Science.gov

Sample records for rolls size effects

  1. Effect of roll hot press temperature on crystallite size of PVDF film

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Ambran Sanjaya, Edi; Djamal, Mitra; Satira, Suparno; Bahar, Herman; Ramli

    2014-03-24

    Fabrication PVDF films have been made using Hot Roll Press. Preparation of samples carried out for nine different temperatures. This condition is carried out to see the effect of Roll Hot Press temperature on the size of the crystallite of PVDF films. To obtain the diffraction pattern of sample characterization is performed using X-Ray Diffraction. Furthermore, from the diffraction pattern is obtained, the calculation to determine the crystallite size of the sample by using the Scherrer equation. From the experimental results and the calculation of crystallite sizes obtained for the samples with temperature 130 °C up to 170 °C respectively increased from 7.2 nm up to 20.54 nm. These results show that increasing temperatures will also increase the size of the crystallite of the sample. This happens because with the increasing temperature causes the higher the degree of crystallization of PVDF film sample is formed, so that the crystallite size also increases. This condition indicates that the specific volume or size of the crystals depends on the magnitude of the temperature as it has been studied by Nakagawa.

  2. Effect of carbide size, area, density on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A carbide parameter that can be used to predict rolling element fatigue life was developed.The parameter is based on a statistical life analysis and incorporates the total number of particles per unit area, particle size, and percent carbide area. These were determined from quantimet image analyzing computer examinations of random samples selected from eight lots of material previously tested in rolling fatigue. The carbide parameter is independent of chemical composition, heat treatment, and hardening mechanism of the materials investigated.

  3. Multi-passes warm rolling of AZ31 magnesium alloy, effect on evaluation of texture, microstructure, grain size and hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, J.; Hasan, B. A.; Tariq, N. H.; Izhar, S.; Sarwar, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this study the effect of multi-passes warm rolling of AZ31 magnesium alloy on texture, microstructure, grain size variation and hardness of as cast sample (A) and two rolled samples (B & C) taken from different locations of the as-cast ingot was investigated. The purpose was to enhance the formability of AZ31 alloy in order to help manufacturability. It was observed that multi-passes warm rolling (250°C to 350°C) of samples B & C with initial thickness 7.76mm and 7.73 mm was successfully achieved up to 85% reduction without any edge or surface cracks in ten steps with a total of 26 passes. The step numbers 1 to 4 consist of 5, 2, 11 and 3 passes respectively, the remaining steps 5 to 10 were single pass rolls. In each discrete step a fixed roll gap is used in a way that true strain per step increases very slowly from 0.0067 in the first step to 0.7118 in the 26th step. Both samples B & C showed very similar behavior after 26th pass and were successfully rolled up to 85% thickness reduction. However, during 10th step (27th pass) with a true strain value of 0.772 the sample B experienced very severe surface as well as edge cracks. Sample C was therefore not rolled for the 10th step and retained after 26 passes. Both samples were studied in terms of their basal texture, microstructure, grain size and hardness. Sample C showed an equiaxed grain structure after 85% total reduction. The equiaxed grain structure of sample C may be due to the effective involvement of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which led to formation of these grains with relatively low misorientations with respect to the parent as cast grains. The sample B on the other hand showed a microstructure in which all the grains were elongated along the rolling direction (RD) after 90 % total reduction and DRX could not effectively play its role due to heavy strain and lack of plastic deformation systems. The microstructure of as cast sample showed a near-random texture (mrd 4.3), with average grain size

  4. Effect of Particle Size on the Mechanical Properties of Semi-Solid, Powder-Rolled AA7050 Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xia; Liu, Yunzhong

    2016-07-01

    The AA7050 alloy strips can be successfully prepared by semi-solid powder rolling. The effect and factors of particle size on the microstructure, relative density, and mechanical properties were discussed. The results show that coarse starting powders require less liquid to achieve high relative density, and the formed strips have lower elongation compared with that prepared with the fine starting powders. The strength is more related to defects, whereas elongation partially depends on the grain size. Additionally, the fracture mechanism of strips prepared with fine powders is the ductile fracture because many dimples are observed. For relative density, when the initial liquid fraction is lower than 10%, the difference of deformation degree is the main factor. When the liquid fraction is higher than 10-20%, premature solidification and more particle interfaces are the two main factors.

  5. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  6. The effects of forming parameters on conical ring rolling process.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the "obtuse angle zone" of ring's cross-section are higher than those at "acute angle zone"; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained.

  7. The Effects of Forming Parameters on Conical Ring Rolling Process

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the “obtuse angle zone” of ring's cross-section are higher than those at “acute angle zone”; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained. PMID:25202716

  8. The effects of cold rolling temperature on corrosion resistance of pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Hongyun, Luo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of cold rolling temperature on grain size and grain orientation of pure iron were investigated. Comparing with sample rolled at room temperature, the grain refinement was facilitated in sample obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature. However, the grain orientation changed little for two samples. It was shown that cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction could govern the corrosion reaction for pure iron in sulfuric acid solution. The grain refinement obtained by rolling improved the corrosion resistance of iron in sulfuric acid solution, borate buffer solution and borate buffer solution with chloride ion. However, comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, the corrosion resistance of iron obtained by cryogenic temperature rolling was lower. Comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, higher dislocation density in iron rolled at cryogenic temperature reduced its corrosion resistance.

  9. Effect of temper rolling on final shape defects in a V-section roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abvabi, Akbar; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Roll forming is a continuous process in which a flat strip is shaped to the desired profile by sequential bending in a series of roll stands. Because of the large variety of applications of roll forming in the industry, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is increasingly utilized for roll forming process design. Bending is the dominant deformation mode in roll forming. Sheet materials used in this process are generally temper rolled, roller- or tension- leveled. These processes introduce residual stresses into the material, and recent studies have shown that those affect the material behavior in bending. In this study a numerical model of the temper rolling (skin passing) process was used to determine a residual stress distribution in a dual phase, DP780, steel strip. A 5-stand roll forming process for the forming of a V-section was modeled, and the effect of various thickness reduction levels in the temper rolling process on the final shape defects was analyzed. The results show that a small thickness reduction in the temper rolling process decreases the maximum bow height but the final springback angle increases. It is also shown that reasonable model accuracy can be achieved by including the residual stress information due to temper rolling as initial condition in the numerical modeling of a roll forming process.

  10. Computational Analysis of Ares I Roll Control System Jet Interaction Effects on Rolling Moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2011-01-01

    The computational flow solver USM3D was used to investigate the jet interaction effects from the roll control system on the rolling moment of the Ares I full protuberance configuration at wind tunnel Reynolds numbers. Solutions were computed at freestream Mach numbers from M = 0.5 to M = 5 at the angle of attack 0deg, at the angle of attack 3.5deg for a roll angle of 120deg, and at the angle of attack 7deg for roll angles of 120deg and 210deg. Results indicate that the RoCS housing provided a beneficial jet interaction effect on vehicle rolling moment for M > or = 0.9. Most of the components downstream of the roll control system housing contributed to jet interaction penalties on vehicle rolling moment.

  11. The effects of luminance, size, and duration of a visual line on apparent vertical while the head is being inclined in roll.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Atsuki; Murakami, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    We determined orientation of a line that is seen to be vertical (i.e., apparent vertical) while the head is inclined with the trunk upright. In this condition, it has been documented that apparent vertical is independent of head orientation (i.e., orientation constancy) or is in a direction opposite to the head inclination (i.e., the Müller effect). In this study, we have focused not only on the effect of head inclination but also on visual parameters of the line that was used to indicate apparent vertical. As the visual parameters, size (5.5° and 22° in visual angle), duration (0.1 s, 3 s, and no time limit), and luminance (0.026, 0.003, and 0.001 cd/m(2) against total darkness) were varied with the head being inclined within ±30°. The main findings were: 1) the Müller effect was at best 2°, but the head inclination was judged to be much larger than it was; 2) the correlation between apparent vertical and the judgmental error of head inclination was significant but was not very high (r = -0.20); 3) the line of short duration or of low luminance facilitated the Müller effect; and 4) the magnitude of the Müller effect was large when the head was inclined to the right rather than to the left. These findings were compared with the predictions from the theory of allowing for apparent head position, the theory of ocular countertorsion, and the sensory-tonic field theory. Many aspects of the results were consistent with the predictions from the sensory-tonic field theory.

  12. Biophysical and chemical handles to control the size of DNA nanoparticles produced by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Bang, Duhee; Bae, Se Won; Kim, Hak Joong; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-08-16

    Although rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an efficient method to produce DNA materials for biomedical applications, it does not yield nano-sized products suitable for intracellular delivery. We here provide the ways to control the size of RCA products and show a potential application of the size-controlled DNA nanoparticles. PMID:27464359

  13. Biophysical and chemical handles to control the size of DNA nanoparticles produced by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Bang, Duhee; Bae, Se Won; Kim, Hak Joong; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-08-16

    Although rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an efficient method to produce DNA materials for biomedical applications, it does not yield nano-sized products suitable for intracellular delivery. We here provide the ways to control the size of RCA products and show a potential application of the size-controlled DNA nanoparticles.

  14. Effects of microalloying on hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo de Araujo, Ana Luiza

    austenite morphology from lath-like to blocky with increasing CT was observed. Hardness generally increased with decreasing CT, consistent with the increased fraction of harder phases in the microstructure. For the cold-rolled Q&P study, several combinations of quenching temperature (QT), partitioning temperature (PT), and partitioning time (t p) were examined using heat treatments in salt baths. Uniaxial tensile tests and RA measurements via x-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed for all alloys and heat treatment conditions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and EBSD were conducted for a few select conditions. In terms of microstructure, Nb promoted an extensive refinement of the prior austenite grain size. Additions of V and Nb also seemed to affect the morphology of the microstructural constituents. It was observed that V generally increased austenite fractions at lower t p's, and the Nb-containing alloys had greater austenite fractions in most instances when compared to the Base alloy. Carbon content in austenite was usually increased or maintained with additions of Nb and V. In terms of mechanical properties, V slightly improved strength and elongation when compared to the Base alloy for most conditions. Niobium additions were somewhat more effective in improving ductility.

  15. Helicopter roll control effectiveness criteria program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, Robert K.; Bourne, Simon M.; Mnich, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    A study of helicopter roll control effectiveness is summarized for the purpose of defining military helicopter handling qualities requirements. The study is based on an analysis of pilot-in-the-loop task performance of several basic maneuvers. This is extended by a series of piloted simulations using the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator and selected flight data. The main results cover roll control power and short-term response characteristics. In general the handling qualities requirements recommended are set in conjunction with desired levels of flight task and maneuver response which can be directly observed in actual flight. An important aspect of this, however, is that vehicle handling qualities need to be set with regard to some quantitative aspect of mission performance. Specific examples of how this can be accomplished include a lateral unmask/remask maneuver in the presence of a threat and an air tracking maneuver which recognizes the kill probability enhancement connected with decreasing the range to the target. Conclusions and recommendations address not only the handling qualities recommendations, but also the general use of flight simulators and the dependence of mission performance on handling qualities.

  16. Effects of False Tilt Cues on the Training of Manual Roll Control Skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Peter M. T.; Popovici, Alexandru; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a transfer-of-training study performed in the NASA Ames Vertica lMotion Simulator. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of false tilt cues on training and transfer of training of manual roll control skills. Of specific interest were the skills needed to control unstable roll dynamics of a mid-size transport aircraft close to the stall point. Nineteen general aviation pilots trained on a roll control task with one of three motion conditions: no motion, roll motion only, or reduced coordinated roll motion. All pilots transferred to full coordinated roll motion in the transfer session. A novel multimodal pilot model identification technique was successfully applied to characterize how pilots' use of visual and motion cues changed over the course of training and after transfer. Pilots who trained with uncoordinated roll motion had significantly higher performance during training and after transfer, even though they experienced the false tilt cues. Furthermore, pilot control behavior significantly changed during the two sessions, as indicated by increasing visual and motion gains, and decreasing lead time constants. Pilots training without motion showed higher learning rates after transfer to the full coordinated roll motion case.

  17. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  18. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  19. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  20. The Influence of Grain Size on Twinning and Microstructure Refinement During Cold Rolling of Commercial-Purity Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. V.; Dyakonov, G. S.; Salishchev, G. A.; Salem, A. A.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    Microstructure evolution in commercial-purity titanium (CP Ti) with various initial grain sizes (1, 7, 15, and 30 μm) during plane-strain multipass rolling to a true thickness strain of 2.66 at 293 K (20 °C) was established. The degree of deformation twinning was found to be strongly dependent on grain size. Twinning was rare in the material with a grain size of 1 μm. For all grain sizes >15 μm, the occurrence of twinning reached a similar, maximum level. Concurrently, the propensity for twinning enhanced the kinetics of microstructure refinement particularly for the initially coarse-grain materials. Due to the extensive twinning-induced microstructure refinement, rolling of coarse-grain (15 μm) CP Ti to a true thickness strain of 2.66 resulted in the formation of an ultrafine microstructure with a grain/subgrain size of 200-300 nm, a value similar to that attained for the initially micrometer-scale microstructure. The effect of grain size on twinning in titanium was discussed in the context of a disclination model.

  1. The Influence of Grain Size on Twinning and Microstructure Refinement During Cold Rolling of Commercial-Purity Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. V.; Dyakonov, G. S.; Salishchev, G. A.; Salem, A. A.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-10-01

    Microstructure evolution in commercial-purity titanium (CP Ti) with various initial grain sizes (1, 7, 15, and 30 μm) during plane-strain multipass rolling to a true thickness strain of 2.66 at 293 K (20 °C) was established. The degree of deformation twinning was found to be strongly dependent on grain size. Twinning was rare in the material with a grain size of 1 μm. For all grain sizes >15 μm, the occurrence of twinning reached a similar, maximum level. Concurrently, the propensity for twinning enhanced the kinetics of microstructure refinement particularly for the initially coarse-grain materials. Due to the extensive twinning-induced microstructure refinement, rolling of coarse-grain (15 μm) CP Ti to a true thickness strain of 2.66 resulted in the formation of an ultrafine microstructure with a grain/subgrain size of 200-300 nm, a value similar to that attained for the initially micrometer-scale microstructure. The effect of grain size on twinning in titanium was discussed in the context of a disclination model.

  2. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  3. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. PMID:27343033

  4. Medium-size power generation market now focus of Rolls-Royce

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1996-12-01

    John Rose, Rolls-Royce chief executive, explained that the focus in power generation would now be upon small- and medium-sized power applications up to 150MW using its ranges of aeroderivative gas turbines, small steam turbines and diesel engines. The company already has an established position in this area and expects to become more competitive as aeroderivative gas turbines like the marine WR21 and industrial Trent reach the market. A measure of Rolls-Royce`s broad capability in medium power generation can be seen in the company`s decision to build its own cogen power station to provide heat and power to its major aerospace manufacturing facilities at Derby in the U.K. Work has already started on preparing land adjoining the site and the 60 MW power station is scheduled to go on line in January 1998. The US$60 million project is being carried out by Derby Cogeneration, a joint venture between Rolls-Royce Power Ventures and National Power Cogen, a subsidiary of the U.K.`s largest electrical power generator. 5 figs.

  5. Electrostatic separation for multi-size granule of crushed printed circuit board waste using two-roll separator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2008-11-30

    The electrostatic separation is an effective method for recycle of crushed waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the robustness of the classical roll-type separator is vulnerable because of its sensitivity to variation of granule size. A new "two-roll type corona-electrostatic separator" was built to overcome the limitation of the classical one considering the actual situation of the industrial application which always contains granule with different size. Multi-size granule of crushed printed circuit board (PCB) wastes was used for investigation and the results showed that the efficiency of the separation process was improved by using the new separator. Compared with the process (lower voltage) performed on the old separator, the metal products increased 34% while the middling products reduced 73%, respectively. Compared with the process (higher voltage) performed on the old separator, the metal products increased 22% while the middling products reduced 59%, respectively. In addition, the metal component of the middling products using new machine notably decreased, 33% (new machine) compared with 58% (lower voltage) and 66% (higher voltage). The efficiency of the separation process is enhanced compared with the classical one.

  6. Quantum slow-roll and quantum fast-roll inflationary initial conditions: CMB quadrupole suppression and further effects on the low CMB multipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, F. J.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-10-15

    Quantum fast-roll initial conditions for the inflaton which are different from the classical fast-roll conditions and from the quantum slow-roll conditions can lead to inflation that lasts long enough. These quantum fast-roll initial conditions for the inflaton allow for kinetic energies of the same order of the potential energies and nonperturbative inflaton modes with nonzero wave numbers. Their evolution starts with a transitory epoch where the redshift due to the expansion succeeds to assemble the quantum excited modes of the inflaton in a homogeneous (zero mode) condensate, and the large value of the Hubble parameter succeeds to overdamp the fast roll of the redshifted inflaton modes. After this transitory stage the effective classical slow-roll epoch is reached. Most of the e-folds are produced during the slow-roll epoch, and we recover the classical slow-roll results for the scalar and tensor metric perturbations plus corrections. These corrections are important if scales which are horizon size today exited the horizon by the end of the transitory stage and, as a consequence, the lower cosmic microwave background (CMB) multipoles get suppressed or enhanced. Both for scalar and tensor metric perturbations, fast roll leads to a suppression of the amplitude of the perturbations (and of the low CMB multipoles), while the quantum precondensate epoch gives an enhancement of the amplitude of the perturbations (and of the low CMB multipoles). These two types of corrections can compete and combine in a scale dependent manner. They turn out to be smaller in new inflation than in chaotic inflation. These corrections arise as natural consequences of the quantum nonperturbative inflaton dynamics, and can allow a further improvement of the fitting of inflation plus the {lambda}CMB model to the observed CMB spectra. In addition, the corrections to the tensor metric perturbations will provide an independent test of this model. Thus, the effects of quantum inflaton fast-roll

  7. Effect of biomimetic coupling units' morphologies on rolling contact fatigue wear resistance of steel from machine tool rolling tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanshi; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Liang; Wang, Chuanwei; Chen, Zhikai

    2014-04-01

    The rolling contact fatigue wear resistance plays an important role on ensuring machining precision of machine tool using rolling tracks. Bio-inspired wearable surfaces with the alternated hardness were prepared on the specimen of steel material from machine tool rolling tracks by biomimetic coupling laser remelting method to imitate biological coupling principle. The microstructures and micromorphologies of bionic units in different sizes were characterized by optical microscope. The specimens with bionic units in different sizes and distributions were tested for rolling contact fatigue wear resistance. Combining the finite element analysis and the results of wear tests, a discussion on rolling contact fatigue wear was had. The specimens with bionic units had better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the untreated one, while the specimens with bionic units in the alternative depth's distributions present a better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the ones with bionic units in the single depth's distribution. It attributed to the alternative distribution made further improvement on the dispersion of depth of stress concentration.

  8. Effects of surface removal on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1987-01-01

    The Lundberg-Palmgren equation was modified to show the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of removing by grinding a portion of the stressed volume of the raceways of a rolling-element bearing. Results of this analysis show that depending on the amount of material removed, and depending on the initial running time of the bearing when material removal occurs, the 10-percent life of the reground bearings ranges from 74 to 100 percent of the 10-percent life of a brand new bearing. Three bearing types were selected for testing. A total of 250 bearings were reground. Of this matter, 30 bearings from each type were endurance tested to 1600 hr. No bearing failure occurred related to material removal. Two bearing failures occurred due to defective rolling elements and were typical of those which may occur in new bearings.

  9. Efficiency roll-off suppression in organic light-emitting diodes using size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yukun; Yun, Feng; Huang, Yi; Wu, Zhaoxin; Li, Yufeng; Jiao, Bo; Feng, Lungang; Li, Sanfeng; Ding, Wen; Zhang, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas have been utilized to suppress the efficiency roll-off characteristics in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using both the numerical and experimental approaches. The resonant range can be widened by the strong dual-atomic couplings in bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas. Compared with the green OLED with conventional bowtie nanoantennas at a high current density of 800 mA/cm2, the measured efficiency roll-off ratio of the OLED with size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas is decreased from 53.2% to 41.8%, and the measured current efficiency is enhanced by 29.9%. When the size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas are utilized in blue phosphorescent OLEDs, the experimental roll-off ratio is suppressed from 43.6% to 25.9% at 250 mA/cm2, and the measured current efficiency is also enhanced significantly. It is proposed that the efficiency roll-off suppression is mainly related to the enhanced localized surface plasmon effect, which leads to a shorter radiative lifetime.

  10. Effect of deformation path on microstructure, microhardness and texture evolution of interstitial free steel fabricated by differential speed rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, Kotiba; Chung, Bong Kwon; Ko, Young Gun

    2014-08-15

    This paper reports the effect of the deformation path on the microstructure, microhardness, and texture evolution of interstitial free (IF) steel processed by differential speed rolling (DSR) method. For this purpose, total height reductions of 50% and 75% were imposed on the samples by a series of differential speed rolling operations with various height reductions per pass (deformation levels) ranging from 10 to 50% under a fixed roll speed ratio of 1:4 for the upper and lower rolls, respectively. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction measurements showed that the samples rolled at deformation level of 50% had the finest mean grain size (∼ 0.5 μm) compared to the other counterparts; also the samples rolled at deformation level of 50% showed a more uniform microstructure. Based on the microhardness measurements along the thickness direction of the deformed samples, gradual evolution of the microhardness value and its homogeneity was observed with the increase of the deformation level per pass. Texture analysis showed that, as the deformation level per pass increased, the fraction of alpha fiber and gamma fiber in the deformed samples increased. The textures obtained by the differential speed rolling process under the lubricated condition would be equivalent to those obtained by the conventional rolling. - Highlights: • Effect of DSR deformation path on microstructure of IF steel is significant. • IF steel rolled at deformation level of 50% has the ultrafine grains of ∼ 0.5 μm. • Rolling texture components are pronounced with increasing deformation level.

  11. A numerical study of the rolling friction between a microsphere and a substrate considering the adhesive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Hanqing; Yang, Weixu

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model of the rolling friction between a microsphere and a substrate is established by introducing the adhesion hysteresis between the front and rear sides of the contact region into Zhang’s adhesive contact model. Effects of the size ratio which is defined as the sphere radius divided by the equilibrium separation, relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter on the dimensionless maximum rolling friction torque in the case of zero normal force are inspected, and the quantitative relationship between the maximum rolling friction torque and the normal force is achieved. Results indicate that due to adhesion hysteresis at microscale, the dimensionless maximum rolling friction torque at zero normal force is not zero, which not only increases with decreasing size ratio, showing clear size effects, but also increases with increasing relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter. In addition, the maximum rolling friction torque at microscale presents a sublinear relationship with the normal force, and the exponent of the normal force is influenced by the size ratio, relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter, which are remarkably different from the superlinear relationship at macroscale.

  12. Vibration response of spalled rolling element bearings: Observations, simulations and signal processing techniques to track the spall size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawalhi, N.; Randall, R. B.

    2011-04-01

    Fatigue in rolling element bearings, resulting in spalling of the races and/or rolling elements, is the most common cause of bearing failure. The useful life of the bearing may extend considerably beyond the appearance of the first spall and a premature removal of the bearing from service can be very expensive, but on the other hand chances cannot be taken with safety of machines or personnel. Previous studies indicated that there might be two parts to the defect vibration signal of a spalled bearing, the first part being originating from the entry of the rolling element into the fault (de-stress) and the second part being due to the departure of the rolling element from the fault (re-stress). This is investigated in this paper using vibration signatures of seeded faults at different speeds. The acceleration signals resulting from the entry of the rolling element into the spall and exit from it were found to be of different natures. The entry into the fault can be described as a step response, with mainly low frequency content, while the impact excites a much broader frequency impulse response. The latter is the most noticeable and prominent event, especially when examining the high pass filtered response or the enveloped signal. In order to enable a clear separation of the two events, and produce an averaged estimate of the size of the fault, two approaches are proposed to enhance the entry event while keeping the impulse response. The first approach (joint treatment) utilizes pre-whitening to balance the low and high frequency energy, then octave band wavelet analysis to allow selection of the best band (or scale) to balance the two pulses with similar frequency content. In the second approach, a separate treatment is applied to the step and the impulse responses, so that they can be equally represented in the signal. Cepstrum analysis can be used to give an average estimate of the spacing between the entry and impact events, but the latter can also be assessed

  13. The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kellie C; Hatfield, Disa L; Blanpied, Peter; Dorfman, Leah R; Riebe, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary. However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance. Twenty-six (13 men and 13 women) healthy college-aged individuals (21.56 ± 2.04 years, 23.97 ± 3.98 body mass index, 20.57 ± 12.21 percent body fat) were recruited. The study design was a randomized crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured. A 2 × 2 (trial × gender) analysis of variance with repeated measures and appropriate post hoc was used to analyze the data. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests. However, there was a significant difference between genders on all the athletic tests (p ≤ 0.001). As expected, there were significant increases from pre to post exercise during both trials for fatigue, soreness, and exertion (p ≤ 0.01). Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking (p ≤ 0.05). The reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance.

  14. The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kellie C; Hatfield, Disa L; Blanpied, Peter; Dorfman, Leah R; Riebe, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary. However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance. Twenty-six (13 men and 13 women) healthy college-aged individuals (21.56 ± 2.04 years, 23.97 ± 3.98 body mass index, 20.57 ± 12.21 percent body fat) were recruited. The study design was a randomized crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured. A 2 × 2 (trial × gender) analysis of variance with repeated measures and appropriate post hoc was used to analyze the data. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests. However, there was a significant difference between genders on all the athletic tests (p ≤ 0.001). As expected, there were significant increases from pre to post exercise during both trials for fatigue, soreness, and exertion (p ≤ 0.01). Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking (p ≤ 0.05). The reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance. PMID:23588488

  15. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  16. Micrometer-sized ice particles for planetary-science experiments - I. Preparation, critical rolling friction force, and specific surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Kilias, S.; Beitz, E.; Blum, J.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulation models assume a higher sticking threshold for micrometer-sized ice particles than for micrometer-sized silicate particles. However, in contrast to silicates, laboratory investigations of the collision properties of micrometer-sized ice particles (in particular, of the most abundant H 2O-ice) have not been conducted yet. Thus, we used two different experimental methods to produce micrometer-sized H 2O-ice particles, i.e. by spraying H 2O droplets into liquid nitrogen and by spraying H 2O droplets into a cold nitrogen atmosphere. The mean particle radii of the ice particles produced with these experimental methods are (1.49 ± 0.79) μm and (1.45 ± 0.65) μm. Ice aggregates composed of the micrometer-sized ice particles are highly porous (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.11 ± 0.01) or rather compact (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.72 ± 0.04), depending on the method of production. Furthermore, the critical rolling friction force of FRoll, ice = (114.8 ± 23.8) × 10 -10 N was measured for micrometer-sized ice particles, which exceeds the critical rolling friction force of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles (F=(12.1±3.6)×10-10N). This result implies that the adhesive bonding between micrometer-sized ice particles is stronger than the bonding strength between SiO 2 particles. An estimation of the specific surface energy of micrometer-sized ice particles, derived from the measured critical rolling friction forces and the surface energy of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles, results in γice = 0.190 J m -2.

  17. Dispersive effects of transverse magnet displacements in rolled arc achromats

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Murray, J.J.

    1986-09-22

    The effect of transverse displacements of combined function magnets is investigated where the disperion in not matched due to roll. This dispersion function is perturbed by displacement of combined function magnets either singly or coherently. In the latter case the effect of a systematic (or DC) offset of magnets is examined. This type of error can occur due to systematics in the placement or the readout of Beam Position Monitors or equivalently by correcting the orbit of a beam of the wrong momentum with respect to the Arc magnet excitation. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  18. A study of energy-size relationship and wear rate in a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Dashtbayaz, Samira

    This study is focused on two independent topics of energy-size relationship and wear-rate measurements on a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). The first part of this study has been aimed to investigate the influence of the operating parameters and the feed characteristics on the particle-bed breakage using four different ore samples in a 200 mm x 100 mm lab-scale HPGR. Additionally, multistage grinding, scale-up from a lab-scale HPGR, and prediction of the particle size distributions have been studied in detail. The results obtained from energy-size relationship studies help with better understanding of the factors contributing to more energy-efficient grinding. It will be shown that the energy efficiency of the two configurations of locked-cycle and open multipass is completely dependent on the ore properties. A test procedure to produce the scale-up data is presented. The comparison of the scale-up factors between the data obtained on the University of Utah lab-scale HPGR and the industrial machine at the Newmont Boddington plant confirmed the applicability of lab-scale machines for trade-off studies. The population balance model for the simulation of product size distributions has shown to work well with the breakage function estimated through tests performed on the HPGR at high rotational speed. Selection function has been estimated by back calculation of population balance model with the help of the experimental data. This is considered to be a major step towards advancing current research on the simulation of particle size distribution by using the HPGR machine for determining the breakage function. Developing a technique/setup to measure the wear rate of the HPGR rolls' surface is the objective of the second topic of this dissertation. A mockup was initially designed to assess the application of the linear displacement sensors for measuring the rolls' weight loss. Upon the analysis of that technique and considering the corresponding sources of

  19. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  20. T Strip Properties Fabricated by Powder Rolling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jae-Keun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Park, Nho-Kwang

    In the present study, the characteristics of the Ti powders fabricated by Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) were analyzed in terms of particle shape, size and size distribution. Ti powders were subjected to roll compaction and their microstructure and green densities were evaluated in terms of particle size, powder morphology, roll gap and rolling speed. Effects of blending elements having different powder sizes on densification properties were analyzed. The strip thickness was proportional to the roll gap up to 0.9 mm and the density of titanium strip was decreased with the increase in roll gap. As the roll speed increased, the strip density and thickness were decreased by using -200 mesh Ti powder. However, the effect of rolling speed for -400 mesh Ti powder was not greater than that of -200 mesh powder. The highest density by 93% was achieved by using -400 mesh Ti powder at 0.1 mm roll gap, however edge cracks and alligator cracks were occurred.

  1. Rolling Shutter Effect aberration compensation in Digital Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaldi, Andrea C.; Romero, Gladis G.; Cabrera, Carlos M.; Blanc, Adriana V.; Alanís, Elvio E.

    2016-05-01

    Due to the sequential-readout nature of most CMOS sensors, each row of the sensor array is exposed at a different time, resulting in the so-called rolling shutter effect that induces geometric distortion to the image if the video camera or the object moves during image acquisition. Particularly in digital holograms recording, while the sensor captures progressively each row of the hologram, interferometric fringes can oscillate due to external vibrations and/or noises even when the object under study remains motionless. The sensor records each hologram row in different instants of these disturbances. As a final effect, phase information is corrupted, distorting the reconstructed holograms quality. We present a fast and simple method for compensating this effect based on image processing tools. The method is exemplified by holograms of microscopic biological static objects. Results encourage incorporating CMOS sensors over CCD in Digital Holographic Microscopy due to a better resolution and less expensive benefits.

  2. The effect of mold materials on the overlay accuracy of a roll-to-roll imprinting system using UV LED illumination within a transparent mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Kook, YunHo; Kim, ChulHo; Yoo, SoonSung; Park, Kwon-Shik; Kim, Seok-min; Kang, Shinill

    2016-06-01

    Although several studies on the roll-to-roll (R2R) imprinting process have reported achieving flexible electronics, improving the alignment accuracy in the overlay process of R2R imprinting is recognized as the biggest problem for the commercialization of this technology. For an overlay technique with high alignment accuracy, it is essential to develop a roll mold with high positional accuracy. In this study, a method for fabricating a roll mold with high positional accuracy is proposed by wrapping a thin glass substrate flexible mold around the transparent roll base, because it can provide higher mechanical strength and thermal stability than a conventional polymer substrate. To confirm the usability of the proposed process, the prepared roll mold was used to fabricate a test pattern of thin-film transistor backplane for a rollable display. The positional and overlay accuracy of the roll mold with the proposed thin glass substrate flexible mold were compared with the roll mold with a conventional polymer substrate flexible mold. Large-area transparent flexible molds with a size of 470  ×  370 mm were fabricated by an ultraviolet (UV) imprinting process on thin glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates, and these flexible molds were wrapped around a roll base of 125 mm radius through a precision alignment process. After an anti-adhesion treatment and the wrapping process, the roll mold with the polymer substrate showed a ~180 μm positional error, whereas the thin glass substrate showed a ~30 μm positional error. After the overlay process using the R2R imprinting system with the alignment system, an average overlay error of ~3 μm was obtained when the thin glass flexible wrapped roll mold was used, whereas a ~22 μm overlay error was obtained when the polymer substrate flexible wrapped roll mold was used.

  3. Effect of roll number on the statistics of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    A series of direct numerical simulations in large computational domains has been performed in order to probe the spatial feature robustness of the Taylor rolls in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. The latter is the flow between two coaxial independently rotating cylinders of radius ri and ro, respectively. Large axial aspect ratios Γ =7 -8 [with Γ =L /(ro-ri) , and L the axial length of the domain] and a simulation with Γ =14 were used in order to allow the system to select the most unstable wave number and to possibly develop multiple states. The radius ratio was taken as η =ri/ro=0.909 , the inner cylinder Reynolds number was fixed to Rei=3.4 ×104 , and the outer cylinder was kept stationary, resulting in a frictional Reynolds number of Reτ≈500 , except for the Γ =14 simulation where Rei=1.5 ×104 and Reτ≈240 . The large-scale rolls were found to remain axially pinned for all simulations. Depending on the initial conditions, stable solutions with different number of rolls nr and roll wavelength λz were found for Γ =7 . The effect of λz and nr on the statistics was quantified. The torque and mean flow statistics were found to be independent of both λz and nr, while the velocity fluctuations and energy spectra showed some box-size dependence. Finally, the axial velocity spectra were found to have a very sharp dropoff for wavelengths larger than λz, while for the small wavelengths they collapse.

  4. Observation and simulation of boundary layer coherent roll structures and their effect on pollution dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeepan, B. S.; Rakesh, P. T.; Venkatesan, R.

    2013-02-01

    Coherent roll structures are often observed in the atmospheric boundary layer during strong wind shears and pre-convective situations. Data collected from in situ and remote observations at a coastal site under the presence of the rolls are analyzed which confirm the typical characteristic features coherent roll structures. A mesoscale simulation study with WRF shows that the structures could be simulated only when the spatial domain is configured in high resolution. The limiting criteria as an indicator of the rolls based on the stability parameter is investigated and found to fail as similarly pointed out by a few other researchers. The effect of rolls on the dispersion of a passive tracer plume is simulated by a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART). The plume is seen confined between two rolls for a significant downwind distance and shows alternative high and low areas of concentration.

  5. Geometry effect on the strain-induced self-rolling of semiconductor membranes.

    PubMed

    Chun, Ik Su; Challa, Archana; Derickson, Brad; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2010-10-13

    Semiconductor micro- and nanotubes can be formed by strain-induced self-rolling of membranes. The effect of geometrical dimensions on the self-rolling behavior of epitaxial mismatch-strained In(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs membranes are systematically studied both experimentally and theoretically using the finite element method. The final rolling direction depends on the length and width of the membrane as well as the diameter of the rolled-up tube. The energetics of the final states, the history of rolling process, and the kinetic control of the etching anisotropy ultimately determine the rolling behavior. Results reported here provide critical information for precise positioning and uniform large area assembly of semiconducting micro- and nanotubes for applications in photonics, microelectromechanical systems, etc.

  6. Effective sizes for subdivided populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, R.K. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA ); Rhodes, O.E. Jr.; Sugg, D.W.; Schnabel, A. )

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective size, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal rates.

  7. Effect of asymmetric hot rolling on texture, microstructure and magnetic properties in a non-grain oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Butler, J.; Melzer, S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, both asymmetric hot rolling (AHR) and conventional hot rolling (CHR) were carried out to study the effect of the hot rolling conditions on the evolution of the texture and microstructure in a non-grain oriented (NGO) steel. The microstructure and texture in the subsequent processing stages were characterised and related to the final magnetic properties. The results show that AHR, compared with CHR, tends to homogenise texture through thickness of the hot band strips. AHR results in a higher fraction of the θ-fibre ({0 0 1}) and a lower fraction of the γ-fibre ({1 1 1}) in the hot band strips, which are favourable features in relation to the magnetic properties of the strip. However, the favourable features observed in hot rolled AHR strips are eliminated after cold rolling and annealing. Contrarily, the required θ-fibre is decreased and the unwanted γ-fibre is intensified in the AHR sheet after cold rolling and their strength is maintained in the subsequent process steps. On the other hand, AHR does not produce a discernible change in the grain size in the hot band annealed strip and in the final annealed sheet, except that the magnetic anisotropy in the AHR is improved after skin pass and extra annealing as the result of the redistribution of the texture components within the θ-fibre, no significant improvement of the magnetic properties as a direct consequence of the application of asymmetric hot rolling has been observed under the current AHR experimental conditions.

  8. Effects of rolling on the ductility of 80% tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Relations between transverse tensile ductility and rolling and annealing schedules were investigated for solid-state sintered and annealed 80%W8%Ni-2%Fe heavy alloy rolled at 900C or 1150C with varying reductions between anneals at either 1150C or 1400C. Final anneals and a solution heat treatment were employed prior to tensile testing. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were performed to determine relations between microstructure and physical properties. Multiple 1400C intermediate anneals with a maximum 60% rolling reduction produced higher transverse tensile elongations than rolled with a higher final reduction, 86%. Tensile elongation differences were attributed to the recrystallized intra-particle W grain sizes achieved during the final anneal. Materials given a maximum of 60% reduction before final anneal had fewer intra-particle W grains and therefore higher ductilities. For materials rolled at 900C or 1150C, no differences in transverse tensile elongation were observed. 1150C intermediate anneals had consistently lower ductility. 900C rolling produced slightly higher elongations than 1150C rolling, but only when the material was annealed at 1455C. Tensile yield and ultimate strengths did not vary greatly with rolling and intermediate annealing conditions. The edge cracking correlated with observed lateral spread and the material softness.

  9. Size Effect in Continuum Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; James W. Foulk; Huestis, Edwin M.; Connelly, Kevin; Song, Bo; Yang, Nancy Y. C.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of some materials (Cu, Ni, Ag, etc.) have been shown to develop strong dependence on the geometric dimensions, resulting in a size effect. Several theories have been proposed to model size effects, but have been based on very few experiments conducted at appropriate scales. Some experimental results implied that size effects are caused by increasing strain gradients and have been used to confirm many strain gradient theories. On the other hand, some recent experiments show that a size effect exists in the absence of strain gradients. This report describes a brief analytical and experimental study trying to clarify the material and experimental issues surrounding the most influential size-effect experiments by Fleck et al (1994). This effort is to understand size effects intended to further develop predictive models.

  10. Effect of the defect initial shape on the fatigue lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasniy, Oleh P.; Lapusta, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the influence of the defect initial shape on the residual lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll made of 25Cr1MoV steel. Based on this approach, previously proposed by some authors, the growth of the surface fatigue crack was modeled in a roll under loading and temperature conditions that are close to operational ones, taking into account the statistical distribution of the C parameter of Paris' equation. Dependencies of the continuous casting machines roll fatigue lifetime on the initial defect shape and critical defect sizes are obtained.

  11. Different effects of anesthetics on spontaneous leukocyte rolling in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Janssen, G H; Tangelder, G J; oude Egbrink, M G; Reneman, R S

    1997-01-01

    In immunological reactions, leukocytes need to travel from the intravascular space through the vessel wall into the surrounding tissue. The first step in this process is leukocyte rolling, which has often been studied in anesthetized animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of pentobarbital, Hypnorm and both components of the latter, fentanyl and fluanisone, on this primary leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction. Using intravital brightfield video microscopy, observations were made in postcapillary venules in the intact skin of the nailfold of trained conscious Lewis rats. Subsequently, the animals were anesthetized and observations were made in vivo. Leukocyte rolling was significantly elevated after injection of Hypnorm or fentanyl, while pentobarbital and fluanisone had no effect. None of the anesthetics affected leukocyte rolling velocity. Blood flow was significantly increased only after injection of Hypnorm and fluanisone. No correlation existed between the relative changes in leukocyte rolling and concomitant changes in blood flow. The results show that the level of leukocyte rolling can be affected by anesthetics. These changes are probably not mediated by changes in local hemodynamics. Pentobarbital anesthesia does not influence leukocyte rolling. Therefore, pentobarbital is a suitable anesthetic for observation of leukocyte rolling in skin. Hypnorm significantly increases the level of rolling in skin venules. This effect seems to be caused mainly by fentanyl.

  12. Effect of intermediate annealing on the microstructure and mechanical property of ZK60 magnesium alloy produced by twin roll casting and hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hongmei; Zang, Qianhao; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yunxue

    2015-08-15

    Twin roll cast (designated as TRC in short) ZK60 magnesium alloy strip with 3.5 mm thickness was used in this paper. The TRC ZK60 strip was multi-pass rolled at different temperatures, intermediate annealing heat treatment was performed when the thickness of the strip changed from 3.5 mm to 1 mm, and then continued to be rolled until the thickness reached to 0.5 mm. The effect of intermediate annealing during rolling process on microstructure, texture and room temperature mechanical properties of TRC ZK60 strip was studied by using OM, TEM, XRD and electronic universal testing machine. The introduction of intermediate annealing can contribute to recrystallization in the ZK60 sheet which was greatly deformed, and help to reduce the stress concentration generated in the rolling process. Microstructure uniformity and mechanical properties of the ZK60 alloy sheet were also improved; in particular, the room temperature elongation was greatly improved. When the TRC ZK60 strip was rolled at 300 °C and 350 °C, the room temperature elongation of the rolled sheet with 0.5 mm thickness which was intermediate annealed during the rolling process was increased by 95% and 72% than that of no intermediate annealing, respectively. - Highlights: • Intermediate annealing was introduced during hot rolling process of twin roll cast ZK60 alloy. • Intermediate annealing can contribute to recrystallization and reduce the stress concentration in the deformed ZK60 sheet. • Microstructure uniformity and mechanical properties of the ZK60 sheet were improved, in particular, the room temperature elongation. • The elongation of the rolled ZK60 sheet after intermediate annealed was increased by 95% and 72% than that of no intermediate annealing.

  13. Effect of axle misalignments on rolling resistance and wheel wear

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, J.F.; Wilson, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    High energy costs impacting the railroad industry and the use of rail lubrication to lower energy consumption have led to investigation of axle misalignment as a cause of train resistance and wear. This paper brings together the results of field and laboratory misalignment tests designed to measure the effects of axle misalignment on roller resistance and wheel wear of standard trucks run on curved and tangent track. These tests employed the Transportation Test Center's Roll Dynamics Unit for the lab tests, an instrumented coupler for field testing, and a modified version of the AAR Curving Model to validate the RDU results and correlate them to field data. All testing was conducted at the Transportation Test Center near Pueblo, Colorado, under the sponsorship of the Association of American Railroads (RDU Test) and the Federal Railroad Administration (Track Test). During testing, deliberate misalignments were introduced in test wheelsets, and measurements were taken in field and laboratory settings. The train resistance and wheel wear data correlated well with the curving model, showing that reasonably accurate results are achievable by modeling within a common range of known conditions. The undesirable effects of axle misalignment on train resistance and wear were confirmed.

  14. Investigation at Low Speeds of the Effect of Aspect Ratio and Sweep on Rolling Stability Derivatives of Untapered Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Alex; Fisher, Lewis R

    1950-01-01

    A low-scale wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in rolling flow to determine the effects of aspect ratio and sweep (when varied independently) on the rolling stability derivatives for a series of untapered wings. The rolling-flow equipment of the Langley stability tunnel was used for the tests. The data of the investigation have been used to develop a method of accounting for the effects of the drag on the yawing moment due to rolling throughout the lift range.

  15. Effects of Hot Rolling on Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Zn-22 wt.% Al Alloy at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. H.; Cao, Q. D.; Ma, S. J.; Han, S. H.; Tang, W.; Zhang, X. P.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the reduction ratio (RR) on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of the Zn-22 wt.% Al (Zn-22Al) alloy were investigated. Various grain sizes from 0.68 to 1.13 μm were obtained by controlled RRs. Tensile and LCF tests were carried out at room temperature. Superplasticity and cyclic softening were observed. Strength and ductility of the rolled Zn-22Al alloy increased with the RR, owing to the decrease in its grain size. The RR did not affect the cyclic softening behavior of the alloy. The fatigue life of the alloy decreased with increasing strain amplitude, while the fatigue life first decreased and then increased with increasing RR. The longest fatigue life was observed for the alloy rolled at a RR of 60%. A bilinear Coffin-Manson relationship was observed to hold true for this alloy.

  16. Effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Cu–Zn–Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Yang, Xuyue; Chen, Wei; Qin, Jia; Fouse, Jiaping

    2015-08-15

    The effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of Cu–Zn–Si alloy were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, electron back scattered diffraction and tensile tests. The Cu–Zn–Si alloy has been processed at cryogenic temperature (approximately 77 K) and room temperature up to different rolling strains. It has been identified that the cryorolled Cu–Zn–Si alloy samples show a higher strength compared with those room temperature rolled samples. The improved strength of cryorolled samples is resulted from grain size effect and higher densities of dislocations and deformation twins. And subsequent annealing, as a post-heat treatment, enhanced the ductility. An obvious increase in uniform elongation appears when the volume fraction of static recrystallization grains exceeds 25%. The strength–ductility combination of the annealed cryorolled samples is superior to that of annealed room temperature rolled samples, owing to the finer grains, high fractions of high angle grain boundaries and twins. - Highlights: • An increase in hardness of Cu–Zn–Si alloy is noticed during annealing process. • Thermal stability is reduced in Cu–Zn–Si alloy by cryorolling. • An obvious enhancement in UE is noticed when fraction of SRX grains exceeds 25%. • A superior strength–ductility combination is achieved in the cryorolling samples.

  17. Effect of Rolling Bearing Refurbishment and Restoration on Bearing Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Branzai, Emanuel V.

    2005-01-01

    For nearly four decades it has been a practice in commercial and military aircraft application that rolling-element bearings removed at maintenance or overhaul be reworked and returned to service. The work presented extends previously reported bearing life analysis to consider the depth (Z(45)) to maximum shear stress (45) on stressed volume removal and the effect of replacing the rolling elements with a new set. A simple algebraic relationship was established to determine the L(10) life of bearing races subject to bearing rework. Depending on the extent of rework and based upon theoretical analysis, representative life factors (LF) for bearings subject to rework ranged from 0.87 to 0.99 the lives of new bearings. Based on bearing endurance data, 92 percent of the bearing sets that would be subject to rework would result in L(10) lives equaling and/or exceeding that predicted for new bearings with the remaining 8 percent having the potential to achieve the analytically predicted life of new bearings when one of the rings is replaced at rework.. The potential savings from bearing rework varies from 53 to 82 percent that of new bearings depending on the cost, size and complexity of the bearing.

  18. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Severe Plastically Deformed Hypo- and Hyper-Eutectoid Steels by Caliber Rolling Process.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shin-Cheon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Bae, Chul-Min; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-heat treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of severe plastically deformed hypo- and hyper-eutectoid steels that underwent a caliber rolling process. First, 28 passes of caliber rolling were performed on both the hypo-eutectoid steel with Fe-0.47% C (wt%) composition and the hyper-eutectoid steel with Fe-1.02%C (wt%) composition. Then, the caliber rolled materials underwent heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, 10, 30 and 60 minutes. The caliber rolled steel possessed a 300-400 nm-sized oval cementite structure created through elongating and segmentation regardless of the C composition. The observation of heat-treated microstructures showed that cementite structure became globular and ferrite size increased as heat treatment temperature increased. In the hardness measurement, the initial caliber rolled samples showed 372.8 Hv (hypoeutectoid) and 480.1 Hv (hyper-eutectoid). However, hardness dramatically decreased up to 10 min. heat treatments, and then showed a constant or small reduction with time. The yield strengths (compression) of caliber rolled hypo- and hypereutectoid steels obtained were 1097 MPa and 1426 MPa, respectively, and the yield strengths of the same steels after heat treatment (500 degrees C, 60 min.) were identified to be 868 MPa and 1316 MPa, respectively. PMID:27433697

  19. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Severe Plastically Deformed Hypo- and Hyper-Eutectoid Steels by Caliber Rolling Process.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shin-Cheon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Bae, Chul-Min; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-heat treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of severe plastically deformed hypo- and hyper-eutectoid steels that underwent a caliber rolling process. First, 28 passes of caliber rolling were performed on both the hypo-eutectoid steel with Fe-0.47% C (wt%) composition and the hyper-eutectoid steel with Fe-1.02%C (wt%) composition. Then, the caliber rolled materials underwent heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, 10, 30 and 60 minutes. The caliber rolled steel possessed a 300-400 nm-sized oval cementite structure created through elongating and segmentation regardless of the C composition. The observation of heat-treated microstructures showed that cementite structure became globular and ferrite size increased as heat treatment temperature increased. In the hardness measurement, the initial caliber rolled samples showed 372.8 Hv (hypoeutectoid) and 480.1 Hv (hyper-eutectoid). However, hardness dramatically decreased up to 10 min. heat treatments, and then showed a constant or small reduction with time. The yield strengths (compression) of caliber rolled hypo- and hypereutectoid steels obtained were 1097 MPa and 1426 MPa, respectively, and the yield strengths of the same steels after heat treatment (500 degrees C, 60 min.) were identified to be 868 MPa and 1316 MPa, respectively.

  20. Effect of Heating Rate on Recrystallization of Twin Roll Cast Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Naiyu; Patterson, Burton R.; Suni, Jaakko P.; Doherty, Roger D.; Weiland, Hasso; Kadolkar, Puja; Blue, Craig A.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on precipitation and recrystallization behavior in twin roll cast (TRC) AA3105 has been investigated by three different means: conventional air furnace, controlled infrared, and lead bath heating. Experimental results showed that as-recrystallized grain size decreased and became more equiaxed as the annealing heating rate increased. These results were explained via time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves for both dispersoid precipitation and recrystallization. With the faster heating rate, recrystallization could occur before precipitation of Mn present in the unhomogenized TRC samples. At a heating rate of 50 °C/s, the material underwent grain growth after recrystallization at 500 °C. No sign of grain growth was observed in materials annealed with lower heating rates, 3 °C/s, 0.5 °C/s, and 0.01 °C/s, due to greater dispersoid precipitation.

  1. Effect of Packaging and Antioxidant Combinations on Physicochemical Properties of Irradiated Restructured Chicken Rolls.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Ahn, Dong U; Nam, Ki-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Effects of double packaging (combinational use of aerobic and vacuum conditions) and antioxidants on physicochemical properties in irradiated restructured chicken rolls were determined. Chicken breast treated with antioxidants (none, sesamol+a-tocopherol) was used to process restructured chicken breast rolls. The sliced rolls were vacuum, aerobic, or double packaged (vacuum for 7 d then aerobic for 3 d) and electron beam irradiated at 2.5 kGy. Color, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation reduction potentials (ORP), and volatile profiles of the samples were determined at 0 and 10 d. Irradiation made restructured chicken rolls redder (p<0.05), and the increased redness was more distinct in irradiated vacuum-packaged than irradiated aerobic or double packaged meats. TBARS values of antioxidant-treated double packaged rolls were lower than even nonirradiated vacuum-packaged meat, and those were distinct at 10 d (p<0.05). ORP and lipid oxidation values were lower in irradiated vacuum and double packaged samples than those in irradiated aerobic packaged ones at 0 d (p<0.05). Irradiation of restructured chicken rolls increased the amount of total volatiles. Considerable amounts of off-odor volatiles were reduced or not detected by double packaging and antioxidant treatment at 10 d. Therefore, the combined use of antioxidants and double packaging would be useful to reduce redness and control the oxidative quality changes of irradiated restructured chicken rolls. PMID:26761835

  2. Effect of Packaging and Antioxidant Combinations on Physicochemical Properties of Irradiated Restructured Chicken Rolls

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Ahn, Dong U.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of double packaging (combinational use of aerobic and vacuum conditions) and antioxidants on physicochemical properties in irradiated restructured chicken rolls were determined. Chicken breast treated with antioxidants (none, sesamol+a-tocopherol) was used to process restructured chicken breast rolls. The sliced rolls were vacuum, aerobic, or double packaged (vacuum for 7 d then aerobic for 3 d) and electron beam irradiated at 2.5 kGy. Color, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation reduction potentials (ORP), and volatile profiles of the samples were determined at 0 and 10 d. Irradiation made restructured chicken rolls redder (p<0.05), and the increased redness was more distinct in irradiated vacuum-packaged than irradiated aerobic or double packaged meats. TBARS values of antioxidant-treated double packaged rolls were lower than even nonirradiated vacuum-packaged meat, and those were distinct at 10 d (p<0.05). ORP and lipid oxidation values were lower in irradiated vacuum and double packaged samples than those in irradiated aerobic packaged ones at 0 d (p<0.05). Irradiation of restructured chicken rolls increased the amount of total volatiles. Considerable amounts of off-odor volatiles were reduced or not detected by double packaging and antioxidant treatment at 10 d. Therefore, the combined use of antioxidants and double packaging would be useful to reduce redness and control the oxidative quality changes of irradiated restructured chicken rolls. PMID:26761835

  3. Effect Size in Clinical Phonology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to motivate the use of effect size (ES) for single-subject research in clinical phonology, with an eye towards meta-analyses of treatment effects for children with phonological disorders. Standard mean difference (SMD) is introduced and illustrated as one ES well suited to the multiple baseline (MBL) design and…

  4. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn; Cavin, Odis Burl; Davis, Dr. Bruce; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R; Peter, William H; Randman, David; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  5. Effect of Cold Rolling on Phase Transformation Temperatures of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabi, Manjunatha; Murari, M. S.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of cold rolling and heat treatment on the phase transformation behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) heat treated at 660 °C has been investigated. Four sets of samples were cold rolled after heat treatment. The austenite-to-martensite and martensite-to-austenite transformation temperatures for samples without any cold rolling are determined through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The austenitic start temperature gets shifted to the higher temperature side with increase in the percentage of the cold rolling up to 12.5%. Austenitic finish temperature could not be detected in cold-rolled samples. Martensitic start temperature increases slightly with increased cold rolling while martensitc finish temperature slightly decreases. Beyond 12.5% cold work, the shape memory effect (SME) is completely lost. The evolution of austenitic phase in SMA subjected to cold rolling was studied through powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) at different temperatures in the range 25 to 160 °C at intervals of 10 °C, during heating and cooling. The XRD results agree with those of DSC. Two sets of cold-rolled samples were again heat treated to 300 and 500 °C and the transformation behavior was studied using DSC. Heat treatment at 300 °C brings back the SME, but with the presence of an intermediate R-Phase due to the additional dislocations present. Even with a heat treatment at 500 °C, the effect of cold work is not completely removed and a single-step transformation is not observed. Another set of samples subjected to cold work were heat treated at 660 °C and the transformation is studied. The effect of cold work even up to 25% is completely removed with this heat treatment as indicated by DSC. The complete regaining of the SME is further confirmed by electrical resistivity measurements also.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  8. Quantum Size Effects in Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ching-Ming

    2006-03-01

    Quantum size effects in metal thin films and metallic clusters are studied using first-principles density functional theory. For metal thin films, Pb(111), Pb(100), Al(110), and Al(111) films up to 30 monolayers are calculated. Significant oscillatory quantum size effects are found on surface energy, work function, and surface relaxations. These oscillations are correlated with the thickness dependence of the energies of confined electrons, which can be properly modelled by an energy-dependent phase shift of the electronic wave function upon reflection at the interface. It is found that a quantitative description of these quantum size effects requires full consideration of the crystal band structure. For metallic clusters, the highly symmetric particles of sizes up 4 nm (Al923, Pb923, and Au309) in the icosahedral (ico), decahedral, and cubotohedral (fcc) structures are calculated. We propose a simple scheme to compare their relative stability and to identify the quantum size effect. In addition, the famous Mackay (fcc-to-ico) transition for metallic clusters is investigated by ab-initio elastic-band method. The transition path can in general be described by an angular variable s. The barriers of the Mackay transition for large Al, Pb, and Au clusters are found to be smaller than the thermal energy at room temperature. Finally CO oxidation on metallic clusters will be presented. A catalytic reaction path for CO oxidation on Au55, Ag55, and Au25Ag30 ico clusters is found with activation energies of less than 0.5 eV. The reaction consists of a peroxolike transition intermediate involving the OOCO configuration. A crucial factor to determine the reaction rate on these clusters is identified as the co-adsorption energy of CO and O2 on these clusters.

  9. Effect of Rolling Temperature and Ultrafast Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qibin; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yu; Wang, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    Microstructure can vary significantly through thickness after ultrafast cooling of rolled steel plates, impacting their mechanical properties. This study examined the microstructure, microstructural banding at centerline, and mechanical properties through thickness for different ultrafast cooling conditions and rolling temperatures. One set of steels (UC1 and UC2) were ultrafast-cooled (UFC) at 40 K/s after finish rolling at 1223 K and 1193 K (950 °C and 910 °C), respectively, while the second set (LC) was cooled by laminar cooling at 17 K/s after finish rolling at 1238 K (965 °C). UFC produced microstructural variation through thickness; highly dislocated lath-type bainitic ferrite was formed near the surface, whereas the primary microstructure was acicular ferrite and irregular polygonal ferrite in the interior of UC1 and UC2 steels, respectively. However, UFC has the advantage of suppression of microstructural banding in centerline segregation regions. The ferrite grain size in both UFC-cooled steels was refined to ~5 μm, increasing strength and toughness. The optimum combination of properties was obtained in UC2 steel with appropriate low finish rolling temperature, being attributed to the distinct microstructure resulting from work-hardened austenite before UFC.

  10. The effect of the cube texture component on the earing behavior of rolled f. c. c. metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, A.D.; Canova, G.R.; Kocks, U.F.

    1986-01-01

    An application of texture simulation to the formability of rolled f.c.c. sheet is described. Control of the earing behavior of such sheet is crucial to the efficient utilization of material. Cold-rolled f.c.c. metals characteristically give ears at 45/sup 0/ to the rolling direction but it is known that if a large cube component is present before the material is rolled, the severity of the earing is reduced. The cube component, (010)(001), by itself is known to give ears at 90/sup 0/ to the rolling direction and could thus balance a 45/sup 0/ earing tendency. The cube component is unstable to rolling deformation, however, and is generally not observed in heavily cold-rolled f.c.c. metals. Therefore, the challenge is to explain how a large cube component, present prior to rolling, can affect the earing behavior at large rolling reductions. Texture simulation shows that orientations near cube tend to rotate primarily about the rolling direction towards the Goss orientation, (110)(001). It has been established both experimentally and theoretically that all orientations between the cube and the Goss positions give 90/sup 0/ ears. Therefore, the effect of a prior cube component is due to the special behavior of orientations near cube under rolling deformation.

  11. The effects of local rotation on roll vection induced by globally rotating visual inducer

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    A visual stimulus rotating globally along an observer's line of sight can induce the illusory perception of self-rotation in the opposite direction (roll vection). Psychophysical experiments were conducted to examine the effects of local rotations of visual elements of the stimulus that were manipulated independently of the global rotation. The results indicated that the addition of local rotations inconsistent with the global rotation (assumed to be the primary inducer of roll vection), generally decreased the strength of perceived self-rotation. The uniformity of orientation of the elements composing the global visual pattern and the visual polarities assigned to each visual element, i.e., intrinsic directionality concerning up and down, were observed to function as modulators of the effects of the local rotation. These results suggested that local motion signals arising from independent rotations assigned to each element of a visual object cannot be ignored in the perceptual mechanism underlying roll vection. PMID:26074848

  12. The effects of local rotation on roll vection induced by globally rotating visual inducer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    A visual stimulus rotating globally along an observer's line of sight can induce the illusory perception of self-rotation in the opposite direction (roll vection). Psychophysical experiments were conducted to examine the effects of local rotations of visual elements of the stimulus that were manipulated independently of the global rotation. The results indicated that the addition of local rotations inconsistent with the global rotation (assumed to be the primary inducer of roll vection), generally decreased the strength of perceived self-rotation. The uniformity of orientation of the elements composing the global visual pattern and the visual polarities assigned to each visual element, i.e., intrinsic directionality concerning up and down, were observed to function as modulators of the effects of the local rotation. These results suggested that local motion signals arising from independent rotations assigned to each element of a visual object cannot be ignored in the perceptual mechanism underlying roll vection.

  13. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  14. Effect of carbide distribution on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    Endurance tests with ball bearings made of corrosion resistant bearing steel which resulted in fatigue lives much lower than were predicted are discussed. Metallurgical analysis revealed an undesirable carbide distribution in the races. It was shown in accelerated fatigue tests in the RC rig that large, banded carbides can reduce rolling element fatigue life by a factor of approximately four. The early spalling failures on the bearing raceways are attributed to the large carbide size and banded distribution.

  15. Effect of tangential traction and roughness on crack initiation/propagation during rolling contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soda, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1980-01-01

    Rolling fatigue tests of 0.45 percent carbon steel rollers were carried out using a four roller type rolling contact fatigue tester. Tangential traction and surface roughness of the harder mating rollers were varied and their effect was studied. The results indicate that the fatigue life decreases when fraction is applied in the same direction as that of rolling. When the direction of fraction is reversed, the life increases over that obtained with zero traction. The roughness of harder mating roller also has a marked influence on life. The smoother the mating roller, the longer the life. Microscopic observation of specimens revealed that the initiation of cracks during the early stages of life is more strongly influenced by the surface roughness, while the propagation of these cracks in the latter stages is affected mainly by the tangential traction.

  16. Models for the Effects of G-seat Cuing on Roll-axis Tracking Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Mcmillan, G. R.; Martin, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Including whole-body motion in a flight simulator improves performance for a variety of tasks requiring a pilot to compensate for the effects of unexpected disturbances. A possible mechanism for this improvement is that whole-body motion provides high derivative vehicle state information whic allows the pilot to generate more lead in responding to the external disturbances. During development of motion simulating algorithms for an advanced g-cuing system it was discovered that an algorithm based on aircraft roll acceleration producted little or no performance improvement. On the other hand, algorithms based on roll position or roll velocity produced performance equivalent to whole-body motion. The analysis and modeling conducted at both the sensory system and manual control performance levels to explain the above results are described.

  17. An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll (de)-coupling on helicopter handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockier, C. J.; Pausder, H. J.; Blanken, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll coupling on helicopter handling qualities was performed by the US Army and DLR, using a NASA ground-based and a DLR inflight simulator. Over 90 different coupling configurations were evaluated using a roll-axis tracking task. The results show that although the current ADS-33C coupling criterion discriminates against those types of coupling typical of conventionally controlled helicopters, it not always suited for the prediction of handling qualities of helicopters with modern control systems. Based on the observation that high frequency inputs during tracking are used to alleviate coupling, a frequency domain pitch-roll coupling criterion that uses the average coupling ratio between the bandwidth and neutral stability frequency is formulated. This criterion provides a more comprehensive coverage with respect to the different types of coupling and shows excellent consistency.

  18. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the microbial quality of steamed tofu rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Gao, Meixu; Li, Shurong; Wang, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of two kinds of radiation processing, gamma and electron beam (ebeam) irradiation, for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria innocua which were inoculated in pre-sterilised steamed tofu rolls was studied. The corresponding effects of both irradiation types on total bacterial counts (TBCs) in commercial steamed tofu rolls available in the market were also examined. The microbiological results demonstrated that gamma irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.20, 0.24 and 0.22 kGy for S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. innocua, respectively. The respective D10 values for ebeam irradiation were 0.31, 0.35 and 0.27 kGy. Gamma and ebeam irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.48 and 0.43 kGy for total bacterial counts in commercial steamed tofu rolls, respectively. The results suggest that ebeam irradiation has similar effect on decreasing TBCs in steamed tofu rolls, and gamma irradiation is slightly more effective than ebeam irradiation in reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria. The observed differences in D10-values between them might be due to the significant differences in dose rate applied, and radiation processing of soybean products to improve their microbial quality could be available for other sources of protein.

  19. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  20. Class-Size Effects in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassel, Karl Fritjof; Heinesen, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    We analyze class-size effects on academic achievement in secondary school in Denmark exploiting an institutional setting where pupils cannot predict class size prior to enrollment, and where post-enrollment responses aimed at affecting realized class size are unlikely. We identify class-size effects combining a regression discontinuity design with…

  1. Effects of thermal treatment on the co-rolled U-Mo fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Brady L. Mackowiak; Glenn A. Moore; Barry H. Rabin; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-11-01

    A monolithic fuel type is being developed to convert US high performance research and test reactors such as Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The interaction between the cladding and the U-Mo fuel meat during fuel fabrication and irradiation is known to have negative impacts on fuel performance, such as mechanical integrity and dimensional stability. In order to eliminate/minimize the direct interaction between cladding and fuel meat, a thin zirconium diffusion barrier was introduced between the cladding and U-Mo fuel meat through a co-rolling process. A complex interface between the zirconium and U-Mo was developed during the co-rolling process. A predictable interface between zirconium and U-Mo is critical to achieve good fuel performance since the interfaces can be the weakest link in the monolithic fuel system. A post co-rolling annealing treatment is expected to create a well-controlled interface between zirconium and U-Mo. A systematic study utilizing post co-rolling annealing treatment has been carried out. Based on microscopy results, the impacts of the annealing treatment on the interface between zirconium and U-Mo will be presented and an optima annealing treatment schedule will be suggested. The effects of the annealing treatment on the fuel performance will also be discussed.

  2. Effect of the gaseous medium in the process of rolling on the microhardness of aluminum and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Aruev, N. N.; Derkachenko, L. I.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    The load dependence of the microhardness of polycrystalline aluminum and iron specimens produced by rolling in a nitrogen, helium, or air medium has been investigated. It has been found that nitrogen and helium have different effects on the microhardness of these metals in the low-load range. This difference is associated with the specific features in the intensity of dynamic penetration of nitrogen and helium into the surface layer of aluminum and iron, which depends on the initial defect crystal structure of the metals, as well as on the type of bonding of helium atoms and nitrogen molecules with metal atoms. It has been shown that the effect of the gaseous medium of the rolling on the microhardness manifests itself only in a very thin surface layer of metal specimens, where the microhardness exhibits a size effect, and an increase in the microhardness indentation depth remains unchanged with an increase in the load and does not depend on the gaseous medium of the prerolling of the specimens.

  3. Cavitation erosion size scale effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Size scaling in cavitation erosion is a major problem confronting the design engineers of modern high speed machinery. An overview and erosion data analysis presented in this paper indicate that the size scale exponent n in the erosion rate relationship as a function of the size or diameter can vary from 1.7 to 4.9 depending on the type of device used. There is, however, a general agreement as to the values of n if the correlations are made with constant cavitation number.

  4. Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

  5. Recalibrated Equations for Determining Effect of Oil Filtration on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needelman, William M.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, Needelman and Zaretsky presented a set of empirically derived equations for bearing fatigue life (adjustment) factors (LFs) as a function of oil filter ratings. These equations for life factors were incorporated into the reference book, "STLE Life Factors for Rolling Bearings." These equations were normalized (LF = 1) to a 10-micrometer filter rating at Beta(sub x) = 200 (normal cleanliness) as it was then defined. Over the past 20 years, these life factors based on oil filtration have been used in conjunction with ANSI/ABMA standards and bearing computer codes to predict rolling bearing life. Also, additional experimental studies have been made by other investigators into the relationship between rolling bearing life and the size, number, and type of particle contamination. During this time period filter ratings have also been revised and improved, and they now use particle counting calibrated to a new National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reference material, NIST SRM 2806, 1997. This paper reviews the relevant bearing life studies and describes the new filter ratings. New filter ratings, Beta(sub x(c)) = 200 and Beta(sub x(c)) = 1000, are benchmarked to old filter ratings, Beta(sub x) = 200, and vice versa. Two separate sets of filter LF values were derived based on the new filter ratings for roller bearings and ball bearings, respectively. Filter LFs can be calculated for the new filter ratings.

  6. Effective Population Sizes with Multiple Paternity

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, D. W.; Chesser, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    While the concept of effective population size is of obvious applicability to many questions in population genetics and conservation biology, its utility has suffered due to a lack of agreement among its various formulations. Often, mathematical formulations for effective sizes apply restrictive assumptions that limit their applicability. Herein, expressions for effective sizes of populations that account for mating tactics, biases in sex ratios, and differential dispersal rates (among other parameters) are developed. Of primary interest is the influence of multiple paternity on the maintenance of genetic variation in a population. In addition to the standard inbreeding and variance effective sizes, intragroup (coancestral) and intergroup effective sizes also are developed. Expressions for effective sizes are developed for the beginning of nonrandom gene exchanges (initial effective sizes), the transition of gene correlations (instantaneous effective sizes), and the steady-state (asymptotic effective size). Results indicate that systems of mating that incorporate more than one male mate per female increase all effective sizes above those expected from polygyny and monogamy. Instantaneous and asymptotic sizes can be expressed relative to the fixation indices. The parameters presented herein can be utilized in models of effective sizes for the study of evolutionary biology and conservation genetics. PMID:7982568

  7. The effect of skatole and androstenone on consumer response towards streaky bacon and pork belly roll.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, Margit D; De Lichtenberg Broge, Eva Honnens; Brockhoff, Per B; Christensen, Rune Haubo

    2015-12-01

    Consumer liking was assessed for streaky bacon and pork belly roll from entire male pigs with an androstenone (AND) content of up to 9.4 ppm and a skatole (SKA) content of up to 0.92 ppm in the back fat and castrates. No clear effect of either AND or SKA was seen in consumer liking, although an insignificant tendency was seen for SKA. A sensory profile analysis showed that AND increased the boar taint of bacon, while both AND and SKA increased the boar taint of the pork belly roll. Consumer sensitivity towards AND and SKA did not affect liking of the meat products. The lack of effect of AND and SKA on consumer liking could be due to a masking effect of the spices and smoke. Three consecutive weeks' exposure to bacon did not change the liking score, irrespective of the AND and SKA content. This indicates that the consumers did not become more sensitive towards boar taint.

  8. Cohort Size Effects and Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Franklin D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores whether changes in the size of cohorts entering the labor force affected the propensity within the U.S. labor force to migrate and socioeconomic circumstances of migrants at destination within 1965-76. Suggests that a significant reduction in the volume of migration among members of the baby boom cohort was the primary adjustment…

  9. Effect of Controlled Hot Rolling Parameters on Microstructure of a Nb-Microalloyed Steel Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Khaki, Daavood Mirahmadi; Abedi, Amir

    2011-01-17

    The design of controlled rolling process of microalloyed steel sheets is affected by several factors. In this investigation, effect of the reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures of rolling, which are considered as the most effective parameters on microstructure of hot rolled products has been studied. For this purpose, seven different reheating temperatures between 1000 to 1300 deg. C with 50 deg. C increments, three different finishing temperatures of 950, 900 and 850 deg. C below the non-recrystallization temperature and one temperature of 800 deg. C in the inter critical range and four different coiling temperatures of 550, 600, 650 and 700 deg. C were chosen. By soaking the specimens in furnace, the grain coarsening temperature (T{sub gc}) is obtained about 1250 deg. C. Hence, for these kinds of steels, the reheating temperature 1200 to 1250 deg. C is recommended. Moreover, it is observed that decreasing the coiling and finishing temperatures causes more grain refinement of microstructure and the morphology is changed from polygonal ferrite to acicular one. Findings of this research provide a good connection among reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures and microstructural features of Nb-microalloyed steel sheets.

  10. The Effect of Foam Rolling Duration on Hamstring Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Grace; Karlik, Dustin; Glass, Stephen C; Hatzel, Brian M

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal health benefits from flexibility training and maintaining a functional, or sport specific, range of motion is important to one’s overall fitness. Commercial foam rollers are commonly used in gyms, therapy clinics and homes, yet data are lacking on the optimal rolling duration and effect on range of motion. Purpose : The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of varied durations of a commercial foam roller treatment on hamstring range of motion. Methods : The knee extension range of motion of 33 college aged men and women (age= 20±1.5y, mass= 72.2±10.8 kg) was assessed after a short (2 sets of 10s) and long (4 sets of 30s) duration of hamstring self-administered myofascial release using a commercial foam roller. A one way ANOVA was performed to compare the mean knee extension angle for each condition to baseline measures. Results : Results indicated that neither the short duration (67.30 ± 10.60 deg) nor long duration (67.41 ± 10.81 deg) rolling condition produced significant increases in knee extension compared to baseline (67.70 ± 9.90 deg). Conclusion : Self-administered foam rolling for a total duration of up to 2 minutes is not adequate to induce improvements in knee joint flexibility. Contributing factors may include the amount of pressure imparted by the commercial roller as well as duration of treatment. PMID:26587061

  11. Numerical study of strain-rate effect in cold rolls forming of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsafi, J.; Demirci, E.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold roll forming (CRF) is a well-known continuous manufacturing process, in which a flat strip is deformed by successive rotating pairs of tools, without changing the material thickness. In the past decades, to lessen the process-development efforts, finite-element simulations have been increasingly employed to improve the process design and predict the manufacturing-induced defects. One of the important aspects in design of the CRF process is consideration of resulting strains in the final product as the material passes through several complex forming stands. Sufficient knowledge of longitudinal strain in the workpiece is required to set various process parameters. Increasing a process speed in a roll forming operation can bring cost advantages, but the influence of the forming speed on the strain distribution should be explored. This study is focussed on a strain-rate effect in the CRF process of steel sheets. The strain-rate dependency of a plastic behaviour observed in most metals can affect the finished product's quality as well as process parameters. This paper investigates the influence of the strain rate on longitudinal strains induced in the roll forming operation by incorporating a phenomenological Johnson-Cook constitutive model, which allows studying the impact of the process speed on the output product. Taking advantage of 3D finite element analysis, a roll forming process was simulated using MCS.Marc, comprising a complete set of forming stations. Through the changing of the process speed, the strain rate impact on longitudinal peak strains and forming length was investigated. The results highlight the effect of the strain rate on edge thinning and subsequent undesirable distortions in the product.

  12. Analysis of Effect of Rolling Pull-Outs on Wing and Aileron Loads of a Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A.; Aiken, William S.

    1946-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the effect of rolling pull-out maneuvers on the wing and aileron loads of a typical fighter airplane, the P-47B. The results obtained indicate that higher loads are imposed upon wings and ailerons because of the rolling pull-out maneuver, than would be obtained by application of the loading requirements to which the airplane was designed. An increase of 102 lb or 15 percent of wing weight would be required if the wing were designed for rolling pull-out maneuver. It was also determined that the requirements by which the aileron was originally designed were inadequate.

  13. Do Class Size Effects Differ across Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analysing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enrolled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class size cap that creates exogenous variation in…

  14. Multi-field coupled numerical simulation of hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sendong; Zhang, Liwen; Ruan, Jinhua; Mei, Hongyu; Zhen, Yu; Shi, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, based on rolling technology of hot reversible rolling mill, a multi-filed coupled finite element (FE) model of hot reversible rolling process of large dimension cross-section GCr15 steel rod is established. Thermal, mechanical and microstructural phenomena during the rolling process are coupled in the model. By employing grain growth experiment, double and single hit hot compression experiments, the austenite grain size growth mathematical model and recrystallization behavior mathematical models are determined. And a designed subprogram is coupled in the FE model. Actual hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel is simulated using the model and the distribution and evolution of different filed-variables, such as temperature, effective strain and austenite grain size are obtained. To verify the model predictions, hot rolling experiments are carried out and the temperature and microstructure of the rolling metal are compared with the predicted results. The comparison between the two sets of data shows a good agreement.

  15. An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll (de)coupling on helicopter handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, C. L.; Pausder, H. J.; Ockier, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    An extensive investigation of the effects of pitch-roll coupling on helicopter handling qualities was performed by the U.S. Army and Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), using a NASA ground-based and a DLR in-flight simulator. Over 90 different coupling configurations were evaluated using a high gain roll-axis tracking task. The results show that although the current ADS-33C coupling criterion discriminates against those types of coupling typical of conventionally controlled helicopters, it is not always suited for the prediction of handling qualities of helicopters with modern control systems. Based on the observation that high frequency inputs during tracking are used to alleviate coupling, a frequency domain pitch-roll coupling criterion that uses the average coupling ratio between the bandwidth and neutral stability frequency is formulated. This criterion provides a more comprehensive coverage with respect to the different types of coupling, shows excellent consistency, and has the additional benefit that compliance testing data are obtained from the bandwidth/phase delay tests, so that no additional flight testing is needed.

  16. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin-Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHETA, E. F.; KANDIL, O. A.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration model on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The configuration model is statically pitched at a 30° angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4° and reduced frequency of π and 2π . This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration. The unsteady aerodynamic loads have never reached complete periodicity due to the irregular vibrations of the left and right tails.

  17. The effect of solid film lubricants on the stability of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed for modeling solid films in rolling element bearings. For a given bearing geometry an effective viscosity can be calculated for a solid film as a function of the film shear modulus and ball-race friction coefficient. The calculated effective viscosity can subsequently be used as an input to a numerical model of cage motion and stability. Results from a sample calculation of effective viscosity and prediction of cage stability for a turbopump bearing are presented for films of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and polytetrafluoroethylene ()PTFE).

  18. Mangrove propagule size and oil contamination effects: Does size matter?

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Gonasageran

    2016-09-15

    Three mangroves species with differential propagule size, Avicennia marina (2.5±0.3cm), Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (16±2cm) and Rhizophora mucronata (36±3cm), were subjected to oil contamination. In a series of glasshouse and field experiments, the sediment, propagules, leaves and stems were oiled and growth monitored. Oiling of the propagules, leaves, internodes or sediment reduced plant height, leaf number, leaf chlorophyll content index and induced growth abnormalities, leaf abscission and mortality, with effects being greatest in A. marina, intermediate in R. mucronata and least in B. gymnorrhiza. The results suggest that the greater susceptibility of A. marina to oil is due to early shedding of the protective pericarp and rapid root and shoot development after detachment from the parent tree and not to propagule size. After seedling emergence, micromorphological factors such as presence of trichomes, salt glands and thickness of protective barriers influence oil tolerance. PMID:27342901

  19. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  20. Computing & Interpreting Effect Sizes in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on using effect sizes in research. A small heuristic data set is used in order to make the discussion concrete. Additionally, various admonitions for best practice in reporting and interpreting effect sizes are presented. Among these is the admonition to not use Cohen's benchmarks for "small," "medium," and…

  1. Group Size Effects in Employment Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillery, Joseph M.; Fugita, Stephen S.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of the number of individuals coacting while taking two standardized motor performance tests were examined. Increases in aptitude scores corresponding to increases in group size were predicted based upon the summation hypothesis of social facilitation theory. Results indicated a group size effect. (Author/BJG)

  2. Numerical investigation about the effect of increasing the number of forming passes on the quality of AHSS roll formed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Ossama Mamdouh; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Over recent years, roll forming has gained an increasing interest for the manufacture of structural components made of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. It is an incremental forming technique where the material is bent into the desired shape by feeding it through a number of roll forming stands. Springback is a major concern in forming of AHSS, and springback is lower in roll forming when compared to that in single step and multi-step bending. Some experimental studies suggest that this is may be due to the incremental nature of the roll forming process. In this study the effect of forming passes/steps on springback is numerically analyzed for DP 780 by means of FEA - Abaqus standard. The cyclic hardening characteristics of DP780 were determined by the pure bending test. The hardening model generated from bend data set was imported into Abaqus. The effect forming pattern on the springback was analyzed by forming a V-section shaped profile (15 mm forming radius). The numerical results show that there is a reduction in springback with increasing number of forming passes in the roll forming process, and that this may be the result of straining experienced by the sheet during the multi-step roll forming. This study seems to provide a greater insight into understanding the nature of springback with the forming passes and process design.

  3. Structural effect of size on interracial friendship

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siwei; Xie, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Social contexts exert structural effects on individuals’ social relationships, including interracial friendships. In this study, we posit that, net of group composition, total context size has a distinct effect on interracial friendship. Under the assumptions of (i) maximization of preference in choosing a friend, (ii) multidimensionality of preference, and (iii) preference for same-race friends, we conducted analyses using microsimulation that yielded three main findings. First, increased context size decreases the likelihood of forming an interracial friendship. Second, the size effect increases with the number of preference dimensions. Third, the size effect is diluted by noise, i.e., the random component affecting friendship formation. Analysis of actual friendship data among 4,745 American high school students yielded results consistent with the main conclusion that increased context size promotes racial segregation and discourages interracial friendship. PMID:23589848

  4. Structural effect of size on interracial friendship.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Siwei; Xie, Yu

    2013-04-30

    Social contexts exert structural effects on individuals' social relationships, including interracial friendships. In this study, we posit that, net of group composition, total context size has a distinct effect on interracial friendship. Under the assumptions of (i) maximization of preference in choosing a friend, (ii) multidimensionality of preference, and (iii) preference for same-race friends, we conducted analyses using microsimulation that yielded three main findings. First, increased context size decreases the likelihood of forming an interracial friendship. Second, the size effect increases with the number of preference dimensions. Third, the size effect is diluted by noise, i.e., the random component affecting friendship formation. Analysis of actual friendship data among 4,745 American high school students yielded results consistent with the main conclusion that increased context size promotes racial segregation and discourages interracial friendship.

  5. The effects of prosthetic foot roll-over shape arc length on the gait of trans-tibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew H; Meier, Margrit R; Sessoms, Pinata H; Childress, Dudley S

    2006-12-01

    The Shape&Roll prosthetic foot was used to examine the effect of roll-over shape arc length on the gait of 14 unilateral trans-tibial prosthesis users. Simple modifications to the prosthetic foot were used to alter the effective forefoot rocker length, leaving factors such as alignment, limb length, and heel and mid-foot characteristics unchanged. Shortening the roll-over shape arc length caused a significant reduction in the maximum external dorsiflexion moment on the prosthetic side at all walking speeds (p < 0.001 for main effect of arc length), due to a reduction in forefoot leverage (moment arm) about the ankle. Roll-over shape arc length significantly affected the initial loading on the sound limb at normal and fast speeds (p = 0.001 for the main effect of arc length), with participants experiencing larger first peaks of vertical ground reaction forces on their sound limbs when using the foot with the shortest effective forefoot rocker arc length. Additionally, the difference between step lengths on the sound and prosthetic limbs was larger with the shortest arc length condition, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.06 for main effect). It appears that prosthesis users may experience a drop-off effect at the end of single limb stance on prosthetic feet with short roll-over shape arc lengths, leading to increased loading and/or a shortened step on the contralateral limb.

  6. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  7. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Ball Failures Under Rolling-contact Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Robert H; Bear, H Robert; Carter, Thomas L

    1957-01-01

    The rolling-contact fatigue spin rig was used to test bails of a bearing steel at maximum Hertz stresses of 600,000 to 750,000 psi. The effect of fiber orientation was observed with the ball track restricted to passing directly over the poles, coincident with the equator, or randomly around the ball. The polar areas were found to be weaker in fatigue than the nonpolar areas. This resulted in a much greater portion of the failures occurring in the polar areas than would be expected from a homogeneous material. The early failures are discussed.

  8. Metal rolling - Asymmetrical rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S.; Kiss, I.

    2016-02-01

    The development of theory and practice related to the asymmetric longitudinal rolling process is based on the general theory of metalworking by pressure and symmetric rolling theory, to which a large number of scientists brought their contribution. The rolling of metal materials was a serious problem throughout history, either economically or technically, because the plating technologies enabled the consumption of raw materials (scarce and expensive) to be reduced, while improving the mechanical properties. Knowing the force parameters related to asymmetric rolling leads to the optimization of energy and raw material consumption. This paper presents data on symmetric rolling process, in order to comparatively highlight the particularities of the asymmetric process.

  9. The effect of skatole and androstenone on consumer response towards streaky bacon and pork belly roll.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, Margit D; De Lichtenberg Broge, Eva Honnens; Brockhoff, Per B; Christensen, Rune Haubo

    2015-12-01

    Consumer liking was assessed for streaky bacon and pork belly roll from entire male pigs with an androstenone (AND) content of up to 9.4 ppm and a skatole (SKA) content of up to 0.92 ppm in the back fat and castrates. No clear effect of either AND or SKA was seen in consumer liking, although an insignificant tendency was seen for SKA. A sensory profile analysis showed that AND increased the boar taint of bacon, while both AND and SKA increased the boar taint of the pork belly roll. Consumer sensitivity towards AND and SKA did not affect liking of the meat products. The lack of effect of AND and SKA on consumer liking could be due to a masking effect of the spices and smoke. Three consecutive weeks' exposure to bacon did not change the liking score, irrespective of the AND and SKA content. This indicates that the consumers did not become more sensitive towards boar taint. PMID:26186398

  10. Rolling Wrinkles on Elastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imburgia, Michael; Crosby, Alfred

    The mechanics of rolling contact between an elastomer layer and a thin film present unique opportunities for taking advantage of elastic instabilities, such as surface wrinkling, to create patterned surfaces. Here we present a plate-to-roll(P2R) geometry to laminate a thin film onto an elastomer layer in order to induce surface wrinkling. First, a poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) layer is draped around a roller and pressed into contact with a poly(styrene)(PS) film supported on a plate. Once rolling begins, the PS film preferentially laminates onto the PDMS layer. During this process, the deformation of the PDMS layer can induce wrinkling when the contact load exceeds a critical value. Wrinkle feature size consists of amplitudes of 0 . 2 - 4 μm and wavelengths of 15 - 20 μm . Wrinkle amplitude can be controlled by contact load and roller curvature, as well as the mechanical properties and thickness of the film and elastomer. We develop semi-empirical equations to describe the effect of contact load and roller curvature on the wrinkle aspect ratio. Finite-element modeling of an elastomer layer in rolling contact with a rigid plate is used to support experimental results. Using these models, wrinkle-based technologies such as optoelectronics and enhanced adhesives can be envisioned.

  11. Effect of heating rate on intercritical annealing of low-carbon cold-rolled steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Larrin

    A study was performed on the effect of heating rate on transformations during intercritical annealing of cold-rolled low-carbon sheet steels. Two sets of experiments were developed: 1) a series of alloys (1020, 1019M, 15B25) with two different cold reductions (nominally 40 and 60 pct) were heated at different rates and transformation temperatures were determined using analysis of dilatometry and metallography of intercritically annealed samples, allowing the study of the impact of composition and cold work on transformation behavior with different heating rates. 2) A cold-rolled C-Mn-Nb steel was tested with different heating rates selected for different degrees of recrystallization during austenite formation to test the impact of ferrite recrystallization on austenite formation. Heat treated samples were analyzed with SEM, EBSD, dilatometry, and microhardness to study the changes in transformation behavior. The results of this study were extended by adding step heating tests, heat treatments with an intercritical hold, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements of Mn distribution. Austenite transformation temperatures increased logarithmically with heating rate. Greater degrees of cold work led to reduced transformation temperatures across all heating rates because the energy of cold work increased the driving force for austenite formation. The relative effects of alloying additions on transformation temperatures remained with increasing heating rate. Rapid heating minimized ferrite recrystallization and pearlite spheroidization. Austenite formation occurred preferentially in recovered ferrite regions as opposed to recrystallized ferrite boundaries. Martensite was evenly distributed in slowly heated steels because austenite formed on recrystallized, equiaxed, ferrite boundaries. With rapid heating, austenite formed in directionally-oriented recovered ferrite which increased the degree of banding. The greatest degree of banding was found with

  12. Rolling Reloaded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Simon A.; Nieminen, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Not so long ago a new observation about rolling motion was described: for a rolling wheel, there is a set of points with instantaneous velocities directed at or away from the centre of the wheel; these points form a circle whose diameter connects the centre of the wheel to the wheel's point of contact with the ground (Sharma 1996 "Eur. J. Phys."…

  13. Effect of Strip Velocity on Pickling Rate of Hot-Rolled Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. M.; Warning, C. J.

    1982-02-01

    The combined effect of strip velocity with other parameters on pickling rate of hot-rolled low-carbon steel in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions was determined. At temperatures from 150 to200°F(66 to 93°), the time required for pickling decreased substantially as strip velocity was increased from 0 to about 250 fpm (76 mpm); no further decrease in time resulted when velocities were increased to 800 fpm (244 mpm). Other pickling variables were studied with a velocity of 400 fpm (122 mpm). Pickling times decrease with increases in HCl concentrations, CHCl, and temperature, TF, according to prediction equations of the form log t = A + B log CHCl + D(459 + TF)-1. At 200°F, temper-mill scalebreaking decreased pickling times by about 5 sec; at lower temperatures, a larger magnitude effect was noted for one steel in the group tested.

  14. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  15. Effects of Recrystallization on Microstructure and Texture Evolution of Cold-Rolled Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haitao; Dong, Peng; Zeng, Shangwu; Wu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of recrystallization during annealing process on microstructure and texture evolution of cold-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy plates were investigated. The plates after cold rolling with a thickness reduction of 5, 10, and 15% were annealed under different conditions of 750 °C for 1 h, 800 °C for 1 h, and 800 °C for 1.5 h, respectively. It was found out that the recrystallization temperature decreased with increasing rolling reduction due to higher storage energy, while the extension of annealing time caused grain growth. For the cold-rolled plate with a reduction of 10%, the resulting microstructure showed more equal-axis grains after annealing at 800 °C for 1 h, among different conditions. Moreover, the XRD results showed that the cold-rolled plate composed mainly of {0001} <10-10> basal texture, {10-11} <1-210> and {01-12} <10-10> pyramidal textures, and {01-10} <10-10> prismatic texture, and that the weak {10-11} <1-210> texture was transformed to components {01-12} <10-10> and {01-10} <10-10>, which were expected to improve formability. Electron back-scattered diffraction results ascertained that two mechanisms, i.e., recrystallization sites of preferred orientations and favorable grain growth both played important roles in static recrystallization.

  16. Prediction and estimation of effective population size.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Santiago, E; Caballero, A

    2016-10-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is a key parameter in population genetics. It has important applications in evolutionary biology, conservation genetics and plant and animal breeding, because it measures the rates of genetic drift and inbreeding and affects the efficacy of systematic evolutionary forces, such as mutation, selection and migration. We review the developments in predictive equations and estimation methodologies of effective size. In the prediction part, we focus on the equations for populations with different modes of reproduction, for populations under selection for unlinked or linked loci and for the specific applications to conservation genetics. In the estimation part, we focus on methods developed for estimating the current or recent effective size from molecular marker or sequence data. We discuss some underdeveloped areas in predicting and estimating Ne for future research. PMID:27353047

  17. Understanding the effect size and its measures.

    PubMed

    Ialongo, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The evidence based medicine paradigm demands scientific reliability, but modern research seems to overlook it sometimes. The power analysis represents a way to show the meaningfulness of findings, regardless to the emphasized aspect of statistical significance. Within this statistical framework, the estimation of the effect size represents a means to show the relevance of the evidences produced through research. In this regard, this paper presents and discusses the main procedures to estimate the size of an effect with respect to the specific statistical test used for hypothesis testing. Thus, this work can be seen as an introduction and a guide for the reader interested in the use of effect size estimation for its scientific endeavour.

  18. Prediction and estimation of effective population size.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Santiago, E; Caballero, A

    2016-10-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is a key parameter in population genetics. It has important applications in evolutionary biology, conservation genetics and plant and animal breeding, because it measures the rates of genetic drift and inbreeding and affects the efficacy of systematic evolutionary forces, such as mutation, selection and migration. We review the developments in predictive equations and estimation methodologies of effective size. In the prediction part, we focus on the equations for populations with different modes of reproduction, for populations under selection for unlinked or linked loci and for the specific applications to conservation genetics. In the estimation part, we focus on methods developed for estimating the current or recent effective size from molecular marker or sequence data. We discuss some underdeveloped areas in predicting and estimating Ne for future research.

  19. Understanding the effect size and its measures

    PubMed Central

    Ialongo, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The evidence based medicine paradigm demands scientific reliability, but modern research seems to overlook it sometimes. The power analysis represents a way to show the meaningfulness of findings, regardless to the emphasized aspect of statistical significance. Within this statistical framework, the estimation of the effect size represents a means to show the relevance of the evidences produced through research. In this regard, this paper presents and discusses the main procedures to estimate the size of an effect with respect to the specific statistical test used for hypothesis testing. Thus, this work can be seen as an introduction and a guide for the reader interested in the use of effect size estimation for its scientific endeavour. PMID:27346958

  20. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (100GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth vs. stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  1. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  2. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E., III; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GigaPascals) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 millimeters diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  3. Effects of cold rolling on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, Abbas; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Behnam, Mir Masud Jabbari

    2011-10-01

    Effects of cold rolling on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels were studied. To investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile test, and hardness test were used. The results show that the solution-annealing treatment in the cold-rolled steel redounds to the formation of submicrocrystalline Fe2(Mo, Ti) Laves phase particles, which are stable at high temperatures. These secondary Laves phase particles prevent from recrystallization at high temperatures and correspond to semi-brittle fracture in the subsequent aging treatment.

  4. Effects of rolling conditions on grain orientation and magnetic properties of thin-gauged 3% Si-Fe sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.C.; Heo, N.H.; Chai, K.H.; Na, J.G.; Woo, J.S.; Kim, G.M.

    1998-04-03

    3% Si-Fe sheets are widely used as core material of large transformers, large rotating machines and pole transformers due to characteristic soft magnetic properties, where energy losses during magnetization are critically concerned. The magnetic characteristics in silicon iron arises from a preferred grain orientation, i.e. (110) [001] Goss texture which forms after cold rolling followed by secondary recrystallization. In this paper, effects of rolling direction on the grain orientation and magnetic properties of the thin-gauged 3% Si-Fe sheets are investigated.

  5. Effect of wall thickness and material on flexural fatigue of hollow rolling elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hollow cylindrical bars were tested in a rolling-contact fatigue tester to determine the effects of material and outside diameter to inside diameter (OD/ID) ratios on fatigue failure mode and subsequent failure propagation. The range of applied loads with OD/ID ratios of 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.2 resulted in maximum tangential tensile stresses ranging from 165 to 655 MPa at the bore surface. Flexural failures of the hollow test bars occurred when this bore stress was 490 MPa or greater with AISI 52100 hollow bars and 338 MPa or greater with AISI M-50 hollow bars. Good correlation was obtained in relating the failures of these hollow bars with flexural failures of drilled balls from full-scale bearing test published previously.

  6. Detecting past changes of effective population size.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff.

  7. Effect of Vestibular Impairment on Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Dynamic Roll Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Black, F. O.; Schlgel, Todd T.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Wood, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Change to upright posture results in reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure due to hydrostatic pressure changes related to gravity. Since vestibular organs, specifically the otoliths, provide information on position relative to gravity, vestibular inputs may assist in adaptation to the upright posture. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of direct vestibular stimulation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). To examine the role of otolith inputs we screened 165 subjects for vestibular function and classified subjects as either normal or impaired based on ocular torsion. Ocular torsion, an indication of otolith function, was assessed during sinusoidal roll tilt of 20 degrees at 0.01 Hz (100 sec per cycle). Subjects with torsion one SD below the mean were classified as impaired while subjects one SD above the mean were considered normal. During one session subjects were placed in a chair that was sinusoidally rotated 25 degrees in the roll plane at five frequencies: 0.25 & 0.125 Hz for 80 sec, 0.0625 Hz for 160 sec and 0.03125 Hz and 0.015625 Hz for 320 sec. During testing, CBF (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres), and end tidal CO2 (Puritan Bennet) were measured continuously. Ocular torsion was assessed from infrared images of the eyes. All rotations were done in the dark with subjects fixated on a red LED directly at the center of rotation. In the normal group, dynamic tilt resulted in significant changes in both blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity that was related to the frequency of stimulus. In contrast the impaired group did not show similar patterns. As expected normal subjects demonstrated significant ocular torsion that was related to stimulus frequency while impaired subjects had minimal changes. These data suggest that vestibular inputs have direct effects on cerebral blood flow regulation during dynamic tilt. Supported by NASA.

  8. Effect of cold-rolling on the magnettic ttransitions in Au83Fe17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing Du, Chen; J, Nogues; K, V. Rao; C, E. Violet; R, J. Borg

    1988-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the dynamic-elastic and viscous susceptibilities have been measured for Au83Fe17 after cold-rolling. It is found that cold-rolling reduces the Curie temperature and raises the spin-freezing temperature remarkably. These results can be explained on the basis of the precipitation medel proposed by Borg and Violet.

  9. Discomfort of seated persons exposed to low frequency lateral and roll oscillation: effect of seat cushion.

    PubMed

    Beard, George F; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The discomfort caused by lateral oscillation, roll oscillation, and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation has been investigated at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz when sitting on a rigid seat and when sitting on a compliant cushion, both without a backrest. Judgements of vibration discomfort and the transmission of lateral and roll oscillation through the seat cushion were obtained with 20 subjects. Relative to the rigid seat, the cushion increased lateral acceleration and roll oscillation at the lower frequencies and also increased discomfort during lateral oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz), roll oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.4 Hz), and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation (at frequencies between 0.315 and 0.5 Hz). The root-sums-of-squares of the frequency-weighted lateral and roll acceleration at the seat surface predicted the greater vibration discomfort when sitting on the cushion. The frequency-dependence of the predicted discomfort may be improved by adjusting the frequency weighting for roll acceleration at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz. PMID:24947003

  10. Effects of warm temper rolling on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of strip-casting 6.5 wt% Si electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao-Ze; Liu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Yi; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Guang-Ming; Luo, Zhong-Han; Zhang, Feng-Quan; Chen, Sheng-Lin; Lyu, Li; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2014-12-01

    6.5 wt% Si electrical steel thin sheets were produced by a processing route including strip casting, hot rolling, warm rolling, intermediate annealing, warm temper rolling and final annealing, in which the warm temper rolling reduction varied from 2.7% to 14.4%. A detailed study of the microstructural and textural evolutions through the whole processing route was carried out by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. The findings revealed that the final recrystallization microstructure, texture and magnetic properties relied heavily on the warm temper rolling reduction. As the warm temper rolling reduction increased from 2.7% to 14.4%, the finally recrystallized microstructures were more homogeneous and the average grain size was decreased. At the warm temper rolling reduction lower than 7.0%, the occurrence of the exaggeratedly large annealing grains which dominated the whole sheet thickness resulted in strong <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND fiber and many other strong hard-magnetization texture components. By contrast, at the warm temper rolling reduction higher than 7.0%, the recrystallization textures were characterized by weak <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND texture, together with fewer and weak hard-magnetization texture components. The mechanism responsible for the finally microstructural and textural changes was explained by strain induced boundary migration. As warm temper rolling reduction increased, the magnetic properties at high frequency were gradually improved due to smaller grain sizes and more desirable textures. The highest magnetic inductions of 1.383 T (B8), 1.484 T (B25) and 1.571 T (B50) in combination with the lowest iron losses at high frequencies of 19.11 W/Kg (W10/400) and 3.824 W/Kg (W2/1000) were obtained at 14.4% warm temper rolling reduction under the applied condition.

  11. Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gracio, J. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B.; Kim, H. J.; Barlat, F.; Rauch, E. F.; Yoon, J. W.

    2010-06-15

    Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0 deg. , 45 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45 deg. shear tests.

  12. The Effect of Prosthetic Ankle Units on Roll-Over Shape Characteristics During Walking in Persons with Bilateral Transtibial Amputations

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Steven A.; Su, Po-Fu; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Some important functions of walking are adversely affected or eliminated in prosthesis users due to reduced or absent ankle motion. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis was to determine the effect of prosthetic ankle units on the characteristics of the ankle-foot roll-over shape in persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Seventeen subjects were fitted with Endolite Multiflex Ankles to provide ankle plantar/dorsiflexion during the stance phase of gait. Two quantitative gait analyses were performed as subjects walked with (1) Seattle Lightfoot II feet (baseline condition) and (2) with the prosthetic ankle units added. Roll-over shape radii and effective foot length ratio were calculated and compared for the two prosthetic configurations. When subjects walked with the ankle units, ankle motion increased (p<0.001), peak ankle plantarflexion moment during stance decreased slightly, and ankle-foot roll-over shape radii were significantly less (p<0.001) compared to the baseline condition. The effective foot length ratio of the roll-over shape was found to increase with walking speed (p<0.001), but it was not significantly affected by the prosthetic ankle units (p=0.066). Prosthetists and manufacturers are encouraged to consider the effect of combining prosthetic components on the overall characteristics of the prosthesis and the functions they impart to the user. PMID:22234709

  13. Wobbly Strings: Calculating the Capture Rate of a Webcam Using the Rolling Shutter Effect in a Guitar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunnah, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  14. Effects of terminating cover crops with rolling/crimping and herbicides in a cotton no-till system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fall of 2008, a field experiment was initiated in central Alabama to study the effects of rolling/crimping and different herbicides with different application rates on cover crops termination rates, cotton population and yield. Results from 2009 and 2010 growing seasons are presented. A roller/cr...

  15. Wobbly strings: calculating the capture rate of a webcam using the rolling shutter effect in a guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnah, David

    2014-07-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  16. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  17. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  18. Effect Size Reporting Practices in Published Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhija, Fadia Nasser-Abu; Levy, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Effect size (ES) reporting practices in a sample of 10 educational research journals are examined in this study. Five of these journals explicitly require reporting ES and the other 5 have no such policy. Data were obtained from 99 articles published in the years 2003 and 2004, in which 183 statistical analyses were conducted. Findings indicate no…

  19. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  20. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  1. GRCop-84 Rolling Parameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005, when the program ended. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a new copper alloy, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb), for rocket engine main combustion chamber components that will improve rocket engine life and performance. This work examines the sensitivity of GRCop-84 mechanical properties to rolling parameters as a means to better define rolling parameters for commercial warm rolling. Experiment variables studied were total reduction, rolling temperature, rolling speed, and post rolling annealing heat treatment. The responses were tensile properties measured at 23 and 500 C, hardness, and creep at three stress-temperature combinations. Understanding these relationships will better define boundaries for a robust commercial warm rolling process. The four processing parameters were varied within limits consistent with typical commercial production processes. Testing revealed that the rolling-related variables selected have a minimal influence on tensile, hardness, and creep properties over the range of values tested. Annealing had the expected result of lowering room temperature hardness and strength while increasing room temperature elongations with 600 C (1112 F) having the most effect. These results indicate that the process conditions to warm roll plate and sheet for these variables can range over wide levels without negatively impacting mechanical properties. Incorporating broader process ranges in future rolling campaigns should lower commercial rolling costs through increased productivity.

  2. Effect of fiber fractions of prickly pear cactus (nopal) on quality and sensory properties of wheat bread rolls.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Arauza, Juan Carlos; Bárcenas, Diego Guadalupe; Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Martínez, Jaime David Pérez; Hernández, Jaime Reyes; de Jesús Ornelas-Paz, José

    2015-05-01

    In this study the addition of total fiber (TF), insoluble fiber (IF), and soluble fiber (SF) from nopal to wheat flour used to make bread rolls was assessed. The rheological properties of dough as well as quality, texture, sensorial and physical characteristics of the crumb rolls produced were evaluated. The storage (23.50 MPa) and loss modulus (11.95 MPa) for SF-dough were the lowest indicating that a less visco-elastic behavior was obtained. Polarized light microscopy showed that a more homogeneous size and a better distribution of starch granules were developed into SF-dough. Crumb hardness (3.25-4.78 N) and chewiness (0.31-0.81 N) of SF-rolls were lower than the control experiment (3.99-5.81 N and 0.35-1.01 N respectively). Springiness for all treatments was constant (1.0) compared with the control (1.02-0.87) for 2 days of storage. The lowest cohesiveness values (0.24-014) were computed by IF treatment for a similar storage time. The specific crumb volume increased by 12.46, 9.03 and 1.10 % by the addition of SF, TF and IF respectively. The lowest rate of staling was shown by SF-rolls (0.199) and it was followed by TF (0.296), IF (0.381) and control (0.458) treatments. As a result, the highest scores on quality (9.3 out of 10) and sensorial attributes (from 8.9 up to 9.7) were assigned to SF-rolls. PMID:25892800

  3. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  4. Effects of macromolecular crowding on nuclear size.

    PubMed

    Rosania, G R; Swanson, J A

    1995-05-01

    The concentration of macromolecules inside cells is high, and the resultant crowding of cytoplasm can be expected to affect many interactions involving macromolecular assemblies. Here, we have examined the effect of solute size and concentration on nuclear volume in saponin-permeabilized macrophages. Nuclei swelled in the presence of small solutes and shrank reversibly in the presence of larger permeant solutes. Remarkably, the smallest solutes capable of shrinking the nucleus were not excluded by the pores in the nuclear envelope. Indeed, nuclei shrank in the presence of such solutes even after the nuclear envelope had been sheared mechanically or permeabilized with detergent. Nuclei extracted with 1% Triton X-100 shrank in the presence of very high concentrations of small solute molecules (30% w/v) as well as in lower concentrations of larger solutes. Consistent with a macromolecular crowding effect, changes in nuclear volume were dependent on solute size and not simply dependent on the colligative properties of solutes or the exclusion of solutes by the nuclear envelope. Solute size-dependent changes in nuclear volume were independent of the chemical nature of the solutes and of the activity of the ions in the buffer. Together, these observations indicate that high concentrations of macromolecules such as those found inside cells can influence the size of the nucleus by directly affecting nuclear structure.

  5. [Roll repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Komiya, T; Yamazaki, K; Kohchi, K; Kanzaki, Y

    1995-11-01

    We reviewed the repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery using a roll to clarify indication of this operation, operative technique (especially the material and the size of conduit) and possibility of total correction. Eleven patients (mean age: five years) and 13 operations including two reoperations were reviewed. The material of the roll was xenopericardium in nine and artificial graft in four operations. No operative death and late death occurred. Five patients required reoperations from three occlusion and two severe stenosis of the roll. Three of nine xenopericardial roll needed reoperations and in two reoperated cases, the roll had been placed behind the aorta. In contrast, one artificial graft needed reoperation. The diameter of the roll was compared with that of normal pulmonary artery estimated from the body surface area. If the roll was too large (more than 125% normal) or too small (less than 100% normal), the luminal diameter of the roll became significantly smaller than appropriate-sized roll (p = 0.002). The size of nonconfluent side of the pulmonary artery also affect the result of repair. In occluded or stenotic cases, the unilateral PA index was significantly smaller than good patent cases (p = 0.014). Total correction was possible in eight cases (73%) including four Rastelli operation, two right ventricular outflow patch enlargement, and two modified Fontan operations without operative death. Thus preoperative evaluation of the pulmonary artery size and anatomy, selection of roll material and size matching seemed to be important for successful roll repair of nonconfluent pulmonary artery.

  6. Size segregation in the Brazil nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soterroni, Aline C.; Ramos, Fernando M.

    2013-10-01

    Granular materials are ubiquitous in nature and in our daily lives, and used in many industrial processes. Depending on the physical conditions that they are subjected, granular materials may present unusual behavior, combining properties of solids, liquids or gases, and displaying interesting and diversified phenomena. In this work we numerically simulated a granular system in order to investigate the phenomena of size segregation in the Brazil Nut Effect. Our simulations indicate that the phenomenon of size segregation results from the combined effect of two different mechanisms: buoyancy and convection. Increasing the vibration amplitude, the behavior of the system becomes less periodic and more turbulent, with evidence of deterministic chaos in the dynamics of the large particle.

  7. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  8. Scuffing Characteristics of High-Load Rolling/Sliding Contacts Operating in Liquid Oxygen: Effects of Materials and Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, L.; Hall, P. B.; Thom, R.

    1996-01-01

    This research reports on an experimental study of the effects of materials and surface roughness on the scuffing characteristics of rolling/sliding contacts cooled and lubricated with liquid oxygen. Experiments were carried out under heavy loading with a Hertzian pressure in the range of 2.0 GPa to 3.0 GPa and with a high rolling velocity of up to 48 m/s. For contacts between AISI 440 C stainless-steel elements, the results showed that the scuffing behavior of the system was fairly consistent under a wide range of rolling velocity. Scuffing commenced at a small slide-to-roll ratio of around 0.02, and the scuffing behavior of the contact was not sensitive to surface roughness for the test-sample RMS roughness ranging from 0.02 microns to 0.10 microns. For contacts between 440 C and Si3N4 elements, on the other hand, the scuffing behavior of the system was not very consistent and somewhat unpredictable. The results were sensitive to surface roughness particularly that of the Si3N4 test sample. With well polished test samples, consistent results were obtained; the level of traction was lower than that with a 440 C toroid and scuffing did not take place up to a slide-to-roll ratio of near 0.03. The results strongly suggest that significant hydrodynamic effect can be generated by liquid oxygen under heavy loading and high velocity conditions. The results also suggest that the hydrodynamic action is likely generated by the conventional viscous mechanism as it can be largely destroyed by a narrow circumferential surface scratch running through the central region of the contact.

  9. The Relationship between Sample Sizes and Effect Sizes in Systematic Reviews in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert; Smith, Dewi

    2009-01-01

    Research in fields other than education has found that studies with small sample sizes tend to have larger effect sizes than those with large samples. This article examines the relationship between sample size and effect size in education. It analyzes data from 185 studies of elementary and secondary mathematics programs that met the standards of…

  10. Roller compaction of hydrophilic extended release tablets-combined effects of processing variables and drug/matrix former particle size.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Johanna; Tajarobi, Farhad; Gururajan, Bindhumadhavan; Juppo, Anne; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows that roller compaction (RC) can successfully be used as a granulation method to prepare hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-based extended release matrix tablets containing a high drug load, both for materials deforming mainly by fragmentation (paracetamol) as for those having mainly plastic deformation (ibuprofen). The combined effect of RC process variables and composition on the manufacturability of HPMC tablets was investigated. Standard wet granulation grade HPMC was compared with a larger particle size direct compressible HPMC grade. Higher roll pressure was found to result in larger paracetamol granules and narrower granule particle size distributions, especially for formulations containing smaller size HPMC. However, for ibuprofen, no clear effect of roll pressure was observed. High roll pressure also resulted in denser ribbon and less bypass fines during RC. Loss of compactibility was observed for granules compared to powder blends, which was found to be related to differences in granule porosity and morphology. Using the large-sized HPMC grade did in some cases result in lower tensile strength tablets but had the advantage to improve the powder flow into the roller compactor. This work also indicates that when the HPMC level lies near the percolation threshold, significant changes can occur in the drug release rate due to changes in other factors (raw material characteristics and processing). PMID:25273028

  11. Roller compaction of hydrophilic extended release tablets-combined effects of processing variables and drug/matrix former particle size.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Johanna; Tajarobi, Farhad; Gururajan, Bindhumadhavan; Juppo, Anne; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows that roller compaction (RC) can successfully be used as a granulation method to prepare hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-based extended release matrix tablets containing a high drug load, both for materials deforming mainly by fragmentation (paracetamol) as for those having mainly plastic deformation (ibuprofen). The combined effect of RC process variables and composition on the manufacturability of HPMC tablets was investigated. Standard wet granulation grade HPMC was compared with a larger particle size direct compressible HPMC grade. Higher roll pressure was found to result in larger paracetamol granules and narrower granule particle size distributions, especially for formulations containing smaller size HPMC. However, for ibuprofen, no clear effect of roll pressure was observed. High roll pressure also resulted in denser ribbon and less bypass fines during RC. Loss of compactibility was observed for granules compared to powder blends, which was found to be related to differences in granule porosity and morphology. Using the large-sized HPMC grade did in some cases result in lower tensile strength tablets but had the advantage to improve the powder flow into the roller compactor. This work also indicates that when the HPMC level lies near the percolation threshold, significant changes can occur in the drug release rate due to changes in other factors (raw material characteristics and processing).

  12. Effect of rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn alloy anodes during copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Chen, Bu-ming; Hang, Hui; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Wang, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of different rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn anodes during copper electrowinning and to determine the relationship between the properties of the anodes and rolling techniques during copper electrowinning. The anode process was investigated via anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry curves, electrochemical impedance spectra, and corrosion tests. The microscopic morphology and phase composition of the anodic oxide layers were observed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Observable variations in the electrocatalytic activity and reaction kinetics of anodes during electrowinning indicated that the electrochemical behavior of the anodes was strongly affected by the rolling technology. An increase in the rolling number tended to decrease the oxygen evolution overpotential and the corrosion rate of the anodes. These trends are contrary to that of the apparent exchange current density. Furthermore, the intensities of diffraction peaks associated with PbO, PbOx, and α-PbO2 tended to increase with increasing rolling number. In addition, the rolled anodes exhibited a more uniform microstructure. Compared with one-way rolled anodes, the eight-time cross rolled anodes exhibited better electrocatalytic activity and improved corrosion resistance.

  13. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu-Rong, Yao; Ya-Xia, Yin; Yu-Gao, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225204 and 21303222), the Shandong Taishan Scholarship, China, the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB932900), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010000).

  14. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1993-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  15. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Chris L.; Pausder, Heinz-Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter aeromechanics have recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effect of time delays in a high bandwidth vehicle on handling qualities. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays of up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and band width values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities Aeronautical Design Standard (ADS)-33C.

  16. Comparison of wing-span averaging effects on lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions and for two turbulence representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical method of computing the averaging effect of wing-span size on the loading of a wing induced by random turbulence was adapted for use on a digital electronic computer. The turbulence input was assumed to have a Dryden power spectral density. The computations were made for lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions, rectangular and elliptic. Data are presented to show the wing-span averaging effect for wing-span ratios encompassing current airplane sizes. The rectangular wing-span loading showed a slightly greater averaging effect than did the elliptic loading. In the frequency range most bothersome to airplane passengers, the wing-span averaging effect can reduce the normal lift load, and thus the acceleration, by about 7 percent for a typical medium-sized transport. Some calculations were made to evaluate the effect of using a Von Karman turbulence representation. These results showed that using the Von Karman representation generally resulted in a span averaging effect about 3 percent larger.

  17. Tumor size and effectiveness of electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Barbara; Miklavcic, Damijan; Campana, Luca G.; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Snoj, Marko; Jarm, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is an effective and safe method for local treatment of tumors. However, relatively large variability in effectiveness of ECT has been observed, which likely results from different treatment conditions and tumor characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and effectiveness of a single-session ECT. Materials and methods A systematic search of various bibliographic databases was performed and nine studies eligible for this study were extracted. Different statistical methods including meta-analysis were applied to analyze the data. Results The results of analysis based on data from 1466 tumors of any histotype show significantly lower effectiveness of ECT on tumors with maximal diameter equal to or larger than 3 cm (complete response (CR) of 33.3%, objective response (OR) of 68.2%) in comparison to smaller tumors (CR% of 59.5%, OR% of 85.7%). The results of meta-analysis indicated that ECT performed on tumors smaller than 3 cm statistically significantly increases the probability of CR by 31.0% and OR by 24.9% on average in comparison to larger tumors. The analysis of raw data about the size and response of tumors showed statistically significant decrease in effectiveness of ECT progressively with increasing tumor diameter. The biggest drop in CR% was detected at tumor diameters as small as 2 cm. Conclusions The standard operating procedures for ECT should be reexamined and refined for the treatment of large tumors. We propose that future clinical trials should include accurate ECT treatment planning and/or multiple ECT cycles, besides a prolonged observation for tumor response evaluation. PMID:23450195

  18. SPECIFIC AND CROSS-OVER EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Flexibility is an important physical quality. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) methods such as foam rolling (FR) increase flexibility acutely but how long such increases in range of motion (ROM) last is unclear. Static stretching (SS) also increases flexibility acutely and produces a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs. FR may also produce a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs but this has not yet been identified. Purpose To explore the potential cross-over effect of SMFR by investigating the effects of a FR treatment on the ipsilateral limb of 3 bouts of 30 seconds on changes in ipsilateral and contralateral ankle DF ROM and to assess the time-course of those effects up to 20 minutes post-treatment. Methods A within- and between-subject design was carried out in a convenience sample of 26 subjects, allocated into FR (n=13) and control (CON, n=13) groups. Ankle DF ROM was recorded at baseline with the in-line weight-bearing lunge test for both ipsilateral and contralateral legs and at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes following either a two-minute seated rest (CON) or 3 3 30 seconds of FR of the plantar flexors of the dominant leg (FR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences in ankle DF ROM. Results No significant between-group effect was seen following the intervention. However, a significant within-group effect (p<0.05) in the FR group was seen between baseline and all post-treatment time-points (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes). Significant within-group effects (p<0.05) were also seen in the ipsilateral leg between baseline and at all post-treatment time-points, and in the contralateral leg up to 10 minutes post-treatment, indicating the presence of a cross-over effect. Conclusions FR improves ankle DF ROM for at least 20 minutes in the ipsilateral limb and up to 10 minutes in the contralateral limb, indicating that FR produces a cross-over effect into the contralateral limb. The mechanism producing these cross-over effects is

  19. Size effects in thermal conduction by phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip B.

    2014-08-01

    Heat transport in nanoscale systems is both hard to measure microscopically, and hard to interpret. Ballistic and diffusive heat flow coexist, adding confusion. This paper looks at a very simple case: a nanoscale crystal repeated periodically. This is a popular model for simulation of bulk heat transport using classical molecular dynamics (MD), and is related to transient thermal grating experiments. Nanoscale effects are seen in perhaps their simplest form. The model is solved by an extension of standard quasiparticle gas theory of bulk solids. Both structure and heat flow are constrained by periodic boundary conditions. Diffusive transport is fully included, while ballistic transport by phonons of a long mean free path is diminished in a specific way. Heat current J (x) and temperature gradient ∇T (x') have a nonlocal relationship, via κ (x-x'), over a distance |x-x'| determined by phonon mean free paths. In MD modeling of bulk conductivity, finite computer resources limit system size. Long mean free paths, comparable to the scale of heating and cooling, cause undesired finite-size effects that have to be removed by extrapolation. The present model allows this extrapolation to be quantified. Calculations based on the Peierls-Boltzmann equation, using a generalized Debye model, show that extrapolation involves fractional powers of 1/L. It is also argued that heating and cooling should be distributed sinusoidally [ė∝cos(2πx/L)] to improve convergence of numerics.

  20. Mechanisms underlying the portion-size effect.

    PubMed

    Peter Herman, C; Polivy, Janet; Pliner, Patricia; Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-05-15

    The portion-size effect (PSE) refers to the fact that people eat more when served larger portions. This effect is neither obvious nor artifactual. We examine the prevailing explanations (or underlying mechanisms) that have been offered for the PSE. The dominant candidate mechanism is "appropriateness"; that is, people accept the portion that they are served as being of an appropriate size and eat accordingly. Because people do not necessarily finish the portion that they are served, variations on the basic appropriateness mechanism have been suggested. We also consider some evidence that is inconsistent with an appropriateness explanation, including the appearance of the PSE in children as young as two years of age. We also examine other mechanisms that do not rely on appropriateness norms. Visual food cues may assist in assessing appropriateness but may also drive food intake in a more mindless fashion. Larger portions induce larger bites, which may increase intake by reducing oral exposure time and sensory-specific satiety. We consider further research questions that could help to clarify the mechanisms underlying the PSE. PMID:25802021

  1. Effect of viscosity on rolling-element fatigue life at cryogenic temperature with fluorinated ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted with 12.7-mm-(1/2-in.-) diameter AISI 52100 steel balls in the NASA five-ball fatigue tester, with a maximum hertz stress of 5500 mN/m2 (800 000 psi), a shaft speed of 4750 rpm, lubricant temperature of 200 K (360 R), a contact angle of 20 deg, using four fluorinated ether lubricants of varying viscosities. No statistically significant differences in rolling-element fatigue life occurred using the four viscosity levels. Elastohydrodynamic calculations indicate that values of the lubricant film parameter were approximately 2 or greater.

  2. Effect of Microstructure and Texture on Anisotropy and Mechanical Properties of SAE 970X Steel Under Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of microstructure and crystallographic texture by developed in hot rolling and different post-treatments on anisotropic and mechanical properties of SAE 970X steel. The experimental results showed that the hot-rolled sample followed by quenching and consequent tempering at 700 °C led to a significant improvement in anisotropic and mechanical properties. This happened due to the reduction in the number of grains oriented with {001} planes parallel to normal direction. Also, the formation of new strain-free and recrystallized grains associated with {111}//ND and {110}//ND directions improved the mechanical properties. These grains corresponded to the close-packed planes in BCC structure as well.

  3. The effect of tooling design parameters on web-warping in the flexible roll forming of UHSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jingsi; Rolfe, Bernard; Mendiguren, Joseba; Galdos, Lander; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    To reduce weight and improve passenger safety there is an increased need in the automotive industry to use Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) for structural and crash components. However, the application of UHSS is restricted by their limited formability and the difficulty of forming them in conventional processes. An alternative method of manufacturing structural auto body parts from UHSS is the flexible roll forming process which can accommodate materials with high strength and limited ductility in the production of complex and weight-optimised components. However, one major concern in the flexible roll forming is web-warping, which is the height deviation of the profile web area. This paper investigates, using a numerical model, the effect on web-warping with respect to various forming methods. The results demonstrate that different forming methods lead to different amount of web-warping in terms of forming the product with identical geometry.

  4. The effect of tooling design parameters on web-warping in the flexible roll forming of UHSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jingsi; Weiss, Matthias; Rolfe, Bernard; Mendiguren, Joseba; Galdos, Lander

    2013-12-16

    To reduce weight and improve passenger safety there is an increased need in the automotive industry to use Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) for structural and crash components. However, the application of UHSS is restricted by their limited formability and the difficulty of forming them in conventional processes. An alternative method of manufacturing structural auto body parts from UHSS is the flexible roll forming process which can accommodate materials with high strength and limited ductility in the production of complex and weight-optimised components. However, one major concern in the flexible roll forming is web-warping, which is the height deviation of the profile web area. This paper investigates, using a numerical model, the effect on web-warping with respect to various forming methods. The results demonstrate that different forming methods lead to different amount of web-warping in terms of forming the product with identical geometry.

  5. Effect of length of Handley Page tip slots on the lateral-stability factor, damping in roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1932-01-01

    Tests have been made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel on a Clark Y wing model equipped with various lengths of Handley Page slots extending inward from the wing tips. The slot lengths tested ranged from 20 to 100 per cent of the semi span. The effect of slot lengths on damping in roll was determined by means of both free-autorotation and forced-rotation test. In addition, the maximum lift coefficient was found with each slot length. The optimum length of slot for satisfactory damping in roll over a large range of angles of attack was found to be slightly over 50 per cent of the semispan for the form of slot tested.

  6. Effects of Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillations on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex-breakdown flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock which induces of the leading edge vortex cores to breakdown. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex-breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while keeping the maximum pitch and roll amplitude equal.

  7. Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillation Effects on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex dominated flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The wing mean angle of attack is 20 deg. and the free stream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.85 and 3.23 x 10(exp 6), respectively. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock and vortex breakdown of the leading edge vortex cores. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while the maximum pitch and roll amplitude is kept constant at 4.0 deg. Four cases demonstrate the following: simultaneous motion at a frequency of 1(pi), motion with a 90 deg. phase lead in pitch, motion with a rolling frequency of twice the pitching frequency, and simultaneous motion at a frequency of 2(pi). Comparisons with single mode motion at these frequencies complete this study and illustrate the effects of coupling the oscillations.

  8. Effect of feeding rolled flaxseed on milk fatty acid profiles and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bork, N R; Schroeder, J W; Lardy, G P; Vonnahme, K A; Bauer, M L; Buchanan, D S; Shaver, R D; Fricke, P M

    2010-11-01

    The objectives were to study the effects of feeding rolled flaxseed (FLX) to early-lactation dairy cows on milk yield, milk components, and milk fatty acid profiles as well as on measures of cow reproduction. Lactating Holstein cows, on 3 commercial dairies, were fed either an early-lactation ration (CON) or a ration that was similar in protein, energy, and fat content but that included FLX (0.85 kg of DM/cow per day). Within each dairy, cows were allocated alternately to breeding pens upon leaving the fresh pen (approximately 10 ± 5 d postpartum). Pens (n = 4 to 5 pens/dairy) were randomized to treatment (n = 2 to 3 pens/treatment per dairy). Pen (CON, n = 6; FLX, n = 7) was considered the experimental unit and data were analyzed as a split plot with pen as the whole-plot error term. Cows fed FLX had greater (P ≤ 0.06) proportions of cis-9, trans-11 C18:2, C18:3n-3, and C20:0 fatty acids in milk fat and a lesser (P = 0.03) proportion of C20:3n-6 fatty acid when compared with cows fed the CON diet. Treatment did not affect (P ≥ 0.24) milk yield, milk protein, protein yield, milk fat, or milk fat yield. No interactions (P ≥ 0.52) were found between treatment and season of the year or parity, or between treatment and days open, pregnancies per AI at first or second service, or pregnancy loss. In conclusion, feeding FLX at 0.85 kg/cow per day (DM basis) altered the fatty acid profile of milk, but milk yield, milk composition, and reproductive performance of dairy cows were not affected.

  9. Crash Simulation of Roll Formed Parts by Damage Modelling Taking Into Account Preforming Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Edwin T.; Hackl, Benjamin; Schauer, Hermann

    2011-08-01

    Complex phase steels of strength levels up to 1200 MPa are suitable to roll forming. These may be applied in automotive structures for enhancing the crashworthiness, e. g. as stiffeners in doors. Even though the strain hardening of the material is low there is considerable bending formability. However ductility decreases with the strength level. Higher strength requires more focus to the structural integrity of the part during the process planning stage and with respect to the crash behavior. Nowadays numerical simulation is used as a process design tool for roll-forming in a production environment. The assessment of the stability of a roll forming process is quite challenging for AHSS grades. There are two objectives of the present work. First to provide a reliable assessment tool to the roll forming analyst for failure prediction. Second to establish simulation procedures in order to predict the part's behavior in crash applications taking into account damage and failure. Today adequate ductile fracture models are available which can be used in forming and crash applications. These continuum models are based on failure strain curves or surfaces which depend on the stress triaxiality (e. g. Crach or GISSMO) and may additionally include the Lode angle (extended Mohr Coulomb or extended GISSMO model). A challenging task is to obtain the respective failure strain curves. In the paper the procedure is described in detail how these failure strain curves are obtained using small scale tests within voestalpine Stahl, notch tensile-, bulge and shear tests. It is shown that capturing the surface strains is not sufficient for obtaining reliable material failure parameters. The simulation tool for roll-forming at the site of voestalpine Krems is Copra® FEA RF, which is a 3D continuum finite element solver based on MSC.Marc. The simulation environment for crash applications is LS-DYNA. Shell elements are used for this type of analyses. A major task is to provide results of

  10. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  11. Estimation of stiffening effect of shaft and housing material outside projected area of a rolling element bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    In the analysis of distortions occurring in rolling-element bearings, it is common to neglect the stiffening effect of shafting outside the bearing region. The magnitude of such an effect will be dependent primarily on the bearing width-to-bore ratio, the shaft geometry, and the location of the bearing on the shaft. An estimate is given of the stiffening effect for a wide range of these variables. In addition, brief consideration is given to the parallel situation existing at the outer ring housing.

  12. Effective Size of Populations under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, E.; Caballero, A.

    1995-01-01

    Equations to approximate the effective size (N(e)) of populations under continued selection are obtained that include the possibility of partial full-sib mating and other systems such as assortative mating. The general equation for the case of equal number of sexes and constant number of breeding individuals (N) is N(e) = 4N/[2(1 - α(I)) + (S(k)(2) + 4Q(2)C(2)) (1 + α(I) + 2α(O))], where S(k)(2) is the variance of family size due to sampling without selection, C(2) is the variance of selective advantages among families (the squared coefficient of variation of the expected number of offspring per family), α(I) is the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, α(O) is the correlation between genes of male and female parents, and Q(2) is the term accounting for the cumulative effect of selection on an inherited trait. This is obtained as Q = 2/[2 - G(1 + r)], where G is the remaining proportion of genetic variance in selected individuals and r is the correlation of the expected selective values of male and female parents. The method is also extended to the general case of different numbers of male and female parents. The predictive value of the formulae is tested under a model of truncation selection with the infinitesimal model of gene effects, where C(2) and G are a function of the selection intensity, the heritability and the intraclass correlation of sibs. Under random mating r = α(I) = -1/(N - 1) and α(O) = 0. Under partial full-sib mating with an average proportion β of full-sib matings per generation, r & β and α(O) & α(I) & β/ (4 - 3β). The prediction equation is compared to other approximations based on the long-term contributions of ancestors to descendants. Finally, based on the approach followed, a system of mating (compensatory mating) is proposed to reduce rates of inbreeding without loss of response in selection programs in which selected individuals from the largest families are mated to those from the smallest families. PMID:7713405

  13. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications.

  14. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  15. Common Language Effect Size for Multiple Treatment Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2015-01-01

    Researchers who need to explain treatment effects to laypeople can translate Cohen's effect size (standardized mean difference) to a common language effect size--a probability of a random observation from one population being larger than a random observation from the other population. This common language effect size can be extended to represent…

  16. Effects of Calibration Sample Size and Item Bank Size on Ability Estimation in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alper; Weiss, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of calibration sample size and item bank size on examinee ability estimation in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). For this purpose, a 500-item bank pre-calibrated using the three-parameter logistic model with 10,000 examinees was simulated. Calibration samples of varying sizes (150, 250, 350, 500,…

  17. Quantum size effects in spherical semiconductor microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Selvakumar V.; Sinha, Sucharita; Rustagi, K. C.

    1987-03-01

    The size dependence of the lowest electron-hole state in semiconductor microcrystals is calculated using the variational principle with a three-parameter Hylleraas-type wave function. For very small particles the Coulomb interaction may be treated as a perturbation. For larger particles the size dependence of the energy is much sharper than that expected in previous work.

  18. Effect of hot rolling on the structure and the mechanical properties of nitrogen-bearing austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, V. M.; Voznesenskaya, N. M.; Tonysheva, O. A.; Blinov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the rolling temperature and strain on the structure and the properties of corrosionresistant austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel is studied. The steel is shown to exhibit high ductility: upon rolling in the temperature range 700-1100°C at a reduction per pass up to 80%, wedge steel specimens are uniformly deformed along and across the rolling direction without cracking and other surface defects. Subsequent cold treatment and low-temperature tempering ensure a high hardness of the steel (50-56 HRC). Austenite mainly contributes to the hardening upon rolling in the temperature range 700-800°C at a reduction of 50-70%, and martensite makes the main contribution at higher temperatures and lower strains. Texture does not form under the chosen deformation conditions, which indicates dynamic recrystallization with the nucleation and growth of grains having no preferential orientation.

  19. Decoding mobile-phone image sensor rolling shutter effect for visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) using visible lights, also known as visible light communication (VLC), has attracted significant attention recently. As the traditional OWC and VLC receivers (Rxs) are based on PIN photo-diode or avalanche photo-diode, deploying the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor as the VLC Rx is attractive since nowadays nearly every person has a smart phone with embedded CMOS image sensor. However, deploying the CMOS image sensor as the VLC Rx is challenging. In this work, we propose and demonstrate two simple contrast ratio (CR) enhancement schemes to improve the contrast of the rolling shutter pattern. Then we describe their processing algorithms one by one. The experimental results show that both the proposed CR enhancement schemes can significantly mitigate the high-intensity fluctuations of the rolling shutter pattern and improve the bit-error-rate performance.

  20. [Effect sizes, statistical power and sample sizes in "the Japanese Journal of Psychology"].

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Yumi; Toyoda, Hideki

    2012-04-01

    This study analyzed the statistical power of research studies published in the "Japanese Journal of Psychology" in 2008 and 2009. Sample effect sizes and sample statistical powers were calculated for each statistical test and analyzed with respect to the analytical methods and the fields of the studies. The results show that in the fields like perception, cognition or learning, the effect sizes were relatively large, although the sample sizes were small. At the same time, because of the small sample sizes, some meaningful effects could not be detected. In the other fields, because of the large sample sizes, meaningless effects could be detected. This implies that researchers who could not get large enough effect sizes would use larger samples to obtain significant results.

  1. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  2. Effect of starvation on film thickness and traction under elastohydrodynamic rolling and sliding conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    Traction measurements under starved elastohydrodynamic conditions were obtained for a point-contact geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the film thickness and the location of the inlet lubricant boundary were made. Optical interferometry was used to measure film thickness. The thickness of a starved film for combined rolling and sliding conditions varies with the location of the inlet boundary in the same way as previously found for pure rolling conditions. When the fluid velocity distribution is calculated in the inlet region by a Reynolds lubrication analysis, backflow is seen to occur over a portion of the inlet region. Backflow is essential for the establishment of a flooded condition. The location of certain fluid velocity conditions within the inlet region, as suggested in the literature, does not adequately describe the onset of starvation. For the same slide-roll ratio a starved film was observed to possess greater traction than a flooded film. Traction measurements under starved conditions were also compared with those under flooded conditions for equivalent shear rates in the Hertzian region. When the shear rates within the Hertzian region were low and the film was severely starved, the measured tractions were lower than expected. This may be due to large shear stresses developed by the large pressure gradients that are generated in the inlet region when it is severely starved.

  3. The effect of neighborhood size on effective population size in theory and in practice.

    PubMed

    Nunney, L

    2016-10-01

    The distinction between the effective size of a population (Ne) and the effective size of its neighborhoods (Nn) has sometimes become blurred. Ne reflects the effect of random sampling on the genetic composition of a population of size N, whereas Nn is a measure of within-population spatial genetic structure and depends strongly on the dispersal characteristics of a species. Although Nn is independent of Ne, the reverse is not true. Using simulations of a population of annual plants, it was found that the effect of Nn on Ne was well approximated by Ne=N/(1-FIS), where FIS (determined by Nn) was evaluated population wide. Nn only had a notable influence of increasing Ne as it became smaller (⩽16). In contrast, the effect of Nn on genetic estimates of Ne was substantial. Using the temporal method (a standard two-sample approach) based on 1000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and varying sampling method, sample size (2-25% of N) and interval between samples (T=1-32 generations), estimates of Ne ranged from infinity to <0.1% of the true value (defined as Ne based on 100% sampling). Estimates were never accurate unless Nn and T were large. Three sampling techniques were tested: same-site resampling, different-site resampling and random sampling. Random sampling was the least biased method. Extremely low estimates often resulted when different-site resampling was used, especially when the population was large and the sample fraction was small, raising the possibility that this estimation bias could be a factor determining some very low Ne/N that have been published. PMID:27553453

  4. Reporting and Discussing Effect Size: Still the Road Less Traveled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, James H.; Foley, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This study shows the extent to which effect size is reported and discussed in four major journals. A series of judgments about different aspects of effect size were conducted for 417 articles from four journals. Results suggest that while the reporting of simple effect size indices is more prevalent, substantive discussions of the meaning of…

  5. Calculating Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes Using Noncentral Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah

    This paper provides a brief review of the concepts of confidence intervals, effect sizes, and central and noncentral distributions. The use of confidence intervals around effect sizes is discussed. A demonstration of the Exploratory Software for Confidence Intervals (G. Cuming and S. Finch, 2001; ESCI) is given to illustrate effect size confidence…

  6. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  7. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/ σ b or σ f/ σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  8. Effect of the cold-rolling parameters and the yield strength of the strip material on the friction stresses in a deformation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, E. A.; Yagudin, I. V.; Ermilov, V. V.; Traino, A. I.

    2009-10-01

    The reliability of the methods of determining the friction coefficient is analyzed, since the friction stresses in the deformation zone during cold rolling significantly affect the quality of cold-rolled sheets and the energy consumption. The well-known experimental data and empirical dependences are shown to contradict each other, and the statistical assurance of these dependences is absent. A database on the interrelated technological and energy-force parameters of a five-stand cold-rolling mill, which includes a wide range of steel grades and strip sizes and shapes, is analyzed. Regression analysis is used to obtain a statistically reliable regression dependence of the friction coefficient in the deformation zone on the most significant technological parameters. The application of this dependence decreases the error of energy-force calculations by more than two times.

  9. Size effects of effective Young's modulus for periodic cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoming; Zhang, Weihong

    2009-08-01

    With the wide demands of cellular materials applications in aerospace and civil engineering, research effort sacrificed for this type of materials attains nowadays a higher level than ever before. This paper is focused on the prediction methods of effective Young’s modulus for periodical cellular materials. Based on comprehensive studies of the existing homogenization method (HM), the G-A meso-mechanics method (G-A MMM) and the stretching energy method (SEM) that are unable to reflect the size effect, we propose the bending energy method (BEM) for the first time, and a comparative study of these four methods is further made to show the generality and the capability of capturing the size effect of the BEM method. Meanwhile, the underlying characteristics of each method and their relations are clarified. To do this, the detailed finite element computing and existing experimental results of hexagonal honeycombs from the literature are adopted as the standard of comparison for the above four methods. Stretch and bending models of periodical cellular materials are taken into account, respectively for the comparison of stretch and flexural displacements resulting from the above methods. We conclude that the BEM has the strong ability of both predicting the effective Young’s modulus and revealing the size effect. Such a method is also able to predict well the variations of structural displacements in terms of the cell size under stretching and bending loads including the non-monotonous variations for the hexagonal cell. On the contrary, other three methods can only predict the limited results whenever the cell size tends to be infinitely small.

  10. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-( γ) to-bainite ( α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110}, S {213} and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111> γ and <110> γ.

  11. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-(γ) to-bainite (α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110} < {1bar{1}2} > , S {213} < {bar{3}bar{6}4} > and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} < {bar{1}bar{1}1} > grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111>γ and <110>γ.

  12. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes. PMID:22665985

  13. Biofuel manufacturing from woody biomass: effects of sieve size used in biomass size reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T W; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes.

  14. Rolling magnets down a conductive hill: Revisiting a classic demonstration of the effects of eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasel, Fernando G.; Marconi, Mario C.

    2012-09-01

    We re-examine the case of rare-earth magnets rolling down an inclined plane, presenting an approach to conducting quantitative investigations that results in high-quality experimental data connecting simple experiments to a handful of important applications of eddy currents. These include not only magnetic braking but also the characterization of conductive materials, measurement of the thickness of dielectric coatings, and nondestructive evaluation of conductive objects. The simplicity of the proposed experimental setups, which include the use of widely available smart phones to record video that can be post-processed with free software, makes these experiments appealing to high school and college physics students.

  15. Interpreting and Reporting Effect Sizes in Research Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Martha; Marsh, George E., II

    Since 1994, the American Psychological Association (APA) has advocated the inclusion of effect size indices in reporting research to elucidate the statistical significance of studies based on sample size. In 2001, the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual" stressed the importance of including an index of effect size to clarify research…

  16. Effect of Subelement Size, Strand Size and RRR on Stability of RRP Nb3Sn Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Moio, Simone; Zlobin, Alexander; Superconductor R&D Team

    2013-03-01

    Using ample statistics gathered from state-of-the-art Nb3Sn strands of different designs and sizes developed by Oxford Superconductor Technology (OST), the effects on the strand current density of subelement size, Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the copper matrix, and strand size were measured, analyzed and compared with the predictions of a stability model. The data confirmed a strong dependence of the instability current density on the subelement size, but also hinted at effects of non-uniform current distribution in the wire. The data also show that the instability current relates so weakly to RRR that it is possible to cleanly identify a common instability behavior as a function of subelement size and of strand size despite an ample range of RRR. This analysis was performed both at 4.2 K and 1.9 K.

  17. Microstructure and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten processed by cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Kecskes, Laszlo; Zhu, Kaigui; Wei, Qiuming

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the effects of confined cold rolling on the evolution of microstructure, hardness, and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten (W). Using a final rolling temperature of 450 °C, W samples were severely deformed by confined cold rolling up to equivalent strains (εeq) of 1.6 and 3.3. Experimental results indicate that the average grain size of W specimens processed by confined cold rolling has been greatly reduced, and the rolled W samples with εeq ∼3.3 do not show an "ideal texture" of (001)[110] which is the expected texture of bcc metals processed by conventional cold rolling. The irradiation resistance against 60 keV He+ ions with up to a dose of 1.5 × 1022 ions·m-2 of the rolled W is compared to that of the as-received W. Results show that, due to an improvement of the metal's ductility, blister bursting with a partially opened lid forms on the surface of the rolled W, whereas blister bursting with a fully opened lid forms on the surface of the as-received W.

  18. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis.

  19. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis. PMID:21823805

  20. Wind Tunnel Analysis of the Aerodynamic Loads on Rolling Stock over Railway Embankments: The Effect of Shelter Windbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Sanchez, Sergio; Lopez-Garcia, Oscar; Sanz-Andres, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Wind-flow pattern over embankments involves an overexposure of the rolling stock travelling on them to wind loads. Windbreaks are a common solution for changing the flow characteristic in order to decrease unwanted effects induced by the presence of cross-wind. The shelter effectiveness of a set of windbreaks placed over a railway twin-track embankment is experimentally analysed. A set of two-dimensional wind tunnel tests are undertaken and results corresponding to pressure tap measurements over a section of a typical high-speed train are herein presented. The results indicate that even small-height windbreaks provide sheltering effects to the vehicles. Also, eaves located at the windbreak tips seem to improve their sheltering effect. PMID:25544954

  1. Wind tunnel analysis of the aerodynamic loads on rolling stock over railway embankments: the effect of shelter windbreaks.

    PubMed

    Avila-Sanchez, Sergio; Pindado, Santiago; Lopez-Garcia, Oscar; Sanz-Andres, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Wind-flow pattern over embankments involves an overexposure of the rolling stock travelling on them to wind loads. Windbreaks are a common solution for changing the flow characteristic in order to decrease unwanted effects induced by the presence of cross-wind. The shelter effectiveness of a set of windbreaks placed over a railway twin-track embankment is experimentally analysed. A set of two-dimensional wind tunnel tests are undertaken and results corresponding to pressure tap measurements over a section of a typical high-speed train are herein presented. The results indicate that even small-height windbreaks provide sheltering effects to the vehicles. Also, eaves located at the windbreak tips seem to improve their sheltering effect.

  2. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While it is not possible to generalize consumer behaviour across cultures, external cues taken from pack size may affect us all. We thus examined whether pack sizes influence portion size estimates across cultures, leading to a general 'pack size effect'. We compared portion size estimates based on digital presentations of different product pack sizes of solid and liquid products. The study with 13,177 participants across six European countries consisted of three parts. Parts 1 and 2 asked participants to indicate the number of portions present in a combined photographic and text-based description of different pack sizes. The estimated portion size was calculated as the quotient of the content weight or volume of the food presented and the number of stated portions. In Part 3, participants stated the number of food items that make up a portion when presented with packs of food containing either a small or a large number of items. The estimated portion size was calculated as the item weight times the item number. For all three parts and across all countries, we found that participants' portion estimates were based on larger portions for larger packs compared to smaller packs (Part 1 and 2) as well as more items to make up a portion (Part 3); hence, portions were stated to be larger in all cases. Considering that the larger estimated portions are likely to be consumed, there are implications for energy intake and weight status.

  3. Effectiveness of the Size Matters Handwriting Program.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Beth; Rai, Gillian; Murray, Tammy; Brusilovskiy, Eugene

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the research was to study changes in handwriting legibility among kindergarten, first- and second-grade students in response to the Size Matters curricular-based handwriting program. A two-group pre-post-test design was implemented at two public schools with half of the classrooms assigned to receive the Size Matters program and the other continuing to receive standard instruction. All participants completed two standardized handwriting measures at pre-test and after 40 instructional sessions were completed with the classes receiving the handwriting program. Results identified significant changes in legibility in the handwriting intervention group for all three grades when compared with the standard instruction group. The results of this study support the use of a curricular-embedded handwriting program and provide the foundation for future research examining the impact of handwriting legibility on learning outcomes. PMID:26460474

  4. Effect of Taper Ratio on the Low-speed Rolling Stability Derivatives of Swept and Unswept Wings of Aspect Ratio 2.61

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jack D; Fisher, Lewis R

    1951-01-01

    Results of tests conducted in the 6-foot-diameter rolling-flow test section of the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effects of varying taper ratio on the rolling and static stability characteristics of a swept wing are presented; results are also given for the effects of varying taper ratio on an unswept wing and for the effects of sweep on a tapered wing. All the models were of aspect ratio 2.61 and had NACA 0012 sections normal to the quarter-chord line. Taper ratios of 1.00, 0.50, and 0.25 and sweep angles of 0 degrees and 45 degrees were investigated.

  5. Hall-Petch effect: Another manifestation of size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dunstan, David; Bushby, Andy

    In the 1950s, Hall and Petch first established a quantitative relationship, expressed by the famous Hall-Petch equation: σd =σ0 +kHP/√{ d} There is a very large body of experimental data in the literature reinforcing this dependence in a very wide range of metals. Recently, we presented some of the classic data sets which have been considered to confirm the Hall-Petch equation and showed they are equally well consistent with the equation ɛel (d) =ɛ0 +kln/(d) d Eq. 2 is based on critical thickness theory. Fitting to Eq.1 with the exponent 0.5 replaced by the free fitting parameter x, the confidence interval for the exponent is 0.5 size of each study. The normalised kHP are widely scattered. However, the lower bound of the scatter shows a clear dependence on grain size. The Hall-Petch dependence of the strength on grain size, if it obeys Eq.2, is another manifestation of the size effect.

  6. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…

  7. Effect of Work Group Size and Task Size on Observers' Job Characteristics Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Carl I.; And Others

    The Job Characteristics Model proposed by Hackman and his associates postulates that positive personal and work outcomes are derived from five core job dimensions: skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and feedback from the job. The effects of the number of workers (work group size) and the number of tasks (task size) on…

  8. Vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body in the free surface investigated by SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmez, O.; Ozbulut, M.; Yildiz, M.; Goren, O.

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body with square cross-sections by using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A 2-D rigid body with square cross-section is taken into account for the benchmark study and subjected to the oscillatory roll motion with a given angular frequency. The governing equations are continuity equation and Euler's equation with artificial viscosity term. Weakly Compressible SPH (WCSPH) scheme is employed for the discretization of the governing equations. Velocities of the fluid particles are updated by means of XSPH+Artificial Particle Displacement (VXSPH+APD) algorithm. In this method only the free surface fluid particles are subjected to VXSPH algorithm while the APD algorithm is employed for the fully populated flow regions. The hybrid usage of numerical treatment keeps free surface particles together by creating an artificial surface tension on the free surface. VXSPH+APD is a proven numerical treatment to provide the most accurate results for this type of free surface flows (Ozbulut et al. 2014). The results of the present study are compared with those of the experimental studies as well as with those of the numerical methods obtained from the current literature.

  9. Effects of cold rolling deformation on microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Cheng; Sun, Gui-Xun; Jiang, Zhong-Hao; Ji, Chang-Tao; Liu, Jia-An; Lian, Jian-She

    2014-02-01

    Effects of cold rolling deformation on the microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel (HNASS) are investigated. Microstructure characterization shows that 70% cold rolling deformation results in significant refinement of the microstructure of this steel, with its average twin thickness reducing from 6.4 μm to 14 nm. Nanoindentation tests at different strain rates demonstrate that the hardness of the steel with nano-scale twins (nt-HNASS) is about 2 times as high as that of steel with micro-scale twins (mt-HNASS). The hardness of nt-HNASS exhibits a pronounced strain rate dependence with a strain rate sensitivity (m value) of 0.0319, which is far higher than that of mt-HNASS (m = 0.0029). nt-HNASS shows more significant load plateaus and a higher creep rate than mt-HNASS. Analysis reveals that higher hardness and larger m value of nt-HNASS arise from stronger strain hardening role, which is caused by the higher storage rate of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations and high density twins. The more significant load plateaus and higher creep rates of nt-HNASS are due to the rapid relaxation of the dislocation structures generated during loading.

  10. Effects of Two-Stage Cold Rolling Schedule on Microstructure and Texture Evolution of Strip Casting Grain-Oriented Silicon Steel with Extra-Low Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Yin-Ping; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-04-01

    A 0.27 mm-thick grain-oriented silicon steel sheet with extra-low carbon was successfully produced by a novel processing route including strip casting, normalizing, two-stage cold rolling with an intermediate annealing, primary annealing, and secondary recrystallization annealing. The evolutions of microstructure and texture along the whole processing route were investigated with a special emphasis on the effects of two-stage cold rolling schedule. It was found that Goss orientation originated in the first cold rolling due to shear banding and relatively strong Goss texture evolved through the whole thickness after intermediate annealing. This is significantly different from the results in conventional process in which the origin of Goss texture is in the hot rolling stage and Goss texture only develops below the sheet surface. Besides, it was found that cold rolling schedule had significant influences on microstructure homogeneity, evolution of λ-fiber texture in primary annealed state and, thus, on secondary recrystallization. In case of appropriate cold rolling schedule, a homogeneous microstructure with Goss texture, relatively strong γ-fiber texture and medium α-fiber texture was observed in the primary annealed strip. Although Goss texture in primary annealed state was much weaker than that in two-stage route in conventional process, a perfect secondary recrystallization microstructure was produced and the magnetic induction B8 was as high as 1.85 T. By contrast, when the cold rolling schedule was inappropriate, the primary annealed strips exhibited inhomogeneous microstructure, together with weak γ-fiber texture, medium α-fiber and λ-fiber texture. Finally, the sheets showed incomplete secondary recrystallization microstructure in which a large number of fine grains still existed.

  11. Finite size effects on kaonic 'pasta' structures

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Endo, Tomoki; Voskresensky, Dmitri N.; Tanigawa, Tomonori

    2006-03-15

    Nonuniform structures of mixed phases at the first-order phase transition to charged kaon condensation are studied using a density functional theory within the relativistic mean-field model. Including electric field effects and applying the Gibbs conditions in a proper way, we numerically determine density profiles of nucleons, electrons, and condensed kaons. Importance of charge screening effects is elucidated and thereby we show that the Maxwell construction is effectively justified. Surface effect is also studied to figure out its effect on the density profiles.

  12. Size effects on the fatigue behavior of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Y.; Liaw, P. K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2011-12-01

    Size effects on bending fatigue characteristics are investigated on Zr-based bulk-metallic glasses (BMGs). The fatigue lifetimes and endurance limits of the large-size samples are greater than those of the small-size samples. The results suggest that although a BMG exhibits good ductility due to the formation of multiple shear bands when its size decreases, the fatigue resistance of BMGs might degrade when the specimen size becomes smaller. The current study finds that small-size BMG samples under bending fatigue could fail in the flexural or fracture mode.

  13. Influence of roll and solution treatment processing on shape memory effect of Fe-14Mn-5Si-9Cr-5Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.L.; Jin, Z.H.

    1998-10-01

    The shape memory effect was studied in an Fe-14Mn-5Si-9Cr-5Ni alloy rerolled at 1123 K after hot rolling at 1423 K, followed by solution treatment at different temperatures. It was found that the alloy exhibits a maximum degree of shape recovery in a bending test and a complete recovery tensile strain of 2.2% in samples that were solution heated at 973 K for 600 s and then quenched in water. The rerolled processing at 1123 K after hot rolling at 1423 K and the microstructure under solution treatment state are important for obtaining a good shape memory effect in the alloy.

  14. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  15. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  16. Effect of physisorption and chemisorption of water on resonant modes of rolled-up tubular microcavities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both blue- and redshifts of resonant modes are observed in the rolled-up Y2O3/ZrO2 tubular microcavity during a conformal oxide coating process. Our investigation based on spectral analyses suggests that there are two competitive processes during coating: desorption of both chemically and physically absorbed water molecules and increase of the tube wall thickness. The redshift is due to the increase of the wall thickness and corresponding light confinement enhancement. On the other hand, desorption of water molecules by heating leads to a blueshift. The balance of these two factors produces the observed bi-directional shift of the modes while they both contribute to promoted quality factor after coating. PMID:24344644

  17. Effect of grain sizes on mechanical properties and biodegradation behavior of pure iron for cardiovascular stent application

    PubMed Central

    Obayi, Camillus Sunday; Tolouei, Ranna; Mostavan, Afghany; Paternoster, Carlo; Turgeon, Stephane; Okorie, Boniface Adeleh; Obikwelu, Daniel Oray; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pure iron has been demonstrated as a potential candidate for biodegradable metal stents due to its appropriate biocompatibility, suitable mechanical properties and uniform biodegradation behavior. The competing parameters that control the safety and the performance of BMS include proper strength-ductility combination, biocompatibility along with matching rate of corrosion with healing rate of arteries. Being a micrometre-scale biomedical device, the mentioned variables have been found to be governed by the average grain size of the bulk material. Thermo-mechanical processing techniques of the cold rolling and annealing were used to grain-refine the pure iron. Pure Fe samples were unidirectionally cold rolled and then isochronally annealed at different temperatures with the intention of inducing different ranges of grain size. The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on mechanical properties and corrosion rates of the samples were investigated, correspondingly. Mechanical properties of pure Fe samples improved significantly with decrease in grain size while the corrosion rate decreased marginally with decrease in the average grain sizes. These findings could lead to the optimization of the properties to attain an adequate biodegradation-strength-ductility balance. PMID:25482336

  18. Effect of grain sizes on mechanical properties and biodegradation behavior of pure iron for cardiovascular stent application.

    PubMed

    Obayi, Camillus Sunday; Tolouei, Ranna; Mostavan, Afghany; Paternoster, Carlo; Turgeon, Stephane; Okorie, Boniface Adeleh; Obikwelu, Daniel Oray; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been demonstrated as a potential candidate for biodegradable metal stents due to its appropriate biocompatibility, suitable mechanical properties and uniform biodegradation behavior. The competing parameters that control the safety and the performance of BMS include proper strength-ductility combination, biocompatibility along with matching rate of corrosion with healing rate of arteries. Being a micrometre-scale biomedical device, the mentioned variables have been found to be governed by the average grain size of the bulk material. Thermo-mechanical processing techniques of the cold rolling and annealing were used to grain-refine the pure iron. Pure Fe samples were unidirectionally cold rolled and then isochronally annealed at different temperatures with the intention of inducing different ranges of grain size. The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on mechanical properties and corrosion rates of the samples were investigated, correspondingly. Mechanical properties of pure Fe samples improved significantly with decrease in grain size while the corrosion rate decreased marginally with decrease in the average grain sizes. These findings could lead to the optimization of the properties to attain an adequate biodegradation-strength-ductility balance.

  19. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior.

  20. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior. PMID:23116121

  1. How Consistent Are Class Size Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    Thus far researchers have focused on computing average differences in student achievement between smaller and larger classes. In this study, the author focus on the distribution of the small class effects at the school level and compute the inconsistency of the small class effects across schools. The author use data from Project STAR to estimate…

  2. Density-dependent effects on growth, body size, and clutch size in black brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedinger, J.S.; Lindberg, M.S.; Person, B.T.; Eichholz, M.W.; Herzog, M.P.; Flint, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    We documented gosling size in late summer, adult body size, and clutch size of known-age Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) females nesting on the Tutakoke River colony between 1986 and 1995. During this period, the colony increased from 1,100 to >5,000 nesting pairs. Gosling mass at 30 days of age declined from 764 ?? SE of 13 g and 723 ?? 15 g for males and females, respectively, in the 1986 cohort, to 665 ?? 18 g and 579 ?? 18 g in the 1994 cohort. Gosling size was directly negatively correlated with number of Black Brant broods. We detected no trend in adult body size for individuals from these cohorts; in fact, adults from the 1992 and 1994 cohorts had the largest overall masses. Clutch size increased with age from 3.4 eggs for 2-year-old females to 4.4 eggs for 5-year-old females. Clutch size declined during the study by 0.20 (3-year-old females) to 0.45 (2-year-old females) eggs. Clutch size did not decline between the 1986 and 1990 cohorts for females that were >5 years old. Our results for clutch size and gosling size are similar to those recorded for Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens). Our failure to detect a trend in adult body size, however, differs from the response of other geese to increasing population density. We interpret this difference in effects of density on adult size between Black Brant and other geese as an indication of stronger selection against the smallest individuals in Black Brant relative to other species of geese.

  3. Portion size and intended consumption. Evidence for a pre-consumption portion size effect in males?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Eric; te Raa, Wesselien; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Larger portions increase energy intake (the 'portion size effect'); however, the mechanisms behind this effect are unclear. Although pre-meal intentions are thought to be an important determinant of energy intake, little research has examined how much of a meal individuals intend to eat when served standard versus larger portion sizes. Three studies examined the effect of manipulating portion size on intended food consumption. In Studies 1 (spaghetti bolognese) and 2 (curry and rice) male participants were shown an image of either a standard or a larger meal and indicated how much of the meal they intended to consume. In Study 3 male and female participants were served either a standard or a larger portion of ice cream for dessert, they indicated how much they intended to consume and then ate as much of the ice cream as they desired. Regardless of being shown standard or large portion sizes, in Studies 1 and 2 participants reported that they intended to eat the majority of the meal, equating to a large difference in intended energy consumption between portion size conditions (a 'pre-consumption portion size effect'). This finding was replicated in male participants in Study 3, although females intended to eat a smaller proportion of the larger portion of ice cream, compared to the standard portion. Both male and female participants tended to eat in accordance with their pre-meal intentions and a portion size effect on actual consumption was subsequently observed in males, but not in females. The portion size effect may be observed when measuring pre-meal intended consumption in males. PMID:25865660

  4. Development of neural basis for chinese orthographic neighborhood size effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Qing-Lin; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The brain activity of orthographic neighborhood size (N size) effect in Chinese character naming has been studied in adults, meanwhile behavioral studies have revealed a developmental trend of Chinese N-size effect in developing readers. However, it is unclear whether and how the neural mechanism of N-size effect changes in Chinese children along with development. Here we address this issue using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Forty-four students from the 3(rd) , 5(th) , and 7(th) grades were scanned during silent naming of Chinese characters. After scanning, all participants took part in an overt naming test outside the scanner, and results of the naming task showed that the 3(rd) graders named characters from large neighborhoods faster than those from small neighborhoods, revealing a facilitatory N-size effect; the 5(th) graders showed null N-size effect while the 7(th) graders showed an inhibitory N-size effect. Neuroimaging results revealed that only the 3(rd) graders exhibited a significant N-size effect in the left middle occipital activity, with greater activation for large N-size characters. Results of 5(th) and 7(th) graders showed significant N-size effects in the left middle frontal gyrus, in which 5(th) graders induced greater activation in large N-size condition than in small N-size condition, while 7(th) graders exhibited an opposite effect which was similar to the adult pattern reported in a previous study. The current findings suggested the transition from broadly tuned to finely tuned orthographic representation with reading development, and the inhibition from neighbors' phonology for higher graders. Hum Brain Mapp 37:632-647, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26777875

  5. Finite size effect of harmonic measure estimation in a DLA model: Variable size of probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, Anton Yu.; Shchur, Lev N.; Vinokour, Valery M.

    2008-11-01

    A finite size effect in the probing of the harmonic measure in simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) growth is investigated. We introduce a variable size of probe particles, to estimate harmonic measure and extract the fractal dimension of DLA clusters taking two limits, of vanishingly small probe particle size and of infinitely large size of a DLA cluster. We generate 1000 DLA clusters consisting of 50 million particles each, using an off-lattice killing-free algorithm developed in the early work. The introduced method leads to unprecedented accuracy in the estimation of the fractal dimension. We discuss the variation of the probability distribution function with the size of probing particles.

  6. Effect of Coiling Temperature on Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of a Hot-Rolled Ferritic Lightweight Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Yang, Qi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Effects of coiling temperature (CT) ranging from 673 K to 973 K (400 °C to 700 °C) on microstructure and tensile property of a hot-rolled ferritic lightweight steel containing 0.35 wt pct C and 4.1 wt pct Al are investigated in the present study. Basically, the microstructure of the hot-rolled steel is composed of δ-ferrite grain bands and secondary phase bands which are originated from the decomposition of antecedent austenite. The secondary phase band is a bainite band at coiling temperatures (CTs) lower than 723 K (450 °C). More specifically, the bainite band mainly consists of lower bainite together with blocky retained austenite at the CT of 673 K (400 °C), while it primarily contains carbide-free bainite being an aggregate of lath-shaped ferrite and austenite at the CT of 723 K (450 °C). The secondary phase band is a carbide band which mainly contains a pearlite structure at CTs higher than 773 K (500 °C). There are three types of carbides in the steel matrix: transitional ɛ-carbide present inside lower bainite, cementite present within carbide bands as well as at the boundaries between carbide bands and δ-ferrite bands, and κ-carbide present at δ-ferrite grain boundaries which is clearly seen at CTs higher than 773 K (500 °C). The volume fraction of retained austenite reaches the peak value of 9.6 pct at the CT of 723 K (450 °C), and abruptly drops to zero when the CTs are higher than 773 K (500 °C). Lath-shaped retained austenite with a higher volume fraction induces significant enhancement of elongation through the TRIP effect, leading to a uniform elongation of 25 pct and an elongation-to-failure of 32 pct at the CT of 723 K (450 °C). Crack initiation and propagation inside the tested specimens are tracked and fracture surface is observed to help understand the deformation and fracture behavior of the hot-rolled steel.

  7. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  8. Nuclear size effects in vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Shee, Avijit; Saue, Trond

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of nuclear volume in the rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules which is an extension of a previous study restricted to rotational spectra [Chem. Phys., 2012, 401, 103]. We provide a new derivation for the electron-nucleus electrostatic interaction energy which is basically independent of the choice of model for the nuclear charge distribution. Starting from this expression we derive expressions for the electronic, rotational and vibrational field shift parameters in terms of effective electron density and its first and second derivatives with respect to internuclear distance. The effective density is often approximated by the contact density, but we demonstrate that this leads to errors on the order of 10% and is furthermore not necessary since the contact and effective densities can be obtained at the same computational cost. We calculate the field shift parameters at the 4-component relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles level and find that our results confirm the experimental findings of Tiemann and co-workers [Chem. Phys., 1982, 68(21), 1982, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86, 821], whereas we find no theoretical justification for a scaling factor introduced in later work [Chem. Phys., 1985, 93, 349]. For lead sulfide we study the effective density as a function of internuclear distance and find a minimum some 0.2 Å inside the equilibrium bond distance. We also discuss Bigeleisen-Goeppert-Mayer theory of isotope fractionation in light of our results.

  9. Nuclear size effects in vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Shee, Avijit; Saue, Trond

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of nuclear volume in the rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules which is an extension of a previous study restricted to rotational spectra [Chem. Phys., 2012, 401, 103]. We provide a new derivation for the electron-nucleus electrostatic interaction energy which is basically independent of the choice of model for the nuclear charge distribution. Starting from this expression we derive expressions for the electronic, rotational and vibrational field shift parameters in terms of effective electron density and its first and second derivatives with respect to internuclear distance. The effective density is often approximated by the contact density, but we demonstrate that this leads to errors on the order of 10% and is furthermore not necessary since the contact and effective densities can be obtained at the same computational cost. We calculate the field shift parameters at the 4-component relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles level and find that our results confirm the experimental findings of Tiemann and co-workers [Chem. Phys., 1982, 68(21), 1982, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86, 821], whereas we find no theoretical justification for a scaling factor introduced in later work [Chem. Phys., 1985, 93, 349]. For lead sulfide we study the effective density as a function of internuclear distance and find a minimum some 0.2 Å inside the equilibrium bond distance. We also discuss Bigeleisen-Goeppert-Mayer theory of isotope fractionation in light of our results. PMID:27215395

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and yield strength of a cold-rolled enameling steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D.; Yu, Q.; Lin, C.; An, D.; Dai, T.; Krakauer, B. W.; Zhu, M.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms of yield strength reduction of a cold-rolled enameling steel after enamel-fire annealing at 760°C by air cooling, and the effect of the tempering process on the microstructure and yield strength, are studied by combining experiments and thermodynamic calculations. The results show that after heat treatment at 760°C and air cooling, the lump phase, enriched with the element carbon, appears along the ferrite grain boundaries, which leads to yield strength reduction. After tempering at 200°C∼400°C, the lump phase disappears gradually and is transformed to lamellar pearlite as the tempering temperature increases, resulting in the yield strength increasing.

  11. Family size and effective population size in a hatchery stock of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, R.C.; McIntyre, J.D.; Hemmingsen, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Means and variances of family size measured in five year-classes of wire-tagged coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were linearly related. Population effective size was calculated by using estimated means and variances of family size in a 25-yr data set. Although numbers of age 3 adults returning to the hatchery appeared to be large enough to avoid inbreeding problems (the 25-yr mean exceeded 4500), the numbers actually contributing to the hatchery production may be too low. Several strategies are proposed to correct the problem perceived. Argument is given to support the contention that the problem of effective size is fairly general and is not confined to the present study population.

  12. An Effect Size for Regression Predictors in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloe, Ariel M.; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2012-01-01

    A new effect size representing the predictive power of an independent variable from a multiple regression model is presented. The index, denoted as r[subscript sp], is the semipartial correlation of the predictor with the outcome of interest. This effect size can be computed when multiple predictor variables are included in the regression model…

  13. Mean-field description of ionic size effects with nonuniform ionic sizes: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Wang, Zhongming; Li, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Ionic size effects are significant in many biological systems. Mean-field descriptions of such effects can be efficient but also challenging. When ionic sizes are different, explicit formulas in such descriptions are not available for the dependence of the ionic concentrations on the electrostatic potential, that is, there is no explicit Boltzmann-type distributions. This work begins with a variational formulation of the continuum electrostatics of an ionic solution with such nonuniform ionic sizes as well as multiple ionic valences. An augmented Lagrange multiplier method is then developed and implemented to numerically solve the underlying constrained optimization problem. The method is shown to be accurate and efficient, and is applied to ionic systems with nonuniform ionic sizes such as the sodium chloride solution. Extensive numerical tests demonstrate that the mean-field model and numerical method capture qualitatively some significant ionic size effects, particularly those for multivalent ionic solutions, such as the stratification of multivalent counterions near a charged surface. The ionic valence-to-volume ratio is found to be the key physical parameter in the stratification of concentrations. All these are not well described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, or the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann theory that treats uniform ionic sizes. Finally, various issues such as the close packing, limitation of the continuum model, and generalization of this work to molecular solvation are discussed. PMID:21929014

  14. Effect of SiC Nanoparticles on Bond Strength of Cold Roll Bonded IF Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Edris, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    In this study, cold roll bonding process characteristics of IF steel strips, such as bond strength, threshold deformation, undulation of peeling force, and peeled surface, in the presence of SiC nanoparticles were examined and compared to those of an IF steel strip without nanoparticles. The bond strength was evaluated by the peeling test and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that when the thickness reduction was increased, the peeling force of IF steel strips improved. The results also indicated that the presence of silicon carbide nanoparticles decreased the bond strength of IF steel strips when compared to the strips without nanoparticles for the same thickness reduction. When the thickness reduction was increased, the undulation of average peeling force values increased at a constant nanoparticle content. Also, the strips without nanoparticles had a lower undulation value as compared to the strips with SiC nanoparticles. In addition, in the presence of silicon carbide, when the nanoparticles' content was increased, the undulation of average peeling force values decreased at a constant thickness reduction. Finally, it was found that the bond strength of IF steel strips was less than that of aluminum and copper strips. This was attributed to their crystal structure.

  15. Effect of Frying Conditions and Yeast Fermentation on the Acrylamide Content in You-Tiao, a Traditional Chinese Fried Twisted Dough-roll

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of frying temperature, frying time and dough pH on the formation of acrylamide in the processing of you-tiao, a traditional Chinese fried twisted dough-roll, were analyzed using response surface methodology. The results obtained showed that the frying temperature and time had a notable impa...

  16. Repeated Habitat Disturbances by Fire Decrease Local Effective Population Size.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aaron W; Ragsdale, Alexandria K; McCoy, Earl D; Mushinsky, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Effective population size is a fundamental parameter in population genetics, and factors that alter effective population size will shape the genetic characteristics of populations. Habitat disturbance may have a large effect on genetic characteristics of populations by influencing immigration and gene flow, particularly in fragmented habitats. We used the Florida Sand Skink (Plestiodon reynoldsi) to investigate the effect of fire-based habitat disturbances on the effective population size in the highly threatened, severely fragmented, and fire dependent Florida scrub habitat. We screened 7 microsatellite loci in 604 individuals collected from 12 locations at Archbold Biological Station. Archbold Biological Station has an active fire management plan and detailed records of fires dating to 1967. Our objective was to determine how the timing, number, and intervals between fires affect effective population size, focusing on multiple fires in the same location. Effective population size was higher in areas that had not been burned for more than 10 years and decreased with number of fires and shorter time between fires. A similar pattern was observed in abundance: increasing abundance with time-since-fire and decreasing abundance with number of fires. The ratio of effective population size to census size was higher at sites with more recent fires and tended to decrease with time-since-last-fire. These results suggest that habitat disturbances, such as fire, may have a large effect in the genetic characteristics of local populations and that Florida Sand Skinks are well adapted to the natural fire dynamics required to maintain Florida scrub.

  17. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  18. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  19. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol.

  20. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Lehman, Gregory J; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson's r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = -1.39° (-5.53, +2.75); t(22) = -0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen's d = - 0.15 (-0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = -0.005 (-0.013, +0.003); t(22) = -1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen's d = - 0.27 (-0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  1. WORK ROLLS AND BACKUP ROLLS FROM #43 AND #44 MILLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORK ROLLS AND BACKUP ROLLS FROM #43 AND #44 MILLS AWAIT DRESSING IN ROLL GRINDER. ROLL SHOP OPERATIONS, INCLUDING REPAIR, CLEANING AND GREASING, ARE HOUSED IN THE REROLL BAY. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  2. Relationship among grain size, annealing twins and shape memory effect in Fe–Mn–Si based shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaixia; Peng, Huabei; Zhang, Chengyan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship among grain size, annealing twins and the shape memory effect in Fe–Mn–Si based shape memory alloys, the Fe–21.63Mn–5.60Si–9.32Cr–5.38Ni (weight %) alloy with a grain size ranging from 48.9 μm–253.6 μm was obtained by adjusting the heating temperature or heating time after 20% cold-rolling. The densities of grain boundaries and annealing twins increase with a decrease in grain size, whereas the volume fraction and width of stress-induced ε martensite after 9% deformation at Ms + 10 K decrease. This result indicates that grain refinement raises the constraint effects of grain boundaries and annealing twins upon martensitic transformation. In this case, the ability to suppress the plastic deformation and facilitate the stress-induced ε martensite transformation deteriorates after grain refinement owing to the enhancement of the constraint effects. It is demonstrated by the result that the difference at Ms + 10 K between the critical stress for plastic yielding and that for inducing martensitic transformation is smaller for the specimen with a grain size of 48.9 μm than for the specimen with a grain size of 253.6 μm. Therefore, the shape memory effect declined by decreasing the grain size.

  3. Relationship among grain size, annealing twins and shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaixia; Peng, Huabei; Zhang, Chengyan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship among grain size, annealing twins and the shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys, the Fe-21.63Mn-5.60Si-9.32Cr-5.38Ni (weight %) alloy with a grain size ranging from 48.9 μm-253.6 μm was obtained by adjusting the heating temperature or heating time after 20% cold-rolling. The densities of grain boundaries and annealing twins increase with a decrease in grain size, whereas the volume fraction and width of stress-induced ɛ martensite after 9% deformation at Ms + 10 K decrease. This result indicates that grain refinement raises the constraint effects of grain boundaries and annealing twins upon martensitic transformation. In this case, the ability to suppress the plastic deformation and facilitate the stress-induced ɛ martensite transformation deteriorates after grain refinement owing to the enhancement of the constraint effects. It is demonstrated by the result that the difference at Ms + 10 K between the critical stress for plastic yielding and that for inducing martensitic transformation is smaller for the specimen with a grain size of 48.9 μm than for the specimen with a grain size of 253.6 μm. Therefore, the shape memory effect declined by decreasing the grain size.

  4. Effect of cold rolling and first precipitates on the coarsening behavior of γ″-phases in Inconel 718 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-ling; Guo, Qian-ying; Liu, Yong-chang; Li, Chong; Yu, Li-ming; Li, Hui-jun

    2016-09-01

    The coarsening behaviors of γ″-phase particles in Inconel 718 alloy aged at 750, 800, and 850°C were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Detailed observations and quantitative measurements were conducted to characterize the coarsening behavior of the γ?-phase under various aging conditions. The experimental results indicate that the existence of the δ-phase retards the formation and coarsening of the γ″-phase, without influencing its final particle size or amount. Moreover, when cold rolled with a reduction of 50%, the dimensions of the γ″ particles in Inconel 718 alloy decrease with increasing aging time. Furthermore, the coarsening behavior of the γ″-phase in the Inconel 718 alloy after a normal aging treatment (sample A) and that of the primary δ-phase (sample B) follow the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) diffusion-controlled growth theory; the thus-obtained activation energies for the γ″-phase are 292 kJ·mol-1 and 302 kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  5. Effects of Ti and B Addition on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Hot-Rolled High-Strength Nb-Containing Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xianna; Li, Cong; Chen, Wanglin

    2016-08-01

    Four microalloyed samples were designed to study the effects of Ti and B additions on microstructures and mechanical properties. Experimental results show that the samples without B addition mainly contain well-developed pearlite and polygonal ferrite, whereas the B-containing samples consist of degenerated pearlite, polygonal ferrite, and Widmanstätten ferrite (WF). The B addition promotes the precipitation of the complex (Ti,Al,Nb)N and (Ti,Al,Nb)2CS phases during the hot-rolling process. Grain sizes are significantly refined by the combinations of undissolved (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Al,Nb)N complex, (Ti,Al,Nb)2CS, and fine inclusions, which act as the nucleation sites of intragranular ferrite. The core of complex (Ti,Al,Nb)N precipitate is undissolved Ti-N-rich (Ti,Al)N phase, and the cap is Nb-N-rich (Nb,Ti)N phase. The property measurements show that the B addition enhances comprehensive properties of tensile strength and elongation, but decreases fracture toughness due to higher contents of the WF and subgrains.

  6. Effect of Ar Ion Beam Pre-Treatment of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Substrate on the Mechanical and Electrical Stability of Flexible InSnO Films Grown by Roll-to-Roll Sputtering System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwang-Hyuk; Kim, Han-Ki

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the effects of Ar ion beam irradiation on a flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate as surface pre-treatment method in the roll-to-roll (R2R) sputtering system and its contribution to the electrical durability of flexible InSnO (ITO) electrode upon that the flexible PET substrate under repeated mechanical stresses. It was found that the Ar ion beam irradiation of the flexible PET surface could improve an adhesion between R2R sputter-grown ITO film and the PET substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the Ar ion beam irradiation lead to an increase of hydrophilic functional groups when the working pressure, Ar ion beam power, and exposure time increases. Repetitive bending stresses for the flexible ITO/PET film which fabricated through the surface pre-treatment by Ar ion beam irradiation showed more stable electrical durability than those of ITO films on the wet-cleaned PET substrate due to enhanced interfacial adhesion between the ITO film and PET surface. This suggests that the Ar ion beam pre-treatment before sputtering of ITO film in R2R sputtering system is an effective technique to improve the adhesion between ITO film and PET substrate.

  7. An experimental study for determining human discomfort response to roll vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study using a passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) was conducted to determine the subjective reactions of passengers to roll vibrations. The data obtained illustrate the effect upon human comfort of several roll-vibration parameters: namely, roll acceleration level, roll frequency, and seat location (i.e., distance from axis of rotation). Results of an analysis of variance indicated that seat location had no effect on discomfort ratings of roll vibrations. The effect of roll acceleration level was significant, and discomfort ratings increased markedly with increasing roll acceleration level at all roll frequencies investigated. Of particular interest, is the fact that the relationship between discomfort ratings and roll acceleration level was linear in nature. The effect of roll frequency also was significant as was the interaction between roll acceleration level and roll frequency.

  8. A Practical Method of Policy Analysis by Estimating Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The previous articles on class size and other productivity research paint a complex and confusing picture of the relationship between policy variables and student achievement. Missing is a conceptual scheme capable of combining the seemingly unrelated research and dissimilar estimates of effect size into a unified structure for policy analysis and…

  9. The Effect of Primary School Size on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenson, Seth; Langbein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on optimal school size is mixed. We estimate the effect of transitory changes in school size on the academic achievement of fourth-and fifth-grade students in North Carolina using student-level longitudinal administrative data. Estimates of value-added models that condition on school-specific linear time trends and a variety of…

  10. How Methodological Features Affect Effect Sizes in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Alan; Slavin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As evidence-based reform becomes increasingly important in educational policy, it is becoming essential to understand how research design might contribute to reported effect sizes in experiments evaluating educational programs. The purpose of this study was to examine how methodological features such as types of publication, sample sizes, and…

  11. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  12. Internal roll compression system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Graydon E.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a machine for squeezing water out of peat or other material of low tensile strength; the machine including an inner roll eccentrically positioned inside a tubular outer roll, so as to form a gradually increasing pinch area at one point therebetween, so that, as the rolls rotate, the material is placed between the rolls, and gets wrung out when passing through the pinch area.

  13. Improvement of vehicle roll stability by varying suspension properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Taehyun; Velusamy, Pradheep C.

    2011-02-01

    Vehicle roll dynamics are strongly influenced by suspension properties such as roll centre height, roll steer, and roll camber. In this paper, the effects of suspension properties on vehicle roll response have been investigated using a multi-body vehicle dynamics programme. Roll dynamics of a vehicle model with MacPherson (front) and multilink (rear) suspensions were evaluated for the fishhook manoeuvre and variations of its roll response due to changes in the suspension properties were assessed by quantitatively analysing the vehicle response through simulation. Critical suspension design parameters for vehicle roll dynamics were identified and adjusted to improve roll stability of the vehicle model with passive suspension. Design of experiments has been used for identifying critical hardpoints affecting the suspension parameters, and optimisation techniques were employed for parameter optimisation. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active control systems for economy-class vehicles.

  14. Size Matters: The Effect of Institutional Size on Graduation Rates. AIR 1997 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, John P., Jr.; Schneiderman, Stuart

    This study examined the effect of institutional size on the six year institutional graduation rate for undergraduates, controlling for five variables known to affect graduation rate: (1) student academic preparation; (2) enrollment to dormitory capacity ratio; (3) percentage of part-time students; (4) expenditure per student; and (5) student to…

  15. Where Class Size Really Matters: Class Size and Student Ratings of Instructor Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Kelly; Kuhn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We examine the impact of class size on student evaluations of instructor performance using data on all economics classes offered at the University of California, Santa Barbara from Fall 1997 to Spring 2004. A particular strength of this data is the opportunity to control for both instructor and course fixed effects. In contrast to the literature…

  16. Investigation and Modeling of Recrystallization of Cold Rolled Automotive Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitelev, P.; Vasilyev, A.; Sokolov, S.; Sokolov, D.; Paligin, R.

    2016-04-01

    Ferrite recrystallization in cold-rolled sheets of automotive steels has been studied using a Geeble 3800 complex. Mathematical models for quantitative description of the process kinetics and prediction of the recrystallized ferrite grain size have been developed. These models enable performing calculations for any arbitrary heating regimes, including those that are used in industrial production practice, and allow taking into account the effects of a fairly wide range variation of the chemical composition of steels.

  17. Study of Titanium Alloy Sheet During H-sectioned Rolling Forming Using the Taguchi Method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.-C.; Gu, W.-S.; Hwang, Y.-M.

    2007-05-17

    This study employs commercial DEFORM three-dimensional finite element code to investigate the plastic deformation behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy sheet during the H-sectioned rolling process. The simulations are based on a rigid-plastic model and assume that the upper and lower rolls are rigid bodies and that the temperature rise induced during rolling is sufficiently small that it can be ignored. The effects of the roll profile, the friction factor between the rolls and the titanium alloy, the rolling temperature and the roll radii on the rolling force, the roll torque and the effective strain induced in the rolled product are examined. The Taguchi method is employed to optimize the H-sectioned rolling process parameters. The results confirm the effectiveness of this robust design methodology in optimizing the H-sectioned rolling process parameters for the current Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy.

  18. Roll forming of eco-friendly stud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Y. T.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. H.; Sim, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    In order to manufacture an eco-friendly stud, the sheared pattern is designed by the Taguchi method and expanded by the side rolls. The seven geometrical shape of sheared pattern are considered in the structural and thermal analyses to select the best functional one in terms of the durability and fire resistance of dry wall. For optimizing the size of the sheared pattern chosen, the L9 orthogonal array and smaller-the-better characteristics of the Taguchi method are used. As the roll gap causes forming defects when the upper-and-lower roll type is adopted for expanding the sheared pattern, the side roll type is introduced. The stress and strain distributions obtained by the FEM simulation of roll-forming processes are utilized for the design of expanding process. The expanding process by side rolls shortens the length of expanding process and minimizes the cost of dies. Furthermore, the stud manufactured by expanding the sheared pattern of the web is an eco-friend because of the scrapless roll-forming process. In addition, compared to the conventionally roll-formed stud, the material cost is lessened about 13.6% and the weight is lightened about 15.5%.

  19. Resistance to Rolling in the Adhesive Contact of Two Elastic Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    For the stability of agglomerates of micron sized particles it is of considerable importance to study the effects of tangential forces on the contact of two particles. If the particles can slide or roll easily over each other, fractal structures of these agglomerates will not be stable. We use the description of contact forces by Johnson, Kendall and Roberts, along with arguments based on the atomic structure of the surfaces in contact, in order to calculate the resistance to rolling in such a contact. It is shown that the contact reacts elastically to torque forces up to a critical bending angle. Beyond that, irreversible rolling occurs. In the elastic regime, the moment opposing the attempt to roll is proportional to the bending angle and to the pull-off force P(sub c). Young's modulus of the involved materials has hardly any influence on the results. We show that agglomerates of sub-micron sized particles will in general be quite rigid and even long chains of particles cannot be bent easily. For very small particles, the contact will rather break than allow for rolling. We further discuss dynamic properties such as the possibility of vibrations in this degree of freedom and the typical amount of rolling during a collision of two particles.

  20. Effect of Artificial Pitch Damping on the Longitudinal and Rolling Stability of Aircraft with Negative Static Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moul, Martin T.; Brown, Lawrence W.

    1959-01-01

    A preliminary theoretical investigation has been made of the short-period longitudinal and steady-rolling (inertia coupling) stability of a hypersonic glider configuration for center-of-gravity locations rear-ward of the airplane neutral point. Such center-of-gravity positions for subsonic flight would improve performance by reducing supersonic and hypersonic static margins and trim drag. Results are presented of stability calculations and a simulator study for a velocity of 700 ft/sec and an altitude of 401,000 feet. With no augmentation, the airplane was rapidly divergent and was considered unsatisfactory in the simulator study. When a pitch damper was employed as a stability augmenter, the short-period mode became overdamped, and the airplane was easily controlled on the simulator. A steady-rolling analysis showed that the airplane can be made free of rolling divergence for all roll rates with an appropriate damper gain.

  1. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  2. Effect of Annealing on Mechanical Properties and Formability of Cold Rolled Thin Sheets of Fe-P P/M Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Shefali; Ravi Kumar, D.; Aravindan, S.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus in steel is known to increase strength and hardness and decrease ductility. Higher phosphorus content (more than 0.05%), however, promotes brittle behavior due to segregation of Fe3P along the grain boundaries which makes further mechanical working of these alloys difficult. In this work, thin sheets of Fe-P alloys (with phosphorus in range of 0.1-0.35%) have been developed through processing by powder metallurgy followed by hot rolling and cold rolling. The effect of phosphorus content and annealing parameters (temperature and time) on microstructure, mechanical properties, formability in biaxial stretching and fracture behavior of the cold rolled and annealed sheets has been studied. A comparison has also been made between the properties of the sheets made through P/M route and the conventional cast route with similar phosphorus content. It has been shown that thin sheets of Fe-P alloys with phosphorous up to 0.35% possessing a good combination of strength and formability can be produced through rolling of billets of these alloys made through powder metallurgy technique without the problem of segregation.

  3. Effect of Annealing on Mechanical Properties and Formability of Cold Rolled Thin Sheets of Fe-P P/M Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Shefali; Ravi Kumar, D.; Aravindan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphorus in steel is known to increase strength and hardness and decrease ductility. Higher phosphorus content (more than 0.05%), however, promotes brittle behavior due to segregation of Fe3P along the grain boundaries which makes further mechanical working of these alloys difficult. In this work, thin sheets of Fe-P alloys (with phosphorus in range of 0.1-0.35%) have been developed through processing by powder metallurgy followed by hot rolling and cold rolling. The effect of phosphorus content and annealing parameters (temperature and time) on microstructure, mechanical properties, formability in biaxial stretching and fracture behavior of the cold rolled and annealed sheets has been studied. A comparison has also been made between the properties of the sheets made through P/M route and the conventional cast route with similar phosphorus content. It has been shown that thin sheets of Fe-P alloys with phosphorous up to 0.35% possessing a good combination of strength and formability can be produced through rolling of billets of these alloys made through powder metallurgy technique without the problem of segregation.

  4. Effects of Alloying Elements on High-Temperature Oxidation and Sticking Occurring During Hot Rolling of Modified Ferritic STS430J1L Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Lee, Jong Seog; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, mechanisms of sticking that occurs during hot rolling of modified STS430J1L ferritic stainless steels were investigated by using a pilot-plant-scale rolling machine, and the effects of alloying elements on sticking were analyzed by the high-temperature oxidation behavior. The hot-rolling test results indicated that the Cr oxide layer formed in a heating furnace was broken off and infiltrated the steel, thereby forming Cr oxides on the rolled steel surface. Because the surface region without oxides underwent a reduction in hardness rather than the surface region with oxides, the thickness of the surface oxide layer favorably affected the resistance to sticking. The addition of Zr, Cu, and Ni to the ferritic stainless steels worked in favor of the decreased sticking, but the Si addition negatively affected the resistance to sticking. In the Si-rich steel, Si oxides were continuously formed along the interfacial area between the Cr oxide layer and the base steel, and interrupted the formation and growth of the Cr oxide layer. Because the Si addition played a role in increasing sticking, the reduction in Si content was desirable for preventing sticking.

  5. Effects of MC-Type Carbide Forming and Graphitizing Elements on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Indefinite Chilled Cast Iron Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Choi, Won-Doo; Suh, Yongchan; Lee, Young-Kook; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of indefinite chilled cast iron rolls with various V+Nb contents and Si/Cr ratios was evaluated. Increasing the ratio of Si/Cr prolonged the life of the rolls by reducing brittle cementites. Higher V+Nb addition also increased the life through the formation of carbides that refined and toughened the martensite matrix and reduced the thermal expansion mismatch in the microstructure.

  6. The Effect Size Statistic: Overview of Various Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahadevan, Lakshmi

    Over the years, methodologists have been recommending that researchers use magnitude of effect estimates in result interpretation to highlight the distinction between statistical and practical significance (cf. R. Kirk, 1996). A magnitude of effect statistic (i.e., effect size) tells to what degree the dependent variable can be controlled,…

  7. Effects of Mesh Size on Sieved Samples of Corophium volutator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewe, Tara L.; Hamilton, Diana J.; Diamond, Antony W.

    2001-08-01

    Corophium volutator (Pallas), gammaridean amphipods found on intertidal mudflats, are frequently collected in mud samples sieved on mesh screens. However, mesh sizes used vary greatly among studies, raising the possibility that sampling methods bias results. The effect of using different mesh sizes on the resulting size-frequency distributions of Corophium was tested by collecting Corophium from mud samples with 0·5 and 0·25 mm sieves. More than 90% of Corophium less than 2 mm long passed through the larger sieve. A significantly smaller, but still substantial, proportion of 2-2·9 mm Corophium (30%) was also lost. Larger size classes were unaffected by mesh size. Mesh size significantly changed the observed size-frequency distribution of Corophium, and effects varied with sampling date. It is concluded that a 0·5 mm sieve is suitable for studies concentrating on adults, but to accurately estimate Corophium density and size-frequency distributions, a 0·25 mm sieve must be used.

  8. Drift by drift: effective population size is limited by advection

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic estimates of effective population size often generate surprising results, including dramatically low ratios of effective population size to census size. This is particularly true for many marine species, and this effect has been associated with hypotheses of "sweepstakes" reproduction and selective hitchhiking. Results Here we show that in advective environments such as oceans and rivers, the mean asymmetric transport of passively dispersed reproductive propagules will act to limit the effective population size in species with a drifting developmental stage. As advection increases, effective population size becomes decoupled from census size as the persistence of novel genetic lineages is restricted to those that arise in a small upstream portion of the species domain. Conclusion This result leads to predictions about the maintenance of diversity in advective systems, and complements the "sweepstakes" hypothesis and other hypotheses proposed to explain cases of low allelic diversity in species with high fecundity. We describe the spatial extent of the species domain in which novel allelic diversity will be retained, thus determining how large an appropriately placed marine reserve must be to allow the persistence of endemic allelic diversity. PMID:18710549

  9. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. |; MIMD Lattice Calculation Collaboration

    1992-12-31

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8{sup 3}{times}24 to 16{sup 3}{times}24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am{sub q}=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12{sup 3}{times}24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m{pi}/m{rho} than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  10. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. . Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1992-01-01

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8[sup 3][times]24 to 16[sup 3][times]24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am[sub q]=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12[sup 3][times]24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m[pi]/m[rho] than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  11. Effect of proving time on the quality of frozen pre-baked French style rolls elaborated with the addition of wholegrain flour and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Eveline Lopes; Chang, Yoon Kil

    2014-11-01

    Proving is a step in the breadmaking process that can be crucial in determining the final characteristics of the product presented to the consumer. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of proving time on the quality of frozen pre-baked French style rolls elaborated with the addition of wholegrain flour and enzymes. With this objective, doughs from six different formulations were allowed to ferment to different stages of proving. The first stage corresponded to the stage where the dough presented the maximum point of volume development without losing its resistance to touch. The second stage was soon after the first one, being characterized by a loss of resistance to touch but without a marked loss of volume. The rolls were evaluated for their specific volume, crumb texture (firmness and springiness), oven spring, shape, cut opening and cut height. The results showed that the proving time influenced various characteristics of the pre-baked French bread. A longer proving time tended to result in greater specific volume of the rolls with greater crumb springiness, but with a less firm crumb and reduced cut opening and cut height. The oven spring and shape were not altered by the proving time. The increase in volume was the result of increases in the width and length of the rolls. This study showed that the proving time was one of the factors responsible for the collapse in the structure of the pre-baked rolls, and that an adequate formulation could overcome the loss in cut opening and cut height resulting from a longer proving time. PMID:26396336

  12. A Demonstration Project in New York and Virginia: Retrofitting Cost-Effective Roll-over Protective Structures (CROPS) on Tractors.

    PubMed

    Hard, D L; McKenzie, E A; Cantis, D; May, J; Sorensen, J; Bayes, B; Madden, E; Wyckoff, S; Stone, B; Maass, J

    2015-07-01

    The NIOSH cost-effective roll-over protective structure (CROPS) demonstration project sought to determine whether three prototype roll-over protective structures (ROPS) designed to be retrofitted on Ford 8N, Ford 3000, Ford 4000, and Massey Ferguson 135 tractors could be installed in the field and whether they would be acceptable by the intended end users (farmers). There were a total of 50 CROPS. demonstrators (25 in New York and 25 in Virginia), with 45 observers attending the New York CROPS demonstrations and 36 observers attending the Virginia CROPS demonstrations, for a total of 70 participants in New York and 61 in Virginia. The oldest retrofitted tractors were 77 to 62 years old, while the newest retrofitted tractors were 40 to 37 years old. The most frequently retrofitted tractor in the CROPS demonstration project was a Ford 3000 series tractor (n = 19; 38%), followed by Ford 4000 (n = 11; 22%), Massey Ferguson 135 (n = 11; 22%), and Ford 8N (n = 9; 18%). A major issue of CROPS retrofitting was the rear wheel fenders. The effort involved in disassembling the fenders (removing the old bolts was often faster by cutting them with a torch), modifying the fender mounting brackets, and then reinstalling the fenders with the CROPS generally required the most time. In addition, various other semi-permanent equipment attachments, such as front-end loaders, required additional time and effort to fit with the CROPS. Demonstrators were asked to rank the reasons why they had not retrofitted their tractors with ROPS until they had enrolled in the CROPS demonstration program. ROPS "cost too much" was ranked as the primary reason for participants in both states (80% for New York and 88% for Virginia). The second highest ranked reasons were "ROPS wasn't available" for Virginia (80%) and "hassle to find ROPS" for New York (69%). The third highest ranked reasons were "not enough time to find ROPS" for New York (67%) and "hassle to find ROPS" for Virginia (79%). All

  13. A Demonstration Project in New York and Virginia: Retrofitting Cost-Effective Roll-over Protective Structures (CROPS) on Tractors

    PubMed Central

    Hard, David L.; McKenzie, E. A.; Cantis, Douglas; May, John; Sorensen, Julie; Bayes, Barbara; Madden, Erin; Wyckoff, Sherry; Stone, Bruce; Maass, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    The NIOSH cost-effective roll-over protective structure (CROPS) demonstration project sought to determine whether three prototype roll-over protective structures (ROPS) designed to be retrofitted on Ford 8N, Ford 3000, Ford 4000, and Massey Ferguson 135 tractors could be installed in the field and whether they would be acceptable by the intended end users (farmers). There were a total of 50 CROPS demonstrators (25 in New York and 25 in Virginia), with 45 observers attending the New York CROPS demonstrations and 36 observers attending the Virginia CROPS demonstrations, for a total of 70 participants in New York and 61 in Virginia. The oldest retrofitted tractors were 77 to 62 years old, while the newest retrofitted tractors were 40 to 37 years old. The most frequently retrofitted tractor in the CROPS demonstration project was a Ford 3000 series tractor (n = 19; 38%), followed by Ford 4000 (n = 11; 22%), Massey Ferguson 135 (n = 11; 22%), and Ford 8N (n = 9; 18%). A major issue of CROPS retrofitting was the rear wheel fenders. The effort involved in disassembling the fenders (removing the old bolts was often faster by cutting them with a torch), modifying the fender mounting brackets, and then reinstalling the fenders with the CROPS generally required the most time. In addition, various other semi-permanent equipment attachments, such as front-end loaders, required additional time and effort to fit with the CROPS. Demonstrators were asked to rank the reasons why they had not retrofitted their tractors with ROPS until they had enrolled in the CROPS demonstration program. ROPS “cost too much” was ranked as the primary reason for participants in both states (80% for New York and 88% for Virginia). The second highest ranked reasons were “ROPS wasn’t available” for Virginia (80%) and “hassle to find ROPS” for New York (69%). The third highest ranked reasons were “not enough time to find ROPS” for New York (67%) and “hassle to find ROPS” for Virginia

  14. Effect of Alloying Elements in Hot-Rolled Metastable β-Titanium Alloys: Part I. Evolution of Microstructure and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Premkumar; Ghosal, P.; Chakkingal, Uday; Singh, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    The present work describes the evolution of microstructures and textures in alloys Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (A1), Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-7.2V-3Cr (A2), Ti-5Al-5Mo-8.6V-1.5Cr (A3), and Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-5V-3.94Cr (A4) during unidirectional hot rolling. The hot-rolled microstructures of the alloy A1 exhibit large fraction of recovered/recrystallized grains, while the alloy A3 shows small fraction of recovered/recrystallized grains. The alloy A2 displays subgrains and recrystallized grains, while the alloy A4 exhibits the microstructure consisting of the features of both the alloys A1 and A2. The alloys A1, A3, and A4 show the presence of shear bands within the β grains and also small volume fraction of the α phase. The dominance of deformation and/or recrystallization components in respective α and γ fibers varies with alloy compositions and hot rolling reductions. In alloys A1 and A2, deformation components dominate from 30 to 50 pct rolling reductions, while recrystallization components govern in 70 pct rolled samples. The deformation components prevail from 30 to 70 pct rolling reductions in alloy A3. The alloy A4 exhibits softening of texture due to recovery or early stage of recrystallization from 30 to 50 pct reductions, while texture present in 70 pct rolled sample consists of mainly the deformation components. The role of molybdenum appears to be quite critical in the evolution of microstructures and textures of these alloys. The alloys with low and high Mo contents display high and low amount of the α phase, respectively.

  15. Effect of vehicular size on chain-reaction crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We present the dynamic model of the chain-reaction crash to take account of the vehicular size. Drivers brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle. We investigate the effect of the vehicular size on the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in the traffic flow controlled by taillights. In the multiple-vehicle collision, the first crash induces more collisions. We investigate how the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. We derive, analytically, the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in the traffic flow of vehicles with finite sizes. We clarify the effect of the vehicular size on the multiple-vehicle collision.

  16. Multiple trials may yield exaggerated effect size estimates.

    PubMed

    Brand, Andrew; Bradley, Michael T; Best, Lisa A; Stoica, George

    2011-01-01

    Published psychological research attempting to support the existence of small and medium effect sizes may not have enough participants to do so accurately, and thus, repeated trials or the use of multiple items may be used in an attempt to obtain significance. Through a series of Monte-Carlo simulations, this article describes the results of multiple trials or items on effect size estimates when the averages and aggregates of a dependent measure are analyzed. The simulations revealed a large increase in observed effect size estimates when the numbers of trials or items in an experiment were increased. Overestimation effects are mitigated by correlations between trials or items, but remain substantial in some cases. Some concepts, such as a P300 wave or a test score, are best defined as a composite of measures. Troubles may arise in more exploratory research where the interrelations among trials or items may not be well described. PMID:21404946

  17. Effects of overaging temperature on the microstructure and properties of 600 MPa cold-rolled dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Chun-fu; Zheng, Zhi-wang; Zhang, Gong-ting; Chang, Jun; Zhang, Shen-gen; Liu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    C-Mn steels prepared by annealing at 800°C for 120 s and overaging at 250-400°C were subjected to pre-straining (2%) and baking treatments (170°C for 20 min) to measure their bake-hardening (BH2) values. The effects of overaging temperature on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and BH2 behavior of 600 MPa cold-rolled dual-phase (DP) steel were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and tensile tests. The results indicated that the martensite morphology exhibited less variation when the DP steel was overaged at 250-350°C. However, when the DP steel was overaged at 400°C, numerous non-martensite and carbide particles formed and yield-point elongation was observed in the tensile curve. When the overaging temperature was increased from 250 to 400°C, the yield strength increased from 272 to 317 MPa, the tensile strength decreased from 643 to 574 MPa, and the elongation increased from 27.8% to 30.6%. Furthermore, with an increase in overaging temperature from 250 to 400°C, the BH2 value initially increases and then decreases. The maximum BH2 value of 83 MPa was observed for the specimen overaged at 350°C.

  18. Specimen size effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Danzhu; Chen, Pengwan; Dai, Kaida; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important issues in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. Various evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in some impact tests such as drop hammer test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To analyse the specimen size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the critical specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive reaction thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the deformation localization of the impact loading. The critical specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the critical mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and tends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  19. Effects of Class Size on Alternative Educational Outcomes across Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Dorothy A.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to use self-reported ratings of student learning, instructor recommendations, and course recommendations as the outcome measure to estimate class size effects, doing so across 24 disciplines. Fixed-effects models controlling for heterogeneous courses and instructors reveal that increasing enrollment has negative and…

  20. The Relationship of Class Size Effects and Teacher Salary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peevely, Gary; Hedges, Larry; Nye, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of class size on academic achievement have been studied for decades. Although the results of small-scale, randomized experiments and large-scale, econometric studies point to positive effects of small classes, some scholars see the evidence as ambiguous. Recent analyses from a 4-year, large-scale, randomized experiment on the effects…

  1. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  2. Diffusion in nanoporous phases: size dependence and levitation effect.

    PubMed

    Yashonath, S; Ghorai, Pradip Kr

    2008-01-24

    Self-diffusivity, D, of diffusants in widely differing mediums such as liquids (e.g., solution), porous solids (e.g., guests in zeolites), or ions in polar solvents exhibit strong size dependence. We discuss the nature of the size dependence observed in these systems. Altogether, different theoretical approaches have been proposed to understand the nature of size dependence of D not only across these widely differing systems but even in just one medium or class of systems such as, for example, ions in polar solvents. But molecular dynamics investigations in the past decade have shown that the size dependence of self-diffusion in guest-porous solids could have origins in the mutual cancellation of forces that occurs when the size of the diffusant is comparable to the size of the void. The effect leading to the maximum in D is known as the levitation effect (LE). Such a cancellation is a consequence of symmetry. This effect exists in all porous solids irrespective of the geometrical and topological details of the pore network provided by the solid. Recent studies show that the levitation effect and size-dependent diffusivity maximum exists for uncharged solutes in solvents. One of the consequences of this is the breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship over a certain range of solute-solvent size ratio. Experimental measurements of ionic conductivity over the past hundred years have found the existence of a size-dependent diffusivity maximum leading to violation of the Walden's rule for ions in polar solvents. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data suggest that even this maximum has its origin in LE. Simulation studies of impurity atom diffusion in close-packed solids as well as ions in superionic and other solids suggest the existence of a size-dependent diffusivity maximum in these materials as well. The levitation effect is a universal effect leading to a maximum in diffusivity of a diffusant in a variety of condensed matter phases. The only

  3. Effect of Lactobacillus casei- casei and Lactobacillus reuteri on acrylamide formation in flat bread and Bread roll.

    PubMed

    Dastmalchi, Farnaz; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Faraji, Mohammad; Labbafi, Mohsen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) contains lactobacillus (L.) casei- casei and L. reuteri on acrylamide formation and physicochemical properties of the Iranian flat bread named, Sangak, and Bread roll. Sangak and Bread roll were made with whole and white wheat flour, respectively. Whole-wheat flour had upper content of protein, sugar, ash, fiber, damaged starch and the activity of amylase than the white wheat flour. After 24 h of fermentation, the pH values of the sourdoughs made from whole-wheat flour (3.00, 2.90) were lower, in compared to sourdoughs prepared from white wheat flour (3.60, 3.58). In addition, in Sangak bread, glucose, and fructose were completely utilized after fermentation, but in bread roll, the reduced sugar levels increased after fermentation and baking that represent microorganisms cannot be activated and utilized sugars. Acrylamide formation was impacted by pH of sourdough and total reducing sugar (r = 0.915, r = 0.885 respectively). Bread roll and Sangak bread were fermented by L. casei- casei contained lowest acrylamide content, in two bread types (219.1, 104.3 μg/kg respectively). As an important result, the acrylamide content of Sangak bread in all cases was lower than in the Bread roll. PMID:27570278

  4. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Emily L; Oakley, Christopher G; Conner, Jeffrey K; Gould, Billie A; Schemske, Douglas W

    2016-04-13

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature.

  5. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750

  6. Experimental effects on IR reflectance spectra: particle size and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiswenger, Toya N.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Smith, Milton O.; Lanker, Cory L.

    2016-05-01

    For geologic and extraterrestrial samples it is known that both particle size and morphology can have strong effects on a species' infrared reflectance spectra. Due to such effects, the reflectance spectra cannot be predicted from the absorption coefficients alone. This is because reflectance is both a surface as well as a bulk phenomenon, incorporating both dispersion as well as absorption effects. The same spectral feature can even be observed as either a maximum or minimum. The complex effects depend on particle size and preparation, as well as the relative amplitudes of the optical constants n and k, i.e. the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index. While somewhat oversimplified, upward-going amplitude in the reflectance spectrum usually results from surface scattering, i.e. rays that have been reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. While the effects are known, we report seminal measurements of reflectance along with quantified particle size of the samples, the sizing obtained from optical microscopy measurements. The size measurements are correlated with the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size. We report results for both anhydrous sodium sulfate Na2SO4 as well as ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4; the optical constants have been measured for (NH4)2SO4. To go a step further from the laboratory and into the field we explore our understanding of particle size effects on reflectance spectra using standoff detection at distances of up to 160 meters in a field experiment. The studies have shown that particle size has a strong influence on the measured reflectance spectra of such

  7. Kinetic stability of hematite nanoparticles: the effect ofparticle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. thomas; Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu

    2006-11-16

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in environment and arepotentially important in many environmental processes such as sorption,coprecipitation, redox reactions, and dissolution. To investigateparticle size effects on nanoparticle aggregation and stability, thisstudy tested aggregation behavior of 12(+-2), 32(+-3), and 65(+-3) nm(hydrated radius) hematite particles under environmental relevant pH andionic strength conditions. The results showed that at the same ionicstrength and pH conditions, different particle sizes show differenttendency to aggregate. At the same ionic strength, aggregation rates arehigher for smaller particles. The critical coagulation concentration alsodepends on particle size, and decreases as particle size decreases. Asthe particle size decreases, fast aggregation shifted to lower pH. Thismay be related to a dependence of PZC on particle size originating fromchange of structure and surface energy characteristics as particle sizedecreases. Under the same conditions, aggregation occurs faster asparticle concentration increases. Even though the nanoparticles ofdifferent sizes show different response to the same pH and ionicstrength, DLVO theory can be used to qualitatively understand hematitenanoparticle aggregation behavior.

  8. Short communication: Effects of prepartum diets supplemented with rolled oilseeds on Brix values and fatty acid profile of colostrum.

    PubMed

    Salehi, R; Ambrose, D J; Oba, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of oilseeds supplemented in prepartum diets on colostrum quality. Thirty-nine dry pregnant Holstein cows (14 primiparous and 25 multiparous cows) were blocked by body condition score and parity and assigned to 1 of 3 experimental diets containing rolled oilseeds at 8% of dietary dry matter (canola seed or sunflower seed) or no oilseed (control) at 35 d before the expected calving date. Canola seed is high in oleic acid and sunflower seed is high in linoleic acid content. Colostrum samples were collected at the first milking after calving, and concentrations of nutrient composition, fatty acid profile, and Brix value (an indicator IgG concentration) were determined. Cows fed sunflower seeds before calving produced colostrum with greater crude protein content (15.0 vs. 12.9%), colostral Brix values (24.3 vs. 20.3%), and conjugated linoleic acid concentration (18:2 cis-9,trans-11; 0.64 vs. 0.48%) compared with those fed canola seed. Positive effects of feeding sunflower seed might be mediated by ruminal metabolism of linoleic acid and subsequent enhanced production of conjugated linoleic acid. Oilseed supplementation in prepartum diets of dairy cows also altered fatty acid profile of colostrum in a way to reflect fatty acid profile of the supplemented oilseeds except for oleic acid. In conclusion, prepartum feeding of sunflower seed increased colostral Brix value, an indicator of colostral IgG concentration, compared with that of canola seed, but its mode of action and effects on health and productivity of calves need to be investigated.

  9. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  10. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on self-motion perception and eye movements evoked by roll and pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Parker, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    Seven astronauts reported translational self-motion during roll simulation 1-3 h after landing following 5-7 d of orbital flight. Two reported strong translational self-motion perception when they performed pitch head motions during entry and while the orbiter was stationary on the runway. One of two astronauts from whom adequate data were collected exhibited a 132-deg shift in the phase angle between roll stimulation and horizontal eye position 2 h after landing. Neither of two from whom adequate data were collected exhibited increased horizontal eye movement amplitude or disturbance of voluntary pitch or roll body motion immediately postflight. These results are generally consistent with an otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation model and are being applied to the development of apparatus and procedures intended to preadapt astronauts to the sensory rearrangement of weightlessness.

  11. Effect of double vacuum melting and retained austenite on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749 bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Hodder, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    AMS 5749 steel combines the tempering, hot hardness, and hardness retention characteristics of AISI M-50 steel with the corrosion and oxidation resistance of AISI 440C stainless steel. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate the rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749. Double vacuum melting (vacuum induction melting plus vacuum arc remelting, VIM-VAR) produced AMS 5749 material with a rolling-element fatigue life at least 14 times that of vacuum induction melting alone. The VIM-VAR AMS 5749 steel balls gave lives from 6 to 12 times greater than VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel balls. The highest level of retained austenite, 14.6 percent, was significantly detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life relative to the intermediate level of 11.1 percent.

  12. Aircraft Observations of Marine Aerosol Properties in the Presence of Boundary Layer Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Howell, S.; Conley, S.; Faloona, I.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research deployed a wide range of airborne aerosol instrumentation as part of MILAGRO/INTEX (2006) and PASE (2007) experiments. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering - f(RH). The measurements revealed frequently observed presence of numerous periodic structures related both to horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). HCRs, commonly formed when some vertical wind shear is present, are significant to the vertical transport of momentum, heat, moisture, and air pollutant including aerosols within the boundary layer. KHIs, occurred in areas of enhanced velocity shear and/or a local minimum of static stability, contribute strongly to the dissipation of large-scale motions into turbulence. This presentation focused on the direct in-situ marine aerosol properties in the presence of BL rolls by providing evidence that the observed variations are caused by rolls. We also studied whether the presence of rolls leads to the enhancement of aerosol fluxes. We have investigated roll structures in diverse MBL settings and have demonstrated that these can play an active role in the redistribution of aerosol, gas and water vapor in the MBL. Depending upon the thermodynamic profiles and the roll size, altitude, temporal duration these rolls can have a marked effect on the exchange of air masses between the buffer layer, the surface mixed layer and the free troposphere. This will lead to changes in the horizontal extinction in these layers relative to regions not influenced by the rolls. Hence, the evolution of aerosol optical properties in the near-surface mixed layer will be affected by rolls and the conditions that stimulate them. These can occur with or without associated cloud features. Some ongoing studies include the following

  13. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  14. Size effect in resin/glass composite flexure strengths.

    PubMed

    Baran, G R; McCool, J I; Boberick, K G; Zhang, H Q

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that composite restorative materials possess an elastic-brittle nature and therefore will exhibit a size effect for flexure strength data. The experimental material consisted of 20 wt% 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA, 10 wt% colloidal silica, and 70 wt% Sr glass and was cured by light irradiation. Two sizes of flexure specimens were fabricated: 3.2x1.6x35 mm, and 6.25x3.1x35 mm. Half of the specimens made were soaked to equilibrium weight gain in 50:50 ethanol:water. The fracture strengths were measured in four-point bending tests. The beams under load were modelled by the finite element package ABAQUS. A statistical fracture mechanics methodology embodied in a public domain computer program called CARES/LIFE, developed by NASA, utilized the ABAQUS input and the fracture strengths of the smaller specimens to predict the fracture strengths of the larger specimens. In making the computation it used an approach that combines a Weibull distribution of flaw size with Batdorf's fracture mechanical model for failure at a material flaw. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens exhibited Weibull behaviour, with shape parameters ranging from 4.04 to 8.15. Soaking had a clearly detrimental effect on the strengths of specimens of both sizes, and produced a comparable percentage reduction in the estimated scale parameter of the fracture strength distribution. Both the soaked and unsoaked specimens also exhibited a clear and comparable size effect, i.e. the larger specimens had a fracture strength that was lower than that of the smaller specimens by roughly the same percentage. Moreover, the magnitude of the size effect was well predicted by the CARES/LIFE methodology for both the soaked and the dry specimens. The elastic-brittle character of both soaked and unsoaked composite specimens was validated by load-deflection data, the magnitude of the Weibull shape parameters of the observed fracture strength data (<10), and the observed effect

  15. Pore size effect of collagen scaffolds on cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-05-01

    Scaffold pore size is an important factor affecting tissue regeneration efficiency. The effect of pore size on cartilage tissue regeneration was compared by using four types of collagen porous scaffolds with different pore sizes. The collagen porous scaffolds were prepared by using pre-prepared ice particulates that had diameters of 150-250, 250-355, 355-425 and 425-500μm. All the scaffolds had spherical large pores with good interconnectivity and high porosity that facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution. Chondrocytes adhered to the walls of the spherical pores and showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffolds. The in vivo implantation results indicated that the pore size did not exhibit any obvious effect on cell proliferation but exhibited different effects on cartilage regeneration. The collagen porous scaffolds prepared with ice particulates 150-250μm in size best promoted the expression and production of type II collagen and aggrecan, increasing the formation and the mechanical properties of the cartilage.

  16. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yo; Fujimura, Fusako; Handa, Tomoya; Shoji, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size. PMID:27635256

  17. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Tomoya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size.

  18. Effects of Target Size and Test Distance on Stereoacuity

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Tomoya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Target size and test distance effects on stereoacuity were investigated in 24 subjects using a three-dimensional monitor. Examination 1: Target Size Effects. The test distance was 2.5 m for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values for 0.1°, 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes were 59.58 ± 14.86, 47.66 ± 13.71, 41.25 ± 15.95, and 39.41 ± 15.52 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity was significantly worse with a 0.1° target than with 0.2°, 0.5°, and 0.9° target sizes (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, resp.). Examination 2: Test Distance Effects. Test distances of 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 m were investigated for a 0.5° target size; crossed parallax was presented in 22-second units. Average stereoacuity values at 2.5 m, 5.0 m, and 7.5 m test distances were 44.91 ± 16.16, 34.83 ± 10.84, and 24.75 ± 7.27 seconds, respectively. Stereoacuity at a 7.5 m distance was significantly better than at distances of 2.5 m and 5.0 m (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.02, resp.). Stereoacuity at a 5.0 m distance was significantly better than at 2.5 m (P = 0.04). Stereoacuity should be estimated by both parallax and other elements, including test distance and target size. PMID:27635256

  19. Roll over Weismann: extracellular vesicles in the transgenerational transmission of environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Sally A; Jayasooriah, Navind; Buckland, Michael E; Martin, David Ik; Cropley, Jennifer E; Suter, Catherine M

    2015-10-01

    The ability of environmental exposures to induce phenotypic change across multiple generations of offspring has gathered an enormous amount of interest in recent years. There are by now many examples of nongenetic transgenerational effects of environmental exposures, covering a broad range of stressors. Available evidence indicates that epigenetic inheritance may mediate at least some of these transgenerational effects, but how environmental exposures induce changes to the epigenome of the germline is unknown. One possibility is that exposed somatic cells can communicate their exposures to the germline to induce a stable change. In this Perspective, we propose that extracellular vesicles shed by somatic cells represent a credible means by which environmental experience could effect a transmissible epigenetic change in the germline, leading to the inheritance of acquired traits.

  20. Effect of environmental torques on short-term attitude prediction for a rolling-wheel spacecraft in a sun-synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical evaluation and an analysis of the effects of environmental disturbance torques on the attitude of a hexagonal cylinder rolling wheel spacecraft were performed. The resulting perturbations caused by five such torques were found to be very small and exhibited linearity such that linearized equations of motion yielded accurate results over short periods and the separate perturbations contributed by each torque were additive in the sense of superposition. Linearity of the torque perturbations was not affected by moderate system design changes and persisted for torque-to-angular momentum ratios up to 100 times the nominal expected value. As these conditions include many possible applications, similar linear behavior might be anticipated for other rolling-wheel spacecraft.

  1. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = −1.39° (−5.53, +2.75); t(22) = −0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = − 0.15 (−0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = −0.005 (−0.013, +0.003); t(22) = −1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = − 0.27 (−0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  2. Multiple rolling/crimping effects on termination of two summer cover crops in a conservation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field experiment was initiated in the 2015 growing season at the USDA-NSDL to determine the effectiveness of a prototype two-stage roller/crimper in mechanical termination of two summer cover crops intended for organic systems. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four replic...

  3. Debye screening versus Gauss law in electrostatics: Finite size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ritesh Kumar; Menon, V. J.; Mishra, M.; Tripathi, D. N.

    2007-10-01

    We revisit the well-known topics of self- and induced-screening in an otherwise isotropic neutral plasma/colloid. It is pointed out that the standard Debye-Hückel (DH) theory (ignoring finite size effects) suffers from many ambiguities related to net ionic numbers, total charge of the system, role of the electrostatic Gauss law, short-distance behaviour of the potential and incorrectly normalized pair correlation functions. We give a new formulation (incorporating finite size effects) such that ionic numbers are maintained, the total charge of the system has physically correct value, the Gauss law boundary conditions are rigorously obeyed, short-distance behaviour of the potential is guaranteed automatically, and correlation functions are correctly normalized. Numerical differences between the two approaches show up if the screening length μ-1 becomes comparable to the size R of the system.

  4. Numerical modeling of size effect in micro hydromechanical deep drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideki; Manabe, Ken-ichi; Wei, Dongbin; Jiang, Zhengyi

    2013-12-01

    A modeling of tribological size effects in micro deep drawing (MDD) and micro hydromechanical deep drawing (MHDD) is a main focus in this study. The inner and outer pockets in which the different friction coefficients can be applied at different lubrication conditions are considered on the blank surface. The ratio of the area of outer pockets to inner pockets is changed with the decrease in the size. The low friction coefficient at the outer pockets is assumed in MHDD by considering the lubrication effect of fluid medium. The numerical analysis is performed under six lubrication conditions. The analytical results of punch force-stroke curves are in good agreement with the experimental values. The friction force decreases in MHDD with the decrease in the size although it increases in MDD. The friction coefficient at die shoulder significantly influences the friction force due to high contact pressure in MHDD.

  5. Environmental adaptation in stomatal size independent of the effects of genome size

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gregory J; Carpenter, Raymond J; Koutoulis, Anthony; Price, Aina; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cell sizes are linked across multiple tissues, including stomata, and this variation is closely correlated with genome size. These associations raise the question of whether generic changes in cell size cause suboptimal changes in stomata, requiring subsequent evolution under selection for stomatal size. We tested the relationships among guard cell length, genome size and vegetation type using phylogenetically independent analyses on 67 species of the ecologically and structurally diverse family, Proteaceae. We also compared how genome and stomatal sizes varied at ancient (among genera) and more recent (within genus) levels. The observed 60-fold range in genome size in Proteaceae largely reflected the mean chromosome size. Compared with variation among genera, genome size varied much less within genera (< 6% of total variance) than stomatal size, implying evolution in stomatal size subsequent to changes in genome size. Open vegetation and closed forest had significantly different relationships between stomatal and genome sizes. Ancient changes in genome size clearly influenced stomatal size in Proteaceae, but adaptation to habitat strongly modified the genome–stomatal size relationship. Direct adaptation to the environment in stomatal size argues that new proxies for past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 that incorporate stomatal size are superior to older models based solely on stomatal frequency. PMID:25266914

  6. Epidemiological effects of group size variation in social species

    PubMed Central

    Caillaud, Damien; Craft, Meggan E.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2013-01-01

    Contact patterns in group-structured populations determine the course of infectious disease outbreaks. Network-based models have revealed important connections between group-level contact patterns and the dynamics of epidemics, but these models typically ignore heterogeneities in within-group composition. Here, we analyse a flexible mathematical model of disease transmission in a hierarchically structured wildlife population, and find that increased variation in group size reduces the epidemic threshold, making social animal populations susceptible to a broader range of pathogens. Variation in group size also increases the likelihood of an epidemic for mildly transmissible diseases, but can reduce the likelihood and expected size of an epidemic for highly transmissible diseases. Further, we introduce the concept of epidemiological effective group size, which we define to be the group size of a hypothetical population containing groups of identical size that has the same epidemic threshold as an observed population. Using data from the Serengeti Lion Project, we find that pride-living Serengeti lions are epidemiologically comparable to a homogeneous population with up to 20 per cent larger prides. PMID:23576784

  7. Tumor size: effect on monoclonal antibody uptake in tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Shawler, D.L.; Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of radiolabeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies (MoAbs) into human tumors growing in nude mice. The colon tumors ranged in size from 0.03-1.6 g, the melanoma from 0.1 to 6.7 g, and the lymphoma from 0.06 to 10.2 g. Indium-111 was primarily used as the radiolabel, however, both 125I and 111In were used as tracers for the MoAb in one experiment. The per g radiopharmaceutical uptake by tumors was inversely proportional to tumor size when tumor specific MoAb was administered. This finding was independent of the radiolabel and was demonstrable when the mice bore two tumors of differing size. When the MoAb was not specific for the tumor, the data were less well defined and a statistically significant correlation with size did not occur. These data are strong evidence for a decrease in per g uptake of labeled tumor specific antibodies as tumors increase in size.

  8. Simulation of grain size effects in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Quek, Siu Sin; Wu, David T.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys can be suppressed for small grain sizes. Motivated by these results, we study the grain size dependence of martensitic transformations and stress-strain response of nanocrystalline shape memory alloys within the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. A GL model for a square to rectangle transformation in polycrystals is extended to account for grain boundary effects. We propose that an inhibition of the transformation in grain boundary regions can occur, if the grain boundary energy of the martensite is higher than that of the austenite phase. We show that this inhibition of transformation in grain boundary regions has a strong influence on domain patterns inside grains. Although the transformation is inhibited only at the grain boundaries, it leads to a suppression of the transformation even inside the grains as grain size is decreased. In fact, below a critical grain size, the transformation can be completely suppressed. We explain these results in terms of the extra strain gradient cost associated with grain boundaries, when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries. On the other hand, no significant size effects are observed when transformation is not inhibited at grain boundaries. We also study the grain size dependence of the stress strain curve. It is found that when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries, a significant reduction in the hysteresis associated with stress-strain curves during the loading-unloading cycles is observed. The hysteresis for this situation reduces even further as the grain size is reduced, which is consistent with recent experiments. The simulations also demonstrate that the mechanical behavior is influenced by inter-granular interactions and the local microstructural neighbourhood of a grain has a stronger influence than the orientation of the grain itself.

  9. Quantum finite-size effects in graphene plasmons.

    PubMed

    Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Manjavacas, Alejandro; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2012-02-28

    Graphene plasmons are emerging as an alternative solution to noble metal plasmons, adding the advantages of tunability via electrostatic doping and long lifetimes. These excitations have been so far described using classical electrodynamics, with the carbon layer represented by a local conductivity. However, the question remains, how accurately is such a classical description representing graphene? What is the minimum size for which nonlocal and quantum finite-size effects can be ignored in the plasmons of small graphene structures? Here, we provide a clear answer to these questions by performing first-principles calculations of the optical response of doped nanostructured graphene obtained from a tight-binding model for the electronic structure and the random-phase approximation for the dielectric response. The resulting plasmon energies are in good agreement with classical local electromagnetic theory down to ∼10 nm sizes, below which plasmons split into several resonances that emphasize the molecular character of the carbon structures and the quantum nature of their optical excitations. Additionally, finite-size effects produce substantial plasmon broadening compared to homogeneous graphene up to sizes well above 20 nm in nanodisks and 10 nm in nanoribbons. The atomic structure of edge terminations is shown to be critical, with zigzag edges contributing to plasmon broadening significantly more than armchair edges. This study demonstrates the ability of graphene nanostructures to host well-defined plasmons down to sizes below 10 nm, and it delineates a roadmap for understanding their main characteristics, including the role of finite size and nonlocality, thus providing a solid background for the emerging field of graphene nanoplasmonics.

  10. An Analytic Comparison of Effect Sizes for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demars, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    Three types of effects sizes for DIF are described in this exposition: log of the odds-ratio (differences in log-odds), differences in probability-correct, and proportion of variance accounted for. Using these indices involves conceptualizing the degree of DIF in different ways. This integrative review discusses how these measures are impacted in…

  11. How Methodological Features Affect Effect Sizes in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Slavin, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    As evidence becomes increasingly important in educational policy, it is essential to understand how research design might contribute to reported effect sizes in experiments evaluating educational programs. A total of 645 studies from 12 recent reviews of evaluations of preschool, reading, mathematics, and science programs were studied. Effect…

  12. An Introductory Summary of Various Effect Size Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromwell, Susan

    This paper provides a tutorial summary of some of the many effect size choices so that members of the Southwest Educational Research Association would be better able to follow the recommendations of the American Psychological Association (APA) publication manual, the APA Task Force on Statistical Inference, and the publication requirements of some…

  13. Reporting Confidence Intervals and Effect Sizes: Collecting the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Ozel, Z. Ebrar Yetkiner; Ozel, Serkan; Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Confidence intervals (CIs) and effect sizes are essential to encourage meta-analytic thinking and to accumulate research findings. CIs provide a range of plausible values for population parameters with a degree of confidence that the parameter is in that particular interval. CIs also give information about how precise the estimates are. Comparison…

  14. Effect Sizes in Three-Level Cluster-Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    Research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Many of these designs involve two levels of clustering or nesting (students within classes and classes within schools). Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to…

  15. Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Applying Bootstrap Resampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banjanovic, Erin S.; Osborne, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Confidence intervals for effect sizes (CIES) provide readers with an estimate of the strength of a reported statistic as well as the relative precision of the point estimate. These statistics offer more information and context than null hypothesis statistic testing. Although confidence intervals have been recommended by scholars for many years,…

  16. The Effect of Sample Size on Latent Growth Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jennifer; Gagne, Phillip E.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    A Monte Carlo simulation approach was taken to investigate the effect of sample size on a variety of latent growth models. A fully balanced experimental design was implemented, with samples drawn from multivariate normal populations specified to represent 12 unique growth models. The models varied factorially by crossing number of time points,…

  17. Size effect on dielectric properties of synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Dan'kin, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Reducing sizes of diamond crystals in the micrometer range progressively increases their dielectric permittivity. This effect is due to the surface shells of solids where under-coordinated atoms diminish the energy of chemical bonding on a surface that reduces the frequency of atomic vibration but also create a distortion in atomic order causing spontaneous polarization.

  18. Effect of Screen Size on Multimedia Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Daesang; Kim, Dong-Joong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of three different screen sizes (small, medium and large) and two types of multimedia instruction (text only and text with pictorial annotation) on vocabulary learning. One hundred thirty-five Korean middle school students learning English as a foreign language were randomly distributed…

  19. Confidence Interval Coverage for Cohen's Effect Size Statistic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algina, James; Keselman, H. J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2006-01-01

    Kelley compared three methods for setting a confidence interval (CI) around Cohen's standardized mean difference statistic: the noncentral-"t"-based, percentile (PERC) bootstrap, and biased-corrected and accelerated (BCA) bootstrap methods under three conditions of nonnormality, eight cases of sample size, and six cases of population effect size…

  20. Useful Effect Size Interpretations for Single Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard I.; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2007-01-01

    An obstacle to broader acceptability of effect sizes in single case research is their lack of intuitive and useful interpretations. Interpreting Cohen's d as "standard deviation units difference" and R[superscript 2] as "percent of variance accounted for" do not resound with most visual analysts. In fact, the only comparative analysis widely…

  1. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single­-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-­specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method: Data…

  2. The Effects of Rain Garden Size on Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the effect of rain garden size on the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of rain garden systems. The slides will summarize data from both the full-scale rain garden project associated with the permeable pavement parking lot as well as the pilo...

  3. Using Hierarchical Rater Model to Adjust Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Long

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this research is inference for effect size of a curriculum intervention, which is an important research topic in education. The linear relationship between the outcomes of an intervention and teachers' fidelity, the extent to which the intervention was actually delivered by teachers as intended, is an important component for…

  4. Investigation of the size effect for photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Xu, W; Bai, J; Chua, C K; Wei, J; Li, Z; Gao, Y; Kim, D H; Zhou, K

    2016-10-01

    Three types of photonic crystal (PC) thin films have been prepared for the investigation of their deformation behaviors by nanoindentation tests at the microscale and nanoscale. Each type of PC thin film was composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles with a uniform size. Another type of thin film was prepared by assembling nanoparticles with three different sizes. It was exciting to observe that the hardness and Young's modulus were significantly improved (more than 15 times) in well-ordered PC thin films than disordered ones. Furthermore, size-dependent mechanical properties were observed for the three types of PCs. Such a size effect phenomenon can be attributed to the special polycrystalline material having a periodical face-centered cubic structure of PC thin films. Furthermore, the indentation size effect that shows that the indentation hardness decreases with an increasing indentation depth has also been observed for all four types of thin films. It is conjectured that the application of the PC structure to other functional materials may enhance their mechanical properties. PMID:27577061

  5. Investigation of the size effect for photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Xu, W; Bai, J; Chua, C K; Wei, J; Li, Z; Gao, Y; Kim, D H; Zhou, K

    2016-10-01

    Three types of photonic crystal (PC) thin films have been prepared for the investigation of their deformation behaviors by nanoindentation tests at the microscale and nanoscale. Each type of PC thin film was composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles with a uniform size. Another type of thin film was prepared by assembling nanoparticles with three different sizes. It was exciting to observe that the hardness and Young's modulus were significantly improved (more than 15 times) in well-ordered PC thin films than disordered ones. Furthermore, size-dependent mechanical properties were observed for the three types of PCs. Such a size effect phenomenon can be attributed to the special polycrystalline material having a periodical face-centered cubic structure of PC thin films. Furthermore, the indentation size effect that shows that the indentation hardness decreases with an increasing indentation depth has also been observed for all four types of thin films. It is conjectured that the application of the PC structure to other functional materials may enhance their mechanical properties.

  6. Investigation of the size effect for photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Xu, W.; Bai, J.; Chua, C. K.; Wei, J.; Li, Z.; Gao, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Zhou, K.

    2016-10-01

    Three types of photonic crystal (PC) thin films have been prepared for the investigation of their deformation behaviors by nanoindentation tests at the microscale and nanoscale. Each type of PC thin film was composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles with a uniform size. Another type of thin film was prepared by assembling nanoparticles with three different sizes. It was exciting to observe that the hardness and Young’s modulus were significantly improved (more than 15 times) in well-ordered PC thin films than disordered ones. Furthermore, size-dependent mechanical properties were observed for the three types of PCs. Such a size effect phenomenon can be attributed to the special polycrystalline material having a periodical face-centered cubic structure of PC thin films. Furthermore, the indentation size effect that shows that the indentation hardness decreases with an increasing indentation depth has also been observed for all four types of thin films. It is conjectured that the application of the PC structure to other functional materials may enhance their mechanical properties.

  7. Influence of motion coupling and nonlinear effects on parametric roll for a floating production storage and offloading platform

    PubMed Central

    Greco, M.; Lugni, C.; Faltinsen, O. M.

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence and features of parametric roll (PR) on a weather-vaning floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) platform with a turret single-point mooring-line system are examined. The main focus is on the relevance of motions coupling and nonlinear effects on this phenomenon and on more general unstable conditions as well as on the occurrence and severity of water on deck. This work was motivated by recent experiments on an FPSO model without mooring systems highlighting the occurrence of parametric resonance owing to roll–yaw coupling. A three-dimensional numerical hybrid potential-flow seakeeping solver was able to capture this behaviour. The same method, extended to include the mooring lines, is adopted here to investigate the platform behaviour for different incident wavelengths, steepnesses, headings, locations of the turret and pretensions. From the results, sway and yaw tend to destabilize the system, also bringing chaotic features. The sway–roll–yaw coupling widens the existence region of PR resonance and increases PR severity; it also results in a larger amount of shipped water, especially at smaller wavelength-to-ship length ratio and larger steepness. The chaotic features are excited when a sufficiently large yaw amplitude is reached. Consistently, a simplified stability analysis showed the relevance of nonlinear-restoring coefficients, first those connected with the sway–yaw coupling then those associated with the roll–yaw coupling, both destabilizing. From the stability analysis, the system is unstable for all longitudinal locations of the turret and pre-tensions examined, but the instability weakens as the turret is moved forward, and the pre-tension is increased. The use of a suitable dynamic-positioning system can control the horizontal motions, avoiding the instability. PMID:25512590

  8. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  9. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  10. Effects of ultra-clean and centrifugal filtration on rolling-element bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.; Needelman, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted on groups of 65-mm bore diameter deep-groove ball bearings in a MIL-L-23699 lubricant under two levels of filtration to determine the upper limit in bearing life under the strictest possible lubricant cleanliness conditions. Bearing fatigue lives, surface distress and weight loss were compared to previous bearing fatigue tests in contaminated and noncontaminated oil filters having absolute removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns, with lubricant and sump temperatures maintained at 347 K. Ultra clean lubrication was found to produce bearing fatigue lives that were approximately twice that obtained in previous tests with contaminated oil using 3 micron absolute filtration. It was also observed that the centrifugal oil filter has the same effectiveness as a 30 micron absolute filter in preventing surface damage.

  11. Size Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianping

    Finite size effects on the magnetic properties of nanoscale particles have been studied in this work. The first system studied was MnFe_2O _4 prepared by coprecipitation followed by digestion. The particles were single crystals with an average diameter controllable from 5 nm to 25 nm. These particles have a higher inversion degree of metal ion distribution between the tetrahedral sites and octahedral sites of the spinel structure than those synthesized with ceramic methods. This higher inversion leads to a higher Curie temperature. We found that the structure of the particles can be varied by heat treatment. The Curie temperature of the particles decreased after heat treatment in inert gas, however, it increased after heat treatment in air. The size effects show in two aspects on the MnFe_2O _4 particles. First, the Curie temperature decreased as particles size was reduced, which was explained by finite size scaling. Second, the saturation magnetization decreased as particle size decreased because of the existence of a nonmagnetic layer on the surface of MnFe_2 O_4 particles. The second system studied was Co particles synthesized with an inverse micelle technique. The particles were small (1-5 nm) and had a narrow size distribution. The Co particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and showed a set of consistent magnetic data in magnetic moment per particle, coercivity, and blocking temperature. We found the anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization of Co particles had a strong size dependence. The anisotropy constant was above the bulk value of Co and increased as particle size decreased. The saturation magnetization increased as the particle became smaller. The magnetic properties of Co particles also strongly suggested a core/shell structure in each particle. But no physical inhomogeneity was observed. We have also studied ligand effects on the magnetic properties of Co particles. The magnetization of the Co particles was quenched by 36%, 27

  12. Rolling stones and turbulent eddies: why the bigger live longer and travel farther

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the discovery that even the simplest, oldest and most prevalent forms of evolutionary movement—rolling bodies and whirls of turbulence—exhibit the same body-size effect on life time and life travel as the evolutionary movement united by the body-size effect so far: animals, rivers, vehicles, jets and plumes. In short, the bigger should last longer and travel farther. For rolling bodies, the life span (t) and the life travel (L) should increase with the body mass (M) raised to the powers 1/6 and 1/3, respectively. The number of rolls during this movement is constant, independent of body size. For an eddy of turbulence, t should increase with the eddy mass (M) raised to the power 2/3, while L should increase with M2/3 times the bulk speed of the turbulent stream that carries the eddy. The number of rolls during the eddy life span is a constant independent of eddy size. PMID:26883787

  13. A quality by design approach to investigate the effect of mannitol and dicalcium phosphate qualities on roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Souihi, Nabil; Dumarey, Melanie; Wikström, Håkan; Tajarobi, Pirjo; Fransson, Magnus; Svensson, Olof; Josefson, Mats; Trygg, Johan

    2013-04-15

    Roll compaction is a continuous process for solid dosage form manufacturing increasingly popular within pharmaceutical industry. Although roll compaction has become an established technique for dry granulation, the influence of material properties is still not fully understood. In this study, a quality by design (QbD) approach was utilized, not only to understand the influence of different qualities of mannitol and dicalcium phosphate (DCP), but also to predict critical quality attributes of the drug product based solely on the material properties of that filler. By describing each filler quality in terms of several representative physical properties, orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) was used to understand and predict how those properties affected drug product intermediates as well as critical quality attributes of the final drug product. These models were then validated by predicting product attributes for filler qualities not used in the model construction. The results of this study confirmed that the tensile strength reduction, known to affect plastic materials when roll compacted, is not prominent when using brittle materials. Some qualities of these fillers actually demonstrated improved compactability following roll compaction. While direct compression qualities are frequently used for roll compacted drug products because of their excellent flowability and good compaction properties, this study revealed that granules from these qualities were more poor flowing than the corresponding powder blends, which was not seen for granules from traditional qualities. The QbD approach used in this study could be extended beyond fillers. Thus any new compound/ingredient would first be characterized and then suitable formulation characteristics could be determined in silico, without running any additional experiments.

  14. Effects of Cold Rolling on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fe-30Mn-3Si-4Al-0.093C TWIP Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Qiu, C. H.; Wang, Li; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Zhao, Xianming

    2013-05-15

    The effects of cold rolling on microstructure evolution and the associated mechanical properties of Fe-30Mn-3Si-4Al-0.093C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel are examined in this work with reduction rates of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70%. Through texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, it is suggested that slip, mechanical twinning, the interaction between dislocation/twin boundaries (TB), and shear band have influenced the observed mechanical behavior and development of texture. Special components of weak initial textures are preferential for mechanical twinning, resulting in an increase in strain hardening rate. By mechanical twinning, the {111}<112> orientation is rotated into a position at the vicinity of the {110}<001> Goss orientation, and the {552}<115> (Cu-twin) texture is transformed to the {110}<001> orientation. The evolution of texture is closely related to the onset of shear banding resulting from deformation twinning. The sample with 10% cold reduction exhibits a favorable combination of yield strength and ductility, indicating a considerable capacity for energy absorption. With increasing rolling reductions, the deformation of the samples becomes inhomogeneous due to the high anisotropy of the microstructure. The localized shear bands resulting from the excessive cold rolling are detrimental to the ductility of the present TWIP steel.

  15. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Aono, H

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10(4)) to O(10(1)) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design. PMID:19258688

  16. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Aono, H

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10(4)) to O(10(1)) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  17. Effects of Ultra-Clean and centrifugal filtration on rolling-element bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.; Needelman, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted on groups of 65-millimeter bore diameter deep-groove ball bearings in a MIL-L-23699 lubricant under two levels of filtration. In one test series, the oil cleanliness was maintained at an exceptionally high level (better than a class "000" per NAS 1638) with a 3 micron absolute barrier filter. These tests were intended to determine the "upper limit" in bearing life under the strictest possible lubricant cleanliness conditions. In the tests using a centrifugal oil filter, contaminants of the type found in aircraft engine filters were injected into the filters' supply line at 125 milligrams per bearing-hour. "Ultra-clean" lubrication produced bearing fatigue lives that were approximately twice that obtained in previous tests with contaminated oil using 3 micron absolute filtration and approximately three times that obtained with 49 micron filtration. It was also observed that the centrifugal oil filter had approximately the same effectiveness as a 30 micron absolute filter in preventing bearing surface damage.

  18. Physics-Based Reactive Burn Model: Grain Size Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Hamate, Y.; Horie, Y.

    2007-12-01

    We have been developing a physics-based reactive burn (PBRB) model, which was formulated based on the concept of a statistical hot spot cell. In the model, essential thermomechanics and physiochemical features are explicitly modeled. In this paper, we have extended the statistical hot spot model to explicitly describe the ignition and growth of hot spots. In particular, grain size effects are explicitly delineated through introduction of grain size-dependent, thickness of the hot-region, energy deposition criterion, and specific surface area. Besides the linear relationships between the run distance to detonation and the critical diameter with respect to the reciprocal specific surface area of heterogeneous explosives (HE), which is based on the original model and discussed in a parallel paper of this meeting, parametric studies have shown that the extended PBRB model can predict a non-monotonic variation of shock sensitivity with grain size, as observed by Moulard et al.

  19. The Effect of Size and Ecology on Extinction Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, C.; Yuan, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although life on Earth first emerged as prokaryotic organisms, it eventually evolved into billions of different species. However, extinctions on Earth, especially the five mass extinctions, have decimated species. So what leads to a species survival or demise during a mass extinction? Are certain species more susceptible to extinctions based on their size and ecology? For this project, we focused on the data of marine animals. To examine the impact of size and ecology on a species's likelihood of survival, we compared the sizes and ecologies of the survivors and victims of the five mass extinctions. The ecology, or life mode, of a genus consists of the combination of tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. Tiering refers to the animal's typical location in the water column and sediments, motility refers to its ability to move, and feeding mechanism describes the way the organism eats; together, they describe the animal's behavior. We analyzed the effect of ecology on survival using logistic regression, which compares life mode to the success or failure of a genus during each mass extinction interval. For organism size, we found the extinct organisms' mean size (both volume and length) and compared it with the average size of survivors on a graph. Our results show that while surviving genera of mass extinctions tended to be slightly larger than those that went extinct, there was no significant difference. Even though the Permian (Changhsingian) and Triassic (Rhaetian) extinctions had larger surviving species, likewise the difference was small. Ecology had a more obvious impact on the likelihood of survival; fast-moving, predatory pelagic organisms were the most likely to go extinct, while sedentary, infaunal suspension feeders had the greatest chances of survival. Overall, ecology played a greater role than size in determining the survival of a species. With this information, we can use ecology to predict which species would survive future extinctions.

  20. Why herd size matters - mitigating the effects of livestock crashes.

    PubMed

    Næss, Marius Warg; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the effect of pastoral risk management strategies provides insights into a system of subsistence that have persevered in marginal areas for hundreds to thousands of years and may shed light into the future of around 200 million households in the face of climate change. This study investigated the efficiency of herd accumulation as a buffer strategy by analysing changes in livestock holdings during an environmental crisis in the Saami reindeer husbandry in Norway. We found a positive relationship between: (1) pre- and post-collapse herd size; and (2) pre-collapse herd size and the number of animals lost during the collapse, indicating that herd accumulation is an effective but costly strategy. Policies that fail to incorporate the risk-beneficial aspect of herd accumulation will have a limited effect and may indeed fail entirely. In the context of climate change, official policies that incorporate pastoral risk management strategies may be the only solution for ensuring their continued existence.

  1. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  2. [The effect of group size on salience of member desirability].

    PubMed

    Sugimori, S

    1993-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that undesirable members are salient in a small group, while desirable members become salient in a larger group. One hundred and forty-five students were randomly assigned to twelve conditions, and read sentences desirably, undesirably, or neutrally describing each member of a college student club. The twelve clubs had one of three group sizes: 13, 39, or 52, and the proportion of the desirable or undesirable to the neutral was either 11:2 or 2:11, forming a three-way (3 x 2 x 2) factorial. Twelve subjects each were asked to make proportion judgments and impression ratings. Results indicated that proportion of the undesirable members was over estimated when the group size was 13, showing negativity bias, whereas proportion of the desirable was overestimated when the size was 52, displaying positivity bias. The size 39 showed neither positivity nor negativity bias. These results along with those from impression ratings suggested that salience of member desirability interacted with group size. It is argued that illusory correlation and group cognition studies may well take these effects into consideration. PMID:8355426

  3. [The effect of group size on salience of member desirability].

    PubMed

    Sugimori, S

    1993-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that undesirable members are salient in a small group, while desirable members become salient in a larger group. One hundred and forty-five students were randomly assigned to twelve conditions, and read sentences desirably, undesirably, or neutrally describing each member of a college student club. The twelve clubs had one of three group sizes: 13, 39, or 52, and the proportion of the desirable or undesirable to the neutral was either 11:2 or 2:11, forming a three-way (3 x 2 x 2) factorial. Twelve subjects each were asked to make proportion judgments and impression ratings. Results indicated that proportion of the undesirable members was over estimated when the group size was 13, showing negativity bias, whereas proportion of the desirable was overestimated when the size was 52, displaying positivity bias. The size 39 showed neither positivity nor negativity bias. These results along with those from impression ratings suggested that salience of member desirability interacted with group size. It is argued that illusory correlation and group cognition studies may well take these effects into consideration.

  4. Effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochun

    2005-11-01

    The effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction was investigated experimentally in a high-speed turbulent channel flow of water. A variety of near-wall injection techniques were used to create a bubbly turbulent boundary layer. The resulting wall friction force was measured directly by a floating element force balance. The bubble size was determined from photographic imaging. Using compressed nitrogen to force flow through a slot injector located in the plate beneath the boundary layer of the tunnel test section, a surfactant solution (Triton X-100, 19ppm) and salt water solution (35ppt) generated bubbles of average size between ˜500 microns and ˜200 microns and ˜100 microns, respectively (40 < d^+ < 200). In addition hollow spherical glass beads (˜75 microns (d^+ = 30) and specific gravity 0.18) and previously prepared lipid stabilized gas bubbles of ˜ 30 micron (d^+ =12) were injected. The results indicate that the drag reduction is related strongly to the injected gas volume flux and the static pressure in the boundary layer. Changing bubble size had essentially no influence on the measured friction drag, suggesting that friction drag is not a strong function of bubble size. [Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Effect of pupil size on dynamic visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Tetsuo; Nawa, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Masahiro; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2007-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of pupil size on dynamic visual acuity (DVA). 60 young healthy men (M = 28.1 yr., SD = 3.9) with normal vision were divided into three age-matched groups by pupil size: dilated (n=20), unchanged (n=20), and constricted (n=20). DVA was measured binocularly with freehead viewing before and at 30 min. after each drop was instilled. Each of the three groups got a different amount. The sizes of the constricted, unchanged, and dilated pupils were 2.8 mm (SD = 0.5), 4.1 mm (SD = 0.3), and 7.8 mm (SD = 0.5), respectively. The pupil size x DVA interaction was significant (F(2,114)= 6.07). DVA in the constricted pupil decreased, but that in the dilated pupil increased (paired t test). DVA in the unchanged pupil did not change significantly (paired t test). Pupil size is possibly one of the factors which may affect DVA measurement.

  6. Potential effects of racket grip size on lateral epicondilalgy risks.

    PubMed

    Rossi, J; Vigouroux, L; Barla, C; Berton, E

    2014-12-01

    The effects of tennis racket grip size on the forces exerted by muscles affecting lateral epicondylalgia (LE) were assessed in this study. Grip forces and joint moments applied on the wrist were quantified under three different handle size conditions, with and without induced muscle fatigue for intermediate and advanced players. The obtained experimental results were then used as input data of a biomechanical model of the hand. This simulation aimed to quantify the impact of grip strength modulation obtained in the experiment on the wrist extensor muscle forces. Our results show that there is an optimal grip diameter size defined as the handle inducing a reduced grip force during the stroke, in both fatigued and non-fatigued sessions. The results of the simulation suggested that extensor muscles were highly employed during forehand strokes, which confirms that the mechanical overuse of extensor tendons is a potential risk factor for tennis elbow occurrence. The handle grip size appeared to be a significant factor to reduce this extensor tendon loading. This suggests that grip size should be taken into account by players and designers in order to reduce the mechanical risk factors of overuse injury occurrence.

  7. Understanding Rolle's Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parameswaran, Revathy

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment studying twelfth grade students' understanding of Rolle's Theorem. In particular, we study the influence of different concept images that students employ when solving reasoning tasks related to Rolle's Theorem. We argue that students' "container schema" and "motion schema" allow for rich concept images.…

  8. Finite-size effects in nanocomposites: experimental and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, L. I.; Roman, M. P.; Skau, E. W.; Stevens, D. R.; Downen, L. N.; Hoffman, T. J.; Bochinski, J. R.

    2012-02-01

    Many proposed applications for electrically-conducting composite materials (smart textiles, e-m shielding coatings, tissue scaffolds) are nanostructured - that is, characteristic sample length scales may be similar to at least one dimension of the embedded particle. This is particularly true for long aspect-ratio particles such as nanotubes where the length of the particle can approach or exceed the thickness of a thin nanocomposite film or a nanofiber diameter. In these cases, the formation of a particle network and thus the electrical conductivity enhancement is affected by finite size effects, that is, percolation thresholds and the width of the transition to percolation differ with sample size [Stevens et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 021126 (2011)]. We present experimental electrical conductivity and 3-D continuum Monte-Carlo simulation results on such finite-sized percolation effects for particles with aspect ratios of 1 to 1000 and discuss proposed scaling laws and techniques to improve conductance in the finite-size regime.

  9. Effects of childhood body size on breast cancer tumour characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although a role of childhood body size in postmenopausal breast cancer risk has been established, less is known about its influence on tumour characteristics. Methods We studied the relationships between childhood body size and tumour characteristics in a Swedish population-based case-control study consisting of 2,818 breast cancer cases and 3,111 controls. Our classification of childhood body size was derived from a nine-level somatotype. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, derived from fitting unconditional logistic regression models. Association between somatotype at age 7 and tumour characteristics were evaluated in a case-only analysis where P values for heterogeneity were obtained by performing one degree of freedom trend tests. Results A large somatotype at age 7 was found to be associated with decreased postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Although strongly associated with other risk factors such as age of menarche, adult body mass index and mammographic density, somatotype at age 7 remained a significant protective factor (odds ratio (OR) comparing large to lean somatotype at age 7 = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.91, P trend = 0.004) after adjustment. The significant protective effect was observed within all subgroups defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, with a stronger effect for ER-negative (0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.75, P trend = 0.002), than for ER-positive (0.80, 95% CI = 0.62-1.05, P trend = 0.062), tumours (P heterogeneity = 0.046). Somatotype at age 7 was not associated with tumour size, histology, grade or the presence or absence of metastatic nodes. Conclusions Greater body size at age 7 is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, and the associated protective effect is stronger for the ER-negative breast cancer subtype than for the ER-positive subtype. PMID:20398298

  10. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T.

    2013-09-11

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  11. A new criterion for predicting rolling-element fatigue lives of through-hardened steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Parker, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A carbide factor was derived based upon a statistical analysis which related rolling-element fatigue life to the total number of residual carbide particles per unit area, median residual carbide size, and percent residual carbide area. An equation was experimentally determined which predicts material hardness as a function of temperature. The limiting temperatures of all of the materials studied were dependent on initial room temperature hardness and tempering temperature. An equation was derived combining the effects of material hardness, carbide factor, and bearing temperature to predict rolling-element bearing life.

  12. Does screen size matter for smartphones? Utilitarian and hedonic effects of screen size on smartphone adoption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the psychological effects of screen size on smartphone adoption by proposing an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that integrates an empirical comparison between large and small screens with perceived control, affective quality, and the original TAM constructs. A structural equation modeling analysis was conducted on data collected from a between-subjects experiment (N=130) in which users performed a web-based task on a smartphone with either a large (5.3 inches) or a small (3.7 inches) screen. Results show that a large screen, compared to a small screen, is likely to lead to higher smartphone adoption by simultaneously promoting both the utilitarian and hedonic qualities of smartphones, which in turn positively influence perceived ease of use of-and attitude toward-the device respectively. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24694112

  13. Does Screen Size Matter for Smartphones? Utilitarian and Hedonic Effects of Screen Size on Smartphone Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Joon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study explores the psychological effects of screen size on smartphone adoption by proposing an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that integrates an empirical comparison between large and small screens with perceived control, affective quality, and the original TAM constructs. A structural equation modeling analysis was conducted on data collected from a between-subjects experiment (N=130) in which users performed a web-based task on a smartphone with either a large (5.3 inches) or a small (3.7 inches) screen. Results show that a large screen, compared to a small screen, is likely to lead to higher smartphone adoption by simultaneously promoting both the utilitarian and hedonic qualities of smartphones, which in turn positively influence perceived ease of use of—and attitude toward—the device respectively. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24694112

  14. Synaptic Size Dynamics as an Effectively Stochastic Process

    PubMed Central

    Statman, Adiel; Kaufman, Maya; Minerbi, Amir; Ziv, Noam E.; Brenner, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Long-term, repeated measurements of individual synaptic properties have revealed that synapses can undergo significant directed and spontaneous changes over time scales of minutes to weeks. These changes are presumably driven by a large number of activity-dependent and independent molecular processes, yet how these processes integrate to determine the totality of synaptic size remains unknown. Here we propose, as an alternative to detailed, mechanistic descriptions, a statistical approach to synaptic size dynamics. The basic premise of this approach is that the integrated outcome of the myriad of processes that drive synaptic size dynamics are effectively described as a combination of multiplicative and additive processes, both of which are stochastic and taken from distributions parametrically affected by physiological signals. We show that this seemingly simple model, known in probability theory as the Kesten process, can generate rich dynamics which are qualitatively similar to the dynamics of individual glutamatergic synapses recorded in long-term time-lapse experiments in ex-vivo cortical networks. Moreover, we show that this stochastic model, which is insensitive to many of its underlying details, quantitatively captures the distributions of synaptic sizes measured in these experiments, the long-term stability of such distributions and their scaling in response to pharmacological manipulations. Finally, we show that the average kinetics of new postsynaptic density formation measured in such experiments is also faithfully captured by the same model. The model thus provides a useful framework for characterizing synapse size dynamics at steady state, during initial formation of such steady states, and during their convergence to new steady states following perturbations. These findings show the strength of a simple low dimensional statistical model to quantitatively describe synapse size dynamics as the integrated result of many underlying complex processes

  15. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs.

  16. Size effects on thermoelectricity in a strongly correlated oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Siemons, Wolter; McGuire, Michael A; Ramesh, R.; Yadav, A.K.; Wu, Vincent; Vailionis, Arturas; Majumdar, Arunava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated size effects on thermoelectricity in thin films of a strongly correlated layered cobaltate. At room temperature, the thermopower is independent of thickness down to 6 nm. This unusual behavior is inconsistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory, which is used to describe conventional metals and semiconductors, and is attributed to the strong electron correlations in this material. On the other hand, the resistivity increases below a critical thickness of {approx}30 nm, as expected. The temperature-dependent thermopower is similar for different thicknesses but the resistivity shows systematic changes with thickness. Our experiments highlight the differences in thermoelectric behavior of strongly correlated and uncorrelated systems when subjected to finite-size effects. We use the atomic-limit Hubbard model at the high-temperature limit to explain our observations. These findings provide new insights into decoupling electrical conductivity and thermopower in correlated systems.

  17. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs. PMID:27324835

  18. Aerosol effect on cloud droplet size monitored from satellite.

    PubMed

    Bréon, Francois-Marie; Tanré, Didier; Generoso, Sylvia

    2002-02-01

    Aerosol concentration and cloud droplet radii derived from space-borne measurements are used to explore the effect of aerosols on cloud microphysics. Cloud droplet size is found to be largest (14 micrometers) over remote tropical oceans and smallest (6 micrometers) over highly polluted continental areas. Small droplets are also present in clouds downwind of continents. By using estimates of droplet radii coupled with aerosol load, a statistical mean relationship is derived. The cloud droplet size appears to be better correlated with an aerosol index that is representative of the aerosol column number under some assumptions than with the aerosol optical thickness. This study reveals that the effect of aerosols on cloud microphysics is significant and occurs on a global scale.

  19. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi) in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi) where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  20. Effect of Process Variables on the Grain Size and Crystallographic Texture of Hot-Dip Galvanized Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboli, Shirin; McDermid, Joseph R.

    2014-08-01

    A galvanizing simulator was used to determine the effect of galvanizing bath antimony (Sb) content, substrate surface roughness, and cooling rate on the microstructural development of metallic zinc coatings. Substrate surface roughness was varied through the use of relatively rough hot-rolled and relatively smooth bright-rolled steels, cooling rates were varied from 0.1 to 10 K/s, and bulk bath Sb levels were varied from 0 to 0.1 wt pct. In general, it was found that increasing bath Sb content resulted in coatings with a larger grain size and strongly promoted the development of coatings with the close-packed {0002} basal plane parallel to the substrate surface. Increasing substrate surface roughness tended to decrease the coating grain size and promoted a more random coating crystallographic texture, except in the case of the highest Sb content bath (0.1 wt pct Sb), where substrate roughness had no significant effect on grain size except at higher cooling rates (10 K/s). Increased cooling rates tended to decrease the coating grain size and promote the {0002} basal orientation. Calculations showed that increasing the bath Sb content from 0 to 0.1 wt pct Sb increased the dendrite tip growth velocity from 0.06 to 0.11 cm/s by decreasing the solid-liquid interface surface energy from 0.77 to 0.45 J/m2. Increased dendrite tip velocity only partially explains the formation of larger zinc grains at higher Sb levels. It was also found that the classic nucleation theory cannot completely explain the present experimental observations, particularly the effect of increasing the bath Sb, where the classical theory predicts increased nucleation and a finer grain size. In this case, the "poisoning" theory of nucleation sites by segregated Sb may provide a partial explanation. However, any analysis is greatly hampered by the lack of fundamental thermodynamic information such as partition coefficients and surface energies and by a lack of fundamental structural studies. Overall

  1. Thermal properties of size-selective nanoparticles: Effect of the particle size on Einstein temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Anderson, R. M.; Duan, Z.; Chill, S.; Crooks, R. M.; Henkelman, G.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing size related thermal properties of nanoclusters is challenging due to the requirement to accurately control both their average sizes and the size distributions. In this work, temperature-dependent Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy and the phenomenological bond-order-length-strength (BOLS) model were employed to investigate the size-dependent Einstein temperature of Au nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations of Einstein temperature and average bond distance for clusters with different sizes agree quantitatively with experiment. The BOLS model is thus useful for predictive understanding of structure and thermal properties in well-defined metal clusters.

  2. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  3. Effect of Variation of Chord and Span of Ailerons on Rolling and Yawing Moments at Several Angles of Pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H; Strother, D H; Monish, B H

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extension to higher angles of attack of the investigation of the rolling and yawing moments due to ailerons of various chords and spans on two airfoils having the Clark Y and U. S. A. 27 wings. The measurements were made at various angles of pitch but at zero angle of roll and yaw, the wing chord being set at an angle of +4 degrees to the fuselage axis. In the case of the Clark Y airfoil the measurements have been extended to a pitch angle of 40 degrees, using ailerons of span equal to 67 per cent of the wing semispan and chord equal to 20 and 30 per cent of the wing chord. The work was conducted on wing models of 60-inch span and 10-inch chord.

  4. Size Effects in Impact Damage of Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobyns, Alan; Jackson, Wade

    2003-01-01

    Panel size has a large effect on the impact response and resultant damage level of honeycomb sandwich panels. It has been observed during impact testing that panels of the same design but different panel sizes will show large differences in damage when impacted with the same impact energy. To study this effect, a test program was conducted with instrumented impact testing of three different sizes of sandwich panels to obtain data on panel response and residual damage. In concert with the test program. a closed form analysis method was developed that incorporates the effects of damage on the impact response. This analysis method will predict both the impact response and the residual damage of a simply-supported sandwich panel impacted at any position on the panel. The damage is incorporated by the use of an experimental load-indentation curve obtained for the face-sheet/honeycomb and indentor combination under study. This curve inherently includes the damage response and can be obtained quasi-statically from a rigidly-backed specimen or a specimen with any support conditions. Good correlation has been obtained between the test data and the analysis results for the maximum force and residual indentation. The predictions can be improved by using a dynamic indentation curve. Analyses have also been done using the MSC/DYTRAN finite element code.

  5. TiN nanoparticles: small size-selected fabrication and their quantum size effect

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Size-selected TiN nanoclusters in the range of 4 to 20 nm have been produced by an ionized cluster beam, which combines a glow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a high control in size. The size distribution of TiN nanoparticles was determined before deposition by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size distribution was also analyzed using a high-resolution transmission electron micrograph. The photoluminescence [PL] spectra of TiN nanoparticles at different sizes were also experimentally investigated. We reported, for the first time, the strong visible luminescence of TiN nanoparticles on Si (111) wafer due to the reduced size. We also discussed the PL intensity as a function of the nanoparticle size distribution. PMID:22252375

  6. TiN nanoparticles: small size-selected fabrication and their quantum size effect.

    PubMed

    Hernández Mainet, Luis Carlos; Cabrera, Luis Ponce; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Cruz, Abel Fundora; Santana, Guillermo; Menchaca, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Size-selected TiN nanoclusters in the range of 4 to 20 nm have been produced by an ionized cluster beam, which combines a glow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a high control in size. The size distribution of TiN nanoparticles was determined before deposition by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size distribution was also analyzed using a high-resolution transmission electron micrograph. The photoluminescence [PL] spectra of TiN nanoparticles at different sizes were also experimentally investigated. We reported, for the first time, the strong visible luminescence of TiN nanoparticles on Si (111) wafer due to the reduced size. We also discussed the PL intensity as a function of the nanoparticle size distribution. PMID:22252375

  7. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  8. Serving size guidance for consumers: is it effective?

    PubMed

    Faulkner, G P; Pourshahidi, L K; Wallace, J M W; Kerr, M A; McCrorie, T A; Livingstone, M B E

    2012-11-01

    Larger portion sizes (PS) may be inciting over-eating and contributing to obesity rates. Currently, there is a paucity of data on the effectiveness of serving size (SS) guidance. The aims of the present review are to evaluate SS guidance; the understanding, usability and acceptability of such guidance, its impact on consumers and potential barriers to its uptake. A sample of worldwide SS guidance schemes (n 87) were identified using targeted and untargeted searches, overall these were found to communicate various inconsistent and often conflicting messages about PS selection. The available data suggest that consumers have difficulty in understanding terms such as 'portion size' and 'serving size', as these tend to be used interchangeably. In addition, discrepancies between recommended SS and those present on food labels add to the confusion. Consumers generally understand and visualise SS best when expressed in terms of household measures rather than actual weights. Only a limited number of studies have examined the direct impact of SS guidance on consumer behaviour with equivocal results. Although consumers recognise that guidance on selecting SS would be helpful, they are often unwilling to act on such guidance. The challenge of achieving consumer adherence to SS guidance is formidable due to several barriers including chronic exposure to larger PS, distorted consumption norms and perceptions, the habit of 'cleaning one's plate' and language barriers for ethnic minorities. In conclusion, the impact of SS guidance on consumers merits further investigation to ensure that future guidance resonates with consumers by being more understandable, usable and acceptable.

  9. Effect of Size Polydispersity on Melting of Charged Colloidal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2003-09-01

    We introduce simple prescriptions of the Yukawa potential to describe the effect of size polydispersity and macroion shielding effect in charged colloidal systems. The solid-liquid phase boundaries were presented with the Lindemann criterion based on molecular dynamics simulations. Compared with the Robbins-Kremer-Grest simulation results, a deviation of melting line is observed at small lambda, which means large macroion screening length. This deviation of phase boundary is qualitatively consistent with the simulation result of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with full many-body interactions. It is found that this deviation of the solid-liquid phase behaviour is sensitive to the screening parameter.

  10. Effect of Conversion from Natural Grassland to Arable Land on Soil Carbon Reserve in the Argentinean Rolling Pampas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriulo, A. E.; Irizar, A. B.; Mary, B.; Wilson, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    The evaluation of the effect of land use change on accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC) requires reliable data obtained from georeferenced sites with land use history records. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long term changes in the reserves of SOC in a typical Argiudol of the Pergamino series after the introduction of agriculture. Measures of soil organic carbon concentration and bulk density of Ap and A12 horizons were carried out in three sites of the Pergamino County (N of Buenos Aires province): a reference field with untilled pristine soil (33° 57' S; 60° 34' W), a field with 31 years (1980-2011) of agriculture (31Y) located next to the former, and a third field (33° 46' S; 60° 37' W) with 80 years (1910/1990) of agriculture (80Y). 31Y has been under continuous soybean cultivation with conventional tillage (CT) that consists of moldboard plow or double disk harrowing. At 80K the cultivation sequence was: 44 years of corn + 9 years of flax + 2 years of wheat + 17 years of wheat/soybean double cropping + 1 year of lentil; mostly under CT, some years under chisel plow during the 70's and a few years under zero tillage in soybean after wheat sown with conventional tillage during the 80's. Before the introduction of mechanical harvesting (1947) crop residues were burnt as well as the wheat stubble during the conventional double cropping period (1970-1980). Soil texture (23±1% clay, with predominance of illite) and field slopes (<0.5%) were similar in the three sites. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization rates were minimal due to the low crop response. The results are expressed in Mg ha-1 for an A soil horizon mass of 2500 Mg ha-1. The introduction of agriculture decreased SOC stock: 31Y varied from 68.3 to 40.1 Mg ha-1 (41.3% loss) and 80Y from 68.3 to 47.2 Mg ha-1 (30% loss). The SOC loss was the result of the mineralization of a large amount labile SOC present in the pristine soil and low annual additions of carbon issued from crop residue

  11. Hofmeister effects: interplay of hydration, nonelectrostatic potentials, and ion size.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Boström, Mathias; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Ninham, Barry W

    2011-07-21

    The classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloids, and corresponding theories of electrolytes, are unable to explain ion specific forces between colloidal particles quantitatively. The same is true generally, for surfactant aggregates, lipids, proteins, for zeta and membrane potentials and in adsorption phenomena. Even with fitting parameters the theory is not predictive. The classical theories of interactions begin with continuum solvent electrostatic (double layer) forces. Extensions to include surface hydration are taken care of with concepts like inner and outer Helmholtz planes, and "dressed" ion sizes. The opposing quantum mechanical attractive forces (variously termed van der Waals, Hamaker, Lifshitz, dispersion, nonelectrostatic forces) are treated separately from electrostatic forces. The ansatz that separates electrostatic and quantum forces can be shown to be thermodynamically inconsistent. Hofmeister or specific ion effects usually show up above ≈10(-2) molar salt. Parameters to accommodate these in terms of hydration and ion size had to be invoked, specific to each case. Ionic dispersion forces, between ions and solvent, for ion-ion and ion-surface interactions are not explicit in classical theories that use "effective" potentials. It can be shown that the missing ionic quantum fluctuation forces have a large role to play in specific ion effects, and in hydration. In a consistent predictive theory they have to be included at the same level as the nonlinear electrostatic forces that form the skeletal framework of standard theory. This poses a challenge. The challenges go further than academic theory and have implications for the interpretation and meaning of concepts like pH, buffers and membrane potentials, and for their experimental interpretation. In this article we overview recent quantitative developments in our evolving understanding of the theoretical origins of specific ion, or Hofmeister effects. These are demonstrated

  12. Sizing Up Objects: The Effect of Diminutive Forms on Positive Mood, Value, and Size Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Parzuchowski, Michał; Bocian, Konrad; Gygax, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Language (e.g., structure, morphology, and wording) can direct our attention toward the specific properties of an object, in turn influencing the mental representation of that same object. In this paper, we examined this idea by focusing on a particular linguistic form of diminution used in many languages (e.g., in Polish, Spanish, and Portuguese) to refer to an object as being “smaller.” Interestingly, although objects are usually considered “better” when they are bigger in size, objects described with linguistic diminution can also refer to those that are emotionally positive. Across three experiments conducted in Polish, we examined this lexical ambiguity in terms of mood (Experiment 1), subjective quality and monetary value (Experiment 2), and choice selection (Experiment 3). Overall, we found that people evaluate objects differently depending on the linguistic form (i.e., with or without diminution) with which they are described, and that it was related to the perceptual representation of these objects, and not their affective status. Objects described with diminution are evaluated as less satisfying and of lesser value and this effect is attributed to the way participants represent the objects (i.e., encoded and memorized). The generalizability of these effects is discussed. PMID:27721802

  13. An analytical solution for quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabetoglu, S.; Sisman, A.; Ozturk, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous experimental and numerical studies about quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient. In contrast, in this study, we obtain analytical expressions for Seebeck coefficient under quantum size effects. Seebeck coefficient of a Fermi gas confined in a rectangular domain is considered. Analytical expressions, which represent the size dependency of Seebeck coefficient explicitly, are derived in terms of confinement parameters. A fundamental form of Seebeck coefficient based on infinite summations is used under relaxation time approximation. To obtain analytical results, summations are calculated using the first two terms of Poisson summation formula. It is shown that they are in good agreement with the exact results based on direct calculation of summations as long as confinement parameters are less than unity. The analytical results are also in good agreement with experimental and numerical ones in literature. Maximum relative errors of analytical expressions are less than 3% and 4% for 2D and 1D cases, respectively. Dimensional transitions of Seebeck coefficient are also examined. Furthermore, a detailed physical explanation for the oscillations in Seebeck coefficient is proposed by considering the relative standard deviation of total variance of particle number in Fermi shell.

  14. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  15. Size-assortative mating and effect of maternal body size on the reproductive output of the nassariid Buccinanops globulosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaca, María Soledad; Narvarte, Maite; Martín, Pablo

    2012-04-01

    Size- assortative mating is usually present in populations where there is a positive relationship between female size and reproductive output. In this study, we tested for the presence of sexual size dimorphism, size-assortative mating and the effects of female size on reproductive output in a wild population of Buccinanops globulosus, an endemic nassariid of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean with direct development. The results showed that: 1) females were larger than males, indicating sexual size dimorphism; 2) mate sizes were significantly correlated, indicating a component of size-assortative mating; 3) males of medium and large size classes were paired with larger females than small-sized males; 4) larger females were paired with large males; 5) maternal body size was positively related to some proxies of reproductive success (number of nurse eggs per egg capsule, egg capsular area and total length at hatching). Our results suggest that larger females may be favored as mates over smaller ones owing to their higher investment per offspring and consequently a larger initial juvenile size as juvenile.

  16. Inferring the Dynamics of Effective Population Size Using Autosomal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zheng; Luo, Yin; Wang, Zhisheng; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hang; Wu, Leqin; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has provided a great opportunity for inferring human demographic history by investigating changes in the effective population size (Ne). In this report, we introduce a strategy for estimating Ne dynamics, allowing the exploration of large multi-locus SNP datasets. We applied this strategy to the Phase 1 Han Chinese samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. The Han Chinese population has undergone a continuous expansion since 25,000 years ago, at first slowly from about 7,300 to 9,800 (at the end of the last glacial maximum about 15,000 YBP), then more quickly to about 46,000 (at the beginning of the Neolithic about 8,000 YBP), and then even more quickly to reach a population size of about 140,000 (recently). PMID:26832887

  17. Fast and accurate determination of modularity and its effect size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, Santiago, III; Nyberg, Amy; Del Genio, Charo I.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2015-02-01

    We present a fast spectral algorithm for community detection in complex networks. Our method searches for the partition with the maximum value of the modularity via the interplay of several refinement steps that include both agglomeration and division. We validate the accuracy of the algorithm by applying it to several real-world benchmark networks. On all these, our algorithm performs as well or better than any other known polynomial scheme. This allows us to extensively study the modularity distribution in ensembles of Erdős-Rényi networks, producing theoretical predictions for means and variances inclusive of finite-size corrections. Our work provides a way to accurately estimate the effect size of modularity, providing a z-score measure of it and enabling a more informative comparison of networks with different numbers of nodes and links.

  18. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Ian D.; Bickersteth, Chloe; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J.; Brooks, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers’ point of subjective normality (PSN) for bodies shifts toward narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object) and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object) have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object) affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN) was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect.

  19. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Ian D; Bickersteth, Chloe; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J; Brooks, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers' point of subjective normality (PSN) for bodies shifts toward narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object) and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object) have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object) affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN) was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect. PMID:27597835

  20. Effective-medium theory for finite-size aggregates.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Charles-Antoine; Mallet, Pierre; Sentenac, Anne

    2006-02-01

    We propose an effective-medium theory for random aggregates of small spherical particles that accounts for the finite size of the embedding volume. The technique is based on the identification of the first two orders of the Born series within a finite volume for the coherent field and the effective field. Although the convergence of the Born series requires a finite volume, the effective constants that are derived through this identification are shown to admit of a large-scale limit. With this approach we recover successively, and in a simple manner, some classical homogenization formulas: the Maxwell Garnett mixing rule, the effective-field approximation, and a finite-size correction to the quasi-crystalline approximation (QCA). The last formula is shown to coincide with the usual low-frequency QCA in the limit of large volumes, while bringing substantial improvements when the dimension of the embedding medium is of the order of the probing wavelength. An application to composite spheres is discussed.

  1. Effective population size and population subdivision in demographically structured populations.

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Valérie; Charlesworth, Brian

    2002-01-01

    A fast-timescale approximation is applied to the coalescent process in a single population, which is demographically structured by sex and/or age. This provides a general expression for the probability that a pair of alleles sampled from the population coalesce in the previous time interval. The effective population size is defined as the reciprocal of twice the product of generation time and the coalescence probability. Biologically explicit formulas for effective population size with discrete generations and separate sexes are derived for a variety of different modes of inheritance. The method is also applied to a nuclear gene in a population of partially self-fertilizing hermaphrodites. The effects of population subdivision on a demographically structured population are analyzed, using a matrix of net rates of movement of genes between different local populations. This involves weighting the migration probabilities of individuals of a given age/sex class by the contribution of this class to the leading left eigenvector of the matrix describing the movements of genes between age/sex classes. The effects of sex-specific migration and nonrandom distributions of offspring number on levels of genetic variability and among-population differentiation are described for different modes of inheritance in an island model. Data on DNA sequence variability in human and plant populations are discussed in the light of the results. PMID:12242257

  2. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Ian D.; Bickersteth, Chloe; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J.; Brooks, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers’ point of subjective normality (PSN) for bodies shifts toward narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object) and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object) have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object) affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN) was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect. PMID:27597835

  3. Sensitivity analysis of roll load, torque and material properties in the roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyrathna, Buddhika; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) and Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) are increasingly used in the current automotive industry because of their high strength and weight saving potential. As a sheet forming process, roll forming is capable of forming such materials with precise dimensions, however a small change in processing may results in significant change in the material properties such as yield strength and hardening exponent from coil to coil or within the same coil. This paper presents the effect of yield strength and the hardening exponent on roll load, torque of the roll forming process and the longitudinal bow. The roll forming process is numerically simulated, and then the regression analysis and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques are employed to establish the relationships among the aforementioned parameters and to determine the percentage influence of material properties on longitudinal bow, roll load and torque.

  4. Comparing Acute Bouts of Sagittal Plane Progression Foam Rolling vs. Frontal Plane Progression Foam Rolling.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Corey A; Krein, Darren D; Antonio, Jose; Sanders, Gabriel J; Silver, Tobin A; Colas, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Many strength and conditioning professionals have included the use of foam rolling devices within a warm-up routine prior to both training and competition. Multiple studies have investigated foam rolling in regards to performance, flexibility, and rehabilitation; however, additional research is necessary in supporting the topic. Furthermore, as multiple foam rolling progressions exist, researching differences that may result from each is required. To investigate differences in foam rolling progressions, 16 athletically trained males underwent a 2-condition within-subjects protocol comparing the differences of 2 common foam rolling progressions in regards to performance testing. The 2 conditions included a foam rolling progression targeting the mediolateral axis of the body (FRml) and foam rolling progression targeting the anteroposterior axis (FRap). Each was administered in adjunct with a full-body dynamic warm-up. After each rolling progression, subjects performed National Football League combine drills, flexibility, and subjective scaling measures. The data demonstrated that FRml was effective at improving flexibility (p ≤ 0.05) when compared with FRap. No other differences existed between progressions.

  5. Mechanism of fault friction variations associated with rolling of non-spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Friction resisting the fault sliding is known to be rate and path-dependent, which is often related to the movement of the gouge particles. This movement includes particle rotation which can be modelled either using the Cosserat-type models or by direct computer simulation using a discrete element method. These models are however based on the notion that the gouge particles are spherical (circular in 2D) tacitly assuming that the real non-spherical shapes of the particles create quantities effects, which can be accounted for by introducing proper correction factors. We show that non-spherical particles behave qualitatively different. This is a result of the fact that the normal force applied to the non-spherical particle can create a moment whose resistance to the particle rolling changes with the angle - a phenomenon not possible in a spherical (circular) particle due to symmetry. If rolling of a particle is caused by macroscopic shear stress, the normal stress will resist or assist the rolling depending on the angle. As a result the effective friction coefficient associated with a single particle can be reduced to zero in the process of its rolling and then restore its initial value. This leads to the oscillatory behaviour of the friction coefficient as a function of displacement. When sliding involves the rolling of (very) many particles the random variations in their sizes and initial positions cause the friction coefficient to oscillate with decreasing amplitude; the characteristic displacement of this decrease can be an order of magnitude greater than the average particle size. If the gouge layer is sufficiently thick, the friction variations can be associated with rotating clusters of particles. The size of the clusters exceeds the particle size by a factor of the order of the ratio of the effective modulus of the particulate material to the acting shear stress. Thus the clusters may be significantly larger than the original particles and hence the

  6. Time-Indexed Effect Size for P-12 Reading and Math Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung; Finn, Jeremy; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    This study contextualizes an effect-size-like index of educational treatment effects or any group mean differences in academic achievement by referencing time. The new effect size metric can enrich effect size interpretations while serving as a supplement (but not substitute) for conventional standardized effect size measures. Specifically, the…

  7. Static and yawed-rolling mechanical properties of two type 7 aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Mccarty, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of 18 x 5.5 and 49 x 17 size, type 7 aircraft tires were evaluated. The tires were subjected to pure vertical loads and to combined vertical and lateral loads under both static and rolling conditions. Parameters for the static tests consisted of tire load in the vertical and lateral directions, and parameters for the rolling tests included tire vertical load, yaw angle, and ground speed. Effects of each of these parameters on the measured tire characteristics are discussed and, where possible, compared with previous work. Results indicate that dynamic tire properties under investigation were generally insensitive to speed variations and therefore tend to support the conclusion that many tire dynamic characteristics can be obtained from static and low speed rolling tests. Furthermore, many of the tire mechanical properties are in good agreement with empirical predictions based on earlier research.

  8. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez Molinelli, P. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear and neutron star matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. Our aim is to gain insight on the nature of the so-called "finite size effects", unavoidable in this kind of simulations, and to understand what they actually affect. To do so, we explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. For nuclear matter simulations we show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the "nuclear pasta" phases expected in neutron star matter simulations, but only one structure per cell and shaped by specific artificial aspects of the simulations-for the same physical conditions (i.e. number density and temperature) different cells yield different solutions. The particular shape of the solution at low enough temperature and a given density can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to the imposition of periodic boundary conditions on finite systems, this does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems, and it is actually independent of the system size. We conclude that, for nuclear matter simulations, the cells' size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneities, and the geometry of the periodic cell determines the shape of those inhomogeneities.

  9. High resolution patterning for flexible electronics via roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Sami; de Riet, Joris; Yakimets, Iryna; Smits, Edsger

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronics is a growing field and is currently maturing in applications such as displays, smart packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. In order to process on flexible substrates at high throughput and large areas, novel patterning techniques will be essential. Conventional optical lithography is limited in throughput as well as resolution, and requires several alignment steps to generate multi-layered patterns, required for applications such as thin-film transistors. It therefore remains a complex and expensive process. Nanoimprint lithography is an emerging alternative to optical lithography, demonstrating patterning capabilities over a wide range of resolutions, from several microns down to a few nanometres. For display applications, nanoimprint lithography can be used to pattern various layers. Micron sized thin-film transistors for backplane can be fabricated where a self-aligned geometry is used to decrease the number of alignment steps, and increase the overlay accuracy. In addition, nano-structures can be used for optical applications such as anti-reflective surfaces and nano patterned transparent electrodes. Imprint lithography is a fully roll-to-roll compatible process and enables large area and high throughput fabrication for flexible electronics. In this paper we discuss the possibilities and the challenges of large area patterning by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography, reviewing micron and nano sized structures realized on our roll-to-roll equipment. Nano patterned transparent electrodes, moth-eye antireflective coatings, and multilevel structures will be covered.

  10. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Gang; Liu, Zhiguo; Xie, Qiyun; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Wei; Yan, Xiaobing

    2015-09-15

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}TiO{sub 3} above T{sub c} similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties.

  11. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect in size-quantized diamagnetic film

    SciTech Connect

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate the oscillating magnetocaloric effect on a size-quantized diamagnetic film in a transverse magnetic field. We obtain the analytical expression for the thermodynamic potential in case of the arbitrary spectrum of carriers. The entropy change is shown to be the oscillating function of the magnetic field and the film thickness. The nature of this effect is the same as for the de Haas–van Alphen effect. The magnetic part of entropy has a maximal value at some temperature. Such behavior of the entropy is not observed in magneto-ordered materials. We discuss the nature of unusual behavior of the magnetic entropy. We compare our results with the data obtained for 2D and 3D cases.

  12. Size effects on mechanical and thermal properties of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md Tarekul

    Materials, from electronic to structural, exhibit properties that are sensitive to their composition and internal microstructures such as grain and precipitate sizes, crystalline phases, defects and dopants. Therefore, the research trend has been to obtain fundamental understanding in processing-structure-properties to develop new materials or new functionalities for engineering applications. The advent of nanotechnology has opened a new dimension to this research area because when material size is reduced to nanoscale, properties change significantly from the bulk values. This phenomenon expands the problem to 'size-processing-structure-propertiesfunctionalities'. The reinvigorated research for the last few decades has established size dependency of the material properties such as thermal conductivity, Young's modulus and yield strength, electrical resistivity, photo-conductance etc. It is generally accepted that classical physical laws can be used to scale down the properties up to 25-50 nm length-scale, below which their significant deviation or even breakdown occur. This dissertation probes the size effect from a different perspective by asking the question, if nanoscale size influences one physical domain, why it would not influence the coupling between two or more domains? Or in other words, if both mechanical and thermal properties are different at the nanoscale, can mechanical strain influence thermal conductivity? The hypothesis of size induced multi-domain coupling is therefore the foundation of this dissertation. It is catalyzed by the only few computational studies available in the literature while experimental validations have been non-existent owing to experimental challenges. The objective of this research is to validate this hypothesis, which will open a novel avenue to tune properties and functionalities of materials with the size induced multi-domain coupling. Single domain characterization itself is difficult at the nanoscale due to specimen

  13. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  14. Finite-size effects in biomimetic smectic films

    SciTech Connect

    Harroun, T.A.; Pencer, J.; Nieh, M.-P.; Katsaras, J.; Raghunathan, V.A.

    2004-12-01

    Thin stacks of lipid multibilayers supported on rigid silicon and mica substrates are found to exhibit finite-size effects. Using neutron diffraction we find that the repeat spacing (d) of stacks containing up to a few tens of bilayers depends on their thickness (D), with d increasing with decreasing D. Differences in d are larger in the low-temperature L'{sub {beta}} phase consisting of rigid bilayers than in the high-temperature L{sub {alpha}} phase where the bilayers are more flexible. Various scenarios that may be responsible for this counterintuitive observation are discussed.

  15. Effects of size and temperature on metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, J F; Brown, J H; West, G B; Savage, V M; Charnov, E L

    2001-09-21

    We derive a general model, based on principles of biochemical kinetics and allometry, that characterizes the effects of temperature and body mass on metabolic rate. The model fits metabolic rates of microbes, ectotherms, endotherms (including those in hibernation), and plants in temperatures ranging from 0 degrees to 40 degrees C. Mass- and temperature-compensated resting metabolic rates of all organisms are similar: The lowest (for unicellular organisms and plants) is separated from the highest (for endothermic vertebrates) by a factor of about 20. Temperature and body size are primary determinants of biological time and ecological roles.

  16. Making sense of genetic estimates of effective population size.

    PubMed

    Waples, Robin S

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion of interest in use of genetic markers to estimate effective population size, Ne . Effective population size is important both theoretically (Ne is a key parameter in almost every aspect of evolutionary biology) and for practical application (Ne determines rates of genetic drift and loss of genetic variability and modulates the effectiveness of selection, so it is crucial to consider in conservation). As documented by Palstra & Fraser (), most of the recent growth in Ne estimation can be attributed to development or refinement of methods that can use a single sample of individuals (the older temporal method requires at least two samples separated in time). As with other population genetic methods, performance of new Ne estimators is typically evaluated with simulated data for a few scenarios selected by the author(s). Inevitably, these initial evaluations fail to fully consider the consequences of violating simplifying assumptions, such as discrete generations, closed populations of constant size and selective neutrality. Subsequently, many researchers studying natural or captive populations have reported estimates of Ne for multiple methods; often these estimates are congruent, but that is not always the case. Because true Ne is rarely known in these empirical studies, it is difficult to make sense of the results when estimates differ substantially among methods. What is needed is a rigorous, comparative analysis under realistic scenarios for which true Ne is known. Recently, Gilbert & Whitlock () did just that for both single-sample and temporal methods under a wide range of migration schemes. In the current issue of Molecular Ecology, Wang () uses simulations to evaluate performance of four single-sample Ne estimators. In addition to assessing effects of true Ne , sample size, and number of loci, Wang also evaluated performance under changing abundance, physical linkage and genotyping errors, as well as for some alternative

  17. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  18. a Numerical Simulation of Strip Profile in a 6-HIGH Cold Rolling Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaozhong; Yang, Quan; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Kim, Shinil

    Shape control is always a key issue in the six-high rolling mill, in which the shifting of the intermediate roll and the work roll have been used to enhance the shape control capability. In this paper, a finite element method (FEM) model has been developed to simultaneously simulate the strip deformation and the roll stack deformation for the six-high rolling mill. The effects of the work-roll bending, the shifting of the intermediate roll and the work roll on the strip crown and edge drop are discussed in details. Results have shown that both higher bending force and more roll shifting will significantly reduce the strip crown. The edge drop is also reduced with the bending force and the roll shifting.

  19. Effects of rolling deformation processes on the properties of Ag-sheathed Sr1-xKxFe2As2 superconducting tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He; Zhang, Xianping; Yao, Chao; Dong, Chiheng; Zhang, Qianjun; Ma, Yanwei; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The powder-in-tube method is widely used in fabricating iron-based superconducting wires and tapes. To make tapes, a multi-pass rolling process is usually adopted. However, the multi-pass rolling process limits the efficiency of tapes. In this work, rolling deformation technique was studied systematically by fabricating Sr1-xKxFe2As2 superconducting tapes. The total rolling reduction ratio is about 80% and the difference of superconducting performance of tapes rolled by 2, 3, 5 and 7 passes has been investigated. The critical current density Jc, Vickers micro-hardness and microstructure of the superconducting core indicate that tapes after 2, 3, 5 and 7 rolling passes exhibit a similar trend. The width of the tapes and the area of superconducting cores increase with decreasing the number of rolling passes, but the transport Jc of tapes after different rolling passes seems to be the same, except for the tape rolled by 2 passes, whose transport Jc is lower than the other tapes. Concerning the geometry uniformity for the superconducting cores, the sausaging phenomenon was not observed from the photograph of longitudinal cross-section of all the samples. "Lobes" phenomenon on transverse cross-section can be suppressed through decreasing the rolling passes. Therefore, we can obtain uniform and high-performance Ag-sheathed iron-based superconducting tapes by cutting the number of rolling passes down to 3, which is more advantageous to the large-scale producing in the future.

  20. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  1. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  2. DETAIL OF CUTTING ROLLS ON #72 BRASS MILL SLITTER, ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CUTTING ROLLS ON #72 BRASS MILL SLITTER, ONE OF THREE CURRENTLY IN OPERATION. BRASS STRIP IS CUT TO CUSTOMER ORDER; COPPER STRIP IS PRODUCED IN STANDARD SIZES. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  3. The Size Congruity Effect: Is Bigger Always More?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santens, Seppe; Verguts, Tom

    2011-01-01

    When comparing digits of different physical sizes, numerical and physical size interact. For example, in a numerical comparison task, people are faster to compare two digits when their numerical size (the relevant dimension) and physical size (the irrelevant dimension) are congruent than when they are incongruent. Two main accounts have been put…

  4. Texture and Magnetic Properties of Rolled Fe-6.5 wt.%Si Thin Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y. C.; Sha, Y. H.; Liu, J. L.; Zhang, F.; Zuo, L.

    2014-01-01

    Thin (0.20 mm) Fe-6.5 wt.%Si sheets have been successfully fabricated by the continuous rolling method. The designed rolling process parameters, including the initial hot-band grain size, grain size after intermediate annealing, cold rolling reduction, and cold rolling temperature, were selected to control the texture development. Dominant recrystallization η fiber [rolling direction (RD)//] was achieved after high-temperature annealing. The produced Fe-6.5 wt.%Si thin sheets are promising alternatives for use in power electronics because of their magnetic properties from 400 Hz to 40 kHz.

  5. Computation of Effect Size for Moderating Effects of Categorical Variables in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguinis, Herman; Pierce, Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    The computation and reporting of effect size estimates is becoming the norm in many journals in psychology and related disciplines. Despite the increased importance of effect sizes, researchers may not report them or may report inaccurate values because of a lack of appropriate computational tools. For instance, Pierce, Block, and Aguinis (2004)…

  6. Toward Policy-Relevant Benchmarks for Interpreting Effect Sizes: Combining Effects with Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2009-01-01

    The common reporting of effect sizes has been an important advance in education research in recent years. However, the benchmarks used to interpret the size of these effects--as small, medium, and large--do little to inform educational administration and policy making because they do not account for program costs. The author proposes an approach…

  7. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  8. Correcting overestimated effect size estimates in multiple trials.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; Gula, Bartosz; Czech, Paul; Muschik, Denise

    2011-01-01

    In a simulation study, Brand, Bradley, Best, and Stoica (2011) have shown that Cohen's d is notably overestimated if computed for data aggregated over multiple trials. Although the phenomenon is highly important for studies and meta-analyses of studies structurally similar to the simulated scenario, the authors do not comprehensively address how the problem could be handled. In this comment, we first suggest a corrective term d(')c that includes the number and correlation of trials. Next, the results of a simulation study provide evidence that the proposed dc' results in a more precise estimation of trial-level effects. We conclude that, in practice, d( ')c together with plausible estimates of inter-trial correlation will produce a more precise effect size range compared to that suggested by Brand and colleagues (2011).

  9. Effect of cooling rate after hot rolling and of multistage strain aging on the drawability of low-carbon-steel wire rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A. Karimi; Maccagno, T. M.; Jonas, J. J.

    1995-05-01

    Tensile testing was used to simulate the multistage strain aging occurring in low-C steel during the relatively short intervals between dies in a multiple-die wire-drawing machine. The effects were examined of three simulated post-hot-rolling cooling rates and three thermal treatments on the strain-aging susceptibility of a high- and a low-N steel. This was measured by applying a 6 pct tensile strain, followed by aging at either 65° or 100 °C for 20 seconds, and then pulling the specimen to failure at room temperature. Increases in flow stress and decreases in the elongation to fracture both indicated high susceptibility to strain aging. It was found that the nitrogen content, the cooling rate from the hot-rolling temperature to about 300 °C, as well as the cooling rate below 300 °C, all have dramatic effects on the strain-aging behavior. Moreover, multistage strain aging is more severe than single-stage strain aging. The implications of these observations on increasing the drawability of low-carbon-steel wire are discussed.

  10. A Familiar-Size Stroop Effect: Real-World Size Is an Automatic Property of Object Representation

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2012-01-01

    When we recognize an object, do we automatically know how big it is in the world? We employed a Stroop-like paradigm, in which two familiar objects were presented at different visual sizes on the screen. Observers were faster to indicate which was bigger or smaller on the screen when the real-world size of the objects was congruent with the visual size than when it was incongruent— demonstrating a familiar-size Stroop effect. Critically, the real-world size of the objects was irrelevant for the task. This Stroop effect was also present when only one item was present at a congruent or incongruent visual size on the display. In contrast, no Stroop effect was observed for participants who simply learned a rule to categorize novel objects as big or small. These results show that people access the familiar size of objects without the intention of doing so, demonstrating that real-world size is an automatic property of object representation. PMID:22545601

  11. A familiar-size Stroop effect: real-world size is an automatic property of object representation.

    PubMed

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2012-06-01

    When we recognize an object, do we automatically know how big it is in the world? We employed a Stroop-like paradigm, in which two familiar objects were presented at different visual sizes on the screen. Observers were faster to indicate which was bigger or smaller on the screen when the real-world size of the objects was congruent with the visual size than when it was incongruent--demonstrating a familiar-size Stroop effect. Critically, the real-world size of the objects was irrelevant for the task. This Stroop effect was also present when only one item was present at a congruent or incongruent visual size on the display. In contrast, no Stroop effect was observed for participants who simply learned a rule to categorize novel objects as big or small. These results show that people access the familiar size of objects without the intention of doing so, demonstrating that real-world size is an automatic property of object representation.

  12. The use of stoned olive cake and rolled linseed in the diet of intensively reared lambs: effect on the intramuscular fatty-acid composition.

    PubMed

    Mele, M; Serra, A; Pauselli, M; Luciano, G; Lanza, M; Pennisi, P; Conte, G; Taticchi, A; Esposto, S; Morbidini, L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of stoned olive cake and rolled linseed in a concentrate-based diet for lambs on the fatty-acid composition of polar and non-polar intramuscular lipids of the longissimus dorsi muscle. To achieve this objective, 32 Appenninica lambs were randomly distributed into four groups of eight lambs each and were fed conventional cereal-based concentrates (diet C); concentrates containing 20% on a dry matter (DM) basis of rolled linseed (diet L); concentrates containing 35% DM of stoned olive cake (diet OC); and concentrates containing both rolled linseed (10% DM) and stoned olive cake (17% DM; diet OCL). The concentrates were administered together with grass hay at a 20:80 forage:concentrate ratio. Growing performances and carcass traits were evaluated. The fatty-acid composition was analysed in the total intramuscular lipids, as well as in the polar and neutral lipids. The average feed intake and the growth performance of lambs were not affected by the dietary treatments, as a consequence of similar nutritional characteristics of the diets. The inclusion of rolled linseed in the L and OCL diets increased the content of C18:3 n-3 in intramuscular total lipids, which was threefold higher in meat from the L lambs and more than twofold higher in meat from the OCL lambs compared with the C and OC treatments. The n-6:n-3 ratio significantly decreased in the meat from lambs in the L and OCL groups, reaching values below 3. The L treatment resulted in the highest level of trans-18:1 fatty acids in the muscle. Regardless of the dietary treatment, the t10-18:1 was the major isomer, representing 55%, 45%, 49% and 45% of total trans-18:1 for C, L, OC and OCL treatments, respectively. Neutral lipids from the OC-fed lambs contained the highest amount of c9-18:1 (more than 36% of total fatty acids); however, the content of c9-18:1 did not differ between the OC and C lambs, suggesting an intensive biohydrogenation of

  13. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  14. Mechanisms of rolling contact spalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Bhargava, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at analyzing the mechanical material interactions responsible for rolling contact spalling of the 440 C steel, high pressure oxygen turbopump bearings are presented. A coupled temperature displacement finite element analysis of the effects of friction heating under the contact is presented. The contact is modelled as a stationary, heat generating, 2 dimensional indent in an elastic perfectly plastic half-space with heat fluxes up to 8.6 x 10000 KW/m sq comparable to those generated in the bearing. Local temperatures in excess of 1000 C are treated. The calculations reveal high levels of residual tension after the contact is unloaded and cools. Efforts to promote Mode 2/Mode 3 fatigue crack growth under cyclic torsion in hardened 440 C steel are described. Spalls produced on 440 C steel by a 3 ball/rod rolling contact testing machine were studied with scanning microscopy. The shapes of the cyclic, stress strain hysteresis loops displayed by hardened 440 C steel in cyclic torsion at room temperature are defined for the plastic strain amplitudes encountered in rolling/sliding contact. Results of these analyses are discussed in detail.

  15. Effect of meal size and body size on specific dynamic action and gastric processing in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    McGaw, Iain J; Curtis, Daniel L

    2013-11-01

    Meal size and animal size are important factors affecting the characteristics of the specific dynamic action (SDA) response across a variety of taxa. The effects of these two variables on the SDA of decapod crustaceans are based on just a couple of articles, and are not wholly consistent with the responses reported for other aquatic ectotherms. Therefore, the effects of meal size and animal size on the characteristics of SDA response were investigated in a variety of decapod crustaceans from different families. A 6 fold increase in meal size (0.5%-3% body mass) resulted a pronounced increase in the duration of increased oxygen consumption, resulting in an increase in the SDA of Callinectes sapidus, Cancer gracilis, Hemigrapsus nudus, Homarus americanus, Pugettia producta and Procambarus clarkii. Unlike many other aquatic ectotherms a substantial increase between meal sizes was required, with meal size close to their upper feeding limit (3% body mass), before changes were evident. In many organisms increases in both duration and scope contribute to the overall SDA, here changes in scope as a function of meal size were weak, suggesting that a similar amount of energy is required to upregulate gastric processes, regardless of meal size. The SDA characteristics were less likely to be influenced by the size of the animal, and there was no difference in the SDA (kJ) as a function of size in H. americanus or Cancer irroratus when analysed as mass specific values. In several fish species characteristics of the SDA response are more closely related to the transit times of food, rather than the size of a meal. To determine if a similar trend occurred in crustaceans, the transit rates of different sized meals were followed through the digestive system using a fluoroscope. Although there was a trend towards larger meals taking longer to pass through the gut, this was only statistically significant for P. clarkii. There were some changes in transit times as a function of animal

  16. Modelling of spring roll actuators based on viscoelastic dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Tang, Liling; Li, Bo; Sheng, Junjie; Liu, Lei

    2015-06-01

    In this article, the effect of viscoelastic deformation is analyzed theoretically to evaluate the performance of spring roll dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. By patterning the electrodes on the rolls, respectively, two functions are studied: axial elongation and bending. The thermodynamic model of viscoelastic DE spring roll is established, and the governing equation is deduced by the free energy method. It is found that when the applied voltage is static and relatively small, both the axial elongated and bending deformed spring rolls can reach equilibrium after viscoelastic relaxation. The evolutions in different timescales and the final profile are presented. The dynamic response is studied as well, by applying a sinusoidal voltage. For the axial elongated spring roll, viscoelasticity can reduce amplitude and increase mean stretch of the actuator. For the bending deformed spring rolls, the results indicate that the spring stiffness has a more significant impact on dynamic performance compared to the effect of voltage.

  17. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  18. Size effects in long-term quasistatic heat transport.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, George Y; Yerkes, Kirk L

    2013-06-01

    We consider finite-size effects on heat transfer between thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system, where the number of modes in each reservoir is finite. Our approach is based on the generalized quantum Langevin equation and the thermal reservoirs are described as ensembles of oscillators within the Drude-Ullersma model. A general expression for the heat current between the thermal reservoirs in the long-time quasistatic regime, when an observation time is of the order of Δ(-1) and Δ is the mode spacing constant of a thermal reservoir, is obtained. The resulting equations that govern the long-time relaxation for the mode temperatures and the average temperatures of the reservoirs are derived and approximate analytical solutions are found. The obtained time dependencies of the temperatures and the resulting heat current reveal peculiarities at t=2πm/Δ with non-negative integers m and the heat current vanishes nonmonotonically when t→∞. The validity of Fourier's law for a chain of finite-size macroscopic subsystems is considered. As is shown, for characteristic times of the order of Δ(-1) the temperatures of subsystems' modes deviate from each other and the validity of Fourier's law cannot be established. In a case when deviations of initial temperatures of the subsystems from their average value are small, t→∞ asymptotic values for the mode temperatures do not depend on a mode's number and are the same as if Fourier's law were valid for all times.

  19. Comparing effective population sizes of dominant marine alphaproteobacteria lineages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei; Swan, Brandon K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Hughes, Austin L; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental question in marine microbial ecology is how microbes adapt to ocean environments. Although numerically dominant populations are typically considered more successful, higher census population sizes (Nc) do not equate directly to a greater capability for adaptation. Instead, effective population size (Ne) determines the fate of deleterious and favourable mutations, and thus is a key parameter for determining the adaptive potential of a population. In the case of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages, two abundant heterotrophic bacteria in ocean surface waters with contrasting life history strategies, culture-independent population surveys suggest that SAR11s have greater Nc than Roseobacters. To determine relative Ne, we compared the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) of recently diverged lineages of these taxa. Values of ω associated with several of the Roseobacter subclades were lower than for SAR11 subclades, suggesting greater Ne in these cases. Most Roseobacter lineages also had smaller ω values compared with an atypical basal Roseobacter lineage with a large Nc. This finding provides insight into variability in Ne across two important marine bacterial lineages, and provides an evolutionary context for considering how heterotrophic marine bacteria may differ in their ability to adapt to changing ocean habitats.

  20. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  1. Nosewitness Identification: Effects of Lineup Size and Retention Interval

    PubMed Central

    Alho, Laura; Soares, Sandra C.; Costa, Liliana P.; Pinto, Elisa; Ferreira, Jacqueline H. T.; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Silva, Carlos F.; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    Although canine identification of body odor (BO) has been widely used as forensic evidence, the concept of nosewitness identification by human observers was only recently put to the test. The results indicated that BOs associated with male characters in authentic crime videos could later be identified in BO lineup tests well above chance. To further evaluate nosewitness memory, we assessed the effects of lineup size (Experiment 1) and retention interval (Experiment 2), using a forced-choice memory test. The results showed that nosewitness identification works for all lineup sizes (3, 5, and 8 BOs), but that larger lineups compromise identification performance in similarity to observations from eye- and earwitness studies. Also in line with previous eye- and earwitness studies, but in disagreement with some studies on odor memory, Experiment 2 showed significant forgetting between shorter retention intervals (15 min) and longer retention intervals (1-week) using lineups of five BOs. Altogether this study shows that identification of BO in a forensic setting is possible and has limits and characteristics in line with witness identification through other sensory modalities. PMID:27303317

  2. Community Size Effects on Epidemic Spreading in Multiplex Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Li, Ping; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical process of epidemic spreading has drawn much attention of the complex network community. In the network paradigm, diseases spread from one person to another through the social ties amongst the population. There are a variety of factors that govern the processes of disease spreading on the networks. A common but not negligible factor is people’s reaction to the outbreak of epidemics. Such reaction can be related information dissemination or self-protection. In this work, we explore the interactions between disease spreading and population response in terms of information diffusion and individuals’ alertness. We model the system by mapping multiplex networks into two-layer networks and incorporating individuals’ risk awareness, on the assumption that their response to the disease spreading depends on the size of the community they belong to. By comparing the final incidence of diseases in multiplex networks, we find that there is considerable mitigation of diseases spreading for full phase of spreading speed when individuals’ protection responses are introduced. Interestingly, the degree of community overlap between the two layers is found to be critical factor that affects the final incidence. We also analyze the consequences of the epidemic incidence in communities with different sizes and the impacts of community overlap between two layers. Specifically, as the diseases information makes individuals alert and take measures to prevent the diseases, the effective protection is more striking in small community. These phenomena can be explained by the multiplexity of the networked system and the competition between two spreading processes. PMID:27007112

  3. Nanometer-Size Effect on Hydrogen Sites in Palladium Lattice.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroshi; Kofu, Maiko; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2016-08-17

    Nanometer-sized materials attract much attention because their physical and chemical properties are substantially different from those of bulk materials owing to their size and surface effects. In this work, neutron powder diffraction experiments on the nanoparticles of palladium hydride, which is the most popular metal hydride, have been performed at 300, 150, and 44 K to investigate the positions of the hydrogen atoms in the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of palladium. We used high-quality PdD0.363 nanocrystals with a diameter of 8.0 ± 0.9 nm. The Rietveld analysis revealed that 30% of D atoms are located at the tetrahedral (T) sites and 70% at the octahedral (O) sites. In contrast, only the O sites are occupied in bulk palladium hydride and in most fcc metal hydrides. The temperature dependence of the T-site occupancy suggested that the T-sites are occupied only in a limited part, probably in the subsurface region, of the nanoparticles. This is the first study to determine the hydrogen sites in metal nanoparticles. PMID:27462875

  4. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  5. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  6. Rolling friction—models and experiment. An undergraduate student project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozdecký, L.; Bartoš, J.; Musilová, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the rolling friction (rolling resistance) model is studied theoretically and experimentally in undergraduate level fundamental general physics courses. Rolling motions of a cylinder along horizontal or inclined planes are studied by simple experiments, measuring deformations of the underlay or of the rolling body. The rolling of a hard cylinder on a soft underlay as well as of a soft cylinder on a hard underlay is studied. The experimental data are treated by the open source software Tracker, appropriate for use at the undergraduate level of physics. Interpretation of results is based on elementary considerations comprehensible to university students—beginners. It appears that the commonly accepted model of rolling resistance based on the idea of a warp (little bulge) on the underlay in front of the rolling body does not correspond with experimental results even for the soft underlay and hard rolling body. The alternative model of the rolling resistance is suggested in agreement with experiment and the corresponding concept of the rolling resistance coefficient is presented. In addition to the obtained results we can conclude that the project can be used as a task for students in practical exercises of fundamental general physics undergraduate courses. Projects of similar type effectively contribute to the development of the physical thinking of students.

  7. An automated procedure for analyzing the effects of vortex-induced fin pressure on roll torque for a finned body of revolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Vijlee, Shazib Z.

    2004-09-01

    In flight tests, certain finned bodies of revolution firing lateral jets experience slower spin rates than expected. The primary cause for the reduced spin rate is the interaction between the lateral jets and the freestream air flowing past the body. This interaction produces vortices that interact with the fins (Vortex-Fin Interaction (VFI)) altering the pressure distribution over the fins and creating torque that counteracts the desired spin (counter torque). The current task is to develop an automated procedure for analyzing the pressures measured at an array of points on the fin surfaces of a body tested in a production-scale wind tunnel to determine the VFI-induced roll torque and compare it to the roll torque experimentally measured with an aerodynamic balance. Basic pressure, force, and torque relationships were applied to finite elements defined by the pressure measurement locations and integrated across the fin surface. The integrated fin pressures will help assess the distinct contributions of the individual fins to the counter torque and aid in correlating the counter torque with the positions and strengths of the vortices. The methodology produced comparisons of the effects of VFI for varying flow conditions such as freestream Mach number and dynamic pressure. The results show that for some cases the calculated counter torque agreed with the measured counter torque; however, the results were less consistent with increased freestream Mach numbers and dynamic pressures.

  8. Acute effects of instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization vs. foam rolling on knee and hip range of motion in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the acute effects of foam rolling (FR) and a new form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM), Fascial Abrasion Technique ™ (FAT) on hip and knee range of motion in soccer players. Twenty male soccer players randomly allocated into FR and FAT group (n = 10 each). Passive knee flexion and straight leg raise tests were measured before, immediately after and 24 h after intervention (FR or FAT). The FR group applied a 2-min quadriceps and hamstrings rolling, while FAT group received a 2-min application of FAT to the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles. Both groups significantly improved knee and hip ROM (p < 0.05), with higher gains observed in FAT group (10-19% vs. 5-9%). At 24 h post-treatment, only FAT group preserved most of the gains in ROM (7-13%; p < 0.05). These results support the use of the newly developed IASMT, Fascial Abrasion Technique ™ and FR for increasing lower extremity ROM of athletes. PMID:26592226

  9. MINSIZE: A Computer Program for Obtaining Minimum Sample Size as an Indicator of Effect Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Describes MINSIZE, an MS-DOS computer program that permits the user to determine the minimum sample size needed for the results of a given analysis to be statistically significant. Program applications for statistical significance tests are presented and illustrated. (SLD)

  10. Indentation size effect and the plastic compressibility of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-06-23

    Oxide glasses exhibit significant densification under an applied isostatic pressure at the glass transition temperature. The glass compressibility is correlated with the chemical composition and atomic packing density, e.g., borate glasses with planar triangular BO{sub 3} units are more disposed for densification than silicate glasses with tetrahedral units. We here show that there is a direct relation between the plastic compressibility following hot isostatic compression and the extent of the indentation size effect (ISE), which is the decrease of hardness with indentation load exhibited by most materials. This could suggest that the ISE is correlated with indentation-induced shear bands, which should form in greater density when the glass network is more adaptable to volume changes through structural and topological rearrangements under an applied pressure.

  11. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamaina, Dario; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners.

  12. Effective capture of respirable sized particulates using electrostatic precipitator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, K.R.; Sanyal, A.

    1999-11-01

    The electrostatic precipitator widely used for the prevention of particulate pollution from industrial sources, can also be effective, when correctly sized and operated, for the collection of respirable fine particulates. That is, those below some 2 micron diameter, particularly of heavy metals which tend to be cumulative and hence injurious to health. Following a review of the basic principles of operation of electrostatic precipitators, specifically addressed to the capture of fine particulates, an outline of the various types of equipment used for collecting solid and liquid (mist) particulates will be discussed. Finally some typical precipitator applications will be illustrated, together with suggestions as to how efficiencies can be further increased to meet compliance with any potential future changes in legislation.

  13. Effect of chip size on steam explosion pretreatment of softwood.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, I; Oliva, J M; Navarro, A A; González, A; Carrasco, J; Ballesteros, M

    2000-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in technology for converting lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol, substantial opportunities still exist to reduce production costs. In biomass pretreatment, reducing milling power is a technological improvement that will substantially lower production costs for ethanol. Improving sugar yield from hemicellulose hydrolysis would also reduce ethanol production costs. Thus, it would be desirable to test innovative pretreatment conditions to improve the economics by reducing electrical power of the milling stage and by optimizing pretreatment recovery of hemicellulose, as well as to enhance cellulose hydrolysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chip size (2-5, 5-8, and 8-12 mm) on steam-explosion pretreatment (190 and 210 degrees C, 4 and 8 min) of softwood (Pinus pinaster).

  14. Non-local damage rheology and size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V.

    2011-12-01

    We study scaling relations controlling the onset of transiently-accelerating fracturing and transition to dynamic rupture propagation in a non-local damage rheology model. The size effect is caused principally by growth of a fracture process zone, involving stress redistribution and energy release associated with a large fracture. This implies that rupture nucleation and transition to dynamic propagation are inherently scale-dependent processes. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and local damage mechanics are formulated in terms of dimensionless strain components and thus do not allow introducing any space scaling, except linear relations between fracture length and displacements. Generalization of Weibull theory provides scaling relations between stress and crack length at the onset of failure. A powerful extension of the LEFM formulation is the displacement-weakening model which postulates that yielding is complete when the crack wall displacement exceeds some critical value or slip-weakening distance Dc at which a transition to kinetic friction is complete. Scaling relations controlling the transition to dynamic rupture propagation in slip-weakening formulation are widely accepted in earthquake physics. Strong micro-crack interaction in a process zone may be accounted for by adopting either integral or gradient type non-local damage models. We formulate a gradient-type model with free energy depending on the scalar damage parameter and its spatial derivative. The damage-gradient term leads to structural stresses in the constitutive stress-strain relations and a damage diffusion term in the kinetic equation for damage evolution. The damage diffusion eliminates the singular localization predicted by local models. The finite width of the localization zone provides a fundamental length scale that allows numerical simulations with the model to achieve the continuum limit. A diffusive term in the damage evolution gives rise to additional damage diffusive time

  15. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    PubMed

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  16. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    PubMed

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  17. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff

    PubMed Central

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  18. Effects of prepartum diets supplemented with rolled oilseeds on calf birth weight, postpartum health, feed intake, milk yield, and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Salehi, R; Colazo, M G; Oba, M; Ambrose, D J

    2016-05-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of supplemental fat (no oilseed vs. oilseed) during late gestation and the source of fat (canola vs. sunflower seed), on dry matter intake (DMI), plasma metabolite concentrations, milk production and composition, calf birth weight, postpartum health disorders, ovarian function and reproductive performance in dairy cows. Pregnant Holstein cows, blocked by body condition and parity, were assigned to 1 of 3 diets containing rolled canola seed (high in oleic acid; n=43) or sunflower (high in linoleic acid; n=45) at 8% of dry matter, or no oilseed (control; n=43), for the last 35±2 d of pregnancy. After calving, all cows received a common lactation diet. Blood samples were collected at wk -3 (i.e., 2 wk after initiation of prepartum diets) and at wk +1, +2, +3, +4 and +5 postpartum to determine the concentration of fatty acids (mEq/dL), β-hydroxybutyrate (mg/dL), and glucose (mg/dL). Ovarian ultrasonography was performed twice weekly to determine the first appearance of dominant (10mm) and preovulatory-size (≥16mm) follicles, and ovulation. Uterine inflammatory status based on the proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; subclinical endometritis: >8% PMN) was assessed at d 25±1 postpartum. Significant parity by treatment interactions were observed for DMI and milk yield. Prepartum oilseed supplementation, more specifically sunflower seed supplementation, increased postpartum DMI in primiparous cows without affecting prepartum DMI or milk yield. Contrarily, in multiparous cows, prepartum oilseed supplementation decreased both prepartum and postpartum DMI and milk yield during the first 2 wk. Regardless of parity, prepartum feeding of canola reduced postpartum DMI compared with those fed sunflower. Mean fatty acids concentrations at wk -3 were greater in cows given supplemental oilseed than those fed no oilseeds. Gestation length and calf birth weight were increased in cows given supplemental oilseed prepartum

  19. Effects of prepartum diets supplemented with rolled oilseeds on calf birth weight, postpartum health, feed intake, milk yield, and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Salehi, R; Colazo, M G; Oba, M; Ambrose, D J

    2016-05-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of supplemental fat (no oilseed vs. oilseed) during late gestation and the source of fat (canola vs. sunflower seed), on dry matter intake (DMI), plasma metabolite concentrations, milk production and composition, calf birth weight, postpartum health disorders, ovarian function and reproductive performance in dairy cows. Pregnant Holstein cows, blocked by body condition and parity, were assigned to 1 of 3 diets containing rolled canola seed (high in oleic acid; n=43) or sunflower (high in linoleic acid; n=45) at 8% of dry matter, or no oilseed (control; n=43), for the last 35±2 d of pregnancy. After calving, all cows received a common lactation diet. Blood samples were collected at wk -3 (i.e., 2 wk after initiation of prepartum diets) and at wk +1, +2, +3, +4 and +5 postpartum to determine the concentration of fatty acids (mEq/dL), β-hydroxybutyrate (mg/dL), and glucose (mg/dL). Ovarian ultrasonography was performed twice weekly to determine the first appearance of dominant (10mm) and preovulatory-size (≥16mm) follicles, and ovulation. Uterine inflammatory status based on the proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; subclinical endometritis: >8% PMN) was assessed at d 25±1 postpartum. Significant parity by treatment interactions were observed for DMI and milk yield. Prepartum oilseed supplementation, more specifically sunflower seed supplementation, increased postpartum DMI in primiparous cows without affecting prepartum DMI or milk yield. Contrarily, in multiparous cows, prepartum oilseed supplementation decreased both prepartum and postpartum DMI and milk yield during the first 2 wk. Regardless of parity, prepartum feeding of canola reduced postpartum DMI compared with those fed sunflower. Mean fatty acids concentrations at wk -3 were greater in cows given supplemental oilseed than those fed no oilseeds. Gestation length and calf birth weight were increased in cows given supplemental oilseed prepartum

  20. An FE Based On-line Model for the Prediction of Work Roll Thermal Profile in Hot Strip Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji Won; Lee, Jung Hyeung; Sun, Cheng Gang; Hwang, Sang Moo

    2010-06-01

    Prediction and control of the thermal deformation of the work roll is vital for enhancing product quality in hot strip and plate rolling. In this paper, we present an on-line model for the prediction of the work roll thermal profile. The model is developed on the basis of an integrated finite element model for the coupled analysis of heat transfer and deformation occurring at the bite zone, to rigorously take into account the effect of various rolling parameters on the thermal behavior of the work roll. The validity of the model is demonstrated through comparison with measurements made in an industrial hot strip mill. Also, an emphasis is given to the examination the effect of some selected rolling parameters in an actual production environment.

  1. Mesh size and code option effects of strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-12-10

    Modern Lagrangian hydrodynamics codes include numerical methods which allow calculations to proceed past the point obtainable by a purely Lagrangian scheme. These options can be employed as the user deems necessary to 'complete' a calculation. While one could argue that any calculation is better than none, to truly understand the calculated results and their relationship to physical reality, the user needs to understand how their runtime choices affect the calculated results. One step toward this goal is to understand the effect of each runtime choice on particular pieces of the code physics. This paper will present simulation results for some experiments typically used for strength model validation. Topics to be covered include effect of mesh size, use of various ALE schemes for mesh detangling, and use of anti-hour-glassing schemes. Experiments to be modeled include the lower strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) gas gun driven Taylor impact experiments and the higher strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) HE products driven perturbed plate experiments. The necessary mesh resolution and the effect of the code runtime options are highly dependent on the amount of localization of strain and stress in each experiment. In turn, this localization is dependent on the geometry of the experimental setup and the drive conditions.

  2. High-rate, roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.; Wachter, Ralph F.

    2012-10-01

    Since the National Nanotechnology Initiative was first announced in 2000, nanotechnology has developed an impressive catalog of nano-scale structures with building-blocks such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, nanopillars, and quantum dots. Similarly, there are accompanying materials processes such as, atomic layer deposition, pulsed layer deposition, nanoprinting, nanoimprinting, transfer printing, nanolithography and nanopatterning. One of the challenges of nanomanufacturing is scaling up these processes reliably and affordably. Roll-to-roll manufacturing is a means for scaling up, for increasing throughput. It is high-speed production using a continuous, moving platform such as a web or a flexible substrate. The adoption of roll-to-roll to nanomanufacturing is novel. The goal is to build structures and devices with nano-scale features and specific functionality. The substrate could be a polymer, metal foil, silk, cloth or paper. The materials to build the structures and multi-level devices could be organic, inorganic or biological. Processing could be solution-based, e.g., ink-jet printing, or vacuum-based, e.g., chemical vapor deposition. Products could be electronics, optoelectronics, membranes, catalysts, microfluidics, lab-on-film, filters, etc. By this means, processing of large and conformal areas is achievable. High-throughput translates into low cost, which is the attraction of roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing. There are technical challenges requiring fundamental scientific advances in materials and process development and in manufacturing and system-integration where achieving nano-scale feature size, resolution and accuracy at high speeds can be major hurdles. We will give an overview of roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing with emphasis on the need to understand the material, process and system complexities, the need for instrumentation, measurement, and process control and describe the concept of cyber-enabled nanomanufacturing for reliable and

  3. Extended slow-roll conditions and rapid-roll conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We derive slow-roll conditions for a scalar field which is non-minimally coupled with gravity in a consistent manner and express spectral indices of scalar/tensor perturbations in terms of the slow-roll parameters. The conformal invariance of the curvature perturbation is proved without linear approximations. Rapid-roll conditions are also derived, and the relation with the slow-roll conditions is discussed.

  4. Effects of meaning and symmetry on judgments of size.

    PubMed

    Reber, Rolf; Christensen, Bo T; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that people judge words as having bigger font size than non-words. This finding has been interpreted in terms of processing fluency, with higher fluency leading to judgments of bigger size. If so, symmetric numbers (e.g., 44) which can be processed more fluently are predicted to be judged as larger than asymmetric numbers (e.g., 43). However, recent research found that symmetric numbers were judged to be smaller than asymmetric numbers. This finding suggests that the mechanisms underlying size judgments may differ in meaningful and meaningless materials. Supporting this notion, we showed in Experiment 1 that meaning increased judged size, whereas symmetry decreased judged size. In the next two experiments, we excluded several alternative explanations for the differences in size judgments between meaningful and meaningless materials in earlier studies. This finding contradicts the notion that the mechanism underlying judgments of size is processing fluency.

  5. Artificial fish schools: collective effects of school size, body size, and body form.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Hanspeter; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2003-01-01

    Individual-based models of schooling in fish have demonstrated that, via processes of self-organization, artificial fish may school in the absence of a leader or external stimuli, using local information only. We study for the first time how body size and body form of artificial fish affect school formation in such a model. For a variety of group sizes we describe how school characteristics (i.e., group form, spread, density, polarization, turning rate, and speed) depend on body characteristics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nearest neighbor distance and turning rate of individuals are different for different regions in the group, although the agents are completely identical. Our approach shows the significance of both self-organization and embodiment in modeling of schools of artificial fish and, probably, in structuring schools of real fish. PMID:14556686

  6. Artificial fish schools: collective effects of school size, body size, and body form.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Hanspeter; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2003-01-01

    Individual-based models of schooling in fish have demonstrated that, via processes of self-organization, artificial fish may school in the absence of a leader or external stimuli, using local information only. We study for the first time how body size and body form of artificial fish affect school formation in such a model. For a variety of group sizes we describe how school characteristics (i.e., group form, spread, density, polarization, turning rate, and speed) depend on body characteristics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nearest neighbor distance and turning rate of individuals are different for different regions in the group, although the agents are completely identical. Our approach shows the significance of both self-organization and embodiment in modeling of schools of artificial fish and, probably, in structuring schools of real fish.

  7. Intermittent breeding and constraints on litter size: consequences for effective population size per generation (Ne ) and per reproductive cycle (Nb ).

    PubMed

    Waples, Robin S; Antao, Tiago

    2014-06-01

    In iteroparous species, it is easier to estimate Nb (effective number of breeders in one reproductive cycle) than Ne (effective population size per generation). Nb can be used as a proxy for Ne and also can provide crucial insights into eco-evolutionary processes that occur during reproduction. We used analytical and numerical methods to evaluate effects of intermittent breeding and litter/clutch size on inbreeding Nb and Ne . Fixed or random litter sizes ≥ 3 have little effect on either effective-size parameter; however, in species (e.g., many large mammals) in which females can produce only one offspring per cycle, female Nb  = ∞ and overall Nb  = 4Nb (male) . Intermittent breeding reduces the pool of female breeders, which reduces both female and overall Nb ; reductions are larger in high-fecundity species with high juvenile mortality and increase when multiple reproductive cycles are skipped. Simulated data for six model species showed that both intermittent breeding and litter-size constraints increase Ne , but only slightly. We show how to quantitatively account for these effects, which are important to consider when (1) using Nb to estimate Ne , or (2) drawing inferences about male reproductive success based on estimates of female Nb . PMID:24611912

  8. The effect of practical portion size measurement aids on the accuracy of portion size estimates made by young adults.

    PubMed

    Byrd-Bredbenner, C; Schwartz, J

    2004-08-01

    A barrier to controlling the amount of food consumed may be the difficulty consumers have in accurately estimating portion sizes. Although portion size measurement aids (PSMAs) can improve estimation accuracy, their bulk and/or cost tends to make them impractical for regular use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect on portion size estimation accuracy of two practical PSMAs: a 2-D PSMA (life size picture of tennis and golf balls) and 3-D PSMAs (tennis and golf balls). Young adults were randomly assigned to one of two groups and estimated the portion sizes of 36 foods divided into three equal sets. PSMAs were not used to estimate portion sizes in Food Set 1. Study group 1 (n = 57) used the 2-D PSMA and study group 2 (n = 56) used the 3-D PSMAs to estimate the portion sizes in Food Set 2. Neither group used PSMAs to estimate portion sizes in Food Set 3. Repeated measures anova indicated that both groups significantly improved estimation accuracy between Food Sets 1 and 2 and between Foods Sets 1 and 3. Thus, even short-term exposure to practical PSMAs may improve estimation accuracy and these improvements persist when the PSMA is no longer available. However, the accuracy rate for Food Set 2 was only about 60% indicating that a great deal of estimation error remains. PMID:15250844

  9. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  10. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  11. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  12. Shoaling in juvenile guppies: the effects of body size and shoal size.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J M; McRobert, S P

    2008-03-01

    While factors affecting shoal mate choice have been examined extensively in adult guppies (Poecilia reticulata), few studies have focused on the shoaling behavior of juveniles. In this study, juvenile guppies were tested for their ability to shoal as well as their response to shoal mates of different body size and to shoals with different numbers of individuals. In dichotomous choice tests, 10-day-old guppies (mean body length=8.83 mm), 30-day-old guppies (13.17 mm) and 50-day-old guppies (18.6mm) were given the opportunity to swim near shoals of five fish or an empty chamber. In most cases, the juvenile fish demonstrated shoaling behavior, swimming near a group of fish rather than an empty chamber, regardless of the age of the stimulus shoal. When presented with two shoals, one of similar age and body size and one of dissimilar age and body size, only the 50-day-old guppies showed a significant preference for the age-matched shoal. Similarly, when choosing between a large shoal and a small shoal, only the 50-day-old guppies spent significantly more time near the larger shoal. Thus, while juveniles at each age shoaled, only 50-day-old fish demonstrated the shoal mate discrimination seen in adult fish. PMID:18061375

  13. Mechanics of Thin Strip Steering in Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhengyi; Tieu, Kiet A.

    2004-06-01

    The hot rolling of thin strip can result in several problems in hot rolling, for instance, the control of strip steering, strip shape and flatness and surface roughness etc. Therefore, the hot rolling of thin strip brings out a requirement of innovative technologies such as the extended control of shape and flatness, steering control and reduction of load by roll gap lubrication. In this paper, the authors focus on the analysis of thin strip snaking movement, as well as solve the related problems such as the shape and flatness due to a larger reduction applied when the strip is thinner. A finite element method was used to simulate this nonsymmetricity rolling considering the non-uniform reduction along the strip width. The calculated spread is compared with the measured values obtained from the rolling mill in laboratory and the friction effect is also discussed.

  14. Research on work roll thermal crown in cold rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Shen, Mingang; Chen, Xuebo; Wang, Junsheng

    2013-05-01

    The factors which have influence on the work roll thermal crown in cold strip rolling are discussed. The heat transferring in three directions (radial axis and circumference) were considered for calculating the work roll thermal deformation. Therefore, it is a three dimensions unstable system for the work roll temperature calculation. The plastic deformation work and friction heat are calculated by the divided element and digital integration method. The simplified calculation model is built for the heat transferring along work roll. There are four zones for work roll heat transferring: roll gap zone air cooling zone emulsion zone rolls contact zone. The heat transferring between the zones is decided by the temperature difference. The inter temperature field and thermal deformation of work roll can be calculated by two-dimension finite difference method. The work roll temperature and thermal crown of actual application cold rolling mill are analyzed by the model. By the comparison between calculated values and measured values, the work roll thermal calculation model can meet the accuracy requirement of on-line control.

  15. Calendering and Rolling of Viscoplastic Materials: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsoulis, E.; Sofou, S.; Muliawan, E. B.; Hatzikiriakos, S. G.

    2007-04-01

    The calendering and rolling processes are used in a wide variety of industries for the production of rolled sheets or films of specific thickness and final appearance. The acquired final sheet thickness depends mainly on the rheological properties of the material. Materials which have been used in the present study are foodstuff (such as mozzarella cheese and flour-water dough) used in food processing. These materials are rheologically viscoplastic, obeying the Herschel-Bulkley model. The results give the final sheet thickness and the torque as a function of the roll speed. Theoretical analysis based on the Lubrication Approximation Theory (LAT) shows that LAT is a good predictive tool for calendering, where the sheet thickness is very small compared with the roll size. However, in rolling where this is not true, LAT does not hold, and a 2-D analysis is necessary.

  16. Effects of body size and temperature on population growth.

    PubMed

    Savage, Van M; Gilloly, James F; Brown, James H; Charnov, Eric L

    2004-03-01

    For at least 200 years, since the time of Malthus, population growth has been recognized as providing a critical link between the performance of individual organisms and the ecology and evolution of species. We present a theory that shows how the intrinsic rate of exponential population growth, rmax, and the carrying capacity, K, depend on individual metabolic rate and resource supply rate. To do this, we construct equations for the metabolic rates of entire populations by summing over individuals, and then we combine these population-level equations with Malthusian growth. Thus, the theory makes explicit the relationship between rates of resource supply in the environment and rates of production of new biomass and individuals. These individual-level and population-level processes are inextricably linked because metabolism sets both the demand for environmental resources and the resource allocation to survival, growth, and reproduction. We use the theory to make explicit how and why rmax exhibits its characteristic dependence on body size and temperature. Data for aerobic eukaryotes, including algae, protists, insects, zooplankton, fishes, and mammals, support these predicted scalings for rmax. The metabolic flux of energy and materials also dictates that the carrying capacity or equilibrium density of populations should decrease with increasing body size and increasing temperature. Finally, we argue that body mass and body temperature, through their effects on metabolic rate, can explain most of the variation in fecundity and mortality rates. Data for marine fishes in the field support these predictions for instantaneous rates of mortality. This theory links the rates of metabolism and resource use of individuals to life-history attributes and population dynamics for a broad assortment of organisms, from unicellular organisms to mammals.

  17. Ion size effects on the osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity in a nanoslit: Symmetric and asymmetric ion sizes.

    PubMed

    Rajni; Oh, J M; Kang, I S

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the effect of asymmetric finite ion size in nanoconfinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity. When the confinement width becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer is significantly deformed by the steric effects. We derive the osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in a nanoslit to examine the deviation from the ideal osmotic pressure and the repulsive force on the wall considering the asymmetry of ion sizes. Then the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is investigated under constant potential condition with the flat interface assumption. Later, the deformation by the electrocapillarity is also considered in the first order approximation. PMID:27415363

  18. Ion size effects on the osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity in a nanoslit: Symmetric and asymmetric ion sizes.

    PubMed

    Rajni; Oh, J M; Kang, I S

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the effect of asymmetric finite ion size in nanoconfinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity. When the confinement width becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer is significantly deformed by the steric effects. We derive the osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in a nanoslit to examine the deviation from the ideal osmotic pressure and the repulsive force on the wall considering the asymmetry of ion sizes. Then the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is investigated under constant potential condition with the flat interface assumption. Later, the deformation by the electrocapillarity is also considered in the first order approximation.

  19. Ion size effects on the osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity in a nanoslit: Symmetric and asymmetric ion sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajni; Oh, J. M.; Kang, I. S.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the effect of asymmetric finite ion size in nanoconfinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity. When the confinement width becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer is significantly deformed by the steric effects. We derive the osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in a nanoslit to examine the deviation from the ideal osmotic pressure and the repulsive force on the wall considering the asymmetry of ion sizes. Then the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is investigated under constant potential condition with the flat interface assumption. Later, the deformation by the electrocapillarity is also considered in the first order approximation.

  20. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method Data were extracted from the Developmental Phonologies Archive for 135 preschool children with phonological disorders who previously participated in single-subject experimental treatment studies. Standard mean differenceall with correction for continuity was computed to gauge the magnitude of generalization gain that accrued longitudinally from treatment for each child with the data aggregated for purposes of statistical analyses. Results ES ranged from 0.09 to 27.83 for the study population. ES was positively correlated with conventional measures of phonological learning and visual inspection of learning data on the basis of procedures standard to single-subject design. ES was linked to children's performance on diagnostic assessments of phonology but not other demographic characteristics or related linguistic skills and nonlinguistic skills. Benchmarks for interpretation of ES were estimated as 1.4, 3.6, and 10.1 for small, medium, and large learning effects, respectively. Conclusion Findings have utility for single-subject research and translation of research to evidence-based practice for children with phonological disorders. PMID:26184118

  1. Particle Size Effect in Granular Composite Aluminum/tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun; Wang, Sophia; Vitali, Efrem; Herbold, Eric B.; Benson, David J.; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2009-12-01

    Compressive dynamic strength and fracture pattern of Al-W granular composites with an identical weight ratio of Al (23.8 wt%) and W (76.2 wt%) with different porosities, size and shape of W component were investigated at strain rates 1000-1500 l/s. Samples were fabricated by Cold Isostatic Pressing. A dynamic strength of composites with fine W particles (100 MPa) was significantly larger than the strength of composite with the coarse W particles (75 MPa) at the same porosity 26% (samples with porosity 15% with coarse W particles exhibited a higher strength of 175 MPa). Morphology of W inclusions had a strong effect on dynamic strength. Samples with W wires arranged in axial direction (diameter 100 microns) and porosity 16%) with the same volume content of components had a dynamic strength of 350 MPa. Dynamic behavior was numerically simulated using computer code Raven, demonstrating a strain hardening effect due to in situ densification which was observed experimentally for cold isostatically pressed Al and Al-coarse W powders.

  2. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24675969

  3. The other half of the story: effect size analysis in quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Markey, Jonathan C; Ebert-May, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Statistical significance testing is the cornerstone of quantitative research, but studies that fail to report measures of effect size are potentially missing a robust part of the analysis. We provide a rationale for why effect size measures should be included in quantitative discipline-based education research. Examples from both biological and educational research demonstrate the utility of effect size for evaluating practical significance. We also provide details about some effect size indices that are paired with common statistical significance tests used in educational research and offer general suggestions for interpreting effect size measures. Finally, we discuss some inherent limitations of effect size measures and provide further recommendations about reporting confidence intervals.

  4. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting leukocyte rolling in ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, P; Jutila, M; Payne, D

    1995-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling has been postulated to be mandatory for subsequent leukocyte adhesion and tissue injury observed during ischemia/reperfusion. The objective of this study was to systematically assess this hypothesis at the microvascular level by examining the effects of various concentrations of a selectin-binding carbohydrate (fucoidin) on the increased rolling and adhesion of leukocytes in postischemic venules. The contribution of L-selectin and/or P-selectin to leukocyte rolling were also assessed in this model. Using intravital microscopy we observed that 60 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion caused a profound increase in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. A high dose of fucoidin (25 mg/kg) reduced leukocyte rolling by > 90% and significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion, whereas a lower dose of fucoidin still reduced leukocyte rolling by 60% but had no effect on leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, despite the profound reduction in leukocyte rolling with fucoidin, the remaining rolling cells were able to firmly adhere via a CD18-dependent mechanism, particularly in those postcapillary venules with reduced (30-50%) shear rates. The increased rolling was also reduced 60% by either an anti-P-selectin antibody, an anti-L-selectin antibody, or a combination of the two antibodies, but this reduction in rolling cells did not translate into significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion. Our data suggest that L-selectin, P-selectin, and a fucoidin-sensitive pathway contribute to the significant increase in reperfusion-induced leukocyte rolling. However, targeting leukocyte rolling as a form of therapy requires very significant efficacy (> 90%) to achieve reasonable (approximately 50%) attenuation in leukocyte adhesion in postischemic venules. Images PMID:7539452

  5. Fabrication of microlens arrays on a glass substrate by roll-to-roll process with PDMS mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Nying; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a roll-to-roll method to fabricate microlens arrays on a glass substrate by using a cost-effective PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) mold. We fabricated microlens arrays mold, which was made by photoresist(AZ4620), on the silicon substrate by thermal reflow process, and transferred the pattern to PDMS film. Roll-to-roll system is a standard printing process whose roller is made of acrylic cylinder surrounded with the PDMS mold. UV resin was chosen to be the material to make microlens in rolling process with UV light curing. We investigated the quality of microlens arrays by changing the parameters, such as embossing pressure and rolling speed, to ensure good quality of microlens arrays.

  6. An integrated optical pickup with roll-to-roll fabricated diffractive components.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jo-Han; Lee, Chi-Hung; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-07-01

    This work designed and fabricated an optical pickup system based on optical films using the roll-to-roll process. The design combined the advantages of the stacked and planar optical pickup system. Two blazed gratings were used as beam splitters for bending the optical path, while a cylindrical lens was used for astigmatic focus-error detection. The proposed design effectively reduces overall system configuration, component cost, and fabrication complexity.

  7. Size speed bias or size arrival effect-How judgments of vehicles' approach speed and time to arrival are influenced by the vehicles' size.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    Crashes at railway level crossings are a key problem for railway operations. It has been suggested that a potential explanation for such crashes might lie in a so-called size speed bias, which describes the phenomenon that observers underestimate the speed of larger objects, such as aircraft or trains. While there is some evidence that this size speed bias indeed exists, it is somewhat at odds with another well researched phenomenon, the size arrival effect. When asked to judge the time it takes an approaching object to arrive at a predefined position (time to arrival, TTA), observers tend to provide lower estimates for larger objects. In that case, road users' crossing decisions when confronted with larger vehicles should be rather conservative, which has been confirmed in multiple studies on gap acceptance. The aim of the experiment reported in this paper was to clarify the relationship between size speed bias and size arrival effect. Employing a relative judgment task, both speed and TTA estimates were assessed for virtual depictions of a train and a truck, using a car as a reference to compare against. The results confirmed the size speed bias for the speed judgments, with both train and truck being perceived as travelling slower than the car. A comparable bias was also present in the TTA estimates for the truck. In contrast, no size arrival effect could be found for the train or the truck, neither in the speed nor the TTA judgments. This finding is inconsistent with the fact that crossing behaviour when confronted with larger vehicles appears to be consistently more conservative. This discrepancy might be interpreted as an indication that factors other than perceived speed or TTA play an important role for the differences in gap acceptance between different types of vehicles.

  8. Size speed bias or size arrival effect-How judgments of vehicles' approach speed and time to arrival are influenced by the vehicles' size.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    Crashes at railway level crossings are a key problem for railway operations. It has been suggested that a potential explanation for such crashes might lie in a so-called size speed bias, which describes the phenomenon that observers underestimate the speed of larger objects, such as aircraft or trains. While there is some evidence that this size speed bias indeed exists, it is somewhat at odds with another well researched phenomenon, the size arrival effect. When asked to judge the time it takes an approaching object to arrive at a predefined position (time to arrival, TTA), observers tend to provide lower estimates for larger objects. In that case, road users' crossing decisions when confronted with larger vehicles should be rather conservative, which has been confirmed in multiple studies on gap acceptance. The aim of the experiment reported in this paper was to clarify the relationship between size speed bias and size arrival effect. Employing a relative judgment task, both speed and TTA estimates were assessed for virtual depictions of a train and a truck, using a car as a reference to compare against. The results confirmed the size speed bias for the speed judgments, with both train and truck being perceived as travelling slower than the car. A comparable bias was also present in the TTA estimates for the truck. In contrast, no size arrival effect could be found for the train or the truck, neither in the speed nor the TTA judgments. This finding is inconsistent with the fact that crossing behaviour when confronted with larger vehicles appears to be consistently more conservative. This discrepancy might be interpreted as an indication that factors other than perceived speed or TTA play an important role for the differences in gap acceptance between different types of vehicles. PMID:27428866

  9. Assessing Effect Size in Communication Research: A Case Study and Rationale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Larry L.; Holley, Frances S.

    1979-01-01

    Effect size is the degree of treatment effect in experimental research and is considered in relationship to power, significance criterion, and sample size. Effect size is useful in assessing meaningfulness of statistically significant research results. Its use as a discriminator between "meaningful" and "trivial" treatment effects is considered.…

  10. A study on the effect of surface topography on the actuation performance of stacked-rolled dielectric electro active polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sait, Usha; Muthuswamy, Sreekumar

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) is a suitable actuator material that finds wide applications in the field of robotics and medical areas. This material is highly controllable, flexible, and capable of developing large strain. The influence of geometrical behavior becomes critical when the material is used as miniaturized actuation devices in robotic applications. The present work focuses on the effect of surface topography on the performance of flat (single sheet) and stacked-rolled DEAP actuators. The non-active areas in the form of elliptical spots that affect the performance of the actuator are identified using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dissipated X-ray (EDX) experiments. Performance of DEAP actuation is critically evaluated, compared, and presented with analytical and experimental results.

  11. Effect of Alloying Elements in Hot-Rolled Metastable β-Titanium Alloys. Part II: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Premkumar; Chakkingal, Uday; Singh, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the tensile properties, flow and work-hardening behavior of four metastable β-titanium alloys Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (A1), Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-7.2V-3Cr (A2), Ti-5Al-5Mo-8.6V-1.5Cr (A3), and Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-5V-3.94Cr (A4) in α+β hot-rolled condition. The decreasing order of average strength parameters ( σ YS and σ UTS) is A4, A2, A1, and A3. The maximum strength observed in alloy A4 is due to the presence of highest wt. fraction of Cr. The elongation is the maximum and minimum in alloys A3 and A4, respectively. These alloys display moderate to high percent in-plane anisotropy ( A IP) and reasonably low anisotropic index ( δ) values. Both the A IP and δ values are maximum and minimum in alloys A1 and A3, respectively. The yield locus plots also exhibit the presence of anisotropy due to relatively large differences in yield strength values along tension and compression directions. The flow behavior of alloys A1, A2, and A4 follows Swift equation, while the alloy A3 displays best fit with Holloman equation. The presence of prestrain ( ɛ 0) in hot-rolled materials before tensile testing has an important bearing on the flow curves of A1, A2, and A4 alloys. The instantaneous work-hardening rate curves of the alloys A1, A2, and A3 exhibit all the three typical stages (stage I, stage II, and stage III) in RD samples, while the alloy A4 shows the presence of only stage I and stage III. The 45 deg to RD and TD samples of alloys A1, A2, and A4 display only stage I. The stages I and III as well as I and II are present in alloy A3 in 45 deg to RD and TD samples, respectively. Dislocation-controlled strain hardening occurs in all the three stages of these alloys in the absence of stress-induced martensitic transformation (α″) and twinning. Slip is the predominant deformation mechanism during tensile testing. Three types of slip lines, i.e., planar, wavy, and intersecting have been observed close to fracture surfaces of post tensile-tested specimens.

  12. Effect Size, Statistical Power and Sample Size Requirements for the Bootstrap Likelihood Ratio Test in Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dziak, John J.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Tan, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Selecting the number of different classes which will be assumed to exist in the population is an important step in latent class analysis (LCA). The bootstrap likelihood ratio test (BLRT) provides a data-driven way to evaluate the relative adequacy of a (K −1)-class model compared to a K-class model. However, very little is known about how to predict the power or the required sample size for the BLRT in LCA. Based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we provide practical effect size measures and power curves which can be used to predict power for the BLRT in LCA given a proposed sample size and a set of hypothesized population parameters. Estimated power curves and tables provide guidance for researchers wishing to size a study to have sufficient power to detect hypothesized underlying latent classes. PMID:25328371

  13. Revisiting Size Effects in Higher Education Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramo, Giovanni; Cicero, Tindaro; D'Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The potential occurrence of variable returns to size in research activity is a factor to be considered in choices about the size of research organizations and also in the planning of national research assessment exercises, so as to avoid favoring those organizations that would benefit from such occurrence. The aim of the current work is to improve…

  14. Size effects in Kauffman type evolution for rugged fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, D; Jan, N

    1994-05-21

    Millions of sites are simulated in an NK fitness model of evolution and coevolution. We find a logarithmic size dependence of the number of hill-climbing iterations needed to reach a local fitness optimum (Nash equilibrium). We also check for chaotic behavior and determine the size of the damage clouds or avalanches. Random noise (simulated annealing) is shown to increase appreciably the fitness.

  15. Effect Size Measures for Mediation Models: Quantitative Strategies for Communicating Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Kelley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The statistical analysis of mediation effects has become an indispensable tool for helping scientists investigate processes thought to be causal. Yet, in spite of many recent advances in the estimation and testing of mediation effects, little attention has been given to methods for communicating effect size and the practical importance of those…

  16. Effects of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible UHMWPE as a bearing material during in vitro lubricated sliding/rolling motion.

    PubMed

    López-Cervantes, Adrián; Domínguez-López, Iván; Barceinas-Sánchez, José Dolores Oscar; García-García, Adrián Luis

    2013-04-01

    The effect of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as a bearing material has been investigated using the kinematic range of motions reported for a knee-joint replacement. An experimental apparatus consisting of a ball and a disk rotating independently from each other was used to compare the performance of UHMWPE textured versus plain surfaces, under different combinations of sliding and rolling motion, better known as sliding-to-rolling ratio (SRR). Performance was evaluated through the coefficient of traction of a tribosystem comprising a steel ball on a flat UHMWPE disk and distilled water at 36°C, acting as lubricant. A square array of cavities with diameter D=0.397mm and center-to-center spacing of 1.5D was machined on UHMWPE disks. The experimental design considered two levels for cavity depth, D and D/2, and two for the applied load, 17 and 25N. The SRR was varied from 1 to 11% and the mean speed range was set from 5 to 55mm/s, covering the kinematics and contact pressure conditions of a sauntering cycle on a knee-joint replacement. Stribeck curves of the plain and textured surfaces were obtained and compared against one another. The results demonstrate that the proposed surface pattern reduces the coefficient of traction of the tribological system for the 17N load in the entire kinematic range explored, while for the 25N load the effects were more noticeable at low mean speed and SRR, corresponding to the beginning of motion.

  17. Prediction of temperature distribution in the hot rolling of slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serajzadeh, S.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Mucciardi, F.

    2002-03-01

    In the process of continuous hot slab rolling, it is vital to know the temperature distribution within the slab along the length of the rolling mill because temperature is the dominant parameter controlling the kinetics of metallurgical transformations and the flow stress of the rolled metal. In other words, the microstructural changes, the mechanical properties as well as the final dimensions of the product and roll-force depend on the temperature distribution within the metal being rolled. In this paper, a mathematical model based on the finite element method is utilized to predict the temperature distribution and microstructural changes during the continuous hot slab rolling process. The effects of various parameters such as the heat of deformation, the work-roll temperature, the rolling speed, and the heat transfer coefficient between the work-roll and the metal are all taken into account in the analyses. To verify the validity of the model and the generated computer code, a comparison is carried out between the theoretical and plant-recorded results.

  18. Effects of Annealing Treatment Prior to Cold Rolling on Delayed Fracture Properties in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Song, Hyejin; Kim, Jung Gi; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-02-01

    Tensile properties of recently developed automotive high-strength steels containing about 10 wt pct of Mn and Al are superior to other conventional steels, but the active commercialization has been postponed because they are often subjected to cracking during formation or to the delayed fracture after formation. Here, the delayed fracture behavior of a ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steel whose microstructure was modified by a batch annealing treatment at 1023 K (750 °C) prior to cold rolling was examined by HCl immersion tests of cup specimens, and was compared with that of an unmodified steel. After the batch annealing, band structures were almost decomposed as strong textures of {100}<011> α-fibers and {111}<112> γ-fibers were considerably dissolved, while ferrite grains were refined. The steel cup specimen having this modified microstructure was not cracked when immersed in an HCl solution for 18 days, whereas the specimen having unmodified microstructure underwent the delayed fracture within 1 day. This time delayed fracture was more critically affected by difference in deformation characteristics such as martensitic transformation and deformation inhomogeneity induced from concentration of residual stress or plastic strain, rather than the difference in initial microstructures. The present work gives a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent mechanical and delayed fracture properties as well as reduced specific weight.

  19. Engineering nanoscale surface features to sustain microparticle rolling in flow.

    PubMed

    Kalasin, Surachate; Santore, Maria M

    2015-05-26

    Nanoscopic features of channel walls are often engineered to facilitate microfluidic transport, for instance when surface charge enables electro-osmosis or when grooves drive mixing. The dynamic or rolling adhesion of flowing microparticles on a channel wall holds potential to accomplish particle sorting or to selectively transfer reactive species or signals between the wall and flowing particles. Inspired by cell rolling under the direction of adhesion molecules called selectins, we present an engineered platform in which the rolling of flowing microparticles is sustained through the incorporation of entirely synthetic, discrete, nanoscale, attractive features into the nonadhesive (electrostatically repulsive) surface of a flow channel. Focusing on one example or type of nanoscale feature and probing the impact of broad systematic variations in surface feature loading and processing parameters, this study demonstrates how relatively flat, weakly adhesive nanoscale features, positioned with average spacings on the order of tens of nanometers, can produce sustained microparticle rolling. We further demonstrate how the rolling velocity and travel distance depend on flow and surface design. We identify classes of related surfaces that fail to support rolling and present a state space that identifies combinations of surface and processing variables corresponding to transitions between rolling, free particle motion, and arrest. Finally we identify combinations of parameters (surface length scales, particle size, flow rates) where particles can be manipulated with size-selectivity.

  20. Roll Eccentricity Control Using Identified Eccentricity of Top/Bottom Rolls by Roll Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Koshinuma, Kazuyoshi

    Roll eccentricity is a periodic disturbance caused by a structure of back up rolls in rolling mills, and it affects product thickness accuracy. It cannot be measured directly by sensors, so it should be identified by measured thickness or measured roll force. When there is a large difference of diameters between top and bottom back up roll, the performance of roll eccentricity control using feedback signals of roll force or thickness has not been so good. Also it has been difficult for the control to be applied from the most head end because it is necessary to identify the roll eccentricity during rolling. A new roll eccentricity control has been developed to improve these disadvantages and to get better performance. The method identifies top and bottom roll eccentricity respectively from one signal of roll force and it can start the control from head end. In this paper the new control method is introduced and actual application results to a hot strip mill are shown.

  1. 35% corn wet distiller's grains plus solubles in steam-flaked and dry-rolled corn finishing diets: Effects on fatty acids, sensory attributes, and shelf life of loins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-four crossbred steers were fed dry-rolled corn (DRC) or steam-flaked corn (SFC) based finishing rations with or without 35% wet distiller's grain plus solubles (WDGS) to determine effects of corn processing method and WDGS inclusion on marbling attributes, sensory attributes, and shelf-life of...

  2. Effects of dry-rolled or high-moisture corn with twenty-five or forty-five percent wet distillers' grains with solubles on energy metabolism, nutrient digestibility, and macromineral balance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of feeding dry-rolled corn (DRC) or high-moisture corn (HMC) with 25% and 45% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) on energy metabolism, and nutrient and mineral balance were evaluated in 8 finishing beef steers using a replicated Latin square design. The model included the fixed ...

  3. Effect of size of silica microspheres on photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Dhiman, N. Sharma, A. Gathania, A. K.; Singh, B. P.

    2014-04-24

    In present work photonic crystals of different size of silica microspheres have been fabricated. The optical properties of these developed photonic crystals have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. UV-visible spectroscopy shows that they have photonic band gap that can be tuned in visible and infrared regime by changing the size of silica microspheres. The photonic band gap structures of these photonic crystals have been calculated using MIT photonic band gap package. It also reveals that with the increase in size of silica microspheres the photonic band gap shifts to lower energy region.

  4. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  5. A Simple Effect Size Estimator for Single Case Designs Using WinBUGS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindskopf, David; Shadish, William; Hedges, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Data from single case designs (SCDs) have traditionally been analyzed by visual inspection rather than statistical models. As a consequence, effect sizes have been of little interest. Lately, some effect-size estimators have been proposed, but most are either (i) nonparametric, and/or (ii) based on an analogy incompatible with effect sizes from…

  6. Weighting by Inverse Variance or by Sample Size in Random-Effects Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin-Martinez, Fulgencio; Sanchez-Meca, Julio

    2010-01-01

    Most of the statistical procedures in meta-analysis are based on the estimation of average effect sizes from a set of primary studies. The optimal weight for averaging a set of independent effect sizes is the inverse variance of each effect size, but in practice these weights have to be estimated, being affected by sampling error. When assuming a…

  7. The Effects of Rain Garden Size on Hydrological Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention systems are vegetated depressions designed to accept stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces. Manuals and guidance documents recommend sizing bioretention cells anywhere from 3% to 43% of their associated drainage areas, based on factors including soil type, slop...

  8. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  9. The Acute Effects of Deep Tissue Foam Rolling and Dynamic Stretching on Muscular Strength, Power, and Flexibility in Division I Linemen.

    PubMed

    Behara, Brandon; Jacobson, Bert H

    2015-06-24

    A recent strategy to increase sports performance is a self-massage technique called myofascial release using foam rollers. Myofascial restrictions are thought to be brought on by injuries, muscle imbalances, over recruitment, and/or inflammation, all of which can decrease sports performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of a single-bout of lower extremity self-myofascial release using a custom deep tissue roller (DTR) and a dynamic stretch protocol. Subjects consisted of NCAA Division 1 offensive linemen (n=14) at a Midwestern university. All players were briefed on the objectives of the study and subsequently signed an approved IRB consent document. A randomized crossover design was used to assess each dependent variable (vertical jump power and velocity, knee isometric torque, and hip range of motion was assessed before and after: a) no treatment, b) deep tissue foam rolling, c) dynamic stretching. Results of repeated measures ANOVA yielded no pre- to post-test significant differences (p>0.05) among the groups for VJ peak power (p=.45), VJ average power (p=.16), VJ peak velocity (p=.25), VJ average velocity (p=.23), peak knee extension torque (p=0.63), average knee extension torque (p=0.11), peak knee flexion torque (p=0.63), or average knee flexion torque (p=0.22). However hip flexibility was statistically significant when tested after both dynamic stretching and foam rolling (p=0.0001). While no changes in strength or power was evident increase flexibility following DTR may be used interchangeably with traditional stretching exercises.

  10. Immobilized rolling circle amplification on extended-gate field-effect transistors with integrated readout circuits for early detection of platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Hsu, Wen-Yang; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Huang, Jo-Wen; Chung, Yueh-Lin; Chen, Hsin

    2016-07-01

    Detection of tumor-related proteins with high specificity and sensitivity is important for early diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. While protein sensors based on antibodies are not easy to keep for a long time, aptamers (single-stranded DNA) are found to be a good alternative for recognizing tumor-related protein specifically. This study investigates the feasibility of employing aptamers to recognize the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) specifically and subsequently triggering rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNAs on extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFETs) to enhance the sensitivity. The EGFETs are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology and integrated with readout circuits monolithically. The monolithic integration not only avoids the wiring complexity for a large sensor array but also enhances the sensor reliability and facilitates massive production for commercialization. With the RCA primers immobilized on the sensory surface, the protein signal is amplified as the elongation of DNA, allowing the EGFET to achieve a sensitivity of 8.8 pM, more than three orders better than that achieved by conventional EGFETs. Moreover, the responses of EGFETs are able to indicate quantitatively the reaction rates of RCA, facilitating the estimation on the protein concentration. Our experimental results demonstrate that immobilized RCA on EGFETs is a useful, label-free method for early diagnosis of diseases related to low-concentrated tumor makers (e.g., PDGF) for serum sample, as well as for monitoring the synthesis of various DNA nanostructures in real time. Graphical Abstract The tumor-related protein, PDGF, is detected by immobilizing rolling circle amplification on an EGFET with integrated readout circuit.

  11. Immobilized rolling circle amplification on extended-gate field-effect transistors with integrated readout circuits for early detection of platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Hsu, Wen-Yang; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Huang, Jo-Wen; Chung, Yueh-Lin; Chen, Hsin

    2016-07-01

    Detection of tumor-related proteins with high specificity and sensitivity is important for early diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. While protein sensors based on antibodies are not easy to keep for a long time, aptamers (single-stranded DNA) are found to be a good alternative for recognizing tumor-related protein specifically. This study investigates the feasibility of employing aptamers to recognize the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) specifically and subsequently triggering rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNAs on extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFETs) to enhance the sensitivity. The EGFETs are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology and integrated with readout circuits monolithically. The monolithic integration not only avoids the wiring complexity for a large sensor array but also enhances the sensor reliability and facilitates massive production for commercialization. With the RCA primers immobilized on the sensory surface, the protein signal is amplified as the elongation of DNA, allowing the EGFET to achieve a sensitivity of 8.8 pM, more than three orders better than that achieved by conventional EGFETs. Moreover, the responses of EGFETs are able to indicate quantitatively the reaction rates of RCA, facilitating the estimation on the protein concentration. Our experimental results demonstrate that immobilized RCA on EGFETs is a useful, label-free method for early diagnosis of diseases related to low-concentrated tumor makers (e.g., PDGF) for serum sample, as well as for monitoring the synthesis of various DNA nanostructures in real time. Graphical Abstract The tumor-related protein, PDGF, is detected by immobilizing rolling circle amplification on an EGFET with integrated readout circuit. PMID:27137518

  12. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal. PMID:8850571

  13. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal.

  14. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination.

  15. EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON DYNAMIC SCRATCH RESPONSE IN ALUMINA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lance, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The machining and wear of ceramics and ceramic components are obviously influenced by abrasive damage. One parameter that can affect the abrasion process is the grain size of the ceramic material. To investigate this, single-grit pendulum scratch testing was used to investigate the dynamic scratch response in three 99.9% aluminas that each had a tight size distribution about mean grain sizes of 2, 15, or 25 m, respectively. The scratch speeds generated had an order of magnitude of ~ 1 m/s and the maximum scratch depths were several tens of micrometers. Tangential and normal scratch forces were monitored during each test and interpreted in conjunction with postmortem SEM and profilometry results. It was observed that both plastic deformation and brittle fracture participated in the scratching process and the relative activity of each was dependent on depth of penetration. At a specific depth of penetration, the material removal of alumina prevailingly relies on the generation and interaction of oblique radial and lateral cracks. Chip formation is greatly enhanced when the created cracks interact and that interaction itself depends on grain size. Larger grain size gives rise to larger lateral cracks, more severe fracture at the groove's bottom, and larger amplitude of scratch force oscillation. Lastly, the cutting pressure and the scratch hardness of alumina exhibit sensitivity to both grain size and the groove depth.

  16. Static roll-tilt over 5 minutes locally distorts the internal estimate of direction of gravity.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, A A; Bockisch, C J; Straumann, D; Marti, S; Bertolini, G

    2014-12-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) indicates perceived direction of gravity. Even in healthy human subjects, roll angle-dependent misestimations, roll overcompensation (A-effect, head-roll > 60° and <135°) and undercompensation (E-effect, head-roll < 60°), occur. Previously, we demonstrated that, after prolonged roll-tilt, SVV estimates when upright are biased toward the preceding roll position, which indicates that perceived vertical (PV) is shifted by the prior tilt (Tarnutzer AA, Bertolini G, Bockisch CJ, Straumann D, Marti S. PLoS One 8: e78079, 2013). Hypothetically, PV in any roll position could be biased toward the previous roll position. We asked whether such a "global" bias occurs or whether the bias is "local". The SVV of healthy human subjects (N = 9) was measured in nine roll positions (-120° to +120°, steps = 30°) after 5 min of roll-tilt in one of two adaptation positions (±90°) and compared with control trials without adaptation. After adapting, adjustments were shifted significantly (P < 0.05) toward the previous adaptation position for nearby roll-tilted positions (±30°, ±60°) and upright only. We computationally simulated errors based on the sum of a monotonically increasing function (producing roll undercompensation) and a mixture of Gaussian functions (representing roll overcompensation centered around PV). In combination, the pattern of A- and E-effects could be generated. By shifting the function representing local overcompensation toward the adaptation position, the experimental postadaptation data could be fitted successfully. We conclude that prolonged roll-tilt locally distorts PV rather than globally shifting it. Short-term adaptation of roll overcompensation may explain these shifts and could reflect the brain's strategy to optimize SVV estimates around recent roll positions. Thus postural stability can be improved by visually-mediated compensatory responses at any sustained body-roll orientation.

  17. Effect of Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints in Twin Roll Cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Kasman, Sefika

    2013-10-01

    Twin roll cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates were butt welded with the friction stir welding process which employed a non-consumable tool, tilted by 1.5° and 3° with respect to the plate normal, rotated in a clockwise direction at 400 and 800 rpm, while traversing at a fixed rate of 80 mm/min along the weld line. Microstructural observations and microhardness tests were performed on sections perpendicular to the tool traverse direction. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature on samples cut perpendicular to the weld line. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates improved with increasing tool rotation speed and decreasing tool tilt angle. This marked improvement in ultimate tensile strength is attributed to the increase in the heat input owing to an increased frictional heat generation. There appears to be a perfect correlation between the ultimate tensile strength and the size of the weld zone. The fracture surfaces of the base plate and the welded plates are distinctly different. The former is dominated by dimples typical of ductile fractures. A vast majority of the intermetallic particles inside the weld zones are too small to generate dimples during a tensile test. The fracture surface of the welded plates is thus characterized by occasional dimples that are elongated in the same direction suggesting a tensile tearing mechanism.

  18. Kinetics of Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation During Intercritical Annealing of the Cold-Rolled Ferrite/Martensite Duplex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kalashami, A. Ghatei

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained, dual-phase (UFG DP) steels were produced by a new route using an uncommon cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting microstructures. The effects of processing parameters such as rolling reduction, intercritical annealing temperature, and time on the microstructural evaluations have been studied. UFG DP steels with an average grain size of about 1 to 2 μm were achieved by short intercritical annealing of the 80 pct cold-rolled duplex microstructures. The kinetics of ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were studied based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. The proposed model for describing the isothermal austenite formation kinetics was applied successfully to the nonisothermal conditions. It was found that complete recrystallization of ferrite before the austenite formation led to the formation of a large extent randomly distributed austenite in the ferrite matrix and a chain-networked structure.

  19. Defect formation energy in pyrochlore: the effect of crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Ewing, Rodney C.; Becker, Udo

    2014-09-01

    Defect formation energies of point defects of two pyrochlores Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 as a function of crystal size were calculated. Density functional theory with plane-wave basis sets and the projector-augmented wave method were used in the calculations. The results show that the defect formation energies of the two pyrochlores diverge as the size decreases to the nanometer range. For Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore, the defect formation energy is higher at nanometers with respect to that of the bulk, while it is lower for Gd2Zr2O7. The lowest defect formation energy for Gd2Zr2O7 is found at 15-20 Å. The different behaviors of the defect formation energies as a function of crystal size are caused by different structural adjustments around the defects as the size decreases. For both pyrochlore compositions at large sizes, the defect structures are similar to those of the bulk. As the size decreases, for Gd2Ti2O7, additional structure distortions appear at the surfaces, which cause the defect formation energy to increase. For Gd2Zr2O7, additional oxygen Frenkel pair defects are introduced, which reduce the defect formation energy. As the size further decreases, increased structure distortions occur at the surfaces, which cause the defect formation energy to increase. Based on a hypothesis that correlates the energetics of defect formation and radiation response for complex oxides, the calculated results suggest that at nanometer range Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is expected to have a lower radiation tolerance, and those of Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore to have a higher radiation tolerance. The highest radiation tolerance for Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore is expected to be found at ˜2 nanometers.

  20. Polymer-Particle Nanocomposites: Size and Dispersion Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Joseph

    Polymer-particle nanocomposites are used in industrial processes to enhance a broad range of material properties (e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical and gas permeability properties). This dissertation will focus on explanation and quantification of mechanical property improvements upon the addition of nanoparticles to polymeric materials. Nanoparticles, as enhancers of mechanical properties, are ubiquitous in synthetic and natural materials (e.g. automobile tires, packaging, bone), however, to date, there is no thorough understanding of the mechanism of their action. In this dissertation, silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, both bare and grafted with polystyrene (PS), are studied in polymeric matrices. Several variables of interest are considered, including particle dispersion state, particle size, length and density of grafted polymer chains, and volume fraction of SiO2. Polymer grafted nanoparticles behave akin to block copolymers, and this is critically leveraged to systematically vary nanoparticle dispersion and examine its role on the mechanical reinforcement in polymer based nanocomposites in the melt state. Rheology unequivocally shows that reinforcement is maximized by the formation of a transient, but long-lived, percolating polymer-particle network with the particles serving as the network junctions. The effects of dispersion and weight fraction of filler on nanocomposite mechanical properties are also studied in a bare particle system. Due to the interest in directional properties for many different materials, different means of inducing directional ordering of particle structures are also studied. Using a combination of electron microscopy and x-ray scattering, it is shown that shearing anisotropic NP assemblies (sheets or strings) causes them to orient, one in front of the other, into macroscopic two-dimensional structures along the flow direction. In contrast, no such flow-induced ordering occurs for well dispersed NPs or spherical NP aggregates! This work