenteric artery syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yao, Si-Yuan; Mikami, Ryuichi; Mikami, Sakae

    2015-12-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is defined as a compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the abdominal aorta and the overlying SMA. SMA syndrome associated with anorexia nervosa has been recognized, mainly among young female patients. The excessive weight loss owing to the eating disorder sometimes results in a reduced aorto-mesenteric angle and causes duodenal obstruction. Conservative treatment, including psychiatric and nutritional management, is recommended as initial therapy. If conservative treatment fails, surgery is often required. Currently, traditional open bypass surgery has been replaced by laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy as a curative surgical approach. However, single incision laparoscopic approach is rarely performed. A 20-year-old female patient with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and SMA syndrome was prepared for surgery after failed conservative management. As the patient had body image concerns, a single incision laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy was performed to achieve minimal scarring. As a result, good perioperative outcomes and cosmetic results were achieved. We show the first case of a young patient with SMA syndrome who was successfully treated by single incision laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy. This minimal invasive surgery would be beneficial for other patients with SMA syndrome associated with anorexia nervosa, in terms of both surgical and cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26668518

  12. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  13. Characterization and mesenteric lymph node cells-mediated immunomodulatory activity of litchi pulp polysaccharide fractions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Zhang, Ruifen; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Juan; Su, Dongxiao; Yi, Yang; Wang, Guangjin; Wei, Zhencheng; Zhang, Mingwei

    2016-11-01

    Three water-soluble hetero-polysaccharides, designated LP1-3, were isolated from litchi pulp. Their structures, solution properties and immunomodulatory activities were evaluated. LP1 contained (1→4,6)-β-d-Glc and (1→4)-α-l-Gal, while LP2 contained (1→3)-α-l-Ara and (l→2)-β-d-Gal, and LP3 contained α-l-Ara and (l→4)-β-Rha. Their molecular weights ranged from 105,880 to 986,470g/mol. LP1 had a spherical conformation with hyper-branched structure and LP2 was semi-flexible chain, while the polysaccharide chains of LP3 were cross linked to form network-like conformation in solution. In addition, all fractions strongly stimulated mesenteric lymph node cell proliferation, IFN-γ and IL-6 secretion in the dose range of 25-100μg/mL compared with untreated control group (p<0.05). LP1 exhibited the strongest stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, which may be attributed to its unique chemical structure and chain conformation. This is the first report on the solution properties and intestinal immunity activities of polysaccharides from litchi pulp. PMID:27516297

  14. Effects of noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y on rat mesenteric microvessel contraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Fetscher, C; Schäfers, R F; Wambach, G; Philipp, T; Michel, M C

    1996-02-01

    We have studied the contractile effects of the sympathetic transmitter noradrenaline and its cotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) given alone and in combination on isolated rat mesenteric resistance vessels (200-300 microns diameter). Noradrenaline and NPY each concentration-dependently contracted rat mesenteric microvessels (EC50 approximately equal to 800 nM and 10 nM, respectively), but noradrenaline caused considerably greater maximal effects than NPY (14.3 mN vs. 3.5 mN). A low antagonistic potency of yohimbine indicated that the response to noradrenaline did not involve alpha 2-adrenoceptors, and the subtype-selective antagonists 5-methylurapidil, tamsulosin and chloroethylclonidine indicated mediation via an alpha 1A-adrenoceptor. Shallow Schild regressions for prazosin and 5-methylurapidil indicated that an alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype with relatively low prazosin affinity might additionally be involved. Studies with the NPY analogues PYY, [Leu31, Pro34] NPY and NPY18-36 demonstrated that NPY acted via a Y1 NPY receptor. In addition to its direct vasoconstricting effects NPY also lowered the noradrenaline EC50 but did not appreciably affect maximal noradrenaline responses indicating possible potentiation. The potentiating NPY response occurred with similar agonist potency as the direct contractile NPY effects and also via a Y1 NPY receptor. The Ca2+ entry blocker nitrendipine (300 nM) reduced direct contractile responses to noradrenaline and NPY but did not affect the potentiation response to NPY.

  15. Preduodenal superior mesenteric vein and Whipple procedure with vascular reconstruction—A case report

    PubMed Central

    Höing, Kristina; Ringe, Kristina I.; Bektas, Hüseyin; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Jäger, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Portal vein (PV) disorders are various, but rare. Here, we report a preduodenal superior mesenteric vein (PDSMV) in a patient who underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Presentation of case A 67-year old woman with familial adenomatosis polyposis was suspicious for cancer of the papilla of vater and scheduled for surgery. Pre-operative diagnostic revealed a PDSMV continuing into the left PV. The splenic vein (SV) continued directly into the right PV without forming ananatomic PV confluence. Eight centimetre of the PDSMV were resected during the pancreaticoduodenectomy and reconnected using a polytetrafluoroethylene prosthesis. On day 1, early graft thrombosis was treated by thrombectomy and change to a larger graft. Pathology confirmed a R0-resection of the adenocarcinoma of the papilla of vater (pTis pN0,G2). At three-month follow-up, the patient was cancer-free and clinically asymptomatic, although, a late graft thrombosis with accompanying newly build venous collaterals passing mesenteric blood to the SV were found. Discussion Rare PV disorders like a PDSMV do not contradict pancreatic surgery, but should be treated in experienced centres. Skills of SMV/PV reconstruction and its peri-operative management might be beneficial for successful outcome. Despite late graft thrombosis no clinical disadvantage occurred most likely due to preservation of the SV and of potential venous collateral pathways. Conclusion Extended surgical procedures like a pancreaticoduodenectomy are realisable in patients with PV disorders, but require awareness, adequate radiological interpretation and specific surgical experience for secure treatment. PMID:25853842

  16. The effects of hindlimb unweighting on the capacitance of rat small mesenteric veins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Brooks-Asplund, E. M.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. Mesenteric veins are critical in modulating cardiac filling through venoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simulated microgravity on the capacitance of rat mesenteric small veins. We constructed pressure-diameter relationships from vessels of 21-day hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rats and control rats by changing the internal pressure and measuring the external diameter. Pressure-diameter relationships were obtained both before and after stimulation with norepinephrine (NE). The pressure-diameter curves of HLU vessels were shifted to larger diameters than control vessels. NE (10(-4) M) constricted veins from control animals such that the pressure-diameter relationship was significantly shifted downward (i.e., to smaller diameters at equal pressure). NE had no effect on vessels from HLU animals. These results indicate that, after HLU, unstressed vascular volume may be increased and can no longer decrease in response to sympathetic stimulation. This may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in cardiac output and stroke volume seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  17. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Eduardo; Mauricio, María Dolores; Granado, Miriam; García-Villar, Oscar; Aldasoro, Martín; Vila, José María; Hidalgo, Manuel; Ferrero, Jorge Luis; Fernández, Nuria; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors. PMID:24324963

  18. Superior mesenteric artery (Wilkie's) syndrome: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal system obstruction.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Abdullah; Uslukaya, Omer; Ülger, Burak Veli; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Bahadır, Mehmet Veysi; Bozdag, Zubeyir; Böyük, Abdullah; Göya, Cemil

    2016-04-01

    Background Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) results from the compression of the third part of the duodenum between the aorta and the proximal part of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Clinical presentation of SMAS is characterized by the dilatation of the proximal part of the third part of the duodenum. SMAS is a rare cause of the upper gastrointestinal system (UGS) obstruction. In this study, we aimed to present our clinical experience in the treatment of five patients with SMAS, which is a rare clinical condition requiring surgery. Patients and methods The retrospective study included five patients who were treated due to SMAS at our clinic between January 2010 and January 2014. Results All the patients were underweight, with a mean BMI of 15.73 (14-16). The clinical symptoms included epigastric pain after food intake, large volume bilious emesis, early satiety, failure to gain weight, indigestion, esophageal reflux, sense of fullness, and persistent weight loss. SMAS was diagnosed using barium meal studies, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, abdominal ultrasonography, and CT angiography. Four patients underwent duodenojejunostomy and one patient was managed with gastrojejunostomy. No complication was observed during the postoperative period, and all the patients achieved significant improvement in symptoms. Conclusion SMAS is a rare cause of UGS obstruction, and the diagnosis of SMAS is often delayed. SMAS should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of the patients with unsubstantiated symptoms of persistent nausea, emesis, and significant weight loss. PMID:27385294

  19. Comparison of growth and pubertal progression in wild type female rats with different bedding types

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Ho; Kim, Shin-Hee; Jung, Kyung A; Kim, So Youn; Chung, Sung-Hoon; Park, Young Shil; Yoon, Kyung Lim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endocrine-disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system and therefore affect growth and pubertal progression. The study aim was to compare the growth and pubertal progression in wild-type female rats with different bedding types. Methods Twenty 5-week-old female wild-type Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups with different bedding types: one group received wood shaving bedding, while a second group received corncob bedding. We determined crown-rump length and body weight as anthropometric measurements and assessed the serum growth hormone (GH) and estradiol levels. The gh1 mRNA expression levels were compared using quantitative real time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The estrous cycle was evaluated by vaginal smear. Results The anthropometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean relative expression of the gh1 gene was lower in the corncob bedding group than that in the wood shaving group (P=0.768). Meanwhile serum GH and estradiol were increased in the wood shaving bedding group; however this difference was not statistically significant. The time to first estrus and the length of the estrous cycle were increased in the corncob bedding group; the proportion of normal estrous cycles was also decreased. These findings indicate irregularities in the estrous cycle. Conclusion Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in corncob bedding might be associated with time to first estrus and length of the estrous cycle. Therefore, the type of bedding should be considered as a factor affecting pubertal progression in rodents. PMID:25883928

  20. False-positive results after environmental pinworm PCR testing due to Rhabditid nematodes in Corncob bedding.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and -negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding.

  1. False-Positive Results after Environmental Pinworm PCR Testing due to Rhabditid Nematodes in Corncob Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-01-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and –negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  2. Data quality in predictive toxicology: reproducibility of rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Gottmann, E; Kramer, S; Pfahringer, B; Helma, C

    2001-01-01

    We compared 121 replicate rodent carcinogenicity assays from the two parts (National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program and literature) of the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) to estimate the reliability of these experiments. We estimated a concordance of 57% between the overall rodent carcinogenicity classifications from both sources. This value did not improve substantially when additional biologic information (species, sex, strain, target organs) was considered. These results indicate that rodent carcinogenicity assays are much less reproducible than previously expected, an effect that should be considered in the development of structure-activity relationship models and the risk assessment process. PMID:11401763

  3. Pulling a patient up in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Moving a patient in bed ... You must move or pull someone up in bed the right way to avoid injuring the patient's ... people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can scrape or tear the ...

  4. Defensive burying in rodents: ethology, neurobiology and psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2003-02-28

    Defensive burying refers to the typical rodent behavior of displacing bedding material with vigorous treading-like movements of their forepaws and shoveling movements of their heads directed towards a variety of noxious stimuli that pose a near and immediate threat, such as a wall-mounted electrified shock-prod. Since its introduction 25 years ago by Pinel and Treit [J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 92 (1978) 708], defensive (shock-prod) burying has been the focus of a considerable amount of research effort delineating the methodology/ethology, psychopharmacology and neurobiology of this robust and species-specific active avoidance or coping response. The present review gives a summary of this research with special reference to the behavioral (face and construct) and pharmacological (predictive) validity of the shock-prod burying test as an animal model for human anxiety. Emphasis is also placed on some recent modifications of the paradigm that may increase its utility and reliability as to individual differences in expressed emotional coping responses and sensitivity to pharmacological treatments. Overall, the behavioral and physiological responses displayed in the shock-prod paradigm are expressions of normal and functionally adaptive coping patterns and the extremes of either active (i.e., burying) or passive (i.e., freezing) forms of responding in this test cannot simply be regarded as inappropriate, maladaptive or pathological. For this reason, the shock-prod paradigm is not an animal model for anxiety disorder or for any other psychiatric disease, but instead possesses a high degree of face and construct validity for normal and functionally adaptive human fear and anxious apprehension. However, the apparent good pharmacological validation (predictive validity) of this test reinforces the view that normal and pathological anxiety involves, at least partly, common neurobiological substrates. Therefore, this paradigm is not only suitable for screening potential

  5. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  6. Particle pressures in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Hu, X.; Jin, C.; Potapov, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This is an experimental project to make detailed measurements of the particle pressures generated in fluidized beds. The focus lies in two principle areas: (1) the particle pressure distribution around single bubbles rising in a two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed and (2) the particle pressures measured in liquid-fluidized beds. This first year has largely been to constructing the experiments The design of the particle pressure probe has been improved and tested. A two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed has been constructed in order to measure the particle pressure generated around injected bubbles. The probe is also being adapted to work in a liquid fluidized bed. Finally, a two-dimensional liquid fluidized bed is also under construction. Preliminary measurements show that the majority of the particle pressures are generated in the wake of a bubble. However, the particle pressures generated in the liquid bed appear to be extremely small. Finally, while not directly associated with the particle pressure studies, some NERSC supercomputer time was granted alongside this project. This is being used to make large scale computer simulation of the flow of granular materials in hoppers.

  7. Widespread vestibular activation of the rodent cortex.

    PubMed

    Rancz, Ede A; Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M; Canals, Santiago; Margrie, Troy W

    2015-04-15

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  8. Navigating actions through the rodent parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) participates in a manifold of cognitive functions, including visual attention, working memory, spatial processing, and movement planning. Given the vast interconnectivity of PPC with sensory and motor areas, it is not surprising that neuronal recordings show that PPC often encodes mixtures of spatial information as well as the movements required to reach a goal. Recent work sought to discern the relative strength of spatial vs. motor signaling in PPC by recording single unit activity in PPC of freely behaving rats during selective changes in either the spatial layout of the local environment or in the pattern of locomotor behaviors executed during navigational tasks. The results revealed unequivocally a predominant sensitivity of PPC neurons to locomotor action structure, with subsets of cells even encoding upcoming movements more than 1 s in advance. In light of these and other recent findings in the field, I propose that one of the key contributions of PPC to navigation is the synthesis of goal-directed behavioral sequences, and that the rodent PPC may serve as an apt system to investigate cellular mechanisms for spatial motor planning as traditionally studied in humans and monkeys. PMID:24860475

  9. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  10. Assessing spatial learning and memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks.

  11. Object recognition memory and the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Nicola J; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R; Clark, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR task. Rats received 12 5-min exposures to two identical objects and then received either bilateral lesions of the hippocampus or sham surgery 1 d, 4 wk, or 8 wk after the final exposure. On a retention test 2 wk after surgery, the 1-d and 4-wk hippocampal lesion groups exhibited impaired object recognition memory. In contrast, the 8-wk hippocampal lesion group performed similarly to controls, and both groups exhibited a preference for the novel object. These same rats were then given four postoperative tests using unique object pairs and a 3-h delay between the exposure phase and the test phase. Hippocampal lesions produced moderate and reliable memory impairment. The results suggest that the hippocampus is important for object recognition memory.

  12. Assessing Spatial Learning and Memory in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  13. Pediatric Rodent Models of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Carlson, Jaclyn; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents, age-specific studies are necessary to fully understand the long-term consequences of injuries to the immature brain. Preclinical and translational research can help elucidate the vulnerabilities of the developing brain to insult, and provide model systems to formulate and evaluate potential treatments aimed at minimizing the adverse effects of TBI. Several experimental TBI models have therefore been scaled down from adult rodents for use in juvenile animals. The following chapter discusses these adapted models for pediatric TBI, and the importance of age equivalence across species during model development and interpretation. Many neurodevelopmental processes are ongoing throughout childhood and adolescence, such that neuropathological mechanisms secondary to a brain insult, including oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction and inflammation, may be influenced by the age at the time of insult. The long-term evaluation of clinically relevant functional outcomes is imperative to better understand the persistence and evolution of behavioral deficits over time after injury to the developing brain. Strategies to modify or protect against the chronic consequences of pediatric TBI, by supporting the trajectory of normal brain development, have the potential to improve quality of life for brain-injured children. PMID:27604726

  14. Cellular scaling rules for rodent brains.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Mota, Bruno; Lent, Roberto

    2006-08-01

    How do cell number and size determine brain size? Here, we show that, in the order Rodentia, increased size of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and remaining areas across six species is achieved through greater numbers of neurons of larger size, and much greater numbers of nonneuronal cells of roughly invariant size, such that the ratio between total neuronal and nonneuronal mass remains constant across species. Although relative cerebellar size remains stable among rodents, the number of cerebellar neurons increases with brain size more rapidly than in the cortex, such that the cerebellar fraction of total brain neurons increases with brain size. In contrast, although the relative cortical size increases with total brain size, the cortical fraction of total brain neurons remains constant. We propose that the faster increase in average neuronal size in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum as these structures gain neurons and the rapidly increasing glial numbers that generate glial mass to match total neuronal mass at a fixed glia/neuron total mass ratio are fundamental cellular constraints that lead to the relative expansion of cerebral cortical volume across species.

  15. Mother–Pup Interactions: Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lucion, Aldo B.; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive after birth, mammalian infants need a caretaker, usually the mother. Several behavioral strategies have evolved to guarantee the transition from a period of intense caregiving to offspring independence. Here, we examine a selection of literature on the genetic, epigenetic, physiological, and behavioral factors relating to development and mother–infant interactions. We intend to show the utility of comparisons between rodent and human models for deepening knowledge regarding this key relationship. Particular attention is paid to the following factors: the distinct developmental stages of the mother–pup relationship as relating to behavior; examples of key genetic components of mammalian mother–infant interactions, specifically those coding for the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin; and the possible functions of gene imprinting in mediating interactions between genetics and environment in the mother–infant relationship. As early mother–infant attachment seems to establish the basic parameters for later social interactions, ongoing investigations in this area are essential. We propose the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in order to better understand the network of genes, gene regulation, neuropeptide action, physiological processes, and feedback loops essential to understand the complex behaviors of mother–infant interaction. PMID:24616713

  16. Mother-pup interactions: rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Lucion, Aldo B; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive after birth, mammalian infants need a caretaker, usually the mother. Several behavioral strategies have evolved to guarantee the transition from a period of intense caregiving to offspring independence. Here, we examine a selection of literature on the genetic, epigenetic, physiological, and behavioral factors relating to development and mother-infant interactions. We intend to show the utility of comparisons between rodent and human models for deepening knowledge regarding this key relationship. Particular attention is paid to the following factors: the distinct developmental stages of the mother-pup relationship as relating to behavior; examples of key genetic components of mammalian mother-infant interactions, specifically those coding for the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin; and the possible functions of gene imprinting in mediating interactions between genetics and environment in the mother-infant relationship. As early mother-infant attachment seems to establish the basic parameters for later social interactions, ongoing investigations in this area are essential. We propose the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in order to better understand the network of genes, gene regulation, neuropeptide action, physiological processes, and feedback loops essential to understand the complex behaviors of mother-infant interaction. PMID:24616713

  17. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  18. Simultaneous thrombosis of the mesenteric artery and vein as a novel clinical manifestation of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Daichi; Tabata, Sumie; Matsushita, Akiko; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with a 2-month history of fever and weight loss was admitted to our hospital because of an acute abdomen. Abdominal CT scans showed marked sectional thickening and edema of the small intestine. On laparotomy, a 16-cm section of the small intestine was ischemic and necrotic; therefore, segmentectomy of the intestine was performed. A thrombus was noted at the stump of the mesenteric artery branch. Histopathological analysis of the resected intestine revealed fibrin thrombi in both mesenteric arteries and veins. Furthermore, a cluster of large, abnormal lymphoid cells bordering the intima of most branches of the mesenteric veins and small vessels was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these abnormal cells were positive for CD20, leading to a diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). The patient was successfully treated with standard R-CHOP chemotherapy; however, the lymphoma recurred in the central nervous system 18 months after the initial diagnosis, and the patient died. Simultaneous thrombosis of the mesenteric artery and vein is unusual as a clinical manifestation of IVLBCL. However, IVLBCL should be taken into consideration when ischemic disorders of unknown cause, accompanied by fever of unknown origin, are encountered.

  19. Pancreatectomy for metastasis to the pancreas from colorectal cancer and reconstruction of superior mesenteric vein: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tumors of the pancreatic head can infiltrate the superior mesenteric vein. In such cases, the deep veins of the lower limbs can serve as suitable autologous conduits for superior mesenteric vein reconstruction after its resection. Few data exist, however, describing the technique and the immediate patency of such reconstruction. Case report We present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man with a metachronous metastasis of colon cancer and infiltration of the uncinate pancreatic process, on the anterior surface of which the tumor was located. En bloc resection of the tumor was performed with resection of the superior mesenteric vein and reconstruction. A 10 cm segment of the superficial femoral vein was harvested for the reconstruction. The superficial femoral vein segment was inter-positioned in an end-to-end fashion. The post-operative conduit patency was documented ultrasonographically immediately post-operatively and after a six-month period. The vein donor limb presented subtle signs of post-operative venous hypertension with edema, which was managed with compression stockings and led to significant improvement after six months. Conclusion In cases of exploratory laparotomies with high clinical suspicion of pancreatic involvement, the potential need for vascular reconstruction dictates the preparation for leg vein harvest in advance. The superficial femoral vein provides a suitable conduit for the reconstruction of the superior mesenteric vein. This report supports the uncomplicated nature of this technique, since few data exist about this type of reconstruction. PMID:21880120

  20. A “clean case” of systemic injury: Mesenteric lymph after hemorrhagic shock elicits a sterile inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jeniann; Slaughter, Anne; Kotter, Cassandra V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Hauser, Carl J.; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Wohlauer, Max; Frank, Daniel N.; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Peltz, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Post-injury multiple organ failure results from an inappropriate, overwhelming immune response to injury. During trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS), mesenteric ischemia causes gut mucosal breakdown with disruption of the intestinal barrier. It has been proposed that this releases the gut microbiota systemically via post-shock mesenteric lymph, engendering infectious complications. Despite extensive investigation, no clear evidence has been presented for gut bacterial translocation after resuscitation from T/HS. However, such previous studies were limited by available technologies. More sensitive methods, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), have since emerged for detection of bacterial presence and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Quantitative PCR was applied to post-shock mesenteric lymph (PSML) derived from a rat model of T/HS. No bacterial presence was detected in a series of 12 samples, whereas multiple lymph samples showed presence of DAMPs after T/HS. Thus, we confirmed that bacterial translocation does not exist in PSML following resuscitation from T/HS-associated mesenteric ischemia. However, T/HS does increase the presence of mitochondrial DAMPs in PSML. These results support our current position that PSML elaborates remote organ injury by multiple inflammatory mechanisms, including lipid-mediated pro-inflammatory stimuli, and by contribution from gut-derived DAMPS. PMID:26196840