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Sample records for roma rinkeviiene saulius

  1. Roma as the Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubek, David; Levínská, Marketa; Bittnerová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    While it is common to speak about "Roma culture" as a single entity, the questions posed by Roma culture are more complex. We are speaking about the general issues pertaining to various manifestations of this culture in the context of the Czech Republic. It must be stressed that under "Roma," we understand a family resemblance…

  2. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  3. [Roma populations and health].

    PubMed

    Jackson, Y; Tabin, J P; Hourton, G; Bodenmann, P

    2015-03-25

    The health status of the so-called "Roma" is usually much poorer than that of neighbouring non-Roma populations with a life expectancy gap of 5-15 years. This results from prolonged exposure to adverse determinants of health and to persistent exclusion from social and political arenas. Scientific and social research has only poorly addressed the health issues of Roma and evidences are scarce. Insufficient access to public services, including to health care and non optimal clinical practices are modifiable factors. If correctly addressed, this could contribute to reduce health disparities, including in Switzerland.

  4. The Roma Education Fund: A New Tool for Roma Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marc, Alexandre; Bercus, Costel

    2007-01-01

    In January 2005, the Roma Education Fund (REF) came into existence as a Swiss foundation with the goal of increasing the inclusion of Roma children in mainstream classes in Central and Eastern Europe. The fund gives priority to countries that make a political commitment to design and finance actions to improve Roma living conditions, by taking…

  5. Host tracking or cryptic adaptation? Phylogeography of Pediobius saulius (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the highly invasive horse-chestnut leafminer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-López, Antonio; Rougerie, Rodolphe; Augustin, Sylvie; Lees, David C; Tomov, Rumen; Kenis, Marc; Çota, Ejup; Kullaj, Endrit; Hansson, Christer; Grabenweger, Giselher; Roques, Alain; López-Vaamonde, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Classical biological control is often advocated as a tool for managing invasive species. However, accurate evaluations of parasitoid species complexes and assessment of host specificity are impeded by the lack of morphological variation. Here, we study the possibility of host races/species within the eulophid wasp Pediobius saulius, a pupal generalist parasitoid that parasitize the highly invasive horse-chestnut leaf-mining moth Cameraria ohridella. We analysed the population genetic structure, host associations and phylogeographic patterns of P. saulius in Europe using the COI mitochondrial gene. This marker strongly supports a division into at least five highly differentiated parasitoid complexes, within two of which clades with differing degrees of host specialization were found: a Balkan clade that mainly (but not only) attacks C. ohridella and a more generalist European group that attacks many hosts, including C. ohridella. The divergence in COI (up to 7.6%) suggests the existence of cryptic species, although this is neither confirmed by nuclear divergence nor morphology. We do not find evidence of host tracking. The higher parasitism rates observed in the Balkans and the scarcity of the Balkan–Cameraria haplotypes out of the Balkans open the possibility of using these Balkan haplotypes as biological control agents of C. ohridella elsewhere in Europe. PMID:25568046

  6. Hegemony in the Roma family.

    PubMed

    Mrhálek, Tomáš; Lidová, Lenka; Kajanová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    This article is intended to describe the current hegemonic masculinity within the Roma family structure in the Czech Republic, with regard to changes related to developments in the majority society and the current socioeconomic situation of the Roma. The theoretical context of this article is based on the paradigm of masculine hegemony as it exists and has existed in the Roma families. Data for the study came from semi-structured interviews with 30 Roma females and 30 Roma males living as couples, in three Czech cities. The main finding reveals a dichotomy between the traditional roles of Roma women, i.e. care for the family and the household, and the present functions, i.e. contributing to the family income through social benefits. We observed a decline in the traditional role of Roma men, who were often unemployed. We related the change in the roles of men to the "non-functionality of the men", contributing to the emerging potential for emancipation of Roma women. However, the traditional patriarchal Roma family is structured such that men are given the main decision making powers, which has slowed changes in marginalized Roma families. Additionally, social pressures against women as well as socially conditioned pressures that act to preserve hegemonic masculinity, have largely prevented the realization of the potential for emancipation of Roma women, or if a woman tries to leave her non-functioning husband.

  7. The Roma at Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    race is in the study of their language ”1, but the absence of a significant written language and territory, among other things, may actually...been significant romance attached to the history of the Roma. They have been characterized as traveling bands of musicians and fortune tellers with...strange customs and speaking a mysterious, and until recently, unwritten language . Their storied origins range from Egypt to Bohemia, but they most

  8. ROMA — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) algorithm was approved by the FDA in 2011. Research demonstrates that examining levels of HE4 and CA125 using the ROMA algorithm shows the highest accuracy in determining ovarian cancer risk in pre- and post-menopausal women who have an ovarian mass present.

  9. Evaluating a Project on Roma Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadis, Fokion; Nikolajevic, Dragana; van Driel, Barry

    2011-01-01

    This research note is based on the evaluation of the Comenius project Teacher-IN-SErvice-Training-for-Roma-inclusion ("INSETRom"). The project represented an international effort that was undertaken to bridge the gap between Roma and non-Roma communities and to improve the educational attainment of Roma children in the mainstream…

  10. HIV/AIDS risk behaviours among Roma and non-Roma sex workers in Belgrade (Serbia).

    PubMed

    Sipetić, Sandra; Ilić, Dragan; Marinković, Jelena; Vlajinac, Hristina; Bjegović, Vesna; Cucić, Viktorija; Laaser, Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze differences between Roma and non-Roma sex workers (SWs) according to their HIV/AIDS risk behaviors. In this study 91 Roma and 100 non-Roma SWs were included. They offered sex services at Belgrade hot spots during the period 2006-2007. Roma SW were significantly younger and with lower education and they were significantly more often without reading and writing skills than non Roma SW. They also significantly more often had the first sexual intercourse before an age of 14 years. Roma and non-Roma SWs did not differ significantly in their risky sex behaviors. Out of all SWs (both Roma and non-Roma) 13.6% had more than 5 clients daily, 61.3% always used a condom with the commercial sex partners and 17.3% always used a condom with the steady partner. More than half of all participants (55.0%) reported daily use of some psychoactive substance. Correct answers to all 6 standardized questions regarding HIV transmission gave only 9.9% Roma and 5.0% non-Roma SW and mean scores were 2.87 for Roma and 3.03 for non-Roma SW. These differences were not significant. According to multivariate analysis, Roma SWs were significantly younger, less educated, and with more testing to HIV during life in comparison with non Roma SWs. Significantly protective determinants for Roma SWs were knowledge of reading and writing and less frequently daily using of ecstasy during last month in comparison with non Roma SWs. It is necessary to continue work on education of both Roma and non-Roma SWs and to reconsider and revise the existing prevention programs regarding their impact on HIV transmission knowledge and the respective protective behaviors.

  11. Reclaiming Roma Students in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    For most, being served in a restaurant, treated nicely at a job interview, smiled at in the street, or being able to work is nothing out of the ordinary. Sadly, it is not the case for many. Especially for those who are poor. Especially for those who have little education. Especially for those who are Roma (or in other words Gypsy) living in…

  12. Body mass index in Serbian Roma.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Andrew; Cvorović, Jelena; Strkalj, Goran

    2009-01-01

    Stature and body mass were measured in 346 individuals belonging to three Roma groups from metropolitan Belgrade western Serbia. As with the majority of Serbian Roma, the participants in this study have been historically disadvantaged and their situation was further aggravated during the recent political crises. Surprisingly, the body mass index (BMI) of Serbian Roma is relatively high compared with western Europeans and is inconsistent with the view that Serbian Roma are predisposed to high rates of chronic energy deficiency ( approximately 4%). While the majority of individual Roma display BMI values within the normal range (WHO, 1995), certain groups have a moderate to high proportion of individuals ( approximately 35%) who could be classified as overweight and some who approach at-risk levels for clinical obesity.

  13. Roma Pupils' Attitudes Towards Education--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecek, Mojca; Munda, Milanka

    2015-01-01

    When analysing the reasons behind the academic underachievement of Roma pupils, some teachers suggest that Roma people do not value education and that Roma children have negative attitudes towards school. With increasing frequency, Roma pupils from low socio-economic backgrounds are being researched and the research primarily adopts the…

  14. Roma Girls: Between Traditional Values and Educational Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents findings from a survey of 720 respondents: 240 Roma parents, 240 Roma boys and 240 Roma girls between 12 and 25 years of age. The subjects were from various regions of Bulgaria and were members of different ethnic groups. The main goal of the survey was to study the current attitudes that Roma communities hold regarding an…

  15. The Roma Students' Perception of the Importance of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapat, Goran; Slezak, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers the effects of Roma education in Medjimurje County. Although the positive effects are present in many different aspects related to education of Roma, among the most important is the change in Roma attitude toward their own education. The comprehension of importance of Roma children's education and intention to base their future…

  16. [Cecílio Romaña, Romaña's sign and Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Dias, J C

    1997-01-01

    Cecílio Romaña was an important Argentinean researcher dedicated to tropical diseases in the period 1930-1960, recently died in Barcelona. Working mainly on the epidemiological, clinical and pathological aspects of American trypanosomiasis, Romaña became very famous in 1935 when he accurately described the most typical portal recognized in all the endemic area with the cognomen of "Romaña sign". This description caused an enormous polemic with Romaña's then director, the great Salvador Mazza, who never accepted the specificity of the sign and, much less, its popular name (which was proposed by the Brazilian researchers Emmanuel Dias and Evandro Chagas). This history is briefly summarized in the present article, as well as the great impact of Romaña's discovery in the recognition of the acute Chagas' disease in all the endemic area.

  17. Roma Education and Public Policy: A European Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liegeois, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The trajectory of the Roma is illuminating for understanding the social situation of other minorities, but also for a set of issues concerning the multiculturalism present within states. In this article, the author discusses the context of Roma education--marked by the stateless and marginalized status of the Roma--and provides a brief history of…

  18. Cultural Intersections: The Life Story of a Roma Cultural Mediator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobbo, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the life story of a young Roma cultural mediator who narrates (1) her life and professional decisions, still rather uncommon among young Roma women, and (2) the impact of her education and work experiences and achievements on her self perception. The narratives, from which the life story emerges, express the young Roma's…

  19. Beyond Inclusion: Reconsidering Policies, Curriculum, and Pedagogy for Roma Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskovic, Maja; Curcic, Svjetlana

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the policies and politics of including European Roma students in mainstream educational systems within the context of two European Union (EU) policies: the Decade of Roma Inclusion (2005-2015) and EU National Roma Integration Strategies (2013-2020). Drawing on the scholarship about inclusion and its practical achievements,…

  20. Stigma and Roma Education Policy Reform in Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses reform of Roma education in Slovakia against the backdrop of continued stigmatization of Roma students. Transnational NGOs and IGOs promote rights-based solutions leading to the fullest possible inclusion of Roma students in mainstream education. The Slovak state promotes educational policies that lead to the fullest…

  1. Cultural Mismatch in Roma Parents' Perceptions: The Role of Culture, Language, and Traditional Roma Values in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrev, Veselina

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from a two-year qualitative study exploring the factors contributing to Roma students' disparate outcomes in Bulgaria. I utilize ethnographic observations, oral history, and in-depth interviews with twenty Roma parents to gain understanding of Roma children's "cultural capital" and relation to formal schools.…

  2. Health of Roma children in Vilnius and Ventspils.

    PubMed

    Kanapeckiene, Virginija; Valinteliene, Rolanda; Berzanskyte, Ausra; Kevalas, Rimantas; Supranowicz, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    According to the literature data, Roma health and living conditions in Central and Eastern Europe are poorer than of the rest of population. However, the more detailed information about Roma health is lacking. The aim of the study was to evaluate morbidity, health self-assessment, and prevalence of addictions among Roma children in Vilnius and Ventspils and to compare with health indicators of non-Roma children. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS. A descriptive epidemiological study was carried out, anonymously questioning all volunteer Roma children - 59 in Vilnius (Lithuania) and 31 in Ventspils (Latvia) schools. Results were compared with identical study, carried out in five Vilnius schools (reference group, 640). RESULTS. The appliance rate of Roma children to doctor did not differ from reference group - half of all questioned children visited doctor 1-3 times during the last year. However, more Roma children (74.6% from Vilnius and 64.6% from Ventspils) considered their health as poor and very poor as compared to reference group (4.3%). The proportion of children indicating somatic symptoms often and very often did not differ statistically significantly among groups with exception of vomiting and nausea, which was most prevalent among Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma. The proportion of children indicating emotional symptoms often and very often differed significantly in all groups and was the biggest in Ventspils Roma group. The proportion of daily alcohol, drug users, and smokers was higher in Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma groups, although the differences among all three groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION. Although the morbidity of Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma groups did not differ from reference group, essential discrepancy was found in health self-assessment - more Roma children considered their health as poor and very poor.

  3. Health and Roma People in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekçi, Perihan Elif

    2016-01-01

    Background: The research and published literature on Roma health in Turkey is much more limited than in other European countries. Among these, there are hardly any published literature focusing on the health status, health indicators and health behaviors. Aims: The aim of this research is to describe the perceptions of health-related concepts and access and the use of health services and social determinants of the health of Roma people in Turkey. Study Design: Descriptive qualitative survey. Methods: The participants were chosen by random sampling. The semi-structured interview topic guide was developed from sources such as advice from the Romani community leaders, published evidence and personal experience from previous work with Roma communities. Non-directive open-ended questions allowed the exploration of their health status, how they conceptualize health and disease, their level of awareness on the impact of social determinants of health, on their health status and the access and use of health services. The data analysis was based on grounded theory. Analysis proceeded in four steps: 1. Reading and examining the transcripts separately using open coding, 2. Extracting the key words and codes from the transcripts and sorting them into categories, 3. Re-reading the transcripts by using selective coding, and 4. Examining the categories derived from the open coding systematically and determining the concepts summarizing the material. Results: The survey results are compatible with the existing literature on Roma health and reveal that 1) there is a tight link between the lack of social determinants of health and the poor health status of Roma people 2) socioeconomic factors and cultural norms of the ethnic minority are suspicious factors 3) comparative and systematic research is needed to illuminate the actual health gaps and causal factors for them. Conclusion: The research proves that the need for comparative and systematic research in Turkey to determine the

  4. Otherness in Pedagogical Theory and Practice: The Case of Roma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirova, Anna; Prochner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the topic of the inclusion of Roma children in education in Europe through an examination of theory and practice in relation to the issues of Otherness and foreignness. Roma children entering school encounter a vastly different world from their home culture, with different expectations for teaching and learning, for…

  5. From Research to Policy: Roma Participation through Communicative Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munte, Ariadna; Serradell, Olga; Sorde, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, Roma people's social exclusion has been reinforced through research that has legitimized stereotypes rather than helping to overcome them. This has led Roma people to refuse to participate in the kind of research that has contributed to discrimination against them. We describe how the critical communicative methodology, used in the…

  6. Roma Education on the Agenda of the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaroka, Livia

    2007-01-01

    The Roma community of Europe continues to face discrimination in a number of areas, notably education, employment, healthcare, and housing. In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, education provides one of the primary tools for escaping the cycle of poverty that traps many Roma families, and therefore it is one of the most pressing issues that…

  7. Institutional Racism? Roma Children, Local Community and School Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    This article tries to discuss the conditions Roma pupils face within the Greek educational system. In the first part, through a brief history of Roma groups in Greece followed by a short analysis of their legal status and leaving conditions, I attempt to present a critical approach in Romani Studies. Thereafter, using Institutional Racism as a…

  8. Situated Learning in Young Romanian Roma Successful Learning Biographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Stanciu, Dorin; Vanea, Cornelia; Sasu, Virginia Maria; Dragota, Maria

    2014-01-01

    European Roma are often associated with social problems and conflicts due to poverty and low formal education. Nevertheless, Roma communities traditionally develop expertise in ethnically specific domains, probably by alternative, informal ways, such as situated learning in communities of practice. Although predictable, empirical evidence of…

  9. Securitarian healing: Roma mobility and health care in Rome.

    PubMed

    Alunni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, Roma populations in Europe have been the object of strict securitarian policies. The Rome case is particularly interesting due to the continued shift from securitarian to humanitarian discourses and actions led by local institutions. The specific health care system implemented in the legal and illegal Roma camps was one of the tools used. The ethnographic fieldwork behind this article involved following the daily activities of a mobile medical unit dedicated to Roma camps in Rome and monitoring a health care project led by a nongovernmental organization. This analysis focuses on one particular dimension of precarious forms of Roma citizenship that the health care policies have developed to address Roma issues: the international mobility dynamics relating to health issues, which drive subjects into a forced integration of multiple, incomplete, and fragmentary medical approaches.

  10. Collective identity and wellbeing of Roma minority adolescents in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Bender, Michael; van de Vijver, Fons

    2013-01-01

    In Europe and particularly in Bulgaria, Roma represent the largest low-status minority group that is subjected to marked public intolerance and discrimination. This study examined links among Roma (N = 207) and Bulgarian (N = 399) adolescents' ethnic, familial, and religious identities as salient identity aspects for their psychological wellbeing. Results indicated that, as expected, Roma youth reported lower levels of wellbeing than Bulgarian youth. The latter revealed a weaker religious identity than Roma youth, whereas no ethnic group differences emerged regarding Bulgarian or familial identity. Furthermore, we observed that collective identity was higher in older participants of both groups. Finally, a multigroup analysis using structural equation modeling showed that collective identity was a positive predictor of wellbeing for both Roma and Bulgarian adolescents. Findings demonstrated differences in salience as well as structural communalities regarding ways in which collective identity affects wellbeing of youth from two ethnically diverse communities.

  11. Prevalence of URAT1 allelic variants in the Roma population.

    PubMed

    Stiburkova, Blanka; Gabrikova, Dana; Čepek, Pavel; Šimek, Pavel; Kristian, Pavol; Cordoba-Lanus, Elizabeth; Claverie-Martin, Felix

    2016-12-01

    The Roma represents a transnational ethnic group, with a current European population of 8-10 million. The evolutionary process that had the greatest impact on the gene pool of the Roma population is called the founder effect. Renal hypouricemia (RHUC) is a rare heterogenous inherited disorder characterized by impaired renal urate reabsorption. The affected individuals are predisposed to recurrent episodes of exercise-induced nonmyoglobinuric acute kidney injury and nephrolithiasis. To date, more than 150 patients with a loss-of-function mutation for the SLC22A12 (URAT1) gene have been found, most of whom are Asians. However, RHUC 1 patients have been described in a variety of ethnic groups (e.g., Arab Israelis, Iraqi Jews, Caucasians, and Roma) and in geographically noncontiguous countries. This study confirms our previous findings regarding the high frequency of SLC22A12 variants observed. Frequencies of the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were found to be 1.92% and 5.56%, respectively, in a subgroup of the Roma population from five regions in three countries: Slovakia, Czech Republic, and Spain. Our findings suggested that the common dysfunction allelic variants of URAT1 exist in the general Roma population and thus renal hypouricemia should be kept in differential diagnostic algorithm on Roma patients with defect in renal tubular urate transport. This leads to confirm that the genetic drift in the Roma have increased the prevalence of hereditary disorders caused by very rare variants in major population.

  12. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  13. Genetic structure of the paternal lineage of the Roma people.

    PubMed

    Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Béres, Judit; Nagy, Melinda; Chang, Yuet Meng

    2011-05-01

    According to written sources, Roma (Romanies, Gypsies) arrived in the Balkans around 1,000 years ago from India and have subsequently spread through several parts of Europe. Genetic data, particularly from the Y chromosome, have supported this model, and can potentially refine it. We now provide an analysis of Y-chromosomal markers from five Roma and two non-Roma populations (N = 787) in order to investigate the genetic relatedness of the Roma population groups to one another, and to gain further understanding of their likely Indian origins, the genetic contribution of non-Roma males to the Roma populations, and the early history of their splits and migrations in Europe. The two main sources of the Roma paternal gene pool were identified as South Asian and European. The reduced diversity and expansion of H1a-M82 lineages in all Roma groups imply shared descent from a single paternal ancestor in the Indian subcontinent. The Roma paternal gene pool also contains a specific subset of E1b1b1a-M78 and J2a2-M67 lineages, implying admixture during early settlement in the Balkans and the subsequent influx into the Carpathian Basin. Additional admixture, evident in the low and moderate frequencies of typical European haplogroups I1-M253, I2a-P37.2, I2b-M223, R1b1-P25, and R1a1-M198, has occurred in a more population-specific manner.

  14. The role of the Vlax Roma in shaping the European Romani maternal genetic history.

    PubMed

    Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Barešić, Ana; Klarić, Irena Martinović; Cukrov, Slavena; Lauc, Lovorka Barać; Janićijević, Branka

    2011-10-01

    The Roma are comprised of many founder groups of common Indian origins but different socio-cultural characteristics. The Vlax Roma are one of the founder Roma populations characterized by a period of bondage in the historic Romanian principalities, and by the archaic Romanian language. Demographic history suggests different migration routes of Roma populations, especially after their arrival in Mesopotamia and the eastern boundary of the Byzantine Empire. Although various genetic studies of uniparental genetic markers showed a connection between Roma genetic legacy and their migration routes, precise sampling of Roma populations elucidates this relationship in more detail. In this study, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA of 384 Croatian Vlax Roma from two geographic locations in the context of 734 European Roma samples. Our results show that Roma migration routes are marked with two Near-Eastern haplogroups, X2 and U3, whose inverse proportional incidence clearly separates the Balkan and the Vlax Roma from other Roma populations that reached Europe as part of the first migration wave. Spatial and temporal characteristics of these haplogroups indicate a possibility of their admixture with Roma populations before arrival in Europe. Distribution of haplogroup M35 indicates that all Vlax Roma populations descend from one single founder population that might even reach back to the original ancestral Indian population. Founder effects followed by strict endogamy rules can be traced from India to contemporary small, local communities, as in the case of two Croatian Vlax Roma populations that show clear population differentiation despite similar origins and shared demographic history.

  15. Origins and divergence of the Roma (gypsies).

    PubMed

    Gresham, D; Morar, B; Underhill, P A; Passarino, G; Lin, A A; Wise, C; Angelicheva, D; Calafell, F; Oefner, P J; Shen, P; Tournev, I; de Pablo, R; Kuĉinskas, V; Perez-Lezaun, A; Marushiakova, E; Popov, V; Kalaydjieva, L

    2001-12-01

    The identification of a growing number of novel Mendelian disorders and private mutations in the Roma (Gypsies) points to their unique genetic heritage. Linguistic evidence suggests that they are of diverse Indian origins. Their social structure within Europe resembles that of the jatis of India, where the endogamous group, often defined by profession, is the primary unit. Genetic studies have reported dramatic differences in the frequencies of mutations and neutral polymorphisms in different Romani populations. However, these studies have not resolved ambiguities regarding the origins and relatedness of Romani populations. In this study, we examine the genetic structure of 14 well-defined Romani populations. Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of different mutability were analyzed in a total of 275 individuals. Asian Y-chromosome haplogroup VI-68, defined by a mutation at the M82 locus, was present in all 14 populations and accounted for 44.8% of Romani Y chromosomes. Asian mtDNA-haplogroup M was also identified in all Romani populations and accounted for 26.5% of female lineages in the sample. Limited diversity within these two haplogroups, measured by the variation at eight short-tandem-repeat loci for the Y chromosome, and sequencing of the HVS1 for the mtDNA are consistent with a small group of founders splitting from a single ethnic population in the Indian subcontinent. Principal-components analysis and analysis of molecular variance indicate that genetic structure in extant endogamous Romani populations has been shaped by genetic drift and differential admixture and correlates with the migrational history of the Roma in Europe. By contrast, social organization and professional group divisions appear to be the product of a more recent restitution of the caste system of India.

  16. Dying and death in some Roma communities: ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Gramma, Rodica; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Ioan, Beatrice; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Chirita, Radu

    2014-04-01

    The Roma people have specific values, therefore their views and beliefs about illness, dying and death are important to be known for health care providers caring for members of this community. The aim of this qualitative study based on 48 semi-structured interviews with Roma patients and caregivers in communities in two regions of Romania was to examine their selfdescribed behaviors and practices, their experiences and perceptions of illness, dying and death. Five more important themes about the Roma people facing dying and death have been identified: (1) The perception of illness in the community as reason for shame and the isolation that results from this, as well as the tendency for Roma people to take this on in their self image; (2) The importance of the family as the major support for the ill/dying individual, including the social requirement that family gather when someone is ill/dying; (3) The belief that the patient should not be told his/her diagnosis for fear it will harm him/her and that the family should be informed of the diagnosis as the main decision maker regarding medical treatment; (4) The reluctance of the Roma to decide on stopping life prolonging treatment; (5) The view of death as 'impure'. These results can be useful for health care providers working with members of the Roma community. By paying attention to and respecting the Roma patients' values, spirituality, and relationship dynamics, the medical staff can provide the most suitable healthcare by respecting the patients' wishes and expectations.

  17. Shame and Anxiety Feelings of a Roma Population in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gouva, M; Mentis, M; Kotrotsiou, S; Paralikas, Th; Kotrotsiou, E

    2015-12-01

    Shame is a crucial issue for Roma. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the severity of shame and anxiety feelings in a Roma population living in Greece and assess the differentiation of these feelings between Roma men and women. A quota sample of 194 Roma adult men and women living in Southern Greece was retrieved. The Experiences of Shame Scale (ESS), the Other As Shamer Scale (OAS) and the Spielberg's State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires were used. Women scored statistically significantly higher than men on ESS, whereas men scored higher on OAS scale (52.27 ± 16.91 vs 45.42 ± 9.98 and 35.93 ± 16.94 vs 30.87 ± 13.72 respectively). Women scored higher than men in both STAI subscales, however significant differences were observed only in State Anxiety scale (48.83 ± 9.26 vs 43.20 ± 9.81). OAS total score was inversely related to state anxiety, whereas ESS total score was positive related to trait anxiety, all correlations being significant at p < 0.05 level. Roma men and women exhibit high levels of shame and anxiety. Cultural, social and minority issues contribute to feelings of inferiority and anxiety experience.

  18. Pre-Primary Education of Roma Children in Serbia: Barriers and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica

    2013-01-01

    In Serbia, as in the other countries of the Western Balkans and South-Eastern Europe, the most disadvantaged communities belong to the Roma minority. The present paper demonstrates the conditions of Roma preschool children in Serbia: primarily their early education, but also habitation and health in Roma settlements. The data highlight the…

  19. Effects of a Dialogue-Based Program to Improve Emotion Knowledge in Spanish Roma Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giménez-Dasí, Marta; Quintanilla, Laura; Ojeda, Vanesa; Lucas-Molina, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Romas are one of the largest minority groups in Spain and Europe, but no specific data on children's socioemotional learning are available. Our goal was to determine the level of socioemotional knowledge of a group of 4- and 5-year-old Roma children and to implement an intervention program at school. Forty-three Roma children participated…

  20. Rethinking the Role of Pedagogical Assistants: Establishing Cooperation between Roma Families and Schools in Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcevic, Jelena; Dimitrijevic, Bojana; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to examine the risks and challenges related to the cooperation of pedagogical assistants (PAs) with Roma parents/families and their work with Roma pupils, as well as to offer further insight into ways to overcome these risks and challenges. Roma pupils and parents/families face numerous difficulties in education,…

  1. Affirmative Action in Romania's Higher Education: Roma Students' Perceived Meanings and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantea, Maria-Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative paper explores Roma students' perceptions on the policy of assigning "special places" for Roma in Romania's universities. Findings suggest that Roma see themselves as occupying a precarious social space, concerned not as much to hide perceived merit violation but to handle (alleged) inadequacies given by their…

  2. Involvement of Roma Parents in Children's Education in Croatia: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahic, Tea; Vidovic, Vlasta Vizek; Miljevic-Ridicki, Renata

    2011-01-01

    This article compares Roma and mainstream parents' involvement in the education of their children, based on Epstein's six-dimensional model of parent-school partnership. The survey was conducted in Croatia on two sub-samples: 60 Roma parents and 908 mainstream parents. Results suggest that Roma parents show lower interest in participating in…

  3. Seroprevalence of human Toxocara infections in the Roma and non-Roma populations of Eastern Slovakia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Antolová, D; Jarčuška, P; Janičko, M; Madarasová-Gecková, A; Halánová, M; Čisláková, L; Kalinová, Z; Reiterová, K; Škutová, M; Pella, D; Mareková, M

    2015-07-01

    Socioeconomic conditions and health of the Roma population, the most numerous minority in Europe, are worse than that of the non-Roma population. Information about the occurrence of human toxocarosis and other parasitic diseases in the Roma population is scarce or completely missing. The aim of this study was to map the seroprevalence of toxocarosis in the population living in segregated Roma settlements and to compare the data with the occurrence of antibodies in the non-Roma population of Eastern Slovakia. The seropositivity to Toxocara in 429 examined Roma inhabitants of segregated settlements reached 22·1%, while only 4/394 samples of the non-Roma population were found to be positive (odds ratio 27·7, P < 0·0001). Headache, muscle pain, influenza-like symptoms and diarrhoea occurred significantly more often in seropositive persons than in seronegative individuals. In the Roma population positivity was not influenced by gender, level of education and poverty, but age, lack of sanitary facilities and heating with wood significantly increased the risk of infection. It can be assumed that besides the high prevalence of toxocarosis, other parasitic diseases and communicable diseases will also be more prevalent in the Roma population living in segregated settlements.

  4. Antenatal characteristics of Roma female population in Virovitica-Podravina County, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Šegregur, Domagoj

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This study reports about antenatal characteristics of Roma minority population. The study was designed to investigate data about health behaviours known to be associated with reproductive outcomes of Roma women that have very good living conditions and relatively high resource availability. Methods A retrospective study included 204 Roma and 408 non-Roma hospitalised singleton births that occurred in the Maternity Ward of the General Hospital Virovitica in the period from 1991 to 2010. Data about women’s age, marital status, smoking, reproductive health (abortions, delivery), antenatal care, perinatal complications and gestational age were taken from hospital records and analysed. Results Roma women were averagely more than three years younger than non-Roma women, only 10.8% were married. Smoking was more frequent. The average number of births of Roma and non-Roma women was similar, averagely two children per woman. The rate of induced abortions in the Roma women was higher, while the frequency of spontaneous abortions was equal. Inadequate antenatal care of Roma women was associated with two times higher incidence of perinatal complications. A higher frequency of deliveries at home without professional assistance in Roma pregnancy resulted in lower perinatal outcomes. It was confirmed that Roma mothers give birth earlier (38+6 vs. 39+4 weeks) and have a higher incidence of premature births (9.3% vs. 2.2%). Conclusions In the comparison of antenatal parameters between the two researched groups, poorer prenatal outcomes in the Roma population were found, despite full integration and considerable improvement in living standards of this ethnic Roma population. PMID:28289463

  5. Roma Mediators in Europe: A New Council of Europe Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2012-01-01

    In several European countries the number of the Roma represents approximately 10% of the total population. Due to the global economic crisis, the rise of the far right in places like Hungary, and failed policies of the past, their present social and economic situation continues to become more vulnerable. Mediation is one of the measures used…

  6. Roma Women's Perspectives on End-of-Life Decisions.

    PubMed

    Peinado-Gorlat, Patricia; Castro-Martínez, Francisco Javier; Arriba-Marcos, Beatriz; Melguizo-Jiménez, Miguel; Barrio-Cantalejo, Inés

    2015-12-01

    Spain's Roma community has its own cultural and moral values. These values influence the way in which end-of-life decision-making is confronted. The objective of this study was to explore the perspective of Roma women on end-of-life decision-making. It was a qualitative study involving thirty-three Roma women belonging to groups for training and social development in two municipalities. We brought together five focus groups between February and December 2012. Six mediators each recruited five to six participants. We considered age and care role to be the variables that can have the most influence on opinion regarding end-of-life decision-making. We considered the discussion saturated when the ideas expressed were repeated. Data analysis was carried out according to five steps: describing, organizing, connecting, corroborating/legitimating, and representing the account. The main ideas gleaned from the data were as follows: (1) the important role of the family in end-of-life care, especially the role of women; (2) the large influence of community opinion over personal or family decisions, typical of closed societies; (3) the different preferences women had for themselves compared to that for others regarding desired end-of-life care; (4) unawareness or rejection of advance directives. Roma women wish for their healthcare preferences to be taken into account, but "not in writing." The study concluded that the success of end-of-life healthcare in Roma families and of their involvement in the making of healthcare decisions depends upon considering and respecting their idiosyncrasy.

  7. Reconstructing the Indian origin and dispersal of the European Roma: a maternal genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Valente, Cristina; Gusmão, Alfredo; Alves, Cíntia; Gomes, Verónica; Goios, Ana; Parson, Walther; Calafell, Francesc; Alvarez, Luis; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Comas, David; Prata, Maria João

    2011-01-10

    Previous genetic, anthropological and linguistic studies have shown that Roma (Gypsies) constitute a founder population dispersed throughout Europe whose origins might be traced to the Indian subcontinent. Linguistic and anthropological evidence point to Indo-Aryan ethnic groups from North-western India as the ancestral parental population of Roma. Recently, a strong genetic hint supporting this theory came from a study of a private mutation causing primary congenital glaucoma. In the present study, complete mitochondrial control sequences of Iberian Roma and previously published maternal lineages of other European Roma were analyzed in order to establish the genetic affinities among Roma groups, determine the degree of admixture with neighbouring populations, infer the migration routes followed since the first arrival to Europe, and survey the origin of Roma within the Indian subcontinent. Our results show that the maternal lineage composition in the Roma groups follows a pattern of different migration routes, with several founder effects, and low effective population sizes along their dispersal. Our data allowed the confirmation of a North/West migration route shared by Polish, Lithuanian and Iberian Roma. Additionally, eleven Roma founder lineages were identified and degrees of admixture with host populations were estimated. Finally, the comparison with an extensive database of Indian sequences allowed us to identify the Punjab state, in North-western India, as the putative ancestral homeland of the European Roma, in agreement with previous linguistic and anthropological studies.

  8. Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior and Social Desirability Among Roma and Non-Roma Adolescents in Slovakia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2016-02-01

    Rates of aggression and delinquency are assumed to be higher among Roma and other minorities, but sound evidence of this is lacking. Our aim was to assess delinquent and aggressive behavior among Roma and non-Roma adolescents and the effects on ethnic differences of parental education and social desirability. We conducted a cross-sectional study among Roma from separated and segregated settlements in the eastern part of Slovakia (N = 330; Mage = 14.50; interview) and non-Roma adolescents (N = 722; Mage = 14.86; questionnaire). The effect of ethnicity on antisocial behaviors was analyzed using linear regression (crude) and adjusted for gender, parental education, and social desirability. Adjustment for social desirability diminished the ethnic differences in delinquency (B = 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.12, -0.04]), led to an increase in the differences in hostility (B = 2.43; 95% CI = [0.87, 3.99]), and led to the disappearance of differences in physical aggression (B = 0.45; 95% CI = [1.14, 2.07]). Parental education did not affect the associations in an important way. Our findings indicate that Roma are not that much different from non-Roma, in terms of antisocial behavior, which contradicts the general perception of Roma. Our findings should be confirmed in other settings.

  9. Health Behaviors, Nutritional Status, and Anthropometric Parameters of Roma and Non-Roma Mothers and Their Infants in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambouskova, Jolana; Dlouhy, Pavel; Krizova, Eva; Prochazka, Bohumir; Hrncirova, Dana; Andel, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare maternal health behaviors, maternal nutritional status, and infant size at birth of Romas and non-Romas in the Czech Republic. Design: Maternal interviews and food frequency questionnaire, maternal blood samples, physical measurements of mothers and infants. Setting: Hospital, maternal/child care center; 2-4 days postpartum.…

  10. Alternative Schools and Roma Education: A Review of Alternative Secondary School Models for the Education of Roma Children in Hungary. World Bank Regional Office Hungary NGO Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsos, Eva Hegyesi; Bohn, Katalin; Fleck, Gabor; Imre, Anna

    In recent years, a number of experiments have been undertaken in Hungary with alternative approaches to secondary school education for Roma children. This report examines six different institutions that have attempted to help Roma children make the transition from basic to secondary school, and to improve their performance and future opportunities…

  11. Primary care for the Roma in Europe: Position paper of the European forum for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Rotar Pavlič, Danica; Zelko, Erika; Vintges, Marga; Willems, Sara; Hanssens, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Roma populations’ low health status and limited access to health services, including primary care, has been documented in many European countries, and warrants specific health policies and practices. A variety of experiences shows how primary care can adjust its practices to reduce the barriers to primary care for Roma populations. At local level, establishing collaboration with Roma organisations helps primary care to improve mutual relations and quality of care. Mediation has proved to be an effective tool. Skills training of primary care practitioners may enhance their individual competences. Research and international sharing of experiences are further tools to improve primary care for the Roma people. PMID:27703542

  12. The Survival of Roma Minority Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis Therapy - A Romanian Multicenter Survey

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, Dana; Schiller, Oana; Timar, Romulus; Timar, Bogdan; Bob, Flaviu; Donciu, Mihaela Dora; Munteanu, Mircea; Mihaescu, Adelina; Covic, Adrian; Schiller, Adalbert

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Roma minority represents the largest ethnic group in Central and South-East European countries. Data regarding the mortality in Roma hemodialysis subjects are limited. We evaluated the 3 year mortality of ESRD Roma patients treated with hemodialysis (HD). Study Design and Setting Our prospective cohort study included 600 ESRD patients on HD therapy recruited from 7 HD centers, from the main geographical regions of Romania. The median age of the patients was 56 (19) years, 332 (55.3%) being males, 51 (8.5%) having Roma ethnicity. Results Roma ESRD patients initiate dialysis at a younger age, 47.8 years vs. 52.3 years (P = 0.017), present higher serum albumin (P = 0.013) and higher serum phosphate levels (P = 0.021). In the Roma group, the overall 3 year mortality was higher when compared to Caucasians (33.3% vs. 24.8%). The multivariate survival analysis revealed that being of Roma ethnicity is an independent risk factor for mortality (HR = 1.74; 95% CI = 1.04–2.91; P = 0.035). Conclusions Roma patients with ESRD initiate HD therapy at a younger age as compared to Caucasians. They have a higher 3 year mortality rate and are dying at a younger age. Roma ethnicity represents an independent risk factor for mortality in our cohort. PMID:27196564

  13. Nutritional status and growth parameters of school-age Roma children in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Spiroski, Igor; Dimitrovska, Zlatanka; Gjorgjev, Dragan; Mikik, Vladimir; Efremova-Stefanoska, Vesna; Naunova-Spiroska, Daniela; Kendrovski, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    Main objective of the study was to assess the nutritional status of school age Roma children in Macedonia in order to detect precursors of possible health risks at an early age. The study was designed as a comparative case control study. Study group consisted of 229 Roma school children from the 1st and 272 from the 5th grade residing in different towns in Macedonia. The control group was recruited from other than Roma ethnic background and consisted of 283 children attending 1st and 356 children attending 5th grade. Every participant was measured for his/hers body height and weight. The t-test and Chi square (Chi2) were applied to test statistical significance of variables. The WHO's AnthroPlus software was applied to assess growth parameters and population at risk. There were significant differences in values of the body weight (p = 0.001) and height (p = 0.001) between Roma and non-Roma children attending the 1st grade of primary school. Weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age indexes of the 1st grade children significantly differred in in the same intervals of SD (> or = -2SD and < -1SD; > or = -1SD and median; > +1SD and < or = +2SD; between Roma and non-Roma 5th graders. Anthropometric parameters of nutritional status of Roma children in Macedonia are significantly different than those of their non-Roma peers. Their health risks are predominantly related to underweight. The parameters related to health risks of overweight or obesity are lower in Roma than in non-Roma children.

  14. Poverty and Ethnicity: A Cross-Country Study of Roma Poverty in Central Europe. World Bank Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revenga, Ana; Ringold, Dena; Tracy, William Martin

    Roma, or "gypsies," are the main poverty risk group in many countries of central and eastern Europe. Living standards for the Roma have deteriorated more severely during the region's transition to a market economy than they have for other population groups, and Roma have been poorly positioned to take advantage of emerging economic and…

  15. Inclusion, Integration or Perpetual Exclusion? A Critical Examination of the Decade of Roma Inclusion, 2005-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curcic, Svjetlana; Miskovic, Maja; Plaut, Shayna; Ceobanu, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 European countries with significant Roma populations are taking part in the Decade of Roma Inclusion, 2005-2015 (the Decade). Each of these countries developed a Decade Action Plan with the aim of eliminating the marginalization and discrimination of Roma in the areas of housing, health care, employment and education. Nonetheless, as…

  16. Democratic Governance for Inclusion: A Case Study of a Greek Primary School Welcoming Roma Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noula, Ioanna; Cowan, Steven; Govaris, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how changes in school governance in one state primary school in a city in central Greece have resulted in a significant degree of inclusion for Roma children. This inclusivity runs counter to the disturbing occurrence of the social and ethnic segregation of a group of locally resident Roma children within schools. This…

  17. Roma Pupils' Identification with School in Slovenia and Serbia: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Munda, Milanka; Pecek, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this paper aims to challenge the belief held by some education professionals that Roma pupils do not value education. The research sample included groups of Roma pupils from two countries (Slovenia and Serbia) and from different socio-economic backgrounds. The results suggest that the majority of the pupils are aware of…

  18. Using Mixed Methods from a Communicative Orientation: Researching with Grassroots Roma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecha, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, researchers in Roma studies shifted their approach, from an exclusionary stance to a more communicative one. Despite major positive changes since then, researchers still do not adequately reflect the voices of the majority of the world's Roma. In this article, we draw on a communicative mixed methods case study, conducted within…

  19. Different and Unequal: The Educational Segregation of Roma Pupils in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses and welcomes the decision of the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights which held that the use of special schools for Roma pupils was contrary to the right to an education coupled with the prohibition on discrimination. The decision has wide ramifications for the education of minority, particularly Roma, pupils…

  20. A Study on the Mothers of Roma Children Who Are a Risk Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orçan, Maide; Çiçekler, Canan Yildiz; Ari, Ramazan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to define Roma mothers' views regarding their children's education and their tendency towards crime. The study is based on an illustrative case study method. The participants of this study are mothers of Roma children between the ages of 4 and 6 who live in Konya, Turkey--more specifically in the Yenimahalle neighborhood in the…

  1. Lessons for Life: Roma Children, Communal Practices, and the Global Marketplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianakis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The Roma, also known as gypsies or "tsinganoi," are amongst the oldest ethnic minorities in Europe. Nonetheless, they have been one of the most universally marginalized groups across all of the European nations. Their marginalization is evident in how Roma children have been treated in schools. Until recently, most nations have only…

  2. How to Move from Power-Based to Dialogic Relations? Lessons from Roma Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melgar, Patricia; Larena, Rosa; Ruiz, Laura; Rammel, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In its growth strategy for the coming decade, the EU recognises the Roma as one of several groups especially affected by poverty and social vulnerability. So far, many efforts to reverse this social exclusion have failed; imposed solutions based on power relations have ignored Roma voices and suggestions from the community. As a result, the EU now…

  3. Support Programmes for Roma Children: Do They Help or Promote Exclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igarashi, Kazuyo

    2005-01-01

    This article critically examines current education programmes for Roma primary school students in the Czech Republic and the impact of these programmes. The research described here, based on in?depth case studies, challenges popular beliefs in the "success" of Roma oriented programmes, as well as the stereotypical negative images of Roma…

  4. Why Roma Do Not Like Mainstream Schools: Voices of a People without Territory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claveria, Julio Vargas; Alonso, Jesus Gomez

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a new approach to educational research with the Roma people based on intersubjective dialogue and egalitarian relationships between researchers and subjects. Frames these suggestions within the context of historical discrimination against the Roma and their disaffection with schooling. (Contains 88 references.) (SK)

  5. Intercultural Policies and the Contradictory Views of Teachers: The Roma in Catalonian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beremenyi, Balint-Abel

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine the contradictions and lack of consistency between various levels of discourse relating to Roma educational policies. Policy-makers have claimed that political interventions would positively impact the progress of Roma. However, the results have been mixed. We argue here that teachers need to re-evaluate their roles as…

  6. Good Practices in Roma Education in Bulgaria during the Years of Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present good educational practices from Bulgaria that relate to Roma education. In the so-called Years of Transition, educational conditions changed considerably. Non-governmental organizations have attempted to promote high-quality education for Roma children. The Bulgarian Ministry of Education has made various…

  7. A Minority within a Minority? Social Justice for Traveller and Roma Children in ECEC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Colette

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent policy developments in Europe regarding Roma and Traveller integration and Early Childhood Provision. After a long history of oppression, Roma issues have recently become prominent on the EU policy agenda. The article discusses how these relate to developments in other areas of policy: the European children's rights…

  8. International Policy and Roma Education in Europe: Essential Inputs or Centralized Distractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Melanie H.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the case of Roma inclusion in education as a study of the ways in which international policy can and cannot bring change at the local level. I first reflect on the numerous international organizations and initiatives to improve the educational outcomes of Roma, and to reduce segregation and other non-inclusionary practices.…

  9. A Special Challenge for Europe: The Inclusion of Roma Children in Early Years Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Sarah; Marsh, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Provision of early childhood education and care (ECEC) for Roma children serves as a litmus test for the broader social inclusion agenda in Europe. The majority of Roma children and families live in substandard, often insecure and isolated housing and have limited access to quality health, social care and education services. There is a growing…

  10. Genetic studies of the Roma (Gypsies): a review

    PubMed Central

    Kalaydjieva, Luba; Gresham, David; Calafell, Francesc

    2001-01-01

    Background Data provided by the social sciences as well as genetic research suggest that the 8-10 million Roma (Gypsies) who live in Europe today are best described as a conglomerate of genetically isolated founder populations. The relationship between the traditional social structure observed by the Roma, where the Group is the primary unit, and the boundaries, demographic history and biological relatedness of the diverse founder populations appears complex and has not been addressed by population genetic studies. Results Recent medical genetic research has identified a number of novel, or previously known but rare conditions, caused by private founder mutations. A summary of the findings, provided in this review, should assist diagnosis and counselling in affected families, and promote future collaborative research. The available incomplete epidemiological data suggest a non-random distribution of disease-causing mutations among Romani groups. Conclusion Although far from systematic, the published information indicates that medical genetics has an important role to play in improving the health of this underprivileged and forgotten people of Europe. Reported carrier rates for some Mendelian disorders are in the range of 5 -15%, sufficient to justify newborn screening and early treatment, or community-based education and carrier testing programs for disorders where no therapy is currently available. To be most productive, future studies of the epidemiology of single gene disorders should take social organisation and cultural anthropology into consideration, thus allowing the targeting of public health programs and contributing to the understanding of population structure and demographic history of the Roma. PMID:11299048

  11. Policies to improve the health and well-being of Roma people: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Fésüs, Gabriella; Östlin, Piroska; McKee, Martin; Ádány, Róza

    2012-04-01

    The Roma constitute the largest ethnic minority in the European Region. The many policy initiatives designed over the past two decades to tackle their adverse social conditions in Central and South Eastern Europe, where the Roma population is concentrated, have had limited success. This paper reviews what is being done to improve the health and social situation of Roma communities in the Region and identifies factors that may limit the effectiveness of these policy initiatives. Strong political commitment, measures to overcome prejudices against Roma, inter-sectoral policy coordination, adequate budgets, evidence-based policies, and Roma involvement can be identified as key preconditions for improved health outcomes and well-being. However, developing a sound evidence-based approach to Roma inclusion requires removing obstacles to the collection of reliable data and improving analytical and evaluation capacity. Health policies seeking to reduce health inequalities for Roma people need to be aligned with education, economic, labour market, housing, environmental and territorial development policies and form part of comprehensive policy frameworks allowing for effective integration.

  12. Collective identity and well-being of Bulgarian Roma adolescents and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Bender, Michael; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2014-03-01

    In Europe and specifically in Bulgaria, Roma represent the largest indigenous ethnic minority exposed to severe discrimination, social exclusion, poverty, and compromised well-being. To improve their conditions, identifying sources of psychological well-being for Roma is theoretically relevant and practically important. This study investigated the relation between ethnic, familial, and religious identities as salient collective identity components for psychological well-being among 194 Roma adolescents (age: M = 16.11 years, SD = 1.36) and their mothers (age: M = 35.95 years, SD = 3.54). The results indicated that in line with marginalization models of acculturation, Roma youth and their mothers showed a low endorsement of both Bulgarian mainstream and Roma ethnic identity. The average scores of well-being were also low. For both groups, familial identity was stronger compared to Roma, Bulgarian, and religious identity. A path model showed that collective identity was a positive predictor of well-being in both adolescents and mothers and that the mothers' collective identity was a predictor of adolescent well-being. Bulgarian mainstream identity had the strongest relationship with collective identity. It is concluded that, for Roma youth and their mothers, family is an important identity domain as it represents the most salient identification source that is not challenged in their environment.

  13. Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex 1 (VKORC1) haplotypes in healthy Hungarian and Roma population samples.

    PubMed

    Sipeky, Csilla; Csongei, Veronika; Jaromi, Luca; Safrany, Eniko; Polgar, Noemi; Lakner, Lilla; Szabo, Melinda; Takacs, Istvan; Melegh, Bela

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the VKORC1 haplotype profile in healthy Hungarian and Roma population samples, and to compare our data with other selected populations. Using haplotype tagging SNPs (G-1639A, G9041A and C6009T), we characterized Hungarian (n = 510) and Roma (n = 451) population samples with regard to VKORC1*1, *2, *3 and *4 haplotypes. In the Hungarian samples, the VKORC1*1, *2, *3 and *4 haplotypes accounted for 3, 39, 37 and 21%, respectively and by contrast, in the Roma population samples the VKORC1 variants were 5, 30, 46 and 19%, respectively. Comparing the genotypes of Roma and Hungarian populations, difference was found in the *2/*2 (6.87 vs 13.5%), *2/*4 (13.9 vs 19.2%) and *3*3 (21.9 vs 13.7%) VKORC1 haplotype combinations. Comparing each group with the others, and our data with findings published previously by other groups, the VKORC1 genetic profile in Hungarians was more similar to European Caucasians and Americans with European descent than to Roma samples. Clear differences could be detected between Roma versus Hungarians and European or American Caucasians; the Roma population had only minor similarities with data from India.

  14. Assessing legal advocacy to advance Roma health in Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia.

    PubMed

    Abdikeeva, Alphia; Ezer, Tamar; Covaci, Alina

    2013-12-01

    Across Europe, Roma suffer extreme marginalisation, negatively impacting their health. Many cannot access healthcare at all. For others, the health system is a hostile place. At the same time, good legal frameworks are in place to protect health rights, and there is increasing recognition of systemic violations experienced by Roma. Essential to building on this momentum and closing the gap between standards and implementation is Roma ability to conduct legal advocacy Since 2010, the Open Society Foundations has supported Roma engagement in Macedonia, Romania and Serbia in the following advocacy strategies: i) legal empowerment, ii) documentation and advocacy, iii) media advocacy, and iv) strategic litigation. This article presents a framework developed to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts and a baseline against which outcomes can be measured in a few years. The evaluation framework provides a qualitative assessment of Roma capacity, accountability for violations, changes in law and practice, and impact on communities. Findings reveal that that presently Roma lack knowledge of their rights and rarely challenge violations. Accountability in healthcare is practically non-existent. However, where legal advocacy has been used, violations decrease, and power dynamics shift. As healthcare becomes more responsive to communities, it also better serves non-Roma citizens.

  15. Health impact assessment of Roma housing policies in Central and Eastern Europe: A comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, Agnes; Adam, Balazs; Antova, Temenujka; Bosak, Lubos; Dimitrov, Plamen; Mileva, Hristina; Pekarcikova, Jarmila; Zurlyte, Ingrida; Gulis, Gabriel; Adany, Roza; Kosa, Karolina

    2012-02-15

    Marginalised Roma communities in European countries live in substandard housing conditions the improvement of which has been one of the major issues of the Decade of Roma Inclusion, the ongoing intergovernmental European Roma programme. The paper presents EU-funded health impact assessments of national Roma housing policies and programmes in 3 Central and Eastern European countries in light of the evaluation of a completed local project in a fourth CEE country so as to compare predicted effects to observed ones. Housing was predicted to have beneficial health effects by improving indoor and outdoor conditions, access to services, and socioeconomic conditions. Negative impacts were predicted only in terms of maintenance expenses and housing tenure. However, observed impacts of the completed local project did not fully support predictions especially in terms of social networks, satisfaction with housing and neighbourhood, and inhabitant safety. In order to improve the predictive value of HIA, more evidence should be produced by the careful evaluation of locally implemented housing projects. In addition, current evidence is in favour of planning Roma housing projects at the local rather than at the national level in alignment with the principle of subsidiarity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictive validity of HIA of national Roma housing policies - in light of current evidence - is low. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implemented housing projects should be comprehensively evaluated to improve reliability of HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roma housing projects should be planned at the local rather than at the national level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA should be used to plan Roma housing projects at the local level.

  16. Healthier lives for European minority groups: school and health care, lessons from the Roma.

    PubMed

    Flecha, Ainhoa

    2013-07-24

    On average, the Roma in Europe can expect to die 10 years earlier than the rest of the population, given the health conditions they experience. EU-funded research has informed on successful actions (SA) that when implemented among the Roma provide them new forms of educational participation which have a direct impact on improving their health status, regardless of their educational level. The findings from this research, unanimously endorsed by the European Parliament, have been included in several European Union recommendations and resolutions as part of the EU strategy on Roma inclusion. To analyze these SA, as well as the conditions that promote them and their impact on reducing health inequalities, communicative fieldwork has been conducted with Roma people from a deprived neighbourhood in the South of Spain, who are participating in the previously identified SA. The analysis reveals that these SA enable Roma people to reinforce and enrich specific strategies like improving family cohesion and strengthening their identity, which allow them to improve their overall health. These findings may inform public policies to improve the health condition of the Roma and other vulnerable groups, one goal of the Europe 2020 strategy for a healthier Europe.

  17. Extreme differences in SLCO1B3 functional polymorphisms in Roma and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Agnes; Szalai, Renata; Magyari, Lili; Bene, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Melegh, Bela

    2015-05-01

    Variants in SLCO1B3 transporter are linked to disposition and uptake of drugs and show high degree of heterogeneity between populations. A total of 467 Roma and 448 Hungarian subjects were genotyped for SLCO1B3 c.334T>G and c.1683-5676A>G variant alleles by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. We found significant differences in the frequencies of homozygous variant genotypes of SLCO1B3 334GG (41.54% vs. 8.04%, p<0.001) and 1683-5676GG (0.43% vs. 2.01%, p=0.028) between Romas and Hungarians. A significantly increased prevalence was found in SLCO1B3 1683-5676G allele frequency in Hungarians compared to the Roma population (15.07% vs. 3.43%, p≤0.001). The frequency of SLCO1B3 334G allele was significantly increased in Roma population compared to Hungarians (70.56% vs. 52.23%, p=0.001). The LD values between the examined SNPs were 80 and 90 in Roma and in Hungarian samples, respectively. Our results highlight notable pharmacogenetic differences between Roma and Hungarian populations, which may have therapeutic implications.

  18. Intergenerational transmission of ethnic identity and life satisfaction of Roma minority adolescents and their parents.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Trost, Kari

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates intergeneration transmission of ethnic identity as a resource for life satisfaction of Roma adolescents and their parents. Historically, Roma represent the largest ethnic minority in Europe. They have been exposed to severe discrimination, social exclusion, and poverty. Therefore, identifying resources for their life satisfaction is theoretically and practically important. The present study included 1093 participants, of which there were 171 Roma adolescents (age: M = 14.96 years, SD = 1.85), 155 mothers (age: M = 36.16 years, SD = 5.77) and 123 fathers (age: M = 39.68 years, SD = 6.06). Further, a comparison group of 248 mainstream adolescents with their mothers (n = 221) and fathers (n = 175) was also included in the study. Adolescents and their parents provided data on ethnic identity (MEIM; Phinney, 1992) and life satisfaction (SWLS; Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985). Results indicated that Roma youth were lower on endorsement of ethnic identity and average on life satisfaction compared to their mainstream peers. A structural equation model showed that ethnic identity was a positive predictor of life satisfaction for both adolescents and their Roma parents. Furthermore, parents' ethnic identity was a predictor of adolescent life satisfaction. We concluded that for Roma youth and their parents, ethnic identity represents a salient source for life satisfaction and an intergenerational continuity of identity and life satisfaction exists.

  19. Healthier Lives for European Minority Groups: School and Health Care, Lessons from the Roma

    PubMed Central

    Flecha, Ainhoa

    2013-01-01

    On average, the Roma in Europe can expect to die 10 years earlier than the rest of the population, given the health conditions they experience. EU-funded research has informed on successful actions (SA) that when implemented among the Roma provide them new forms of educational participation which have a direct impact on improving their health status, regardless of their educational level. The findings from this research, unanimously endorsed by the European Parliament, have been included in several European Union recommendations and resolutions as part of the EU strategy on Roma inclusion. To analyze these SA, as well as the conditions that promote them and their impact on reducing health inequalities, communicative fieldwork has been conducted with Roma people from a deprived neighbourhood in the South of Spain, who are participating in the previously identified SA. The analysis reveals that these SA enable Roma people to reinforce and enrich specific strategies like improving family cohesion and strengthening their identity, which allow them to improve their overall health. These findings may inform public policies to improve the health condition of the Roma and other vulnerable groups, one goal of the Europe 2020 strategy for a healthier Europe. PMID:23887619

  20. Genetic structure and admixture between Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and general Croatian population: evidence from Bayesian clustering analysis.

    PubMed

    Novokmet, Natalija; Galov, Ana; Marjanović, Damir; Škaro, Vedrana; Projić, Petar; Lauc, Gordan; Primorac, Dragan; Rudan, Pavao

    2015-01-01

    The European Roma represent a transnational mosaic of minority population groups with different migration histories and contrasting experiences in their interactions with majority populations across the European continent. Although historical genetic contributions of European lineages to the Roma pool were investigated before, the extent of contemporary genetic admixture between Bayash Roma and non-Romani majority population remains elusive. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic structure of the Bayash Roma population from northwestern Croatia and the general Croatian population and to investigate the extent of admixture between them. A set of genetic data from two original studies (100 Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and 195 individuals from the general Croatian population) was analyzed by Bayesian clustering implemented in STRUCTURE software. By re-analyzing published data we intended to focus for the first time on genetic differentiation and structure and in doing so we clearly pointed to the importance of considering social phenomena in understanding genetic structuring. Our results demonstrated that two population clusters best explain the genetic structure, which is consistent with social exclusion of Roma and the demographic history of Bayash Roma who have settled in NW Croatia only about 150 years ago and mostly applied rules of endogamy. The presence of admixture was revealed, while the percentage of non-Croatian individuals in general Croatian population was approximately twofold higher than the percentage of non-Romani individuals in Roma population corroborating the presence of ethnomimicry in Roma.

  1. Renal transplantation in the Roma ethnicity-do all patients have equal chance for transplantation?

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Juric, I; Kes, P

    2013-11-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation worldwide. The Roma people are often socially deprived, uneducated, and unemployed. We investigated all dialysis centers in Croatia to determine number of Roma people on dialysis as well as their access and reasons for eventual failure to enter the waiting list. There are 9463 registered Roma people in Croatia, however, the estimated number reaches 40,000. Twenty-five Roma patients required renal replacement therapy, giving a prevalence of 830 per million people (pmp), compared with 959 pmp among the general population. Average age at the start of dialysis was 29 vs 67 years; waiting time to kidney transplantation was 48.9 vs 53.5 months; mean age at the time of transplantation was 33.18 vs 48.01 years in Roma versus the general population respectively. One patient received a kidney allograft from a living unrelated spousal donor, and all others from deceased individuals. Patients were followed for 51.5 months (range, 6-240). The most frequent post-transplant complications were urinary tract infections. One patient lost a graft due to severe acute rejection caused by noncompliance. Two young patients were also noncompliant with immunosuppressive medications. One patient died with a functioning graft at 20 years after transplantation due to cardiovascular disease. Among 14 Roma patients currently been treated with hemodialysis in Croatia, 10 are old with clinical contraindications for transplantation; 1 is on the waiting list; 1 left hospitalization for pretransplant evaluation twice; 1 refused evaluation; and 1 is currently being evaluated for the waiting list. The Roma people have excellent access to renal transplantation in Croatia. Many of them refuse evaluation. More efforts should be invested in their education to improve compliance and their post-transplant outcomes.

  2. [Public health issues of the Roma and non-Roma unemployed in the Ózd microregion of Hungary].

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Ibolya; Morvai, Veronika; Rudnai, Péter; Szakmáry, Éva; Paksy, András; Ungváry, György

    2014-04-13

    Bevezetés: Korábbi tanulmányukban a szerzők megállapították, hogy az Ózdi kistérség munkanélkülijeinek közegészségügyi-járványügyi biztonsága és szociális helyzete az országos átlaghoz képest rosszabb. Célkitűzés: Korábbi vizsgálataik folytatásaként célul tűzték ki annak meghatározását, hogy az Ózdi kistérség roma munkanélkülijeinek az országos átlagnál jelentősen nagyobb aránya hozzájárul-e a kistérségnek az ország más térségeinél rosszabb közegészségügyi-járványügyi biztonságához, a kistérség munkanélkülijei tanulásra alig vagy nem alkalmas lakókörnyezeti higiénés helyzetéhez. Módszer: 2012-ben és 2013-ban 400 fő 18–61 éves roma és nem roma férfi és nő munkanélkülit kérdőíves-önkitöltéses-kikérdezéses, valamint foglalkozás-orvostani módszerekkel vizsgáltak; az egyes csoportokba – a jelzett sorrendben – 96, 97, 114, 93 személy tartozott. Eredmények: Megállapították, hogy egyrészt valamennyi vizsgált paramétercsoport (közegészségügyi-járványügyi biztonság, in-door lakókörnyezeti higiéné, tanulási feltételek) a romák szignifikánsan hátrányosabb helyzetét jelezte a magyar munkanélküliekhez viszonyítva; másrészt roma személyekben a vizsgált paraméterek értéke az életminőségét hátrányosan befolyásoló tényezőktől függött (munkanélküliség, mélyszegénység, alacsonyabb szintű iskolázottság, rövidebb élet). A térségben a magyar munkanélküliek 1/10–1/5-ének életkörülménye hasonlított a roma munkanélküliek átlagos életkörülményéhez. Következtetések: 1. A romák Ózdi kistérségen belüli nagyobb aránya hozzájárul a kistérség rosszabb közegészségügyi-járványügyi biztonságához, munkanélkülijeinek az ország más térségeiben élő munkanélküliekénél rosszabb életkörülményéhez. 2. A romák megfelelő életkörülményt biztosító foglalkoztatásához szükséges k

  3. High prevalence of CYP2C19*2 allele in Roma samples: study on Roma and Hungarian population samples with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sipeky, Csilla; Weber, Agnes; Szabo, Melinda; Melegh, Bela I; Janicsek, Ingrid; Tarlos, Greta; Szabo, Istvan; Sumegi, Katalin; Melegh, Bela

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterise the CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles in healthy Roma and Hungarian populations. DNA of 500 Roma and 370 Hungarian subjects were genotyped for CYP2C19*2 (G681A, rs4244285) and CYP2C19*3 (G636A, rs4986893) by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. Significant differences were found comparing the Roma and Hungarian populations in CYP2C19 681 GG (63.6 vs. 75.9%), GA (31.8 vs. 23.0%), AA (4.6 vs. 1.1%), GA+AA (36.4 vs. 24.1%) and A allele frequencies (0.205 vs. 0.125) (p<0.004). Striking differences were found between Roma and Hungarian samples in CYP2C19*1 (79.5 vs. 87.4%) and CYP2C19*2 (20.5 vs. 12.6%) alleles, respectively (p<0.001). None of the subjects was found to carry the CYP2C19*3 allele. Frequencies of the intermedier metabolizer phenotype defined by the *1/*2 genotype (0.318 vs. 0.230, p<0.005) and poor metabolizer predicted by the *2/*2 genotype (0.046 vs. 0.011, p<0.005) was significantly higher in Roma than in Hungarians, respectively. Genotype distribution of the Roma population was similar to those of the population of North India, however, a major difference was found in the frequency of the CYP2C19*2 allele, which is likely a result of admixture with European lineages. In conclusion, the frequencies of the CYP2C19 alleles, genotypes and corresponding extensive, intermediate and poor metabolizer phenotypes studied here in the Hungarian population are similar to those of other European Caucasian populations, but display clear differences when compared to the Roma population.

  4. The health mediators-qualified interpreters contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Gramma, Rodica; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    In order to assure optimal care of patients with chronic illnesses, it is necessary to take into account the cultural factors that may influence health-related behaviors, health practices, and health-seeking behavior. Despite the increasing number of Romanian Roma, research regarding their beliefs and practices related to healthcare is rather poor. The aim of this paper is to present empirical evidence of specificities in the practice of healthcare among Romanian Roma patients and their caregivers. Using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, this study is based on data gathered through three focus groups with 30 health mediators in the counties of Iasi and Cluj (Romania). We identified various barriers to access to healthcare for Roma patients: lack of financial resources and health insurance coverage, lack of cognitive resources or lack of personal hygiene, but also important cultural issues, such as the shame of being ill, family function, disclosure of disease-related information, patient's autonomy, attitudes towards illness and health practices, that should be considered in order to create a culturally sensitive environment in Romanian medical facilities:… The role of the health mediators within the context of cultural diversity is also discussed, as cultural brokers contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients Bridging cultural differences may improve patient-healthcare provider relationships, but may have limited impact in reducing ethnic disparities, unless coupled with efforts of Roma communities to get involved in creating and implementing health policies.

  5. Questioning Inclusion: The Education of Roma/Traveller Students and Young People in Europe and England--A Critical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Themelis, Spyros

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with issues pertinent to the "inclusion" of Roma/Traveller children and young people in Europe and, in particular, England. It discusses some key issues that pertain to the inclusion of Roma/Traveller groups in society and it critically presents some key policies that have been advanced to tackle educational and social…

  6. Renegotiating Relations among Teacher, Community, and Students: A Case Study of Teaching Roma Students in a Second Chance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilescu, Dorian; Carapanait, Greta

    2011-01-01

    Prejudice and systematic discrimination have often been mentioned as major causes for the chronic underachievement of Roma students. In this paper we present a case study of a Romanian teacher involved in Second Chance, an educational program implemented in Romania in 2004 for the benefit of disadvantaged groups such as the Roma population. Since…

  7. Culture and the School: The Degree of Educational Integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese Region of Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school"…

  8. Shaping the Right to Education for Roma Children: A Case Study of Present Practices in Ghent, Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelsoet, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Western European cities are increasingly confronted with Roma immigrants. Societal changes associated with this phenomenon create new challenges for schools. Using a case study, this article sheds light on present practices that shape the right to education for Roma children. Three principal success factors are distinguished: boundary-blurring…

  9. The Consequences of Cumulative Discrimination: How Special Schooling Influences Employment and Wages of Roma in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Higgins, Niall; Bruggemann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Unequal labour market outcomes between Roma and non-Roma have typically been explained by either the low level of educational attainment on the one hand or labour marked discrimination on the other--or both. A number of studies have found that significant labour market inequalities persist even after the low levels of educational attainment…

  10. Access of Roma to sexual and reproductive health services: qualitative findings from Albania, Bulgaria and Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Manuela; Rechel, Bernd; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore access of Roma in South-Eastern Europe to sexual and reproductive health services. We conducted 7 focus group discussions with a total of 58 participants from Roma communities in Albania, Bulgaria and Macedonia. Our study revealed a number of barriers for Roma when accessing sexual and reproductive health services. Among the most important were the overall lack of financial resources, requests by health care providers for informal payments, lack of health insurance and geographical barriers. Health systems in the region seem to have failed to provide financial protection and equitable services to one of the most vulnerable groups of society. There is also a need for overcoming racial discrimination, improving awareness and information and addressing gender inequalities.

  11. Do eating habits of the population living in Roma settlements differ from those of the majority population in Slovakia?

    PubMed

    Hijová, Emília; Gecková, Andrea Madarasová; Babinská, Ingrid

    2014-03-01

    Living in Roma settlements is associated with worse health in comparison with the majority population; this might be partially explained by socioeconomic disadvantages as well as cultural differences, including lifestyle. Eating habits represent an important part of lifestyle closely related to primary causes of morbidity and mortality, such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases or cancers. The eating habits of the population living in Roma settlements in comparison with those of the majority population were explored using the cross-sectional epidemiological HepaMeta study conducted in 2011. A representative sample of Roma (n = 452, mean age = 34.7; 35.2% men) and non-Roma (n = 403, mean age = 33.5; 45.9% men) aged 18-55 years living in the Kosice region were asked about breakfasting and recent consumption of fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meat products, meat, farinaceous dishes, and soft drinks. A logistic regression model was used separately for male and female participants. The population living in Roma settlements reported the recent consumption of fruit, vegetables and dairy products significantly less frequently in comparison with the majority population. Moreover, Roma females, in comparison with non-Roma females, reported significantly more frequently the consumption of meat and soft drinks. No differences were found between Roma and non-Roma in the consumption of meat products and farinaceous dishes. The population living in Roma settlements reported more frequently unhealthy eating habits in comparison with the majority population; this might contribute to worse health status of this population. The differences might be attributed to cultural differences between ethnic as well as socioeconomic groups, reduced availability of certain food items due to segregation or poverty and lower health literacy.

  12. Age trends in prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Roma minority population of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zeljko, Hrvojka Marija; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Barešić, Ana; Tomas, Zeljka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Miličić, Jasna; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Janićijević, Branka

    2013-07-01

    The Roma (Gypsy) are the largest European minority population characterized by poverty, social exclusion as well as by numerous life-style and cultural specificities, which all could have an adverse impact on their cardiovascular health. This study assesses the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors in community-based sample of 430 adult Roma, living in rural area of Croatia, by providing the actual and age-adjusted estimates using the European standard population. The most prominent classical CVD risk phenotypes (blood pressure, obesity, smoking, glucose and lipid profile) were selected, and the standard risk cut-offs were applied. The study has shown that compared to general population of Croatia, the Roma population bears a high CVD risk factors load related to smoking and high glucose level. The CVD risk factors prevalence in Roma also showed important sex and age patterns, the most imposing of which are the findings of higher prevalence of CVD risks in women (especially obesity and triglyceride levels) and the trend of higher body mass index (BMI) level in younger age group (18-34 years) which both stand in contrast to the trends characterizing the general population of Croatia. These findings are complemented by the trend of decreased risk in the oldest age group (65+ years) for all investigated CVD risk factors (with exception of triglycerides level) compared to the 50-64 age group. We conclude that the age and sex CVD risks pattern point to the health transition of this rural Roma population. As we expect the proportion of CVD in the Roma minority of Croatia to increase in the future along with further modernization of their lifestyle, the CVD prevention measures in this population are urgent and should be primarily targeted at women and at the younger segment of this population.

  13. Refining the genetic portrait of Portuguese Roma through X-chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vânia; Gusmão, Leonor; Valente, Cristina; Pereira, Rui; Carneiro, João; Gomes, Iva; Morling, Niels; Amorim, António; João Prata, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Due to differences in transmission between X-chromosomal and autosomal DNA, the comparison of data derived from both markers allows deeper insight into the forces that shape the patterns of genetic diversity in populations. In this study, we applied this comparative approach to a sample of Portuguese Roma (Gypsies) by analyzing 43 X-chromosomal markers and 53 autosomal markers. Portuguese individuals of non-Gypsy ancestry were also studied. Compared with the host population, reduced levels of diversity on the X chromosome and autosomes were detected in Gypsies; this result was in line with known patterns of genetic diversity typical of Roma groups. As a consequence of the complex demographic past of the Roma, during which admixture and genetic drift played major roles, the amount of linkage disequilibrium (LD) on the X chromosome in Gypsies was considerably higher than that observed in non-Gypsies. When the pattern of differentiation on the X chromosome was compared with that of autosomes, there was evidence for asymmetries in female and male effective population sizes during the admixture between Roma and non-Roma. This result supplements previous data provided by mtDNA and the Y chromosome, underlining the importance of using combined information from the X chromosome and autosomes to dissect patterns of genetic diversity. Following the out-of-India dispersion, the Roma acquired a complex genetic pattern that was influenced by drift and introgression with surrounding populations, with important contributions from both males and females. We provide evidence that a sex-biased admixture with Europeans is probably associated with the founding of the Portuguese Gypsies.

  14. Lower Viral Response to Pegylated Interferon Alpha 2a Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B in Roma People in Eastern Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Drazilova, Sylvia; Janicko, Martin; Kristian, Pavol; Schreter, Ivan; Kucinsky, Branislav; Kozlej, Marek; Hockickova, Ivana; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the compliance and virological response to pegylated interferon alpha 2a treatment of chronic hepatitis B in Roma population compared to majority Caucasian population in Slovakia. Methods. Retrospective evaluation of a cohort of all Roma patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha 2a from 2007 to 2013 in 3 centers for treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B. The Study included 43 Roma patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and randomly selected control group. Treatment duration was 48 weeks. Viral response was evaluated after 24 weeks, at the end of treatment, and 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. Complete treatment course was finished by 79.1% of Roma patients compared to all patients from the control group (p = 0.0009). There was a tendency toward lower viral response rate in Roma at all time points; however significant difference was only at end of treatment viral response (51.2% Roma versus 81.4% majority, p = 0.003). We also did not find significant difference at the rate of HBsAg loss. Conclusion. Roma patients with chronic hepatitis B have significantly worse compliance to treatment with pegylated interferon and they have significantly lower rate of end of treatment viral response. PMID:26858755

  15. Turning Difficulties into Possibilities: Engaging Roma Families and Students in School through Dialogic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecha, Ramón; Soler, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Schools and communities may have a key role in reversing the cycle of inequality that the Roma suffer in Europe. Aiming at reducing existing inequalities, dialogic learning aims to ensure high levels of academic learning for all children, by involving the whole community through egalitarian dialogue. Less well known are the implications of this…

  16. Race and Populist Radical Right Discourses: Implications for Roma Education Policy in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugosi, Nicole V. T.

    2015-01-01

    Non-government organizations and policy makers agree that the best route to eradicating the widespread discrimination and poverty among the Roma is to improve the quality of and access to education. A cursory glance at the Hungarian Government website suggests that policy makers are on top of the problem with good laws and initiatives in place.…

  17. "Otherness" as Threat: Social and Educational Exclusion of Roma People in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parthenis, Christos; Fragoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on aspects of the social and educational exclusion that Roma people face in the Greek context. It argues that diversity has been constructed as a threat for the security, the social cohesion, and the well-being of western societies. Drawing from two case studies of primary schools conducted in a highly deprived suburb of Athens,…

  18. Recognising the Roma and Their Rights: An Analysis of Exclusion and Integration in the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvai, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws from a small-scale qualitative study related to Roma integration in the Hungarian education system, from the perspective of academics and officials from leading civil society organisations. Based on semi-structured interviews and extensive analysis of the literature, the study identified and categorised key obstacles to Roma…

  19. Continuity or Rupture? Roma/Gypsy Communities in Rural and Urban Environments under Post-Socialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzicka, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the article is to contribute to existing research and debates on social change associated with the post-socialist transformation in Eastern and Central Europe. It does so by drawing attention to and examining the diversity of ways in which such change has been lived through and reflected upon by members of Roma (Gypsy) communities…

  20. Diversity vs. Equality: Why the Education of Roma Children Does Not Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyuchukov, Hristo; New, William

    2016-01-01

    This article takes up the question of why recent efforts to reform Roma education have been largely unsuccessful. Using case studies, the authors identify and discuss situations that have produced poor results: good intentions and bad realisations, good intentions and good realisations, and misguided intentions and bad realisations. They suggest…

  1. Perfectly Equipped Failures: The European Union and Educational Issues Affecting the Roma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolae, Valeriu

    2007-01-01

    Despite often lofty rhetoric in a large number of national and international initiatives and in speeches of national and international politicians and bureaucrats, and despite a long history of awareness and the increased visibility of the generally abysmal situation of the Roma in Europe, there is still no serious reason to hope that the lives of…

  2. Teacher Training in Roma Education in Greece: Intercultural and Critical Educational Necessities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadis, Fokion; Zisimos, Apostolos

    2012-01-01

    This paper first outlines briefly the present status and position of the Roma/Gypsies in the Greek context while it gives a review of education policy and provision. Secondly, it indicates that Greek primary teachers lack adequate preparedness for the challenges accompanying contemporary educational multiculturalism and social justice issues. The…

  3. Roma Education in Europe: In Support of the Discourse of Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskovic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the research findings and policies regarding the conditions and educational needs of the Roma population in Europe. It examines assumptions, possibilities, and setbacks of translating and appropriating US-American academic discourse on race into the debate across the continent. The central task for researchers, policy makers,…

  4. An Evaluation of Asthma Education Project Targeting the Traveller and Roma Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Anne-Marie; Keogh, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this evaluation was to determine the cultural and educational appropriateness of a pilot asthma education programme developed for the Traveller and Roma community in Ireland. Design: A participatory multi-stakeholder and qualitative approach. Setting: Prevalence and inadequate control of asthma have been found to be high…

  5. Exploring Attitude Transformation: A Grounded Theory Study of Romanian Teachers of Roma Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Laura Estella

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic grounded theory study was to explore the process of change in teacher attitudes toward including Roma ("Gypsy") students in non-segregated schools in Romania. The theories guiding this study included Mezirow's (1991, 2000) theory of transformation, Gay's (2002, 2013) theory of culturally responsive…

  6. Attitudes of Serbian and Slovenian Student Teachers towards Causes of Learning Underachievement amongst Roma Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Pecek, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    The task of initial teacher education is to prepare student teachers (ST) to accept responsibility for improving the education of all pupils, including Roma pupils. Thus, knowledge of ST's attitudes regarding such pupils at the onset of initial teacher education is a key for the creation of teacher education programmes that challenge implicit…

  7. Structural Dimensions of Roma School Desegregation Policies in Central and Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostas, Iulius; Kostka, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Scrutiny of the socio-economic exclusion of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe has brought attention to the widespread practice of school segregation of Romani children who are automatically placed in classes for the mentally disabled or shunted into separate and inferior schools and classrooms. It is now widely recognised that such practices…

  8. How to Make Sense of the Right to Education? Issues from the Case of Roma People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelsoet, Elias

    2012-01-01

    In most cases, discussions on the right to education focus on the way access to education can be warranted for all and which aims should be pursued in rather abstract terms. This article approaches the topic starting from the case of Roma people. The particularity of their living circumstances raises the question what it is that we are aiming at…

  9. Raising Roma Educational Participation and Achievement: Collaborative Relationships, Transformative Change, and a Social Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Andrew Richard

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of Roma, Gypsy and Traveller (RGT) educational exclusion in the European Union and seeks to provide insights into good practice through case studies focusing on Bulgaria and the UK. The paper makes a case for the promotion of collaborative relationships, where RGT communities are active partners in developing curricula…

  10. General Mental Ability in South Asians: Data from Three Roma (Gypsy) Communities in Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, J. Philippe; Cvorovic, Jelena; Bons, Trudy Ann

    2007-01-01

    To examine whether the Roma (Gypsy) population of Serbia, like other South Asian population groups, average lower than Europeans on "g", the general factor of intelligence, we tested 323 16- to 66-year-olds (111 males; 212 females) in three different communities over a two-year-period on the Raven's Colored and/or Standard Progressive…

  11. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Roma from Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Petlichkovski, A; Djulejic, E; Trajkov, D; Efinska-Mladenovska, O; Hristomanova, S; Kirijas, M; Senev, A; Spiroski, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze Killer Ig-Like Receptor (KIR) gene polymorphisms in Roma people from Republic of Macedonia. The studied sample consists of 103 healthy unrelated individuals, aged 20-45 years. All individuals are of Roma origin, residents of different geographical regions (Gostivar, Skopje, and Kochani). The population genetics analysis package, Arlequin, was used for analysis of the data. We found that all 16 KIR genes were observed in the Roma individuals and framework genes (KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR- 2DL4, and KIR3DL2) were present in all individuals. The frequencies of other KIR genes were: KIR2DP1 (1), KIR2DL1 (0.961), KIR2DL2 (0.544), KIR2DL3 (0.874), KIR2DL5 (0.311), KIR3DL1 (0.990), KIR- 2DS1 (0.330), KIR2DS2 (0.553), KIR2DS3 (0.359), KIR2DS4 (0.981), KIR2DS5 (0.291), and KIR3DS1 (0.379). The results of tested linkage disequilibrium (LD) among KIR genes demonstrated that KIR genes present a wide range of linkage disequilibrium. The obtained results for KIR genes and genotype frequencies in Macedonian Roma individuals can be used for anthropological comparisons.

  12. Pedagogising Knowledge in Multigrade Roma Schools: Potentials and Tensions of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpati, Andrea; Molnar, Eva D.; Munkacsy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Low school achievement and frequent dropout of Hungarian Roma students from primary education is mostly an effect of inadequate curriculum content and teaching methodology. Between 2004 and 2011, the UNESCO affiliated Research Centre for Multimedia in Education at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE University) in Budapest, Hungary coordinated a series…

  13. Association of the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism with obesity in Roma/Gypsy population.

    PubMed

    Mačeková, Soňa; Bernasovský, Ivan; Gabriková, Dana; Bôžiková, Alexandra; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Boroňová, Iveta; Behulová, Regina; Svíčková, Petra; Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Sovičová, Adriana; Carnogurská, Jana

    2012-01-01

    The rs9939609 SNP located in the first intron of the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has been found to be associated with common obesity mainly in populations of European descent. The Roma/Gypsy population as an ethnic minority of Asian Indian origin is well known for its adverse health status with a high prevalence of obesity. The main aim of this study was to examine the contribution of the rs9939609 FTO polymorphism to the high prevalence of obesity in the Roma/Gypsy population. Following a number of anthropometric measurements, the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism was genotyped in 312 Roma/Gypsy individuals. We observed significant differences in body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio between different genotypes (P = 0.003, P = 0.012, and P = 0.03, respectively). The waist circumference in the subjects with AA genotype was about 7.1 cm larger than in those with TT genotypes (P = 0.005). However, the strongest association of minor allele A of the rs9939609 FTO polymorphism was found with BMI (odds ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.129-2.128; P = 0.007), even after adjusting for age, sex, and smoking status. This study provides the first report of allele and genotype frequencies for the rs9939609 polymorphism and also the first evidence of the association of the FTO variant with obesity in the Roma/Gypsy population.

  14. [Evaluation of the action plan for Roma people in health area].

    PubMed

    Rodin, Urelija

    2010-12-01

    By virtue of the national program for Romanies and participation in the Decade of Roma Inclusion 2005-2015, Croatia has chosen its strategic standpoint toward programs of social inclusion of Romanies in four priority areas: housing, education, employment and health. The objectives of the Roma Action Plan (AP) for 2005-2015 in the health area focus on: * ensuring equal availability of health services through information about personal rights and health insurance options; * child health improvement and care, as well as mortality reduction; * raising health awareness and care in terms of safe motherhood, family planning and reproductive health; * financial support to schooling of Roma people in health professions In order to monitor the implementation of AP and measure the availability of health care and condition, certain indicators of the number and coverage of Romanies are crucial for each of the above objectives: indicators for the Roma informed about personal rights resulting from the mandatory health insurance; for Romanies who have health insurance; for vaccinated Romani children, for Romani newborns born in maternity hospitals, for prenatal and pregnancy health care in Romani women, for Romanies included in family planning, for the mortality rate and causes of death in Romanies, and for the Roma receiving scholarships for education in health professions. Most of these indicators are only obtainable through special studies, while routinely monitored indicators simply do not satisfy quantitative needs. Another problem is Romanies not stating their ethnic denomination. Consequently, routine Roma mortality and cause of death statistics are unreliable. At the state level, no specific indicators of implementation could be obtained for any of the above health objectives, while some were obtainable for specific units of local and self-government (Baranja, Medimurje and Primorje-Goranska County). According to the research, more than 50% of Romanies in Croatia are

  15. Cytochrome P450 Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Roma Population Samples: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Melegh, Bela

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes are highly polymorphic and show inter-individual differences in variability in drug response, which varies widely also with ethnicity. This study aims to summarize the available data on genetic polymorphisms associated with cytochrome enzymes conducted on Roma populations. Our goal was to compare the frequency of the variant alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes with corresponding rates from other populations. We carried out a systematic review including the papers published on the pharmacogenetically relevant variants of cytochrome P450 genes related to Roma population. The study was performed using several articles, websites and databases, including PubMed, Ensembl, dbSNP, HapMap and 1000 Genomes Project. This review attempts to summarize and discuss our current knowledge about the frequency distribution of the ever investigated 20 allelic variants of 9 cytochrome genes (CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2C8, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, CYP4F2) in Roma DNA samples and compare them with other populations. Differences between Roma and Hungarian samples are reported for 7 variant genotypes. CYP2C9 *2/*3 and CYP2C19 *2/*2 genotypes showed more than 3-fold differences. Additional differences are displayed for allele frequency of 7 variants (rs762551, rs3745274, rs1058930, rs1065852, rs3892097, rs1057910 and rs4244285) in Roma population samples. The interethnic variability in clinically relevant genetic polymorphisms of drug metabolizing enzymes, which may explain distinct drug response, highlights the need to allow for the ancestry of participants in pharmacogenetic studies.

  16. Assessment of clinical biochemical parameters in Roma minority residing in eastern Slovakia compared with the majority population.

    PubMed

    Hubková, Beáta; Maslanková, Jana; Stupák, Marek; Guzy, Juraj; Kovácová, Anna; Pella, Daniel; Jarcuska, Peter; Mareková, Mária

    2014-03-01

    Roma constitute the largest ethnic minority in Europe and the second largest minority in Slovakia. Their health problems originate mainly from their low socioeconomic status, certain cultural aspects and their health-threatening lifestyle as well as the psycho-social burden arising from poverty and frequent migration. Evaluation of glucose, albumin, triacylglycerol (TAG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations did not reveal any clue about the presumed deteriorated health of the Roma population. Higher proportions of subjects with elevated serum total cholesterol were found in Roma women as compared to both control groups of women (p = 0.027, p = 0.006) and in Roma men as compared to the male control group living in standard conditions. Only the low level of HDL-cholesterol gives a glimpse of their deteriorated health. Significantly lower levels of serum HDL-C were reported in Roma men and women compared to the respondents in both control groups with a p value of p < 0.001. Comparing the ratio of LDL-C/HDL-C yielded significant differences between the number of physiological values in Roma men and men from the control group 1 (p = 0.022) in favour of the control group. When comparing the number of people with physiological values of cholesterols and with worsening TAG parameters at the same time, the increased risk of Roma men compared with men from the control group 1 became evident, with a level of significance of p = 0.023. Evaluation of urine samples pointed to significantly higher concentrations of urinary protein in Roma women compared with women in the control group 1 (p = 0.012).

  17. Ethnic, Familial, and Religious Identity of Roma Adolescents in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania in Relation to Their Level of Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; van de Vijver, Fons J R; Taušová, Jitka; Chasiotis, Athanasios; Bender, Michael; Buzea, Carmen; Uka, Fitim; Tair, Ergyul

    2017-03-20

    This study examines ethnic, national, familial, and religious identity and well-being of 632 Roma minority and 589 majority adolescents (age: M = 15.98 years, SD = 1.34) in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania. Results indicated that Roma showed lower endorsement of national identity but stronger religious identity than their majority counterparts. Path models showed positive associations of familial and religious identities with well-being, whereas Roma identity was negatively associated with well-being, particularly for Roma in Bulgaria and Kosovo (countries with a less active policy toward improving conditions of Roma). In the latter countries, Roma ethnic identity is less relevant and weakly associated with psychological well-being of youth.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH IN ROMA VILLAGES IN SLOVAKIA AND ROMANIA

    PubMed Central

    Majdan, Marek; Coman, Alexandru; Gallová, Eva; Ďuricová, Janka; Kállayová, Daniela; Kvaková, Mária; Bošák, Ľuboš

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives The objective of this paper is to provide information on indoor air quality and on the quality of the broader indoor environment of the houses in Roma villages in Slovakia and Romania and to discuss possible implications for health. Methods Indoor air was sampled in 11 houses in a Romanian Roma village and in 19 houses in a Slovakian Roma village. Levels of Carbon Monoxide (CO), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), total particulate matter (PM), temperature and humidity were measured. A questionnaire and a checklist were used to obtain additional information on the indoor environment and behavioural factors. We have sampled the same houses in winter and in summer. Results Levels of CO and CO2 were higher in winter in both countries as compared to summer. The limit value of 10 mg/m3 CO was exceeded in a few cases in both countries. In general, levels of CO, CO2 and PM were higher in Romania. Further environmental and behavioural hazards such as indoor smoking, pets inside or lack of ventilation were found. The reported self-perceived quality of the indoor environment was poor in many aspects. Conclusions Our findings of CO, CO2 and PM levels suggest that indoor air pollution in Roma settlements has the potential to be a health threat. The fact that the inhabitants spend a relatively long time inside the houses and that a number of additional environmental and behavioural hazards were identified by our study emphasizes the importance of the indoor air quality for health and thus priority attention should be paid to these issues by health authorities and researchers. Further research is essential and study designs must consider cultural background and specific characteristics of the community, especially in order to obtain valid data on health outcomes. PMID:23285520

  19. A primitive caprine from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Alfambra, Teruel, Aragon, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Luis; Morales, Jorge

    1997-06-01

    We describe a new caprine form from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Teruel Basin, Aragon). Aragoral mudejar Gen.n., sp.n. is close to the primitive forms of the Hippotraginae-Caprinae group. It differs from Norbertia hellenica by its more primitive dentition, the greater separation between the bases of the horn cores, the decreased thickness of the frontal bone and the relatively smaller size of the horn cores.

  20. The Prodigies of The Albano Lake During Roman Age and Natural Hazard Assessment At Roma, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; de Rita, D.

    Roma is built just 20 km to the northwest of the Pleistocene Colli Albani volcano, but is believed not exposed to relevant natural hazards, except for the Tiber river flood- ings, and local amplification of seismic waves from distal earthquakes. This belief has generally induced modern historians and geologists to discard as SmythologicalT the & cedil;many references to natural prodigies that are reported by many Roman-age historians. Recent studies have demonstrated that the Albano maar, the youngest volcanic cen- tre of the Colli Albani volcano and presently filled by a 175 m deep lake, protracted its activity to the Holocene triggering several catastrophic lahar events, likely related to lake withdrawal, the deposits of which are exposed to the southwest of Roma and reach its periphery. This finding youngs the history of the volcano and makes it rele- vant to pre-historic settlements, which ScarefullyT avoided the Albano maar slopes up & cedil;to the Bronze age. What is still unknown, though, is whether the lake experienced such fluctuations and overspills during historic times. Several Roman authors such as Ti- tus Livius, Dionigi d'Alicarnasso, Plutarco, Germanico, and many others wrote about the then well known 398 BC prodigious event, when, during the war between Roma and the Etruscan city of Veio, the gods anger caused the sudden rise and overspill of the Albano lake, reported as unrelated to climatic events, and the destructive flooding of the countryside. After that event Romans actually built a tunnel-drain which still operates regulating the lake level at 293 m a.s.l., 70 m below the maar rim elevation. Should those chronicles be truthful, we can join the geologic observation of Holocene lahar deposits from lake withdrawal with historical lake withdrawals, reassessing the natural hazard for the city of Roma under a point of view never explored before. This paper carefully explores the historical credibility of the 398 BC lake overspill event and its

  1. [Birth weight of Roma neonates: effect of biomedical and socioeconomic factors in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Péter; Fogarasi-Grenczer, Andrea; Rákóczi, Ildikó; Foley, Kristie L

    2014-06-15

    Bevezetés: Roma újszülöttek testtömegével kapcsolatban nagy elemszámú magyarországi mintára alapozott tanulmány utoljára 1991-ben jelent meg, és 377 gramm különbséget jelzett a romák hátrányára. Az összetett probléma mélyebb hátterének megvilágítása mindenképpen indokolta egy többváltozós lineáris regressziós analízis elvégzését. Célkitűzés. Az anyákra és az újszülöttekre vonatkozó adatok epidemiológiai módszerekkel történő összehasonlítása a roma és nem roma népességnél, a biomedicinális és a szociális jellemzők mentén. Az újszülöttek testtömegének kiemelt vizsgálata a különbségek tisztázása érdekében. Módszer: A szerzők öt észak- és kelet-magyarországi megyében 2009 és 2012 között a szülést követő évben kérdőíves adatgyűjtést végeztek, romák és nem romák önazonosításával. Az adatokat az IBM-SPSS v. 22 programmal dolgozták fel. Eredmények: A roma (n = 3103) és nem roma (n = 8918) minta nyers átlagában 294 gramm különbséget találtak a roma újszülöttek hátrányára, amely lineáris regresszióval 92 grammra csökkent az etnikai változó mentén. Következtetések: Nincs abszolút bizonyíték arra, hogy kizárják a biológiai (genetikai) eredetet a roma újszülöttek kisebb testtömegének hátterében. A szerzők többváltozós elemzése azonban főként a komplex biomedicinális és társadalmi-gazdasági-kulturális tényezők hatását jelzi. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(24), 954–962.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in promoter and intronic regions of CYP1A2 gene in Roma and Hungarian population samples.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Magyari, Lili; Matyas, Petra; Duga, Balazs; Banfai, Zsolt; Szabo, Andras; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Melegh, Bela

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interethnic differences of four CYP1A2 drug metabolizing enzyme variants. A total of 404 Roma and 396 Hungarian healthy subjects were genotyped for -163C>A, -729C>T, -2467delT and -3860G>A variants of CYP1A2 by RT-PCR and PCR-RFLP technique. The -3860A and -729T allele were not detectable in Roma samples, while in Hungarian samples were present with 2.02% and 0.25% prevalence, respectively. There was a 1.5-fold difference in presence of homozygous -163AA genotype between Hungarian and Roma samples (49.5% vs. 31.9%, p<0.001). The -163A allele frequency was 68.6% in Hungarians and 56.9% in Romas (p=0.025). The -2467delT allele frequency was 6.81% in Roma group and 5.81% in Hungarians. The most frequent allelic constellation was -3860G/-2467T/-729C/-163A in both populations. In conclusion, Hungarians have markedly elevated chance for rapid metabolism of CYP1A2 substrates, intensified procarcinogen activation and increased risk for cancers.

  3. Culture and the school: The degree of educational integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese region of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-10-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school" programme, funded by the European Union. Despite governmental incentives for poor families to enrol their school-aged children, school attendance of Roma and Gypsy children was found to decline from primary year one to primary year six, with hardly any of them entering secondary school at all. Besides looking at school attendance figures and Roma and Gypsy children's proficiency in reading, writing and numeracy, this paper also considers gender, family composition, living conditions and economic situation, as well as culturally constructed perceptions of childhood and a person's life cycle. The aim of this article is to highlight the contradictions and ambiguities involved in the process of incorporating Roma and Gypsy children in formal education, and to evaluate their school performance and assess their academic choices.

  4. Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction with Family Practice Care in a Roma Population with Chronic Conditions in Northeast Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    ZELKO, Erika; ŠVAB, Igor; ROTAR PAVLIČ, Danica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures a patient’s subjective experience of his or her health status. We aimed to show how the presence of chronic diseases and satisfaction with family physicians (FPs) were associated with the HRQoL of a Roma population. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in May 2011 on a representative sample of 650 Roma living in Prekmurje, Slovenia. The EQ-5D questionnaire was used for measuring the HRQoL of the Roma. Demographical data, 12 groups of diseases diagnosed in the last 12 months and satisfaction with FPs were included in the questionnaire. Results The response rate was 88.3% 574), of which 56.4% were female, and the average age of the participants had a mean value of 40.2±12.7 years. The presence of cardiovascular problems with risk factors for them or presence of musculoskeletal disorders were strongly associated with the presence of pain (Cramer’s V = 0.40 and 0.46 respectively). There was a strong association between the presence of mental disorders and anxiety and depression (Cramer’s V = 0.58). The average satisfaction with the family physician was 3.9 (mean±1.10) on a five-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between HRQoL and satisfaction with the family physician. Conclusions Roma with chronic mental health problems had the lowest HRQoL in the Roma population. More attention should be paid to this subgroup of Roma in family medicine, and interventions should be provided. High satisfaction with their FPs is not associated with the observed quality of life variables. PMID:27646618

  5. The cardiovascular risk factors of the Roma (Gypsies) people in Central-Eastern Europe: a review of the published literature

    PubMed Central

    Dobranici, M; Buzea, A; Popescu, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Estimated number of the Roma people in central-eastern Europe cannot be precisely appreciated, but official data suggest that in the 2004 they were approximately 4.2 million. At this time, there are few available data about the health status of the Roma people, mostly assessing genetic and infectious diseases, which reflect poverty, overcrowding, and lack of education. There is even less data regarding non–communicable and chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. Methods: We searched the published literature on the cardiovascular risk factors in Roma people using PubMed from January 2000 to July 2011. The searching criteria were: (1) randomized, prospective observational, retrospective and meta-analysis; (2) adult patients with cardiac diseases or cardiovascular risk factors (3) data available for cardiovascular patients. Search terms included dyslipidemia, obesity, tobacco, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Results: Twenty-five studies were identified. Approximately 75% of them were related to just four countries: Slovakia, Croatia, Czech Republic, and Serbia. This paper is a review based on existing literature concerning classical risk factors in Roma people with emphasis on their ethnical features. Despite limited data, the results showed that this ethnicity has the incriminated risk factors more frequently than the majority and consequently a higher cardiovascular morbidity rate. Conclusions: Quantification of the cardiovascular risk factor and their implication in the shortening of life expectancy in Roma population was a provocation due to a paucity of reliable data. At this time, we should pay more attention on the Roma health issues and the cultural concerns that might affect them in the context of borderless Europe. PMID:23390466

  6. The emergence, structure and development of ethnic identity during childhood: the case of Roma identity.

    PubMed

    Pnevmatikos, Dimitris; Geka, Maria; Divane, Maria

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the emergence, development and structure of ethnic identity during childhood. Forty Roma children living in Greece aged between 2.8 and 11.9 years answered questions about their awareness/recognition of four aspects of their ethnic identity-namely place of habitation, traditional costumes, the Roma language, and early betrothal of children-their identity and their sense of stability and constancy. The study also investigates how the children feel about the abandonment of those four aspects. The evidence from the current data supports the hypothesis that awareness of ethnic identity emerges before the age of 4. Moreover, this study offers direct empirical evidence of the multidimensionality of ethnic identity. A model of three concentric rings is proposed, extending from a core containing the most highly valued aspects of ethnic identity to the outer annulus that comprises the nonpermanent and nonstable aspects of ethnic identity. The aspects in each annulus differ in terms of the development of the sense of stability and constancy and the feelings associated with loss of the aspects in question. Even the youngest participants considered the aspects in the core to be stable and constant as well as emotionally charged; and even the 11-year-olds did not consider the aspects contained in the outer, more fluid annulus as stable and constant aspects of their ethnic identity. The development of an aspect is determined by what the majority of adults in a society, at a particular time in history, consider to be most important.

  7. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community

    PubMed Central

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: “Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?”, “How can it be attained?”, and “To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?” It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps—a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities—that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and “Do nothing”. The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests. PMID:27314371

  8. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community.

    PubMed

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-06-14

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: "Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?", "How can it be attained?", and "To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?" It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps-a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities-that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and "Do nothing". The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests.

  9. Ethical issues in communication of diagnosis and end-of-life decision-making process in some of the Romanian Roma communities.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Gramma, Rodica; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-08-01

    Medical communication in Western-oriented countries is dominated by concepts of shared decision-making and patient autonomy. In interactions with Roma patients, these behavioral patterns rarely seem to be achieved because the culture and ethnicity have often been shown as barriers in establishing an effective and satisfying doctor-patient relationship. The study aims to explore the Roma's beliefs and experiences related to autonomy and decision-making process in the case of a disease with poor prognosis. Forty-eight Roma people from two Romanian counties participated in semi-structured interviews, conducted by a research team from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi. Participants were recruited among the chronically ill patients and caregivers. The Roma community opposes informing the terminal patients about their condition, the "silence conspiracy" being widely practiced. The family fully undertakes the right of decision making, thus minimizing the patient's autonomy. We identified ethical dilemmas concerning autonomy, lack of patients' real decision-making power, and paternalistic attitudes exerted firstly by the family and, on demand, by the physician. Instead, the Roma patient benefits from a very active support network, being accompanied at the hospital by numerous relatives. The patient's right to make autonomous decisions promoted in the Western countries and stipulated by the Romanian law has diminished value in the Roma community. For the Roma, the understanding of dignity is not simply individual and personal, but it is closely related to their cultural particularities. Ignoring their cultural values could create conflicts between healthcare providers and community.

  10. Teaching about the Genocide of the Roma and Sinti during the Holocaust: Chances and Challenges in Europe Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polak, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents several projects, initiated during the first decade of the twenty-first century, that aim to make the history of the genocide of the Roma more known within the educational field. Some general challenges we face in teaching about the history of a group that is both the largest minority in Europe and, according to the European…

  11. Interethnic differences of cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms may influence outcome of taxane therapy in Roma and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Ganczer, Alma; Magyari, Lili; Matyas, Petra; Bene, Judit; Melegh, Bela

    2015-12-01

    Taxanes are widely used microtubule-stabilizing chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. Several cytochrome P450 gene variants have been proven to influence taxane metabolism and therapy. The purpose of this work was to determine the distribution of genetic variations of CYP1B1, CYP2C8 and CYP3A5 genes as the first report on taxane metabolizer cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms in Roma and Hungarian populations. A total of 397 Roma and 412 Hungarian healthy subjects were genotyped for CYP1B1 c.4326C > G, CYP2C8 c.792C > G and CYP3A5 c.6986A > G variant alleles by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. We found significant differences in the frequencies of homozygous variant genotypes of CYP1B1 4326 GG (p = 0.002) and CYP3A5 6986 GG (p < 0.001) between Roma and Hungarian populations. Regarding minor allele frequencies, for CYP2C8 a significantly increased prevalence was found in 792G allele frequency in the Hungarian population compared to the Roma population (5.83% vs. 2.14%, p = 0.001). Our results can be used as possible predictive factors in population specific treatment algorithms to developing effective programs for a better outcome in patients treated with taxanes.

  12. Outbreak of a new measles B3 variant in the Roma/Sinti population with transmission in the nosocomial setting, Italy, November 2015 to April 2016.

    PubMed

    Filia, Antonietta; Amendola, Antonella; Faccini, Marino; Del Manso, Martina; Senatore, Sabrina; Bianchi, Silvia; Borrini, Bianca Maria; Ciampelli, Alessio; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Filipponi, Maria Teresa; Piccirilli, Giulia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Pascucci, Maria Grazia; Baggieri, Melissa; Magurano, Fabio

    2016-05-19

    A measles outbreak occurred from November 2015 to April 2016 in two northern Italian regions, affecting the Roma/Sinti ethnic population and nosocomial setting. Overall, 67 cases were reported. Median age of 43 cases in three Roma/Sinti camps was four years, nosocomial cases were mainly adults. The outbreak was caused by a new measles virus B3.1 variant. Immunisation resources and strategies should be directed at groups with gaps in vaccine coverage, e.g. Roma/Sinti and healthcare workers.

  13. Distribution of 22 cytokine gene polymorphisms in Roma from the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Trajkov, Dejan; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Hristomanova, Slavica; Djulejic, Eli; Kirijas, Meri; Senev, Aleksandar; Spiroski, Mirko

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze 22 cytokine polymorphisms in the Roma population from the Republic of Macedonia. The Roma population consists of 77 healthy unrelated individuals, residents of different geographical regions of the Republic of Macedonia (Skopje, Gostivar, and Kochani). Blood samples were collected after obtaining written consent. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood and 22 polymorphisms were typed: IL1A -889, IL1B -511, IL1B +3962, IL1R pst1 1970, IL1RN mspa11100, IL4RA +1902, IL12 -1188, IFNG utr5644, TGF-β1 cdn10, TGF-β1 cdn25, TNF-α -308, TNF-α -238, IL-2 -330, IL-2 +166, IL-4 -1098, IL-4 -590, IL-4 -33, IL-6 -174, IL-6 565, IL-10 -1082, IL-10 -819, and IL-10 -592. Cytokine genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP. The population genetics analysis package, PyPop, was used for analysis of the cytokine data. Fnd was negative and significantly different from 0 for IL-4 -590 (p of F=0.006), IL-10 -1082 (p of F=0.010), IFN utr5644 (p of F=0.024), IL-4 -1098 (p of F=0.026) and TGF-1 cdn25 (p of F=0.001) alleles, as well as for IL-2 haplotypes (p=0.025). Several SNPs (IL-12B -1188, IL-2 -330, IL-4 -1098, IL-4 -590, and IL-10 -1082) were not in HWP (p<0.05). A few SNPs (IL-12B -1188, IL-2 -330, IL-4 -1098, IL-4 -590, and IL-10 -1082) and several observed frequencies of cytokine diplotypes (IL-2/GG:TG, IL-2/TG:TG, IL-4/GCC:GCC, IL-4/TTC:TTC, IL-4/TTT:TTC, IL-10/GCC:GCC, IL-10/ATA:GCC, IL-10/ACC:GCC, and IL-10/ACC:ATA) were not in HWP and were significantly different from the expectations. Hardy Weinberg proportion could not be calculated for TNF genotypes and diplotypes because nearly all genotypes and diplotypes belong to GG genotype or GG:GG diplotype. The results of cytokine polymorphisms in Roma population can be used for characterization of the current genetic profile of the Gypsies, anthropological comparisons, as well as for the association studies with different diseases.

  14. Approaches to Working with Children, Young People and Families for Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities. Annotated Bibliography for the Children's Workforce Development Council

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry; Wilkin, Carol

    2008-01-01

    This annoted bibliography relays a range of issues and approaches to working with Travellers, Irish Travellers, Gypsies, Roma and Show People. This is an accompanying document to the literature review report, ED501860.

  15. Lower carrier rate of GJB2 W24X ancestral Indian mutation in Roma samples from Hungary: implication for public health intervention.

    PubMed

    Sipeky, Csilla; Matyas, Petra; Melegh, Marton; Janicsek, Ingrid; Szalai, Renata; Szabo, Istvan; Varnai, Reka; Tarlos, Greta; Ganczer, Alma; Melegh, Bela

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterise the W24X mutation of the GJB2 gene in order to provide more representative and geographicaly relevant carrier rates of healthy Roma subisolates and the Hungarian population. 493 Roma and 498 Hungarian healthy subjects were genotyped for the GJB2 c.71G>A (rs104894396, W24X) mutation by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. This is the first report on GJB2 W24X mutation in geographically subisolated Roma population of Hungary compared to local Hungarians. Comparing the genotype and allele frequencies of GJB2 rs104894396 mutation, significant difference was found in GG (98.4 vs. 99.8 %), GA (1.62 vs. 0.20 %) genotypes and A (0.8 vs. 0.1 %) allele between the Roma and Hungarian populations, respectively (p < 0.02). None of the subjects of Roma and Hungarian samples carried the GJB2 W24X AA genotype. Considerable result of our study, that the proportion of GJB2 W24X GA heterozygotes and the A allele frequency was eight times higher in Roma than in Hungarians. Considering the results, the mutant allele frequency both in Roma (0.8 %) and in Hungarian (0.1 %) populations is lower than expected from previous results, likely reflecting local differentiated subisolates of these populations and a suspected lower risk for GJB2 mutation related deafness. However, the significant difference in GJB2 W24X carrier rates between the Roma and Hungarians may initiate individual diagnostic investigations and effective public health interventions.

  16. Hodgkin disease therapy induced second malignancy susceptibility 6q21 functional variants in roma and hungarian population samples.

    PubMed

    Varszegi, Dalma; Duga, Balazs; Melegh, Bela I; Sumegi, Katalin; Kisfali, Peter; Maasz, Anita; Melegh, Bela

    2014-07-01

    Patients treated successfully for pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma are known to develop secondary malignancies; care is already taken in treatment to prevent this adverse effect. Recent GWAS study identified rs4946728 and rs1040411 noncoding SNPs located between PRDM1 and ATG1 genes on chromosome 6q21 as risk factors for secondary malignancies in patients formerly treated with radiotherapy for pediatric Hodgkin disease. We investigated the allele frequencies of these two SNPs in biobanked, randomly selected DNA of average, apparently healthy Hungarians (n = 277) and in samples of Roma (n = 279) population living Hungary. The risk allele frequency for rs4946728 was 79.4 % in Hungarian and 83.5 % in Roma samples, while for rs1040411 it was 56.4 % in Hungarian and 55.8 % in Roma samples. These values are quite similar in the two populations, and are rather high. The values are higher than those frequencies observed in the controls (rs4946728: 59.1 % and rs1040411: 39.6 %, p < 0.05), and are in the range of the cases (86 % and 68.2 %, respectively) of the above original GWAS study. Our findings suggest, that beside the already taken precautions, genetic characterization of Hungarian pediatric Hodgkin patients seems to be advantageous prior to the treatment of their disease.

  17. Founder mutations in NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Roma/Gypsies in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Mistrik, Martin; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Bozikova, Alexandra; Behulova, Regina; Tothova, Iveta; Macekova, Sona

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) account for less than 10 % of all CMT cases, but are more frequent in the populations with a high rate of consanguinity. Roma (Gypsies) are a transnational minority with an estimated population of 10 to 14 million, in which a high degree of consanguineous marriages is a generally known fact. Similar to the other genetically isolated founder populations, the Roma harbour a number of unique or rare autosomal recessive disorders, caused by "private" founder mutations. There are three subtypes of autosomal recessive CMT with mutations private to the Roma population: CMT4C, CMT4D and CMT4G. We report on the molecular examination of four families of Roma origin in Slovakia with early-onset demyelinating neuropathy and autosomal recessive inheritance. We detected mutation p.R148X (g.631C>T) in the NDRG1 (NM_006096.3) gene in two families and mutation g.9712G>C in the HK1 (NM_033498) gene in the other two families. These mutations cause CMT4D and CMT4G, respectively. The success of molecular genetic analysis in all families confirms that autosomal recessive forms of CMT caused by mutations on the NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Slovak Roma. Providing genetic analysis of these genes for patients with Roma origin as a common part of diagnostic procedure would contribute to a better rate of diagnosed cases of demyelinating neuropathy in Slovakia and in other countries with a Roma minority.

  18. Homozygous EXOSC3 mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A is a founder mutation causing severe pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 among the Czech Roma.

    PubMed

    Schwabova, Jaroslava; Brozkova, Dana Safka; Petrak, Borivoj; Mojzisova, Mahulena; Pavlickova, Klara; Haberlova, Jana; Mrazkova, Lenka; Hedvicakova, Petra; Hornofova, Ludmila; Kaluzova, Marie; Fencl, Filip; Krutova, Marcela; Zamecnik, Josef; Seeman, Pavel

    2013-12-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 (PCH1) is characterized by cerebellar and anterior horn motor neuron degeneration and loss, signs of spinal muscular atrophy plus. Patients manifest severe perinatal weakness, hypotonia, and respiratory insufficiency, causing death frequently before the age of 1 year. Recently, causative mutations in EXOSC3 were reported in a majority of PCH1 patients, but the detailed clinical phenotype caused by EXOSC3 mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations, and prevalent mutations in specific ethnic groups is not yet known. Three unrelated Czech Roma patients with PCH1 were investigated clinically, electrophysiologically, neuroradiologically, and neuropathologically (patients 1 and 2). The entire coding region of the EXOSC3 gene, including the adjacent intron sequences, was sequenced in all three patients. The same mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A in EXOSC3 was found in all three affected patients in homozygous state and in heterozygous state in the parents from two of the families. Haplotype analysis with four flanking microsatellite markers showed identical haplotype in 9 out of 11 haplotypes carrying the c.92G→C, p.G31A mutation. Furthermore, four heterozygotes for this mutation were found in anonymous DNA samples from 90 unrelated Roma individuals. All four of these samples shared the same haplotype. No heterozygous sample was found among 120 anonymous DNA samples from Czech non-Roma individuals with no familial relation. It may therefore be concluded that EXOSC3 c.92G→C, p.G31A mutation is a founder mutation with high prevalence among the Czech Roma causing a similar and particularly severe phenotype of PCH1. These observations from the Czech Roma may have consequences also for other Roma from other countries. PCH1 caused by EXOSC3 founder mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A extends the list of autosomal recessive disorders rare among the general population but more frequent among Roma at least in the Czech Republic.

  19. Differential effect of soil and environment on metabolic expression of turmeric (Curcuma longa cv. Roma).

    PubMed

    Sandeep, I S; Sanghamitra, Nayak; Sujata, Mohanty

    2015-06-01

    Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) is known for its uses in medicine, cosmetics, food flavouring and textile industries. The secondary metabolites of turmeric like essential oil, oleoresin and curcumin are important for its multipurpose uses. These traits of turmeric vary from place to place due to the influence of environment, soil and agro-climatic conditions. Here, we analyzed turmeric from different agroclimatic regions for influence of various factors on its growth and yield of important phytochemicals. A high curcumin yielding cultivar i.e., Roma was collected from high altitude research station, Koraput (HARS) and planted in nine agroclimatic regions of Odisha. Analysis of soil texture, pH, organic carbon, micro and macro nutrients were done from all the studied zones up to 2nd generation. Plants grown in their released station i.e., Eastern Ghat High Land showed 5% of curcumin and were taken as control. Plants grown in different agroclimatic zones showed a range of 1.4-5% of curcumin and 0.3-0.7% of rhizome essential oil and 0.3-1% of leaf essential oil content. Gas chromatography and mass spectra analysis showed tumerone and alpha phellandrene as the major compounds in all the zones with 10-20% variation. The present study will be immensely helpful for standardization and management of environmental and ecological factors for high phytochemical yield in turmeric plant.

  20. [Homozygous E387K (1159G>A) mutation of the CYP1B1 gene in a Roma boy affected with primary congenital glaucoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Vogt, Gábor; Kádasi, Ľudevit Lajos; Czeizel, Endre

    2014-08-17

    Primary congenital glaucoma was diagnosed in a son (born in 2009) of a healthy, non-consanguineous Roma couple. This couple terminated their next two pregnancies because of the 25% recurrence risk of this autosomal recessive ophthalmological abnormality. Molecular genetic analysis showed the homozygote E387K mutation of the CYP1B1 gene in the proband and the presence of this gene mutation in heterozygous form in both parents. This gene mutation is characteristic for Slovakian Roma population. There are two objectives of this case report. On one hand this finding indicates the genetic relationship of Slovakian and Hungarian Romas. On the other hand, the couple plans to have further pregnancies, and prenatal genetic test may help to assess the possible recurrence risk of this hereditary disease.

  1. Health insurance and accessibility to health services among Roma in settlements in Belgrade, Serbia--the journey from data to policy making.

    PubMed

    Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan; Stojanovski, Kristefer; McWeeney, Gerry; Paunovic, Elizabet; Ostlin, Piroska; Licari, Lucianne; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2015-10-01

    The Serbian constitution and health-related laws assert that citizens and residents are universally entitled to health care, provided that they hold health insurance. However, until 2010, persons who did not hold a national identification number (ID) were required to present a plethora of documents to be granted one. We assessed the relationship between citizenship, residency and possession of health insurance cards, together with utilization of health services, among Roma residing in disadvantaged settlements in Belgrade. The Roma Health and Nutrition Survey was conducted in 2009 to assess the social determinants of health among Roma. Data were analysed, using logistic regression, to examine health insurance status and utilization of services by citizenship and residency. Eighty-nine per cent of respondents said they were Serbian citizens. Approximately 11% were refugees, 7% internally displaced persons (IDPs) and remainder domicile. Multivariate analysis revealed that non-citizens were more likely to lack health insurance [odds ratio (OR) = 9.2, confidence interval (CI) (3.5, 24.1)], as were refugees and IDPs [OR = 3.1, CI (1.4, 6.9), OR = 4.0, CI (1.4, 11.5), respectively]. Having health insurance was a positive predictor for being seen by a physician [OR = 2.3, CI (1.3, 4.2), OR = 2.3, CI (1.3, 3.9)]. Data from this survey indicated that non-citizen Roma had limited access to health services. These findings led the Serbian Ministry of Health and National Health Insurance Fund to reduce the administrative and legislative hurdles in obtaining health insurance, to ensure the Roma rights to health care. This demonstration of data-driven policies on Roma health could serve as a model for other countries.

  2. [Triatoma delpontei Romaña & Abalos, 1947 (Hemiptera, Tratominae) in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul].

    PubMed

    Salvatella Agrelo, R; Basmadjian, Y; Rosa, R; Puime, A

    1993-01-01

    Triatoma delpontei (Romaña & Abalos, 1947) (Hemiptera, Triatominae) is an ornithophilic sylvatic with a particular association to the psittacid Myiopsitta monachus (Boaddert, 1783). It is found in the continental biogeographical province of the Chaco, where it inhabits the nests or M. monachus, in subtropical xerophytic forests. The authors report the first finding of T. delpontei in Brasil, in the "campanha" region of the State or Rio Grande do Sul (Barra do Quarai, Uruguaiana), on the right bank of the River Cuareim, not far from de Uruguayan border.

  3. Effect of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vasava, Yogesh R.; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Gupta, S. K.; Dudhamal, T. S.

    2010-01-01

    Vatastheela is a disease of Mutravahasrotasa, one among the 12 types of Mutraghata disorders elaborated by Sushruta in his seminal work, the Sushruta Samhita. Vatastheela, as described in Ayurveda, closely resembles benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) of modern medicine in its signs and symptoms. It is a senile disorder and chiefly affects individuals above the age of 40 years. The symptoms are those of bladder outflow obstruction, with increased frequency of micturition, dribbling, hesitancy, and the features of chronic urinary retention. Surgical management has been accepted as the standard management but is associated with many disadvantages as well as complications, which may not be acceptable at this age. Conservative management with modern medicines is also not free from side effects. So, in this age-group, there is a need for much safer alternative method of management. In this regard, many works have been carried out and shown that the Ayurvedic approach, using natural medicines, is a far better approach. We carried out a comparative study of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara (MRK) and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita (DGG), which are the compounds prescribed for Mutraghata in Ayurvedic literature. The patients were randomly selected from the OPD and IPD of IPGT and RA hospital, Jamnagar, Gujarat, and divided into two groups. In first group, one (500 mg) capsule of MRK was given twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days; in second group, 10 gm of DGG was given orally twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days. DGG showed significantly greater relief in the subjective parameters as per International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) than MRK. However, reduction in the size of the prostate and in the volume of the post-void residual urine was found much better in the MRK group. PMID:22131735

  4. Supporting the Learning of Nomadic Communities across Transnational Contexts: Exploring Parallels in the Education of UK Roma Gypsies and Indigenous Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Martin; Hooley, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Deriving from the authors' respective ethnographic fieldwork (around two decades in each context), this position paper considers experiences of education across two communities: Gypsy/Roma in the UK and Indigenous in Australia. The article brings together understandings across these traditionally nomadic communities, with no shared history or…

  5. The Implications of "Naming" on Roma and "Sinti" Right to Education and Social Inclusion: An Ethnography of Education among a "Sinti" Family Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Acknowledging the European political commitment to Roma education and the research in this field, my article deals with the experience of education of a"Sinti" "minority" (The terms "minority" and "majority" will be used in this article, according to the meaning that is given to them within Anthropology and…

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life of the Roma in Greece: The Role of Socio-Economic Characteristics and Housing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Evelina; Chatzikonstantinidou, Simela; Chalkiopoulos, George; Papadopoulos, Angelos; Niakas, Dimitris

    2015-06-12

    The aim was to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the Roma and further to detect the significant determinants that are associated with their HRQL. The cross-sectional study involved 1068 Roma adults living in settlements (mean age 36). HRQL was measured by the Greek version of SF-36 Health Survey and further socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, marital status, education, permanent occupation etc.) and housing conditions (stable housing, access to basic amenities such as drinkable water, drainage, electricity which compose material deprivation) were involved. Non parametric tests and multiple linear regression models were applied to identify the factors that have significant association with HRQL. After controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, health status and housing conditions, sex, age, education, chronic diseases, stable housing and material deprivation were found to be significant determinants of the Roma's HRQL. Men reported significantly better health than women as well as those who attended school compared to the illiterate. Chronic diseases were remarkably associated with poor HRQL from 10 units in MH (Mental Health) to 34 units in RP (Role Physical). Material deprivation was related to lower GH (General Health), and VT (Vitality) scores and higher RP (Role Physical) and RE (Role Emotional) scores. Chronic conditions and illiteracy are two key areas that contribute significantly to worse HRQL. Policies should be part of a comprehensive and holistic strategy for the Roma through intervention to education, housing and public health.

  7. Overrepresented Minorities in Special Education in the United States and Romania: Comparison between African-American and Roma Populations in Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript briefly examines minority participation within the school population that is eligible for special education services--namely, African Americans in the United States and the Roma population in Romania. A large percentage of students from both minorities come to school unprepared to learn and they remain behind because of the…

  8. The frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma (Gypsy) ethnic group of Eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Bôžiková, Alexandra; Gabriková, Dana; Sovičová, Adriana; Behulová, Regina; Mačeková, Soňa; Boroňová, Iveta; Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A are the two most prevalent causes of inherited thrombophilia. The prevalence of these mutations varies widely in healthy Caucasian population. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma ethnic group from Eastern Slovakia. We analyzed 540 asymptomatic individuals (269 individuals of Slovak ethnicity and 271 individuals of Roma ethnicity) by real-time PCR method. The detected allele frequencies were 2.97 versus 6.64 % for factor V Leiden (p = 0.0049), and 0.74 versus 0.92 % for prothrombin mutation (p = 0.7463) in Slovak and Roma population, respectively. The Roma ethnic group had significantly higher prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation when compared to Slovak ethnic group. The allele frequency of factor V Leiden in ethnic Romanies from Eastern Slovakia was one of the highest in Europe. Our results confirm an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of factor V Leiden.

  9. An Exploration of Training and Support Issues For Those Working with Children, Young People and Families from Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry; Haines, Ben; Kinder, Kay; Wilkin, Anne; Derrington, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown the extent of social exclusion among children and young people of Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Showpeople (GRT) communities, in terms of education, health, and accommodation, and that many mainstream services have little experience of working effectively with these communities. The Every Child Matters (ECM) agenda…

  10. Significant interethnic differencies in functional variants of PON1 and P2RY12 genes in Roma and Hungarian population samples.

    PubMed

    Janicsek, Ingrid; Sipeky, Csilla; Bene, Judit; Duga, Balazs; Melegh, Bela I; Melegh, Bela; Sümegi, Katalin; Jaromi, Luca; Magyari, Lili; Melegh, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel is one of the most common therapies given to patients worldwide. However, the clinical efficacy and toxicity of clopidogrel is not constant in every patient due to interindividual variations. There are several factors that contribute to these interindividual differencies such as SNPs in genes of specific receptors and enzymes. PON1 (paraoxonase 1) plays an important role in the bioactivation of clopidogrel. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of this gene decrease the activity of paraoxonase enzyme and lead to an unefficient clopidogrel effect. P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G-protein coupled, 12) gene is coding a receptor, which is situated on the surface of the platelets and plays a role in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study we investigated 2 functional SNPs of PON1 gene (rs662 and rs854560) and 3 variants of the P2RY12 gene (rs2046934, rs6798347, rs6801273) in samples pooled from average Hungarian Roma and Hungarian population samples with PCR-RFLP method. For the PON1 variants we detected that the R allele frequency was significantly lower in the Roma group compared to the Hungarian population. (0.249 vs 0.318 p < 0.001). By contrast, the frequency of the M allele was significantly higher in Roma than in Hungarians (0.332 vs 0.290 p < 0.05). For the 3 P2RY12 variants we could find significant differencies only in rs2046934: the frequency of the CC genotype is 7 times higher in Hungarians than in Romas (1.4 vs 0.2 %, p < 0.05). The data presented here represent a unique genetic profile in Roma people that has not been reported for other populations.

  11. Influence of modified atmosphere and varying time in storage on the irradiation sensitivity of Salmonella on sliced roma tomatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Boyd, Glenn

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella contamination of tomatoes is a recurrent food safety concern. Irradiation inactivates pathogens on fresh and fresh cut produce. However, the interaction of time in refrigerated storage and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) may influence the response of pathogens to irradiation. Roma tomatoes were sliced and inoculated with a cocktail of outbreak strains of Salmonella. The inoculated tomatoes were packaged under one of four atmospheres: air, 10/90 O2/N2, 5/95 O2/N2 or 100% N2. The packages were kept in refrigerated storage (10 °C) for various times after inoculation, to simulate the potential time delay between packaging and irradiation treatment. Tomatoes were irradiated immediately (0 h), or after 24 or 48 h in storage. The surviving populations were recovered and enumerated. Irradiation effectively reduced Salmonella at all times. Estimated D10 value (the dose necessary for 1 log reduction) varied significantly among the combinations of time and MAP, ranging from 0.165-0.335 kGy. Tomatoes packaged in air, irradiated at 0 h, had a D10 of 0.165 kGy; all other combinations showed significantly higher D10. Reduced oxygen generally resulted in higher D10 values, with the highest D10 of 0.335 kGy obtained for 100% N2, 0 h. Time in storage pre-irradiation tended to increase D10 for air and 5/95 O2/N2, but not for 10/90 O2/N2 or 100% N2. These results suggest that time required for refrigerated holding of processed Roma tomatoes or shipment to an off-site irradiation service provider may alter the efficacy of irradiation if reduced oxygen MAP is used.

  12. High-risk sexual behavior, HIV/STD prevalence, and risk predictors in the social networks of young Roma (Gypsy) men in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Amirkhanian, Yuri A; Kelly, Jeffrey A; Kabakchieva, Elena; Antonova, Radostina; Vassileva, Sylvia; Difranceisco, Wayne J; McAuliffe, Timothy L; Vassilev, Boyan; Petrova, Elena; Khoursine, Roman A

    2013-02-01

    Roma (Gypsies), the largest and most disadvantaged ethnic minority group in Europe, are believed to be vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. This study's aim was to examine HIV risk in 6 Roma male sociocentric networks (n = 405 men) in Bulgaria. Participants were interviewed concerning their risk practices and tested for HIV/STDs. High-risk sexual behaviors were common. Over 57% of men had multiple sexual partners in the past 3 months. Over one-third of men reported both male and female partners in the past year. Condom use was low. Greater levels of sexual risk were associated with lower intentions and self-efficacy for using condoms, drug use, having male partners, knowing HIV-positive persons, and having higher AIDS knowledge but no prior HIV testing. Two men had HIV infection, 3.7% gonorrhea, and 5.2% chlamydia. HIV prevention interventions directed toward high-risk social networks of Roma are needed before HIV infection becomes more widely established.

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life of the Roma in Greece: The Role of Socio-Economic Characteristics and Housing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Evelina; Chatzikonstantinidou, Simela; Chalkiopoulos, George; Papadopoulos, Angelos; Niakas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the Roma and further to detect the significant determinants that are associated with their HRQL. The cross-sectional study involved 1068 Roma adults living in settlements (mean age 36). HRQL was measured by the Greek version of SF-36 Health Survey and further socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, marital status, education, permanent occupation etc.) and housing conditions (stable housing, access to basic amenities such as drinkable water, drainage, electricity which compose material deprivation) were involved. Non parametric tests and multiple linear regression models were applied to identify the factors that have significant association with HRQL. After controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, health status and housing conditions, sex, age, education, chronic diseases, stable housing and material deprivation were found to be significant determinants of the Roma’s HRQL. Men reported significantly better health than women as well as those who attended school compared to the illiterate. Chronic diseases were remarkably associated with poor HRQL from 10 units in MH (Mental Health) to 34 units in RP (Role Physical). Material deprivation was related to lower GH (General Health), and VT (Vitality) scores and higher RP (Role Physical) and RE (Role Emotional) scores. Chronic conditions and illiteracy are two key areas that contribute significantly to worse HRQL. Policies should be part of a comprehensive and holistic strategy for the Roma through intervention to education, housing and public health. PMID:26075724

  14. Founder p.Arg 446* mutation in the PDHX gene explains over half of cases with congenital lactic acidosis in Roma children.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan S; Azmanov, Dimitar N; Ivanova, Mariya B; Chamova, Teodora; Pacheva, Ilyana H; Panova, Margarita V; Song, Sharon; Morar, Bharti; Yordanova, Ralitsa V; Galabova, Fani K; Sotkova, Iglika G; Linev, Alexandar J; Bitchev, Stoyan; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Kancheva, Dalia; Gabrikova, Dana; Karcagi, Veronika; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Geneva, Ina E; Bozhinova, Veneta; Stoyanova, Vili K; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Savov, Aleksey; Horvath, Rita; Brown, Matthew A; Tournev, Ivailo; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of 31 of Roma patients with congenital lactic acidosis (CLA) from Bulgaria identified homozygosity for the R446* mutation in the PDHX gene as the most common cause of the disorder in this ethnic group. It accounted for around 60% of patients in the study and over 25% of all CLA cases referred to the National Genetic Laboratory in Bulgaria. The detection of a homozygous patient from Hungary and carriers among population controls from Romania and Slovakia suggests a wide spread of the mutation in the European Roma population. The clinical phenotype of the twenty R446* homozygotes was relatively homogeneous, with lactic acidosis crisis in the first days or months of life as the most common initial presentation (15/20 patients) and delayed psychomotor development and/or seizures in infancy as the leading manifestations in a smaller group (5/20 patients). The subsequent clinical picture was dominated by impaired physical growth and a very consistent pattern of static cerebral palsy-like encephalopathy with spasticity and severe to profound mental retardation seen in over 80% of cases. Most patients had a positive family history. We propose testing for the R446* mutation in PDHX as a rapid first screening in Roma infants with metabolic acidosis. It will facilitate and accelerate diagnosis in a large proportion of cases, allow early rehabilitation to alleviate the chronic clinical course, and prevent further affected births in high-risk families.

  15. Exploitation of the results of an extend DInSAR analysis performed since 1992 in the urban area of Roma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, Maria; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Bonano, Manuela; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Manunta, Michele; Pepe, Antonio; Solaro, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing is a key tool for environmental monitoring due to its outstanding capabilities to provide unique and timely information about Earth surface. In this framework, differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) represents nowadays a well-established remote sensing technique for the investigation of surface deformation phenomena. In particular, the advanced DInSAR techniques that have been developed over the last years allow the detection and monitoring of the time evolution of very localized deformation signals affecting single buildings or man-made structures on the ground. In this context, DInSAR technology can play a significant role in monitoring ground settlements affecting single buildings and infrastructural network in urban areas. Recently, the availability of high-resolution SAR images collected by the sensors of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Cosmo Sky-Med constellation has allowed the generation of DInSAR products with improved spatial and temporal resolution characteristics with respect to previous SAR systems. This enhanced the capabilities of controlling deformation phenomena affecting the historical heritage in large urban areas, such as the town Roma. As a matter of fact, the monitoring of monuments and historical buildings represents a challenging issue for the preservation of historical heritage which is more sensible to factors causing structural deterioration that may lead to severe degrees of damage up to irreversible situations. This work is aimed at investigating the capability improvement of DInSAR technique to map deformation phenomena affecting the urban area of Rome guaranteed by the exploitation of SAR data acquired by the new X-band SAR instruments onboard of the Cosmo-Skymed (CSM) sensors, with respect to that obtained through the first generation C-band ERS/ENVISAT radar systems. To this aim, we have analyzed three different archives of SAR images gathered by the CSM, the ERS and the ENVISAT platforms over the area of Roma (Italy

  16. Geohazards Monitoring in Roma from InSAR and In Situ Data: Outcomes of the PanGeo Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerci, Valerio; Vittori, Eutizio; Cipolloni, Carlo; Di Manna, Pio; Guerrieri, Luca; Nisio, Stefania; Succhiarelli, Claudio; Ciuffreda, Maria; Bertoletti, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Within the PanGeo project (financed by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Program), the Geological Survey of Italy ( ISPRA) and the Urban Planning Department of the City of Roma developed a geodatabase and map of the geological hazards for the territory of Roma, integrating remotely sensed data (PSInSAR—Permanent Scatterer Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar) and in situ geological information. Numerous thematic layers, maps and inventories of hazards (e.g., landslides, sinkholes, cavities), geological and hydrogeological data added to historical and recent urbanization information were compared to the permanent scatterer (PS) data from the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS-1/2, 1992-2000) and ENVISAT (2002-2005) descending scenes, in order to produce a ground stability layer (GSL). Based on the PS data, most of the territory appears stable (almost 70 % of PS velocities are within ±1 mm/year). About 14 % of the PSs show positive line-of-sight (LOS) velocities (measured along the LOS of the satellite) between 1 and 3 mm/year and more than 2 % exceed 3 mm/year; more than 11 % of PSs show negative LOS velocities between -1 and -3 mm/year, while about 3 % exceed -3 mm/year (with tens of the PSs showing velocities over -20 mm/year). The GSL is comprised of polygons or multi-polygons (multipart polygons grouping individual polygons under a single identifier geohazard) enclosing areas where geohazards have been pointed out by PS data and/or in situ surveys (observed instabilities), and by polygons enclosing areas potentially affected by geohazards, based on the available knowledge of the territory (potential instabilities). In Roma's GSL, 18 multi-polygons (covering ca. 600 km2) related to observed instabilities have been outlined, where ground movements could be detected through InSAR data or where landslides and sinkholes are known to have occurred. Other 13 multi-polygons (covering nearly 900 km2) concern areas where the potential occurrence

  17. Barometric coefficients for different neutron multiplicities according to ESA NM data (Israel) and data of University "Roma Tre" NM (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Iucci, N.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukermann, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of hourly data obtained by neutron monitor (NM) of Emilio Segre' Observatory (height 2025 ma bove s. l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) and by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cutoff rigidity 6.7 GV) we determine barometric coefficients both stations for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m ≥ 1, m ≥ 2, m ≥ 3, m ≥ 4, m ≥ 5, m ≥ 6, m ≥ 7,a nd m ≥ 8, as well as for m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6,a nd m=7. We determine also for each hour the effective multiplicity for m ≥ 8 and estimate the barometricc oefficient for for both NM sections. We used hourly data from June 1998 up to April 2001, and we excludedp eriods when above the NM of Emilio Segre' Observatoryw as snow. We compare obtained results with expected according to the theory of meteorological effects for totaln eutron component and for neutron multiplicities.

  18. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  19. Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome in Roma families from Portugal is due to a founder mutation of the HRPT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Branca M; Guerra, Laura; Bradley, Karin J; Carvalho, Davide; Harding, Brian; Oliveira, Amélia; Santos, Maria-Amparo; Sobrinho, Luís G; Thakker, Rajesh V; Leite, Valeriano

    2004-04-01

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid tumors and ossifying jaw fibromas. The gene causing HPT-JT, HRPT2, is located on chromosome 1q31.2 and consists of 17 exons that encode a 531-amino acid protein, designated parafibromin. We recently identified six Roma families in Portugal with 56 members (11 affected and 45 asymptomatic), who had the HPT-JT syndrome. We postulated that they may have a common ancestor and that the HPT-JT syndrome may be due to a mutation of the HRPT2 gene. Haplotype analysis using 14 chromosome 1q24-q32 polymorphic markers showed that the 11 affected individuals shared a common haplotype defined by seven markers that spanned an approximately 12.5-cM region, flanked centromerically by D1S202 and telomerically by D1S306. DNA sequence analysis identified a 2-bp (TG or GT) frameshift deletion in exon 8, which predicts a truncated parafibromin protein, in all 11 affected individuals. This mutation was also found in 19 unaffected individuals (age range, 12-74 yr) who shared the affected haplotype, suggesting a low age-related penetrance for HPT-JT in these families. Thus, the HPT-JT syndrome in six Roma families from Portugal is due to a novel founder mutation in the HRPT2 gene.

  20. Approaches to Working with Children, Young People and Families for Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities. A Literature Review Report for the Children's Workforce Development Council

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) commissioned this literature review as the first part of a project exploring issues around and approaches to working with Travellers, Irish Travellers, Gypsies, Roma and Showpeople, and the support, training and other programs available to staff involved. The project is intended to contribute to…

  1. Advanced DInSAR analysis for building damage assessment in large urban areas: an application to the city of Roma, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aranno, Peppe J. V.; Marsella, Maria; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Bonano, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing data play an important role for the environmental monitoring because they allow to provide systematic information on very large areas and for a long period of time. Such information must be analyzed, validated and incorporated into proper modeling tools in order to become useful for performing risk assessment analysis. These approaches has been already applied in the field of natural hazard evaluation (i.e. for monitoring seismic, volcanic areas and landslides). However, not enough attention has been devoted to the development of validated methods for implementing quantitative analysis on civil structures. This work is dedicated to the comprehensive utilization of ERS / ENVISAT data store ESA SAR used to detect deformation trends and perform back-analysis of the investigated structures useful to calibrate the damage assessment models. After this preliminary analysis, SAR data of the new satellite mission (ie Cosmo SkyMed) were adopted to monitor the evolution of existent surface deformation processes and to detect new occurrence. The specific objective was to set up a data processing and data analysis chain tailored on a service that sustains the safe maintenance of the built-up environment, including critical construction such as public (schools, hospital, etc), strategic (dam, highways, etc) and also the cultural heritage sites. The analysis of the test area, in the southeastern sector of Roma, has provided three different levels and sub-levels of products from metropolitan area scale (territorial analysis), settlement scale (aggregated analysis) to single structure scale (damage degree associated to the structure).

  2. High frequency of SLC22A12 variants causing renal hypouricemia 1 in the Czech and Slovak Roma population; simple and rapid detection method by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Sokolova, Jitka; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-10-01

    Renal hypouricemia is a rare heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by impaired tubular uric acid transport with severe complications, such as acute kidney injury. Type 1 and 2 are caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 gene, respectively. A cohort of 881 randomly chosen ethnic Roma from two regions in Eastern Slovakia and two regions in the Czech Republic participated. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and/or from blood samples. The c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers in a multiplex arrangement and/or direct sequencing of exon 7 and 9. Allele frequencies and genotypes were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the Chi-square test. 25 subjects were heterozygous and three were homozygous for the c.1245_1253del, while 92 subjects were heterozygous and two were homozygous for the c.1400C>T. Moreover, two participants were compound heterozygotes. Frequencies of the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were 1.87 and 5.56 %, respectively. Our finding confirms an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of SLC22A12 mutant variants. We found that the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were present in the Czech and Slovak Roma population at unexpectedly high frequencies. Renal hypouricemia should be kept in mind during differential diagnostic on Roma patients with low serum uric acid concentrations.

  3. High-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry characterization of a new isoform of human salivary acidic proline-rich proteins named Roma-Boston Ser22(Phos) → Phe variant

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Federica; D’Alessandro, Alfredo; Tian, Na; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    During a survey of human saliva by a top-down reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry approach, two proteins eluting at 27.4 and 28.4 min, with average masses of 15 494 ± 1 and 11 142 ± 1 Da, were detected in a subject from Boston. The Δmass value (4352 Da) of the two proteins was similar to the difference in mass values between intact (150 amino acids, [a.a.]) and truncated acidic proline-rich proteins (aPRPs; 106 a.a.) suggesting an a.a. substitution in the first 106 residues resulting in a strong reduction in polarity, since under the same experimental conditions aPRPs eluted at ~22.5 min (intact) and 23.5 min (truncated forms). Manual inspection of the high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of the truncated isoform showed the replacement of the phosphorylated Ser-22 in PRP-3 with a Phe residue. Inspection of the tandem mass spectra of the intact isoform confirmed the substitution, which is allowed by the code transition TCT→TTT and is in agreement with the dramatic increase in elution time. The isoform was also detected in two other subjects, one from Boston (unrelated to the previous) and one from Rome. For this reason we propose to name this variant PRP-1 (PRP-3) RB (Roma-Boston) Ser22(phos)→Phe. PMID:24771659

  4. Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA) and comparison of binning and change-point methods of analysis: application to detection of del22q11.2 (DiGeorge) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stanczak, Christopher M; Chen, Zugen; Nelson, Stanley F; Suchard, Marc; McCabe, Edward R B; McGhee, Sean

    2008-01-01

    DiGeorge (del22q11.2) syndrome is estimated to occur in 1:4,000 births, is the most common contiguous-gene deletion syndrome in humans, and is caused by autosomal dominant deletions in the 22q11.2 DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR). Multiple microarray methods have been developed recently for analyzing such copy number changes, but data analysis and accurate deletion detection remains challenging. Clinical use of these microarray methods would have many advantages, particularly when the possibility of a chromosomal disorder cannot be determined simply on the basis of history and physical examination data alone. We investigated the use of the microarray technique, representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), in the detection of del22q11.2 syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from three well-characterized cell lines with 22q11.2 DGCR deletions and from the blood of a patient suspected of having del22q11.2 syndrome, and analyzed using both the binning and change-point model algorithms. Though the 22q11.2 deletion was easily identified with either method, change-point models provide clearer identification of deleted regions, with the potential for fewer false-positive results. For circumstances in which a clear, a priori, copy-number change hypothesis is not present, such as in many clinical samples, change-point methods of analysis may be easier to interpret.

  5. Roma, Gypsies, Travellers. Revised Edition. Collection Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liegeois, Jean-Pierre

    In Europe, prejudice and stereotyping of Gypsies and Travellers often result in the failure of measures aimed at helping this group. This book resulted from a request of the Conference of Local and Regional Authorities of Europe to the Council of Europe to prepare teacher information packs on the history, culture, and family life of nomadic…

  6. Roma Invicta! Constructing a Roman Apothecary Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    It may be quite daunting to put together a proposal for an award, especially something as prestigious as the Rolls-Royce Science Prize! But this is exactly what the author did as soon as she was appointed head of juniors at La Sagesse School in Newcastle upon Tyne. After a consultation with staff, governors, the school council and the…

  7. High-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry characterization of a new isoform of human salivary acidic proline-rich proteins named Roma-Boston Ser₂₂ (Phos) → Phe variant.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, Federica; D'Alessandro, Alfredo; Tian, Na; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Helmerhorst, Eva J; Oppenheim, Frank G; Castagnola, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    During a survey of human saliva by a top-down reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry approach, two proteins eluting at 27.4 and 28.4 min, with average masses of 15 494 ± 1 and 11 142 ± 1 Da, were detected in a subject from Boston. The Δmass value (4352 Da) of the two proteins was similar to the difference in mass values between intact (150 amino acids, [a.a.]) and truncated acidic proline-rich proteins (aPRPs; 106 a.a.) suggesting an a.a. substitution in the first 106 residues resulting in a strong reduction in polarity, since under the same experimental conditions aPRPs eluted at ∼22.5 min (intact) and 23.5 min (truncated forms). Manual inspection of the high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of the truncated isoform showed the replacement of the phosphorylated Ser-22 in PRP-3 with a Phe residue. Inspection of the tandem mass spectra of the intact isoform confirmed the substitution, which is allowed by the code transition TCT→TTT and is in agreement with the dramatic increase in elution time. The isoform was also detected in two other subjects, one from Boston (unrelated to the previous) and one from Rome. For this reason we propose to name this variant PRP-1 (PRP-3) RB (Roma-Boston) Ser22 (phos)→Phe.

  8. Roma-BZCAT: a multifrequency catalogue of blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new catalogue of blazars based on multifrequency surveys and on an extensive review of the literature. Blazars are classified as BL Lacertae objects, as flat spectrum radio quasars or as blazars of uncertain/transitional type. Each object is identified by a root name, coded as BZB, BZQ and BZU for these three subclasses respectively, and by its coordinates. This catalogue is being built as a tool useful for the identification of the extragalactic sources that will be detected by present and future experiments for X and gamma-ray astronomy, like Swift, AGILE, Fermi-GLAST and Simbol-X. An electronic version is available from the ASI Science Data Center web site at http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat.

  9. Intercultural Education: The Position of Roma in Education=Obrazovanje za interkulturalizam: Položaj Roma u odgoju i obrazovanju

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlinarevic, Vesnica, Ed.; Brust Nemet, Maja, Ed.; Bushati, Jozef, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Faculty of Educational Sciences has recognized the importance of education for interculturalism, and it organizes the conference entitled "Education for interculturalism" every five years, so that all participants could gain new insights about interculturalism and strengthen their intercultural competencies. Modern interculturalism, as a…

  10. Gas hazard assessment in a densely inhabited area of Colli Albani Volcano (Cava dei Selci, Roma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Badalamenti, B.; Cavarra, L.; Scalzo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The northwestern flank of the Colli Albani, a Quaternary volcanic complex near Rome, is characterised by high pCO 2 values and Rn activities in the groundwater and by the presence of zones with strong emission of gas from the soil. The most significant of these zones is Cava dei Selci where many houses are located very near to the gas emission site. The emitted gas consists mainly of CO 2 (up to 98 vol%) with an appreciable content of H 2S (0.8-2%). The He and C isotopic composition indicates, as for all fluids associated with the Quaternary Roman and Tuscany volcanic provinces, the presence of an upper mantle component contaminated by crustal fluids associated with subducted sediments and carbonates. An advective CO 2 flux of 37 tons/day has been estimated from the gas bubbles rising to the surface in a small drainage ditch and through a stagnant water pool, present in the rainy season in a topographically low central part of the area. A CO 2 soil flux survey with an accumulation chamber, carried out in February-March 2000 over a 12 000 m 2 surface with 242 measurement points, gave a total (mostly conductive) flux of 61 tons/day. CO 2 soil flux values vary by four orders of magnitude over a 160-m distance and by one order of magnitude over several metres. A fixed network of 114 points over 6350 m 2 has been installed in order to investigate temporal flux variations. Six surveys carried out from May 2000 to June 2001 have shown large variations of the total CO 2 soil flux (8-25 tons/day). The strong emission of CO 2 and H 2S, which are gases denser than air, produces dangerous accumulations in low areas which have caused a series of lethal accidents to animals and one to a man. The gas hazard near the houses has been assessed by continuously monitoring the CO 2 and H 2S concentration in the air at 75 cm from the ground by means of two automatic stations. Certain environmental parameters (wind direction and speed; atm P, T, humidity and rainfall) were also continuously recorded. At both stations, H 2S and CO 2 exceeded by several times the recommended concentration thresholds. The highest CO 2 and H 2S values were recorded always with wind speeds less than 1.5 m/s, mostly in the night hours. Our results indicate that there is a severe gas hazard for people living near the gas emission site of Cava dei Selci, and appropriate precautionary and prevention measures have been recommended both to residents and local authorities.

  11. "And Roma Were Victims, Too." The Romani Genocide and Holocaust Education in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    While Holocaust education has been mandatory in Romanian schools for over a decade, educators do not necessarily teach about it. Distortion and obfuscation of Romanian Holocaust crimes during the communist and transition periods means that teachers, like the majority of Romanians, know little about their country's perpetration of genocides. From…

  12. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Roma BZCAT - 5th edition (Massaro+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2016-02-01

    In the 5th Edition we use similar denomination of blazars adopted in the previous editions. Each blazar is identified by a code, with 5BZ for all blazars, a fourth letter that specifies the type (B, G, Q or U), followed by the truncated equatorial coordinates (J2000). We introduced the edition number before the letters BZ to avoid possible confusion due to the fact that several sources changed their old names because of the new adopted classification. The codes are defined in the "Note (G1)" below. The 5th edition contains 1151 BZB sources, 92 of which are reported as candidates because we could not find their optical spectra in the literature, 1909 BZQ sources, 274 BZG sources and 227 BZU objects (1 data file).

  14. Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) effect on the growth of Solanum lycopersicum cv. Roma plants.

    PubMed

    Daresta, Barbara Elisabetta; Italiano, Francesca; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Trotta, Massimo; Tutino, Maria; Veronico, Pasqua

    2015-01-01

    This study shows the direct effect of atmospheric particulate matter on plant growth. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were grown for 18d directly on PM10 collected on quartz fiber filters. Organic and elemental carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contents were analyzed on all the tested filters. The toxicity indicators (i.e., seed germination, root elongation, shoot and/or fresh root weight, chlorophyll and carotenoids content) were quantified to study the negative and/or positive effects in the plants via root uptake. Substantial differences were found in the growth of the root apparatus with respect to that of the control plants. A 17-58% decrease of primary root elongation, a large amount of secondary roots and a decrease in shoot (32%) and root (53-70%) weights were found. Quantitative analysis of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated that an oxidative burst in response to abiotic stress occurred in roots directly grown on PM10, and this detrimental effect was also confirmed by the findings on the chlorophyll content and chlorophyll-to-carotenoid ratio.

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Respiration Rate of Tomato (Cultivar Roma) for Modified Atmosphere Storage.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Palani; Moitra, Ranabir; Mukherjee, Souti

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the respiration rate of tomato at 10, 20 and 30 °C using closed respiration system. Oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide accumulation in the system containing tomato was monitored. Respiration rate was found to decrease with increasing CO2 and decreasing O2 concentration. Michaelis-Menten type model based on enzyme kinetics was evaluated using experimental data generated for predicting the respiration rate. The model parameters that obtained from the respiration rate at different O2 and CO2 concentration levels were used to fit the model against the storage temperatures. The fitting was fair (R2 = 0.923 to 0.970) when the respiration rate was expressed as O2 concentation. Since inhibition constant for CO2 concentration tended towards negetive, the model was modified as a function of O2 concentration only. The modified model was fitted to the experimental data and showed good agreement (R2 = 0.998) with experimentally estimated respiration rate.

  16. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ., 1963. APPENDIX 1 Rendiconti di Matematica , Serie VII Volumie 9 , Roma (1989), 521-543 An Inexact Continuous...di Roma "La Sapienza" - 00161 Roma - Italy Valerio Parisi - Dipartimento di Fisica - II Universit! di Roma "Tor Vergat" 00173 Roma - Italy Francesco...Zirilli - Dipartimento di Matematica "G. Castelnuovo" - Universiti di Roma "La Sapienza" - 00185 Roma - Italy APPENDIX 2 A Quadratcally Convergent

  17. 78 FR 7784 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... acquire Roma Financial Corporation MHC, and Roma Financial Corporation, both in Robbinsville, New Jersey, and indirectly acquire Roma Bank, Robbinsville, New Jersey, and RomAsia Bank, South Brunswick...

  18. "Nothing about Us without Us": The Role of Inclusive Community Development in School Desegregation for Roma Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Andrew Richard; Rostas, Iulius; Taba, Marius

    2014-01-01

    This article was presented at the European Conference on Educational Research, September 2012 Cadiz, Spain. The article argues that community dialogue and participation is a vital dynamic in desegregation and explores the centrality of forms of empowerment which can be described as "inclusive community development" (ICD). The segregation…

  19. Effemeridi del transito meridiano 2017-2020 per la basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli in Roma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-12-01

    The meridian transit time is computed using the ephemerides of IMCCE and the position of the image's center on the 1702 meridian line is corrected for the average atmospheric refraction at the site of Santa Maria degli Angeli, SMA, in Rome. The ephemerides for 2017-2020 are public on http://www.icra.it/gerbertus/2016/effem-SMA.pdf The measurement at SMA of DUT1=-0.34s on Dec 2016 is in agreement with IERS bullettin D132.

  20. Numerical Solution of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations in High Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-23

    high dimension FA9550-10-1-0029 Maurizio Falcone Dipartimento di Matematica SAPIENZA-Universita di Roma P. Aldo Moro, 2 00185 ROMA AH930...Università di Roma P. Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 ROMA email: falcone@mat.uniroma1.it November 23, 2012 Abstract The solution of nonlinear optimal control problems

  1. Numerical Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Dipartimento di Fisica , II Universit L di Romna (Tor Vergata), 00173 Roma (Italy) Francesco Zirilli * m .Dipartieto di Matematica 1G. Castelnuovo", UnT.rsit... Fisica II UniversitA di Roma (Tor Vergata) 00173 Roma - Italy Francesco Zirilli Dipartimento di Matematica G. Castelnuovo Universita di Roma "La...TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Dipartimento di Matematica -G.--iattelnuoz .’ Universita di Roma "La Sapienze" rlnlRr% Pnmaq (Tt-al’g) I$. CONTROLLING

  2. Helping the Marginalised or Supporting the Elite? Affirmative Action as a Tool for Increasing Access to Higher Education for Ethnic Roma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garaz, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Among the many arguments against affirmative action discussed in the academic literature, there is one stating that affirmative action fails to target the most marginalised members of a disadvantaged group, and instead it supports the group's most affluent members whose socio-economic position may be comparable to that of the mainstream…

  3. International Conference on Internal Friction and Ultrasonic Attenuation in Solids (ICIFUAS) (10th) held in Roma, Italy on September 6 - 9, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-09

    velocity in the ferroelectric phase could be described using phenomenological Landau theory. The ultrasonic velocity dispersion is impossible to ob- serve...Tc 3 (ferroelectric instability.).At 85% deuterium Tc 2 =161.5K and T 3 145K.The Landau thermodynamic potential with two order parameters was...transition parameter and an external force. Really, the behavior of the IF peak near the Curie point (T ) may be explained in terms of the Landau -Khalatnikov

  4. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very encouraging local control rate, with acceptable toxicity.

  5. Non-invasive deformation analysis of historical buildings through the advanced SBAS-DInSAR technique: the case of the city of Roma (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Bonano, Manuela; Marsella, Maria; Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    The monitoring of urban areas and man-made structures is of key importance for the preservation of artistic, archaeological and architectural heritage. In this context, the remote sensing techniques may allow non-invasive analysis of large areas by exploiting long time series of satellite data. Among these techniques, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) has already demonstrated to be an effective tool for monitoring the displacements occurring in the historical and artistic heritage located in the historical city centers. As a matter of fact, the InSAR technique allows producing spatially dense deformation maps with centimeter to millimeter accuracy, by exploiting the phase difference (interferogram) of temporally separated SAR images relevant to the same analyzed area. In order to guarantee the monitoring of urban area displacements, it is strategic to provide very long term deformation time series by also exploiting SAR data acquired by different sensors. Accordingly, ERS/ENVISAT data archive, providing acquisitions spanning the 1992-2010 time period, might allow us generating very long term deformation time-series. However, an ERS/ENVISAT data combination is limited by the two sensors slightly different carrier frequencies: 5.331 GHz for the ENVISAT sensor and 5.3 GHz for the ERS one. Therefore, because the interferometric phase is dependent on the radiation wavelength, the generation of conventional ERS/ENVISAT cross-interferograms is strongly affected by the induced decorrelation effects. In this work we show the effectiveness of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) (Berardino et al., 2002; Lanari et al., 2004) approach for the conservation, monitoring and risk prevention of cultural heritage. Indeed, the SBAS technique allows us to produce deformation time series at the scale of the single building by processing very long sequences of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT (IS2 swath) SAR data, acquired with the same illumination geometry. In particular, the SBAS approach exploits only conventional ERS/ERS and ENVISAT/ENVISAT differential interferograms, in order to limit the decorrelation effects and improve the number of the detected coherent points. Accordingly, this method may play a key role for supporting the study and conservation strategies of the historical built heritage, monuments and artistic artifacts, due to its capability of generating deformation time series spanning time interval of more than 15 years. The presented results, achieved by applying the full resolution SBAS approach to an ERS/ENVISAT dataset relevant to the city of Rome, demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique to detect and analyze the temporal evolution of possible deformation phenomena affecting historical buildings within the investigated 1992-2009 time period. [1] P. Berardino, G. Fornaro, R. Lanari, and E. Sansosti, "A new Algorithm for Surface Deformation Monitoring based on Small Baseline Differential SAR Interferograms", IEEE Trans.Geosci. Remote Sens., Vol. 40, No 11, pp. 2375-2383, 2002. [2] Lanari, R., Mora, O., Manunta, M., Mallorquí, J.J., Berardino, P. and Sansosti, E., "A small baseline approach for investigating deformations on full resolution differential SAR interferograms", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 42, pp. 1377-1386, 2004.

  6. [Medical prescription from "Libro de' segreti cavato da molti mastri di cristali et da altri hominij literati" Danzica 1645 (MS.5461 della Biblioteca Casanatense di Roma].

    PubMed

    Moretti, Cesare; Lucarini, Cesare

    2008-01-01

    In the Casanatense Library - Rome, few years ago, a manuscript was found, written in Danzig in 1645, containing a great number of glass recipes but also recipes of alchemic and metallurgical subject and about forty recipes of practical medicine. If the generality of recipes were published in 2004, the medical recipes are here transcribed and commented with the help of experts in pharmaceutical chemistry and in medicine history. The medicine recipes of the manuscript are typical of the therapeutic technique in use in the 17th century, deriving from an empirical knowledge and from a magic-popular heritage that accompanied the medical doctrine till modern era.

  7. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella and E.coli 0157:H7 on Roma tomato stem scars using high-intensity infrared laser light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illness associated with contaminated produce is a continuing concern. Compared to the skin surface, stem scar areas of intact fruits and vegetables harbor more bacteria and are more resistant to chemical sanitizing processes. This study evaluated a precision thermal kill process which uses...

  8. Mathematical Models of Smart Obstacles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Matematica “G. Castelnuovo” Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2 00185 Roma Italy Ph. N. +39-06-49913282, FAX N. +39-06...Dipartimento di Matematica G. Castelnuovo Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2 00185 Roma Italy 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9... Matematica G. Castelnuovo Università di Roma “La Sapienza” 00185 Roma, Italy 2 Smart (or active) obstacles are obstacles that when illuminated by an

  9. 77 FR 23807 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ..., Col. Roma, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Blvd. Puerta de Hierro No 6094, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico; Paseo...- 583093 (Panama) DISTRIBUIDORA MEDICA HOSPITALARIA, S.A. DE C.V., Colima No. 323 Int. 9, Col. Roma...

  10. The Italian Army and Effects-Based Operations: A New Concept for an Army of Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-25

    efficiently42. 41 Ministero della Difesa, Libro Bianco 2002 (Roma: Stabilimento Grafico Militare...GUARDIAN/. Internet; accessed 22 March 2006. __________. Libro Bianco 2002. Roma: Stabilimento grafico Militare, 2001. __________. Nuove Forze per un

  11. The Role of Ellipticity and Normality Assumptions in Formulating Live-Boundary Conditions in Elasticity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    111l11.4 11 1.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of S[ANDARDS 963-4 I 4 . . MRC Technical Summary Report #27H8 - It THE ROLE OF...UniversitA di Roma-Tor Vergata, 00173 Roma, Italy. ** Dipartimento di Matematica , UniversitA di Pisa, 56100 Pisa, Italy. ***Dipartimento di...Roma-Tor Vergata, 00173 Roma, Italy. ** Dipartimento di Matematica , Universith di Pisa, 56100 Pisa, Italy. ***Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale

  12. On a Semi-Coercive Quasi-Variational Inequality.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Roma, Italy. 2Departement de Mathematique , C.P.214, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Bruxl~e BA~q~um, sponsored by the United States Army under...di Roma, 00100 Roma, Italy. 2 Departement de Mathematique , C.P.214, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium, sponsored by the United

  13. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Matematica e Fisica Universitai di Camerino 62052 Camerino (MC) Italy Francesco Zirilli Dipartimento di Maternatica ’G. Castelnuovo’ Universitai di Roma ’La...ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10 PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK Dipartimento di Matematica G. Castelnuovo AE OKUI UBR UniversitA di Roma "La Sapienza" 00185 ROMA

  14. The application of high-concentration short-time chlorine dioxide treatment for selected specialty crops including Roma tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum), cantaloupes (Cucumis melo ssp. melo var. cantaloupensis) and strawberries (Fragaria×ananassa).

    PubMed

    Trinetta, V; Linton, R H; Morgan, M T

    2013-06-01

    The effects of high-concentration short-time chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas treatment on food-borne pathogens inoculated onto the surface of tomatoes, cantaloupes, and strawberries were studied. Produce were spot-inoculated with a mixture of Salmonella enterica (serotypes Montevideo, Javiana and Baildon), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (serotypes 204 P, EDL 933 and C792) or Listeria monocytogenes (serotypes Scott A, F 5069 and LCDC 81-861), and treated with ClO2 gas at 10 mg/l for 180 s. After ClO2 gas treatment, surviving populations were determined and shelf-life studies were conducted (microbial spoilage population, change in color and overall appearance). Significant microbial reduction (p < 0.05) was observed for all treated samples. Nearly a 5LogCFU/cm(2)Salmonella reduction was found on tomatoes, cantaloupe and strawberries, while a ~3LogCFU/cm(2) reduction was observed for E. coli and Listeria on all produce surfaces. E. coli and Listeria appeared to be more resistant to ClO2 gas as compared to Salmonella spp. Treatments significantly (p < 0.05) reduced initial microflora population, while produce color surface was not significantly influenced, as compared to the control (p > 0.05). Results obtained suggest the potential use of high-concentration short-time ClO2 gas treatment as an effective online pathogen inactivation technology for specialty crops in large-scale produce packing operations.

  15. TREC Microblog 2012 Track: Real-Time Algorithm for Microblog Ranking Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Laboratory Roma Tre University Via della Vasca Navale, 79 - 00146 Rome, Italy feltoni@dia.uniroma3.it Fabio Gasparetti Department of Engineering...Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Roma Tre University Via della Vasca Navale, 79 - 00146 Rome, Italy gaspare@dia.uniroma3.it ABSTRACT As a matter of fact...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Roma Tre University,Department

  16. Maximizing the Potential of the Special Operations Forces and General Purpose Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    MAXIMIZING THE POTENTIAL OF THE SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES AND GENERAL PURPOSE FORCES A Monograph by MAJ Romas Zimlicki...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MAJ Romas J. Zimlicki 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Romas Zimlicki a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified

  17. Targeting the Aberrant Androgen Receptor in Advanced Treatment Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    enhancing public understanding and increasing interest in learning and careers in science, technology, and the humanities. The Dame Roma Mitchell...conducted in the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories at the University of Adelaide, communicates research findings to the PI and other co...fellow Nearest person month worked: 6 Contribution to Project: Dr. Selth oversees all research being conducted in the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer

  18. Sleep Tendency and Ability to Sustain Wakefulness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    Pratica di Mare, 00040 Pomezia (Roma) Italy 2 Dipartimento di Psicologia - Universitd di Roma "La Sapienza" Via del policlinico 155 00161 Roma Italy...means respectively of Procedure MSLT and MWT, during the night after a daytime administration 20 mg of Temazepam The experimental design was based on a...complaining of occured on two non-consecutive days separated excessive daytime sleepiness, by at least I week. On each experimental day subjects slept in

  19. SIGMA - A Stochastic-Integration Global Minimization Algorithm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    di Matematica , Universita di Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy). Istituto di Fisica , 2da Unversita dl Roma "Tor Vergata", Via Orazio Raimondo, 00173 (La...Dipartimento di Matematica , Universit di Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy). Istituto dl Fisica , 2a Universitl di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via Orazio Raimondo, 00173 (La...Romanina) Roma (Italy). **Istituto di Matematica , Universita dl Salerno, 84100 Salerno (Italy). Sponsored by the United States Army under Contract No. DAAG29

  20. A Hidden Minority Becomes Visible: Romani Refugee Children in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamas, Judit

    2001-01-01

    Discusses educational concerns of Roma, or Gypsy, children in Canada. Provides background information on this minority group and discusses Roma attitudes toward education and Romani children's experiences in Eastern European schools. Provides suggestions for welcoming Romani children into new schools, including developing children's first and…

  1. School Success and Professional Achievement of Three Women of Serbian-Rom, Italian-Sinti and Albanian-Ashkali Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolognesi, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    The following study, conducted in Italy, based on an analysis of the school biographies of three women of Roma, Sinti and Ashkali origin, highlights paths and educational contexts that lead young Roma not only to school success but also to professional achievement. What emerges from the accounts of the family lives and school histories of these…

  2. Romani Culture and Academic Success: Arguments against the Belief in a Contradiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brüggemann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Roma, today perceived as the most numerous European minority, face marginalisation and exclusion. Education is considered to be one of the focal points for improvement, and numerous studies have analysed and reported on the educational situation of Roma. Several studies have argued that Romani cultural values are not compatible with institutional…

  3. Language Planning and Media: The Case of Romani

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halwachs, Dieter W.

    2011-01-01

    Romani media and language planning gained importance as a consequence of the political emancipation of the Roma, which is mainly based on the idea of a European Roma nation with its own culture and language. Meanwhile the study of Romani has developed from an exotic into a more or less established scientific field. However, with respect to media…

  4. Community as a Source for Literacy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasz, Bird; Tankersley, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    Describes methodologies used successfully to engage the Roma community in Central and Eastern European schools. Notes that the goals of the project were to identify Roma children who were misplaced in special education schools, improve their academic skills, and integrate them back into the mainstream. Notes one of the methodologies used to engage…

  5. Feel Threatened Being Prejudiced: The Role of Past Experience and Proximal Threat in Shaping Adolescents' Romaphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljujic, Vanja

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates Serbian adolescents' attitudes towards the Roma, i.e. Romaphobia. The sample consisted of 687 secondary school students (mean age 17), of which 53% were females. In a survey-based study, we assessed perception of physical threat, quality of previous contact with Roma, and Romaphobia. The findings demonstrate that perceived…

  6. Operations Research / Operations Analysis Orientation Course Curriculum for NATO Nations (Programme d’initiation a la recherche / l’analyse operationnelle pour les pays de l’OTAN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K2 00187 Roma Services Building 247 DANEMARK LUXEMBOURG Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JQ Danish Acquisition and Logistics...Information Centre 00187 Roma 1000 Ljubljana Mladoboleslavská 944 PO Box 18 LUXEMBOURG SPAIN 197 06 Praha 9 See Belgium SDGTECIN (DGAM) C

  7. Emerging from the Cocoon of Romani Pride: The First Graduates of the Gandhi Secondary School in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Susan Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent educational reforms in Hungary, only 33% of Roma who enter primary school subsequently enroll in secondary school, and a mere 0.2% progress to higher education. To address this situation, in 1994 the Gandhi Secondary School opened its doors as the first college preparatory school for Roma in Europe. In 2000, the school graduated 18…

  8. Analysis of falsely elevated risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm in women with ovarian endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Jun; Lee, Ye Ji; Kim, Ranah; Lee, Da Yong; Won, Kyu-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of falsely elevated risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in a group of women with pathologically confirmed endometrioma and to investigate the associated factors. Methods One hundred premenopausal women surgically diagnosed with ovarian endometrioma were selected. Preoperative clinical, laboratory, and surgical characteristics were compared between the elevated-risk group (ROMA-premenopausal value, ≥7.4%) and normal-risk group (ROMA-premenopausal value, <7.4%). Results Elevated ROMA was observed in 15 women (false positive rate, 15%). Excluding one woman with known chronic renal failure, we compared the characteristics of 99 women between the elevated-risk group (n=14) and the normalrisk group (n=85). None of the clinical and surgical variables distinguished the two groups. Serum level of CA 125 >82.3 U/mL and serum level of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) >46 pmol/L could predict an elevated ROMA test with a statistical significance. When serum level of HE4 ≤46 pmol/L, none of the women showed an elevated ROMA test, regardless of serum level of CA 125; however, 55.6% of the women showed an elevated ROMA test when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 ≤82.3 U/mL and all women showed an elevated ROMA test when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 >82.3 U/mL. Conclusion The incidence of falsely elevated ROMA was 15% in the group of women with pathologically confirmed endometrioma. Interpretation of the ROMA results should be cautious when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 >82.3 U/mL in women with suspicious ovarian endometrioma. PMID:27462596

  9. Nonlinear Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-27

    con- €"" straints:’. *’Permanent address: Dipartimento di Fisica . Universita di Roma 1. 00185 u 11lia. tr(a U(x)) = 0. (7a. 2469 1. Math,. PyS. 26 (10...Tenenblat Universidade de Brasilia Departamento de Matematica Brasilia, Brasil September 1985 , - . Abstract The generalized wave equation and generalized...Permanent addrems: Dipartimento di Fisica . Universita di Roma t3 U, 0. Roma. Italy The linear limit of i3) provides the most general solution ot 2614 J. MatM

  10. 7 CFR 351.2 - Location of inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...., Progreso, Tex., Ramey AFB, P.R., Roma, Tex., Rouses Point, N.Y., St. Paul, Minn., San Antonio, Tex., San Diego, Calif., San Francisco, Calif., San Juan, P.R., San Luis, Ariz., San Pedro, Calif., San...

  11. 7 CFR 351.2 - Location of inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...., Progreso, Tex., Ramey AFB, P.R., Roma, Tex., Rouses Point, N.Y., St. Paul, Minn., San Antonio, Tex., San Diego, Calif., San Francisco, Calif., San Juan, P.R., San Luis, Ariz., San Pedro, Calif., San...

  12. Individual Differences in Vigilance and Performance During Continuous/Sustained Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    Casagrande Dipartimento di Psicologia UniversitA degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" Via dei Marsi, 78 -00185 Roma, Italy Aeronautica Militare Italiana...8217based. approach, Journal of Personality and Social Psychologv. 56, 267-283. Casagrande M, Violani C, Curcio G., Bertini M. (1997) Individual differences...Multidimensional assessment of coping: A critical evaluation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 58: 844-854. Evans FJ, Cook MR, Cohen HD, Ome EC

  13. NATO Advanced Research Workshop: Vortex Flows and Related Numerical Methods (Ecoulements Tourbillonnaires et Methodes Numeriques) Held in Grenoble-St. Pierre de Chartreuse, France on June 15-19, 1992. List of Participants (Liste des Participants), Book of Abstracts (Resumes), Instructions for Submission to the Proceedings (Format pour les Actes).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    55 e-mail: buttke@math.ias.edu e-mail: baras@imag.fr Claude Basdevant Emanuele Caglioti LMD Dipatimento Matematica Ecole Normale Superieure Universita...Dipartimento Matematica CALTECH Universita ’La Sapienza’ Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 Tel.: (818) 356 44 62 00185 Roma, ITALIE Fax: (818...Vortices and Localizgtion in Euler Flows. Carlo Marchiom Dipainento di Matematica , Universitk "La Sapienza", Piazzale A.Moro 2, 00185 ROMA ,haly It is

  14. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    fisica matematica . ABSTRACT - We consider a new method for the numerical solution both of non- linear systems of equations and of cornplementauity... Matematica , Serie V11 Volume 9 , Roma (1989), 521-543 An Inexact Continuous Method for the Solution of Large Systems of Equations and Complementarity...34 - 00185 Roma - Italy APPENDIX 2 A Quadratically Convergent Method for Unear Programming’ Stefano Herzel Dipartimento di Matematica -G. Castelnuovo

  15. A Global Optimization Algorithm Using Stochastic Differential Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Bari (Italy).2Istituto di Fisica , 2 UniversitA di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via Orazio Raimondo, 00173 (La Romanina) Roma (Italy). 3Istituto di Matematica ...accompanying Algorithm. lDipartininto di Matematica , Universita di Bari, 70125 Bar (Italy). Istituto di Fisica , 2a UniversitA di Roim ’"Tor Vergata", Via...Optimization, Stochastic Differential Equations Work Unit Number 5 (Optimization and Large Scale Systems) 6Dipartimento di Matematica , Universita di Bari, 70125

  16. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting in Rome 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Fabio; Cattani, Giordano; Mazzaferro, Luca; Migliaccio, Marina; Pietrobon, Davide; Ricci Pacifici, Daniel; Stellato, Francesco; Veneziani, Marcella

    2012-10-01

    Conference logo At its third edition, the Young Researcher Meeting in Rome (YRMR) proves to be a growing event in the Italian scientific panorama. The high-quality content of the abstracts submitted to the scientific committee resulted in an exciting conference, held, for the second time, at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' on 20 January 2012. A busy schedule covered a large variety of cutting-edge science topics: fundamental interactions, particle physics, cosmology, astrophysics, condensed matter and biomedical physics. The broad range of the subjects discussed is the distinctive feature of the YRMR, a meeting aimed at enhancing the synergy among complementary branches of science by stimulating a fruitful exchange between theoretical, experimental and computational physics. Promoting collaborations between PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers creates a solid scientific network with an open-minded approach to discovery. In this volume, we collect the contributions that have been presented both in the form of talks and of posters. YRMR Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Luca Mazzaferro (luca.mazzaferro@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Marina Migliaccio (migliaccio@ifca.unican.es) Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Edificio Juan Jorda, Avenida de los Castros, E-39005 Santander, Cantabria Spain Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov) Jet Propulsion Laboratory - California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive 169-237 91109 Pasadena, CA USA Daniel Ricci Pacifici

  17. Diagnostic usefulness of the Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm using the electrochemiluminescence immunoassay for HE4 and the chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay for CA125

    PubMed Central

    Chudecka-Głaz, Anita; Cymbaluk-Płoska, Aneta; Luterek-Puszyńska, Katarzyna; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the usefulness of the Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) in the preoperative stratification of patients with ovarian tumors using a novel combination of laboratory tests. The study group (n=619) consisted of 354 premenopausal and 265 postmenopausal patients. The levels of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) were determined, and ROMA calculations were performed for each pre- and postmenopausal patient. HE4 levels were determined using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, while CA125 levels were determined by a chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay. A contingency table was applied to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV). Receiver operating characteristic curves were also constructed, and areas under the curves (AUCs) were compared between the marker determinations and ROMA algorithms. In terms of distinguishing between ovarian cancer and benign disease, the sensitivity of ROMA was 88.3%, specificity was 88.2%, PPV was 75.3% and NPV was 94.9% among all patients. The respective parameters were 71.1, 90.1, 48.2 and 91.1% in premenopausal patients and 93.6, 82.9, 86.6 and 91.6% in postmenopausal patients. The AUC value for the ROMA algorithm was 0.926 for the ovarian cancer vs. benign groups in all patients, 0.813 in premenopausal patients and 0.939 in postmenopausal patients. The respective AUC values were 0.911, 0.879 and 0.934 for CA125; and 0.879, 0.783 and 0.889 for HE4. In this combination, the ROMA algorithm is characterized by an extremely high sensitivity of prediction of ovarian cancer in women with pelvic masses, and may constitute a precise tool with which to support the qualification of patients to appropriate surgical procedures. The ROMA may be useful in diagnosing ovarian endometrial changes in young patients. PMID:27899969

  18. [Lithuania: the need for a better intergovernmental collaboration].

    PubMed

    Caplinskas, S

    1996-01-01

    An interview is presented with Saulius Caplinskas, a virologist serving as director of Lithuania's National Center to Combat AIDS and president of the AIDS Foundation, a nongovernmental organization (NGO). AIDS is viewed principally as a health issue in Lithuania, but other institutions are gradually becoming involved. Dr. Caplinskas simultaneously heads both a governmental and nongovernmental organization because some of the activities developed with risk groups are at the margin of existing laws. The NGO allows the government to be spared direct involvement in actions that the society is not yet ready to accept. Prevention programs are lacking in Lithuania because health education and promotion were a low priority of the former Soviet Union, and discussion of homosexuality, drug addiction, and prostitution was forbidden. Social workers are nonexistent in Lithuania. Government AIDS control programs in the region have been medically oriented. Lithuania's government program has a diagnostic laboratory and a department for medical, social, and psychological support of the seropositive. An AIDS hotline and an IEC section working with the general population, mass media, and specific target groups are other activities. NGOs working in the area of AIDS receive only indirect assistance, such as use of meeting rooms. NGOs are a new development in Lithuania, and the official attitude toward them remains cautious. The first priority of the AIDS program is to increase collaboration between specialists in sexually transmitted diseases, drug use, health education, and other relevant areas. A multisectorial approach should be developed to prepare for collaboration with the NGOs.

  19. Rank-ordered multifractal analysis for intermittent fluctuations with global crossover behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tom; Kintner, Paul M.; Klatt, Eric M.

    2010-03-15

    The rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA), a recently developed technique that combines the ideas of parametric rank ordering and one-parameter scaling of monofractals, has the capabilities of deciphering the multifractal characteristics of intermittent fluctuations. The method allows one to understand the multifractal properties through rank-ordered scaling or nonscaling parametric variables. The idea of the ROMA technique is applied to analyze the multifractal characteristics of the auroral zone electric-field fluctuations observed by the SIERRA sounding rocket. The observed fluctuations span across contiguous multiple regimes of scales with different multifractal characteristics. We extend the ROMA technique such that it can take into account the crossover behavior - with the possibility of collapsing probability distribution functions - over these contiguous regimes.

  20. Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Nanotechnology (4th) held at the Technische Universitat Muenchen, Munich, Germany on 17-19 Aug 2004.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    G. Iannaccone4,5, (1Unità INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica "E. Amaldi", Università di Roma TRE, V. Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma, Italy, 2Istituto di...Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, 4Dipartimento di Fisica , Universita’ di Trieste, 34127 Trieste, Italy) WE2_2_3 Platinum...l’Elettronica ed il Magnetismo , IMEM Institute - C.N.R., Parco delle Scienze - I-Parma) POSTER II POSTER I ORAL SESSIONS MAIN TU-P25 Freely Suspended

  1. High-Excitation OH and H2O Lines in Markarian 231: The Molecular Signatures of Compact Far-Infrared Continuum Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Spinoglio Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, CNR via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma, Italy; luigi.spinoglio@ifsi-roma.inaf.it and...arises from a warm (Tdust ¼ 70 100 K), optically thick (100m ¼ 1 2 ) medium of effective diameter 200–400 pc. In our best-fit model of total...component suggests that its infrared emission is dominated by the AGN. The derived column densities N (OH)k 1017 cm 2 and N (H2O)k 6 ; 1016 cm 2 may

  2. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    mJZ ipartimento di Matematica "G. Castelnuovo" AREA - 3P ...,N-Es Universit di Roma "La Sapienza" 00185 ROMA (Italy) it, 2ZNTRC.__;NG OFqcE NAME...N) T P a generic vector, the super script T means transpose, <., .> is the euclidean sca- lar product and II 11 the euclidean norm. We consider the...context of continuation methods ( ii ) study the nonlinear complementarity problem. 5 Index 1 Statement of scientific work done during the reporting period

  3. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing a β-1,3-glucanase from sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) show reduced callose deposition and increased tolerance to aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Shi, Wu Liang; You, Jiang Feng; Bian, Ming Di; Qin, Xiao Mei; Yu, Hui; Liu, Qing; Ryan, Peter R; Yang, Zhen Ming

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-one cultivars of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) were screened for aluminium (Al) tolerance by measuring relative root growth (RRG). Two contrasting cultivars, ROMA (Al tolerant) and POTCHETSTRM (Al sensitive), were selected to study shorter term responses to Al stress. POTCHETSTRM had higher callose synthase activity, lower β-1,3-glucanase activity and more callose deposition in the root apices during Al treatment compared with ROMA. We monitored the expression of 12 genes involved in callose synthesis and degradation and found that one of these, SbGlu1 (Sb03g045630.1), which encodes a β-1,3-glucanase enzyme, best explained the contrasting deposition of callose in ROMA and POTCHETSTRM during Al treatment. Full-length cDNAs of SbGlu1 was prepared from ROMA and POTCHETSTRM and expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Independent transgenic lines displayed significantly greater Al tolerance than wild-type plants and vector-only controls. This phenotype was associated with greater total β-1,3-glucanase activity, less Al accumulation and reduced callose deposition in the roots. These results suggest that callose production is not just an early indicator of Al stress in plants but likely to be part of the toxicity pathway that leads to the inhibition of root growth.

  4. The Aspiration and Access to Higher Education of Teenage Refugees in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jacqueline; Willott, John

    2007-01-01

    Refugee young people are an educationally diverse group. However, unlike groups such as Gypsy/Roma and Travellers, in the UK they do not attract targeted educational funding. In addition, neither the UK integration or refugee educational strategies nor the Higher Education Funding Council for England's strategic plan refer to higher education as a…

  5. The Power of Language, Learning and Socialization: Romani and Ebonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Eva

    2017-01-01

    This article draws attention to the role one's language plays in socialization and explains the misunderstandings and conflicts over integration of the Roma in the Czech Republic. Recognizing the role of home language leads to successful socialization. By not demanding that schools account for home language in the process of teaching, the Roma…

  6. Experiencing the Same but Differently: Indigenous Minority and Immigrant Children's Experiences in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorou, Eleni; Symeou, Loizos

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the experiences of minority students from two different cultural groups, immigrant children of Pontian background and indigenous minority children of Roma descent, in the Greek-Cypriot educational system. Through a joint re-examination of results from two different qualitative studies, this paper delineates similarities and…

  7. Representing "The Great Devouring:" Romani Characters in Young Adult Holocaust Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean-Ruzicka, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the representation of Roma-Sinti ("gypsy") characters in young adult literature about the Holocaust. It analyzes three primary texts: Jerry Spinelli's "Milkweed" (2003), Erich Hackl's "Farewell Sidonia" (1991), and Alexander Ramati's "And the Violins Stopped Playing"…

  8. Solving the "Gypsy Problem": "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William S.; Merry, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how the "discourse moment" constituted by "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic" might affect the future of schooling for Roma youth. In this article, the authors follow the scheme proposed by Lilie Chouliaraki and Norman Fairclough, who suggest a five-part framework for critical discourse analysis:…

  9. Essay on Personal Field Experiences from an Intercultural Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtuna, Adrian-Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    In this article I intend to analyse two of the research projects I carried out among the Roma from a critical intercultural perspective. I shall discuss some of the processes referring to the educational policy of teaching Romani mother tongue in school, considering not only the direct beneficiaries of this policy, the students, but also the…

  10. Romani Peoples' Resistance to Mainstream Schooling: A Focus on Romani Woman and Girls' Education and the Educational Policies, Barriers, and Practices in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macris, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    The Romani (or Roma) people are, perhaps, the oldest and most discriminated against ethnic minority group in Eastern Europe. In particular, Romani women and girls have been described by the UN Women, United Nations Development Program (UNDP), and Office of High Commission of Human Rights (OHCHR) as "one of the most disempowered groups in…

  11. Romans: A Simulation of the History and Culture of Ancient Rome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staneart, Chuck; Baral, Wanda

    This simulation allows students to learn about and participate in many of the aspects of ancient Roman life that have influenced present institutions and way of life. The phases of the unit include: (1) "Daily Life"; (2) "Forum of Roma"; (3) "Temple of Apollo"; (4) "Pax Romana"; (5) "History/Mystery:…

  12. The Italian Army’s Role in Homeland Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Roma: Stato Maggiore dell’Esercito – Reparto Impiego delle Forze, Ottobre 2000), B/1-2. 6 Norme di principio sulla disciplina militare, Legge 382, art...contrastare la criminalita` organizzata in Sicilia. Decreto-legge 349 (25 Luglio 1992). Norme di principio sulla disciplina militare. Legge 382 (11 Luglio

  13. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 18, Number 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    Precise location Ma ini, 46-47, pp 66-73 (1984-1985) (in Roma - .0 of UNF and evaluation of the FRF matrix at nian). , these frequencies are critical for...for vibration measurement, techniques for Perspective," by Tustin and Mercado , will be vibration analysis and control, and vibration used. correction

  14. ARCHEOPS: A Large Sky Coverage Balloon-Borne Experiment for Mapping the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Cécile; Archeops Collaboration

    Archeops is an international collaboration gathering laboratories from France [CRTBT, ISN, LAOG (Grenoble); IAS, CSNSM, LAL (Orsay); SPP (Saclay); APC, IAP (Paris), CESR, OMP (Toulouse)], Italy [Univ. La Sapienza (Roma), IROE-CNR (Firenze)], UK [QMW (Cardiff)] and USA [CALTECH, JPL, the University of Minnesota].

  15. A Survey of Modern Air Traffic Control. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    oceanic traffic would use combined hyperbolic-inertial navigation systems. System I could be implemented to meet the demanda for air traffic services...of Aviation c/o Flugrad Reykjavik ITALY Aeronautica Militare Ufficio del Delegato Nationale all’AGARD 3, Piazzale Adenauer Roma /EUR

  16. Missile Aerodynamics (Aerodynamique des Missiles)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    guerre froide la production des missiles a baisse’, avec pour consequence une diminution des budgets de d6veloppement. Les nouveaux types de conflits ...Roma) Directeur - Gestion de l’information LUXEMBOURG (Recherche et developpement) - DRDGI 3 Voir Belgique Ministbre de la Difense nationale NORVEGE

  17. An Investigation of Spinup Dynamics of Axial Gyrostats Using Elliptic Integrals and the Method of Averaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    effect a decrease in the kinetic energy and stabilize a tumbling spacecraft. He tested linear and nonlinear control laws derived using Lyapunov functions...Convegno In- ternazaionale sul Tema: Metodi Valutativi Nella Fisica- Matematica , Roma. 15-19 dicembre 1972, Problemi Attuali di Scienza e di Cultura, Quaderno

  18. The 1999 Conference on Molecular Energy Transfer (COMET XVI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-14

    Departamento de Fisicoquimica , Facultad de Ciencias QuImicas, Universidad Nacional de C6rdoba, 5000 C6rdoba, Argentina and Izhack Oref Department of...Monterotondo Scalo Roma - Italia Ferrero, Juan distefan-mlib.cnr.it INFIQC-Departamento de Fisicoquimica Fax: +39-0690672238 Fac.Ciencias Quimicas

  19. The International Symposium on Applied Military Psychology (18th) Held at London, England on 21-25 June 1982,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    it launches into an interna - of topics and projects were reported. tional marketing and cost-reduction King (US) reviewed some of the American effort...5* Rep. Sanitfi A.M. Centro Studie Ricerche Medicina Aeronauticae Spaziale Viale P. Gobetti, 2-2A 00185 Roma Dr. Massimiliano Stracca Ispettorato

  20. Burnout and Work Engagement: Independent Factors or Opposite Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Roma, Vicente; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Lloret, Susana

    2006-01-01

    Burnout researchers have proposed that the conceptual opposites of emotional exhaustion and cynicism (the core dimensions of burnout) are vigor and dedication (the core dimensions of engagement), respectively (Maslach & Leiter, 1997; Schaufeli, Salanova, Gonzalez-Roma, & Bakker, 2002). We tested this proposition by ascertaining whether two sets of…

  1. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-02

    discrimination against the Roma and Sintis ideas are closely connected with each other and one is [ethnic Gypsy groups] and homosexuals . not conceivable and...remained, more open toward the outside world. The nerable, the system’s innate logic and its militarized, (hesitant and, at times, halting) process of

  2. Hyperbolic Conservation Laws with Umbilic Points I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    del problema di Cauchy Universitih di Roma, Rendiconti di Matematica, 14, 382-387 (1955). [DCL] Ding, X., Chen, G.-Q., and Luo, P.: Convergence of the... Universidade Cat6lica do Rio de Janeiro, Ph. D. Thesis (in Portuguese), 1989. [Mo! Morawetz, C. S. : On a Weak Solution for a Transonic Flow Problem, Comm

  3. On Winter Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    in Latin (Puffendorf zen water bodies had been recognized long before Charles. 1685: Historia Germanico-Sveviae), are authoritative and The Mongols...declaration of war and crossing of the Roma - in the theater of operations, the armies on both sides suf- nian border on 24 April 1877. The war was

  4. Air Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    though his own theoretical views were more akin to those of Mitchell. This is not surprising when one considers that as early as his plebe year at the...permit the airship the more read- ily to be trimmed. Ballonets are provided, as a rule, for each compartment. The Army airship Roma was of this type

  5. Rights of the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Claude, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter examines problems and rights of Romani children in East Central Europe, focusing on such topics as: the displaced childhoods of Romani children; snapshots of living conditions in various European countries; Roma child rights; Romani and non-Romani schools in Bulgaria; Romani children's rights to education in Central and Eastern…

  6. The Role of Community Development Employment Projects in Rural and Remote Communities. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the report, "The Role of Community Development Employment Projects in Rural and Remote Communities," (ED495158) and is an added resource for further information. The contents of this support docment include: (1) Regional Council--Roma; (2) Regional Council--Tennant…

  7. Supporting Refugee Children in 21st Century Britain: A Compendium of Essential Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Jill

    This book provides information on the most recent groups of refugee children in British schools, including children from Albania, Eastern European Roma, the former Soviet Union, Iraq, Kurdistan, Algeria, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Kenya, Nigeria, and many other countries. Because educational provisions for students from refugee communities have…

  8. Recommendations on the Establishment of a NATO Simulation Resource Library (Recommandations pour la creation d une bibliotheque de moyens de simulation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge Services ESPAGNE 00187 Roma Kentigern House INTA (RTO/AGARD Publications) Room 2246 Carretera de Torrejón a Ajalvir, Pk.4 LUXEMBOURG 65...RTO Carretera de Torrejón a Ajalvir, Pk.4 VTÚL a PVO Praha ICELAND 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz - Madrid Mladoboleslavská ul. Director of Aviation

  9. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 16. Introduction to Airborne Early Warning Radar Flight Test. (Introduction aux essais en vol des Radars Aeroportes d’Alerte Lointaine)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    AGARD Publications) 00185 Roma Kentigern House Carretera de Torrej6n a Ajalvir, Pk.4 LUXEMBOURG 65 Brown Street 28850 Torrej6n de Ardoz - Madrid Voir...ICELAND SPAIN Director Research & Development Director of Aviation INTA (RTO/AGARD Publications) Communications & Information c/o Flugrad Carretera

  10. Resonance Capture in Unbalanced Dual-Spin Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    York, 1989. 22. Wittenburg, Jens. "Beitrige zur dynamik von gyrostaten." In Convegno Inter- nazaionale sul Tema: Metodi Valutativi Nella Fisica ... Matematica , Roma, 15-19 dicembre 1972, Problemi Attuali di Scienza e di Cultura, Quaderno N. 217, pages 217-354. Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, 1975. 23

  11. Optimal cosmic microwave background map-making in the presence of cross-correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We present an extension of the ROMA map-making algorithm for the generation of optimal cosmic microwave background polarization maps. The new code allows for a possible cross-correlated noise component among the detectors of a CMB experiment. A promising application is the forthcoming LSPE balloon-borne experiment, which is devoted to the accurate observation of CMB polarization at large angular scales. Methods: We generalized the noise covariance matrix in time domain to account for all the off-diagonal terms due to the detector cross-talk. Hence, we performed preliminary forecasts of the LSPE-SWIPE instrument. Results: We found that considering the noise cross-correlation among the detectors results in a more realistic estimate of the angular power spectra. In particular, the extended ROMA algorithm has provided a considerable reduction of the spectra error bars. We expect that this improvement could be crucial in constraining the B-mode polarization at the largest scales.

  12. SVIRCO data for Ground-Level Enhancements observed during solar cycle 23 (*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storini, Marisa

    S.V.I.R.CO. (Studio Variazioni Intensita' Raggi COsmici) Observatory and TPL (Terrestrial Physics Laboratory) Unit of IFSI-Roma performs measurements of the nucleonic component of cosmic rays since May 1997 at the Physics Department of Roma Tre University. Recorded 5-min data with a standard neutron monitor were carefully checked and the international files for the analysis of Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs) were prepared for the complete solar cycle 23. Data refer to sixteen GLEs observed by the world-wide cosmic-ray network from November 6, 1997 to December 12, 2006. A summary of the obtained results is here presented. (*) This work is a contribution to the European NMDB Project and it was supported by ASI contract I/015/07/0

  13. Ethnic and religious differentials in Bulgarian mortality, 1993–98

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Iliana V.; Preston, Samuel H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated ethnic/religious mortality differentials in Bulgaria during the 1990s. The analyses employed a unique longitudinal data set covering the entire population of Bulgaria from the census of 1992 until 1998. The mortality of Roma is very high compared to all other ethnic/religious groups. The excess applies to nearly every cause of death examined and is not entirely explained by the adverse location of Roma on social and economic variables. For young men, Muslim mortality is substantially lower than that of non-Muslims when socioeconomic differences are controlled. An analysis of causes of death suggests that lower consumption of alcohol may contribute to this ‘Muslim paradox’. For older Muslim women, a significant mortality disadvantage remains after controls are imposed. Suicide mortality is lower for Muslims than for Christian groups of the same ethnicity. Consistent with deteriorating economic conditions over the study period, mortality was rising, particularly for women. PMID:21294054

  14. Y-STR variation in Albanian populations: implications on the match probabilities and the genetic legacy of the minority claiming an Egyptian descent.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Tofanelli, Sergio; Alù, Milena; Taglioli, Luca; Radheshi, Erjon; Corradini, Beatrice; Paoli, Giorgio; Capelli, Cristian; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    Y chromosome variation at 12 STR (the Powerplex® Y system core set) and 18 binary markers was investigated in two major (the Ghegs and the Tosks) and two minor (the Gabels and the Jevgs) populations from Albania (Southern Balkans). The large proportion of haplotypes shared within and between groups makes the Powerplex 12-locus set inadequate to ensure a suitable power of discrimination for the forensic practice. At least 85% of Y lineages in the Jevgs, the cultural minority claiming an Egyptian descent, turned out to be of either Roma or Balkan ancestry. They also showed unequivocal signs of a common genetic history with the Gabels, the other Albanian minority practising social and cultural Roma traditions.

  15. High Frontier: The Journal for Space and Missile Professionals. Volume 6, Number 2, February 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland , Portugal, Roma- nia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the US. 4 NATO home page...terrestrial physics, or planetary sciences. The key for the US and China will be to find areas where each side can make valuable contributions to...science activities in Earth observation, astro- physics, planetary exploration, and heliophysics have significant international par- ticipation. 27

  16. Considerations on the current universal vaccination policy against hepatitis A in Greece after recent outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (p<0.001). However, universal vaccination (~ 80% vaccine coverage of children) had no significant effect on the annual number of reported cases (p = 0.261) and has resulted to a progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5) was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1) (p<0.001). In the last decade, one third of all reported cases were Roma (a population accounting for 1.5% of the country's total population) and in 2013 three outbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a) vaccination of high risk groups, b) universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c) education of the population and travel advice, and d) enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods.

  17. Plane Shock - Thermal Layer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Roma DRSEL-TL, S. Kronenberg R. Freiberg Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703 4 Commander US Army Missile Command ATTN: DRSMI-S, Ch Scientist...of Copies Organization Conunander 3 US Army Mobility Equipment Research S Development Command ATTN: Tech Docu Cen, Bldg 315 DRSME-RZT Fort ...220 - 7th Street, NE Charlottesville, VA 22901 Commander US Army Nuclear Agency ATTN: ATCN-W/CPT M. Bowling CDINS-E Technical Library Fort

  18. The SPARX Project: R & D Activity Towards X-Rays FEL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome2 /Milan Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FELSASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities as described in this paper.

  19. Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    J.M., Departamento de Microbiologia , Universidad de Barcelona, Spain: The influence of growth temperature and osmolarity on lipopolysaccharide and...tica Molecular y Microbiologia , Facultad de Ciencias Biol6gicas, Universidad Catclica de Chile: Effect of heterologous expression of S. typhimurium... Microbiologia , Universiti degli Studi di Parma, 21stituto Superiore di SanitA, Roma, Italy; 3INSERM U42, Villeneuve, d’Ascq, France: Human natural

  20. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  1. European Science Notes Information Bulletin Reports on Current European/ Middle Eastern Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    advanced computation. The deficiencies in the Arrhenius-type aeronautical industry . Some Swedish aeronautical reaction rate models (which do not account...Research in Industrial Technologies for Europe/European Research on Advanced Materials 29 ESNIB 91-04 The Area Della Ricerca di Roma . Fourier transform...break) and the pharmaceutical industry ) ha(’ advanced peptide synthesis cluster changes in time. An effective medium theory was and microencapsulation

  2. Submarine Warfare in the 20th & 21st Centuries: A Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    Strategic and International Studies, 1998. (CSIS panel reports). 42 p. NPS/DKL Location: GENERAL VA50 .G68 1998 Harris , Brayton. The Navy times book...Minardi, Salvatore. Il disarmo navale italiano (1919-1936): un confronto politico- diplomatico per il potere marittimo. Roma: Ufficio storico della...NAVAL STRATEGY/WARFARE -- WWII – GENERAL Bath, Alan Harris . Tracking the axis enemy: the triumph of Anglo-American naval intelligence. Lawrence, KS

  3. Development of a Four-Fin Bio-Inspired UUV: CFD Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    curvature of the robotic pectoral fins was necessary to achieve precise low-speed maneuverability of UUVs in highly time-varying external force... Robotic Pectoral Fin ,” 2007 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Roma, Italy. 9. Geder, J., Ramamurti, R., Palmisano, J., Pruessner, M...UUV) with four actively controlled curvature flapping fins is described. Three dimensional unsteady flow computations past several configuration of

  4. Assessing the Adaptability to Irregular Rest-Work Rhythms in Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    Aeronautica Militare Italiana, CSV Reparto Medicina Aerospaziale Pratica di Mare, 00040 Pomezia (Roma) Italy 2 Dipartimento di Psicologia - Universitd...characteristics to adapt to increased work errors and impaired social work at unusual hours. and family relationship. In addition, there is an increased mortality...DUTY: a brief questionnaire on critical evaluation. Journal of Personality the sleep-wake cycle and vigilance filled in and Social Psychology. 58: 844

  5. Modeling of Ionization Phenomena in SiC Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34 Roma, ITALY United State Army EUROPEAN RESEARCH OFFICE USARDSG-UK CONTRACT NUMBER N68171-96-C-9115 3nd Interim Report October 1997 - December 1997...depletion region to grow more rapidly on the n side than on the p one. The peak field increases with temperature, due to the highe- level of fixed...charge at the junction. In the examined structures, tunneling times out- o: shallow are in the femtosecond range for sufficiently high fields . Thus

  6. JPRS Report, East Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-16

    in 1918 Examined 25000003 Budapest HISTORIA in Hungarian No 4, 1987 pp 16-20 [Article by Magda Adam, former Wilson Center fellow: "An Amercian...in Washington, D.C. First paragraph is HISTORIA intro- duction] [Text] The Hungarian public has shown in recent years a keen interest in the...this to some extent. He had stated in a confidential report that the Romanian government’s unification efforts were unfounded because "... Roma - nians

  7. Albania’s Counter-Terrorism Policy Options: Finding a Strategy of Common Sense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Hoxha, Banner of Struggle for Freedom and Socialism (Tirana, N.p., 1985), 107. 15 Aleks Luarasi, Historia e Institucioneve Juridike Shqiptare...minority villages and neighborhoods. The rampage left nineteen dead; nearly 900 injured; 700 Serb, Ashkali and Roma homes, up to 10 public buildings, 30...OSCE, February 2004. http://www.osce.org/documents/pia/2004/02/2117_en.pdf (accessed 20 March 2004). Luarasi, Aleks. Historia e Institucioneve

  8. XIth Workshop on Resistive Plate Chambers and Related Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RPC2012 continues the tradition of regular scientific meetings, first started in 1991 at Lecce, with following editions in Roma, Pavia, Napoli, Bari, Coimbra, Clermont-Ferrand, Seoul, Mumbai, Darmstadt. The RPC detection technique has found large application in LHC detectors and in astroparticle physics experiments. The workshop focused on performance of large RPC systems, ageing and detector materials studies, electronics for RPCs, physics of basic processes in the gas, timing applications, new ideas for RPC detectors.

  9. Lasers in Synthesis, Characterization and Processing of Diamond, International Center, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 6-9 October 1997

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    di Fisica Sperimentale General Physics Institute. Terza Universita di Roma University of Torino ul. Vavilova 38, Dipartamento di ...Vittonel, G. Mariotto2, C. Vinegoni2 , E. Cazzanelli 3 , N.y. Suetin 4, Y.A. Mankelevich 4, ’ Unii’ersita’ di Torino, Dipartimnento di Fisica...Sperimentale, INFAT-S ezione di Torino, IANFM- Unita’ di Torino Unii’ersita’, Torino, Italy, 2 Universita’ di Trento, Dipartimento di Fisica, INFMJ-Unita’ di

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulosilyticum sp. I15G10I2, a Novel Bacterium Isolated from a Coal Seam Gas Water Treatment Pond

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellulosilyticum sp. strain I15G10I2 was isolated from a coal seam gas water treatment pond at the Spring Gully water treatment facility, Roma, Queensland, Australia. Analysis of the genome of 4,489,861 bp and G+C content of 35.23% revealed that strain I15G10I2 shared limited similarity to members of the genus Cellulosilyticum, family Lachnospiraceae. PMID:28209824

  11. Intrinsic Geodesy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-03-01

    Variation with the Height of the Principal Radii of Curvature in Somigliana’s Theory"), Bollettino di Geodesia e Scienze Affini, anno VIII, 1950 46...MARUSSI, A., "Principi di Geodesia Intrinseca applicati al campo di Somigliana" ("Principles of Intrinsic Geodesy Applied to Somigliana’s Field...34), Bollettino di Geodesia e Scienze Affini, anno VIII, 1950; and also Atti della XLII Riunione _dela Socie&Ljtsjjganaper il Progresso delle Scienze, Roma

  12. Identification of the CRP regulon using in vitro and in vivo transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongling; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Hobman, Jon L; Minchin, Stephen D

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a global regulator that controls transcription initiation from more than 100 promoters by binding to a specific DNA sequence within cognate promoters. Many genes in the CRP regulon have been predicted simply based on the presence of DNA-binding sites within gene promoters. In this study, we have exploited a newly developed technique, run-off transcription/microarray analysis (ROMA) to define CRP-regulated promoters. Using ROMA, we identified 176 operons that were activated by CRP in vitro and 16 operons that were repressed. Using positive control mutants in different regions of CRP, we were able to classify the different promoters into class I or class II/III. A total of 104 operons were predicted to contain Class II CRP-binding sites. Sequence analysis of the operons that were repressed by CRP revealed different mechanisms for CRP inhibition. In contrast, the in vivo transcriptional profiles failed to identify most CRP-dependent regulation because of the complexity of the regulatory network. Analysis of these operons supports the hypothesis that CRP is not only a regulator of genes required for catabolism of sugars other than glucose, but also regulates the expression of a large number of other genes in E.coli. ROMA has revealed 152 hitherto unknown CRP regulons.

  13. Genetic drift and the population history of the Irish travellers.

    PubMed

    Relethford, John H; Crawford, Michael H

    2013-02-01

    The Irish Travellers are an itinerant group in Ireland that has been socially isolated. Two hypotheses have been proposed concerning the genetic origin of the Travellers: (1) they are genetically related to Roma populations in Europe that share a nomadic lifestyle or (2) they are of Irish origin, and genetic differences from the rest of Ireland reflect genetic drift. These hypotheses were tested using data on 33 alleles from 12 red blood cell polymorphism loci. Comparison with other European, Roma, and Indian populations shows that the Travellers are genetically distinct from the Roma and Indian populations and most genetically similar to Ireland, in agreement with earlier genetic analyses of the Travellers. However, the Travellers are still genetically distinct from other Irish populations, which could reflect some external gene flow and/or the action of genetic drift in a small group that was descended from a small number of founders. In order to test the drift hypothesis, we analyzed genetic distances comparing the Travellers to four geographic regions in Ireland. These distances were then compared with adjusted distances that account for differential genetic drift using a method developed by Relethford (Hum Biol 68 (1996) 29-44). The unadjusted distances show the genetic distinctiveness of the Travellers. After adjustment for the expected effects of genetic drift, the Travellers are equidistant from the other Irish samples, showing their Irish origins and population history. The observed genetic differences are thus a reflection of genetic drift, and there is no evidence of any external gene flow.

  14. Designing normative open virtual enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Emilia; Giret, Adriana; Botti, Vicente

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest on developing virtual enterprises in order to deal with the globalisation of the economy, the rapid growth of information technologies and the increase of competitiveness. In this paper we deal with the development of normative open virtual enterprises (NOVEs). They are systems with a global objective that are composed of a set of heterogeneous entities and enterprises that exchange services following a specific normative context. In order to analyse and design systems of this kind the multi-agent paradigm seems suitable because it offers a specific solution for supporting the social and contractual relationships between enterprises and for formalising their business processes. This paper presents how the Regulated Open Multi-agent systems (ROMAS) methodology, an agent-oriented software methodology, can be used to analyse and design NOVEs. ROMAS offers a complete development process that allows identifying and formalising of the structure of NOVEs, their normative context and the interactions among their members. The use of ROMAS is exemplified by means of a case study that represents an automotive supply chain.

  15. Time trends in pediatric hospitalizations for hepatitis A in Greece (1999-2013): Assessment of the impact of universal infant immunization in 2008.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, V; Alexopoulou, Z; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Kourlamba, G; Katsioulis, A; Theodoridou, K; Spoulou, V; Theodoridou, M

    2016-07-02

    Hepatitis A vaccine was introduced in the Greek National Immunization Program in 2008. To estimate possible impact of the universal vaccination implementation, time trends of hospitalizations for hepatitis A at the Infectious Diseases Unit of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Athens during 1999-2013 were analyzed. Hepatitis A hospitalizations were recorded from the discharge database and were expressed as frequencies and rate of annual departmental hospitalizations. Time series analysis (ARIMA) was used to explore trends and the impact of the vaccination. Moreover, changes in patient age, population group distribution and the duration of hospitalization were also examined. Hepatitis A hospitalizations rate significantly decreased between pre-vaccination (1999-2008) and post-vaccination (2009-2013) era from 50.5 to 20.8/1000 hospitalizations (p = 0.005). A 3-year periodicity and a trend of reduction on hepatitis A hospitalizations rates across years were noted. Roma children had significant higher rates of hepatitis A hospitalization, followed by immigrant children. Importantly, possibly due to preceding vaccine availability with considerable uptake in private market and unvaccinated group/pockets of children (Roma), overall vaccination effect was less apparent when compared to data from other countries that implemented universal vaccination. No significant change in patient age, population group distribution, or duration of hospitalization was observed. High risk groups such as Roma children should be targeted for vaccination to reduce future outbreaks.

  16. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Martinelli, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Ricci Pacifici, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2013-12-01

    YRM logo The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been a rapidly growing event for the last few years. Together with other initiatives which have emerged in several research areas, the young researcher meeting marks the awareness and the desire of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in scientific progress. Devoted to the discussion and the interchange of new developments and ideas in physics, the meeting is primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in an informal atmosphere. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. Born in Rome in 2009, after three editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2013 was held in Trieste. Propelled by the past success, the fourth meeting was a two-day conference on 3-4June. It was sponsored by the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA - and the University of Padova, thus acquiring an even further international drive. In this volume, we collect some of the contributions that were presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, biophysics and medical physics. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Matteo Martinelli (mmartin@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di

  17. Quantifying the sensitivity of scent detection dogs to identify fecal contamination on raw produce.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Melissa L; Bond, Ronald F; Farrar, Jeff; Falco, Andy; Cassens, Barbara; Cruse, Alonza; Atwill, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of raw produce commodities has been associated with foodborne outbreaks in the United States. In a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report outlining the incidence of food-related outbreaks from 1998 to 2008, produce of all kinds were implicated in 46% of illnesses and 23% of deaths. Methods that quickly identify fecal contamination of foods, including produce, will allow prioritization of samples for testing during investigations and perhaps decrease the time required to identify specific brands or lots. We conducted a series of trials to characterize the sensitivity and specificity of scent detection dogs to accurately identify fecal contamination on raw agricultural commodities (romaine lettuce, spinach, cilantro, and roma tomatoes). Both indirect and direct methods of detection were evaluated. For the indirect detection method, two dogs were trained to detect contamination on gauze pads previously exposed to produce contaminated with feces. For the direct detection method, two dogs were trained to identify fecal contamination on fresh produce. The indirect method did not result in acceptable levels of sensitivity except for the highest levels of fecal contamination (25 g of feces). Each dog had more difficulty detecting fecal contamination on cilantro and spinach than on roma tomatoes. For the direct detection method, the dogs exhibited >75% sensitivity for detecting ≥0.25 g of feces on leafy greens (cilantro, romaine lettuce, and spinach) and roma tomatoes, with sensitivity declining as the amount of feces dropped below 0.025 g. We determined that use of a scent detection dog to screen samples for testing can increase the probability of detecting ≥0.025 g of fecal contamination by 500 to 3,000% when samples with fecal contamination are rare (≤1%).

  18. The Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup H1a1a-M82 Reveals the Likely Indian Origin of the European Romani Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G.; Underhill, Peter A.; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their Indian origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of Indian-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their South Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in South Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the Indian subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled caste and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India. PMID:23209554

  19. Genetic and biochemical study of dual hereditary jaundice: Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes. Haplotyping and founder effect of deletion in ABCC2.

    PubMed

    Slachtova, Lenka; Seda, Ondrej; Behunova, Jana; Mistrik, Martin; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Dual hereditary jaundice, a combination of Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes, is a rare clinical entity resulting from the compound defects of bilirubin conjugation and transport. We aimed to study the hereditary jaundice in 56 members from seven seemingly unrelated Roma families, to find the causal genetic defect and to estimate its origin in Roma population. On the basis of biochemical results of total and conjugated serum bilirubin and clinical observations, ABCC2 gene, TATA box and phenobarbital enhancer (PBREM) of UGT1A1 gene were analyzed by sequencing, RFLP and fragment analysis. We found a novel variant c.1013_1014delTG in the eighth exon of ABCC2 gene in 17 individuals in homozygous state. Dual defect NG_011798.1:c.[1013_1014delTG]; NG_002601.2:g.[175492_175493insTA] in homozygous state was found in four subjects. Biochemical analyses of porphyrins and coproporphyrin isomers in urine performed by HPLC showed inverted ratio of excreted coproporphyrin, with the predominance of coproporphyrin I (up to 100%), typical for patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome. Pursuant cultural and social specifics of the population led us to suspect a founder effect; therefore, we performed a haplotype study using genotyping data from Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. As a result, we detected a common 86 kbp haplotype encompassing promoter and part of the ABCC2 coding region among all families, and estimated the age of the ancestral variant to 178-185 years. In this study, we found a novel deletion in ABCC2 gene, described genetic and biochemical features of dual hereditary jaundice and confirmed the existence of founder effect and common haplotype among seven Roma families.

  20. Haematological complications in otherwise healthy children hospitalized for varicella.

    PubMed

    Elena, Bozzola; Anna, Quondamcarlo; Andrzej, Krzysztofiak; Elisabetta, Pandolfi; Laura, Lancella; Alberto, Tozzi

    2011-02-11

    Although varicella is commonly regarded as a mild childhood disease, complications may occur and frequently require hospitalization. The aim of this study was to establish the type and frequency of varicella complications among hospitalized paediatric patients over a 4.5-year period. This analysis included the medical charts of 306 patients admitted to the Infectious Disease Unit, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Roma, Italy from 2006 to 2010 for varicella disease. The most common complications were haematological disorders (41.5%) followed by neurological ones (23.5%). Varicella vaccination in childhood immunization program must be increased.

  1. Ozone-induced ethylene release from leaf surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rodecap, K.D.; Tingey, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Ozone-induced stress-ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene diffused through the stomata or cuticle. In plants not exposed to ozone, basal ethylene was detected above both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of all the plant species examined, indicating that some ethylene can diffuse across the leaf cuticle. Oxone-induced stress ethylene production in all species examined. These data indicate that ozone-induced stress ethylene primarily diffuses from the leaf via the stomata.

  2. Editors' preface for the topical issue on Seven papers on Noncommutative Geometry and Operator Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Daniele; Landi, Giovanni; Vassout, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    This topical issue grew out of the International Conference "Noncommutative Geometry and Applications" held 16-21 June 2014 at Villa Mondragone, Frascati (Roma). The main purpose of the conference was to have a unified view of different incarnations of noncommutative geometry and its applications. The seven papers collected in the present topical issue represent a good sample of the topics covered at the workshop. The conference itself was one of the climaxes of the Franco-Italian project GREFI-GENCO, which was initiated in 2007 by CNRS and INDAM to promote and enhance collaboration and exchanges between French and Italian researchers in the area of noncommutative geometry.

  3. Cosmic ray intensity for about five solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storini, M.; Signoretti, F.; Re, F.; Diego, P.; Marcucci, M. F.; Laurenza, M.; Massetti, S.; Parisi, M.

    2015-08-01

    Continuous records of the cosmic ray nucleonic component have been achieved at Rome (SVIRCO Group) by using data from different types and locations of neutron monitors (first at La Sapienza University: 41.90°N, 12.52°E, altitude about 60 m a.s.l., and then at Roma Tre University: 41.86°N, 12.47°E, about sea level). The normalized data, covering the whole period from July 1957 to June 2014, are available to the scientific community by simple request. Here we illustrate some useful results derived from them.

  4. Working together for public health.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pompeo

    2009-06-01

    Italy's recent economic growth and strategic position in the Mediterranean Sea have made it a prime destination for immigrants and asylum seekers in Europe. Despite its well-developed health care system, statistics on foreign citizens' health are worrisome. In 1998 public health services were extended to illegal immigrants, giving them the right to necessary urgent and non-urgent medical assistance, even for a prolonged period. This paper examines a two-year joint intervention project between Centre for the Study and Research of Public Health (Mental Health), Local Health Agency ROMA E (LHA RME) and the non-governmental organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Rome.

  5. [Laboratory tests applied to transfusion problems. Identification of dangerous universal donors and their frequency].

    PubMed

    De Bartolo, M; Giordano, F; Violante, A; Bonomi, P

    1977-01-01

    We studied 504 subjects, whose blood group wes O; they were periodic or occasional blood donors from Transfusional Center A.V.I.S., Policlinico "Umberto I", Roma. Our research was based on the principle stated by Gandini: he states that the natural isoagglutinin concentration equal or superior to 1:200 and the presence of hemolytic isoantibodies may make universal donors dangerous. Our results indicated that the percentage of this kind of donors is 27.75%. Sice 17.26% of our studied subjects showed hemolytic antibodies, we consider it is sufficient to identify dangerous donors through a dosage of hemolytic isoantibodies.

  6. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    ar X iv :1 11 1. 03 25 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 1 N ov 2 01 1 2011 Fermi Symposium, Roma., May. 9-12 1 Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating...observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems. The high...the Vela and CTA 1 pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission

  7. Hemoglobin Solution Effects on the Heart: Review of 19 Research Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    York: Alan R Liss, Inc.] 213-222. niEor 6. Biro GP, Heresford-Kroeger D. 1180. The effect of hemodilut ion with st roma-free hemoglobin and dextran on...1980. The effect of hemodilution with stroma-free hemoglobin and dextran on collateral perfusion of ischemic myocardium in the dog. Am Heart J 99:64-75...Nine dogs received stroma-free hemoglobin solution (Group 1), 9 dogs received their shed blood (Group 2) and 6 dogs received a 6% solution of Dextran -70

  8. Statistical Analysis of Random Number Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Gäbler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    In many applications, for example cryptography and Monte Carlo simulation, there is need for random numbers. Any procedure, algorithm or device which is intended to produce such is called a random number generator (RNG). What makes a good RNG? This paper gives an overview on empirical testing of the statistical properties of the sequences produced by RNGs and special software packages designed for that purpose. We also present the results of applying a particular test suite--TestU01-- to a family of RNGs currently being developed at the Centro Interdipartimentale Vito Volterra (CIVV), Roma, Italy.

  9. Genomic insights into the population structure and history of the Irish Travellers

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Edmund; Carmi, Shai; Ennis, Sean; Wilson, James F.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.

    2017-01-01

    The Irish Travellers are a population with a history of nomadism; consanguineous unions are common and they are socially isolated from the surrounding, ‘settled’ Irish people. Low-resolution genetic analysis suggests a common Irish origin between the settled and the Traveller populations. What is not known, however, is the extent of population structure within the Irish Travellers, the time of divergence from the general Irish population, or the extent of autozygosity. Using a sample of 50 Irish Travellers, 143 European Roma, 2232 settled Irish, 2039 British and 6255 European or world-wide individuals, we demonstrate evidence for population substructure within the Irish Traveller population, and estimate a time of divergence before the Great Famine of 1845–1852. We quantify the high levels of autozygosity, which are comparable to levels previously described in Orcadian 1st/2nd cousin offspring, and finally show the Irish Traveller population has no particular genetic links to the European Roma. The levels of autozygosity and distinct Irish origins have implications for disease mapping within Ireland, while the population structure and divergence inform on social history. PMID:28181990

  10. Test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments within the Colli Albani region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, F.; Calcara, M.

    In this paper we discuss some geochemical data gathered by discrete and continuous monitoring during the 1995-1996 period, carried out for earthquake prediction test-experiments throughout the Colli Albani quiescent volcano, seat of seismicity, selecting some gas discharge sites with peri-volcanic composition. In particular we stressed the results obtained at the continuous geochemical monitoring station (GMS I, BAR site), designed by ING for geochemical surveillance of seismic events. The 12/6/1995 (M=3.6-3.8) Roma earthquake together with the 3/11/1995 (M=3.1) Tivoli earthquake was the most energetic events within the Colli Albani - Roma area, after the beginning of the continuous monitoring (1991) up today: strict correlation between these seismic events and fluid geochemical anomalies in groundwater has been discovered (temperature, Eh, 222Rn, CO 2, NH 3). Separation at depth of a vapour phase, rich in reducing-acidic gases (CO 2, H 2S, etc...), from a hyper-saline brine, within the deep geothermal reservoir is hypothesised to explain the geochemical anomalies: probably the transtensional episodes accompanying the seismic sequences caused an increasing and/or triggering of the phase-separation process and fluid migration, on the regional scale of the Western sector of the Colli Albani, beyond the seismogenic depth (2-4 Km) up to surface. We draw the state of art of GMS II monitoring prototype and the selection criteria of test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments in the Colli Albani region.

  11. Importation and circulation of poliovirus in Bulgaria in 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Gyurova, Snejana; Fiore, Lucia; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Kunchev, Angel; Vladimirova, Nadejda; Korsun, Neli; Filipova, Radosveta; Boneva, Roumiana; Gavrilin, Eugene; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Oblapenko, George; Wassilak, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the circumstances in which poliomyelitis occurred among three children in Bulgaria during 2001 and to describe the public health response. METHODS: Bulgarian authorities investigated the three cases of polio and their contacts, conducted faecal and serological screening of children from high-risk groups, implemented enhanced surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis, and conducted supplemental immunization activities. FINDINGS: The three cases of polio studied had not been vaccinated and lived in socioeconomically deprived areas of two cities. Four Roma children from the Bourgas district had antibody titres to serotype 1 poliovirus only, and wild type 1 virus was isolated from the faeces of two asymptomatic Roma children in the Bourgas and Sofia districts. Poliovirus isolates were related genetically and represented a single evolutionary lineage; genomic sequences were less than 90% identical to poliovirus strains isolated previously in Europe, but 98.3% similar to a strain isolated in India in 2000. No cases or wild virus isolates were found after supplemental immunization activities were launched in May 2001. CONCLUSIONS: In Bulgaria, an imported poliovirus was able to circulate for two to five months among minority populations. Surveillance data strongly suggest that wild poliovirus circulation ceased shortly after supplemental immunization activities with oral poliovirus vaccine were conducted. PMID:12973639

  12. Cultural, social and personal ways of experiencing love - an analysis of the perception of subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Gori, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    This article is based on analysis of 4 couple's personal and public documents, in order to integrate personal choices, values and ideas with cultural representations and social attitudes. Moreover, being based on Italian sources from the nineteenth century, the study offers an historical insight on the Italian nation-building process and its political and social foundations. This study is based on archival and printed primary sources from: Gianna Maffei and Ercole Trotti Mosti (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento - Roma - MCRR); Augusto Pierantoni and Grazia Mancini (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento - Roma); Luigi Majno and Ersilia Bronzini (Archivio Unione Femminile Nazionale - Milano); Angiolo Orvieto and Laura Cantoni (Archivio Contemporaneo Bonsanti del Gabinetto Vieuesseux - Firenze - ACGV). This study reflects on love as a political and moral issue, by linking the personal sphere of subjectivity to the public dimension of the political community. An extensive understanding of the role played by the perception and the expression of sentiments can be considered as the central issue of this analysis.

  13. Measles outbreak in Andalusia, Spain, January to August 2011.

    PubMed

    Mayoral Cortes, Jm; Perez Morilla, E; Gallardo Garcia, V; Navarro Mari, Jm; Perez Ruiz, M; Hermosilla, R; Diaz-Borrego, J; Rodriguez Romero, E; Ruiz Fernandez, J

    2012-10-18

    On 7 January 2011, a six year-old child living in a Roma community near Seville, southern Spain, was hospitalised with measles. Contact tracing identified a probable index case with onset of symptoms on 20 December 2011 and several unreported cases among children under the age of 15 years in the same town. The outbreak initially spread in districts in the city of Seville with a high proportion of Roma residents, and later to other cities and towns in Andalusia. While some towns experienced wide spread of the disease with significant clusters of cases, most of the affected locations saw non-clustered cases or very few secondary cases. The outbreak resulted in 1,759 confirmed or probable cases of which 393 (19%) required hospitalisation. Measles virus of genotype D4 was diagnosed in more than half of the cases. Significant differences (p<0.0001) by age group were found between clustered and non-clustered cases. The highest proportion of clustered cases occurred in the age group of 5-14 yearolds, while the highest proportion of non-clustered cases was seen in those older than 29 years. The last confirmed case related to this outbreak was reported on 20 August 2011.

  14. Description of two measles outbreaks in the Lazio Region, Italy (2006-2007). Importance of pockets of low vaccine coverage in sustaining the infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the launch of the national plan for measles elimination, in Italy, immunization coverage remains suboptimal and outbreaks continue to occur. Two measles outbreaks, occurred in Lazio region during 2006-2007, were investigated to identify sources of infection, transmission routes, and assess operational implications for elimination of the disease. Methods Data were obtained from several sources, the routine infectious diseases surveillance system, field epidemiological investigations, and molecular genotyping of virus by the national reference laboratory. Results Overall 449 cases were reported, sustained by two different stereotypes overlapping for few months. Serotype D4 was likely imported from Romania by a Roma/Sinti family and subsequently spread to the rest of the population. Serotype B3 was responsible for the second outbreak which started in a secondary school. Pockets of low vaccine coverage individuals (Roma/Sinti communities, high school students) facilitated the reintroduction of serotypes not endemic in Italy and facilitated the measles infection to spread. Conclusions Communities with low vaccine coverage represent a more serious public health threat than do sporadic susceptible individuals. The successful elimination of measles will require additional efforts to immunize low vaccine coverage population groups, including hard-to-reach individuals, adolescents, and young adults. An enhanced surveillance systems, which includes viral genotyping to document chains of transmission, is an essential tool for evaluating strategy to control and eliminate measles PMID:20219143

  15. The measles outbreak in Bulgaria, 2009-2011: An epidemiological assessment and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Mark; Marinova, Lili; Mankertz, Annette; Gatcheva, Nina; Mihneva, Zafira; Santibanez, Sabine; Kunchev, Angel; Filipova, Radosveta; Kojouharova, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Measles re-emerged in a nationwide outbreak in Bulgaria from 2009 to 2011 despite reported high vaccination coverage at national level. This followed an eight-year period since the last indigenous cases of measles were detected. The Bulgarian National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases collated measles surveillance data for 2009-2011. We analysed data for age group, sex, ethnicity, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospitalisation, disease complications, and death and describe the outbreak control measures taken. The outbreak started in April 2009 following an importation of measles virus and affected 24,364 persons, predominantly Roma. Most cases (73%) were among children < 15 years old. Vaccination status was available for 52% (n = 12,630) of cases. Of children 1-14 years old, 22% (n = 1,769) were unvaccinated and 70% (n = 5,518) had received one dose of a measles-containing vaccine. Twenty-four measles-related deaths were reported. The Roma ethnic group was particularly susceptible to measles. The magnitude of the outbreak resulted primarily from the accumulation of susceptible children over time. This outbreak serves as a reminder that both high vaccination coverage and closing of immunity gaps across all sections of the population are crucial to reach the goal of measles elimination.

  16. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Thomas B; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.8-2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems.

  17. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of thermal convection are conducted for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The Prandtl number (Pr) varies from 10^0 to 10^4 and the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) are moderate (10^5 < Ra < 10^9). This study is motivated by the fact that the role of the Prandtl number in convective heat transport is not yet fully understood. The three-dimensional behaviors of the temperature and velocity fields, of the viscous and thermal dissipation fields, and of the diffusive and convective heat fluxes are explored. In the ranges of Pr and Ra considered, we find steady, periodic and chaotic regimes, and large-scale structures which are more complex than the single recirculation cell filling the whole volume. Multiple flow structures are found to be associated with a given set of conditions. The multiple solutions seem to be more probable at higher Pr numbers and could explain the scatter in some data trends. In collaboration with Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics - Trieste, and Roberto Verzicco, DIM, Universitàdegli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata - Roma.

  18. Cultural, social and personal ways of experiencing love – an analysis of the perception of subjectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article is based on analysis of 4 couple’s personal and public documents, in order to integrate personal choices, values and ideas with cultural representations and social attitudes. Moreover, being based on Italian sources from the nineteenth century, the study offers an historical insight on the Italian nation-building process and its political and social foundations. This study is based on archival and printed primary sources from: Gianna Maffei and Ercole Trotti Mosti (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma – MCRR); Augusto Pierantoni and Grazia Mancini (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma); Luigi Majno and Ersilia Bronzini (Archivio Unione Femminile Nazionale – Milano); Angiolo Orvieto and Laura Cantoni (Archivio Contemporaneo Bonsanti del Gabinetto Vieuesseux – Firenze – ACGV). This study reflects on love as a political and moral issue, by linking the personal sphere of subjectivity to the public dimension of the political community. An extensive understanding of the role played by the perception and the expression of sentiments can be considered as the central issue of this analysis. PMID:22037756

  19. Genomic insights into the population structure and history of the Irish Travellers.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Edmund; Carmi, Shai; Ennis, Sean; Wilson, James F; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L

    2017-02-09

    The Irish Travellers are a population with a history of nomadism; consanguineous unions are common and they are socially isolated from the surrounding, 'settled' Irish people. Low-resolution genetic analysis suggests a common Irish origin between the settled and the Traveller populations. What is not known, however, is the extent of population structure within the Irish Travellers, the time of divergence from the general Irish population, or the extent of autozygosity. Using a sample of 50 Irish Travellers, 143 European Roma, 2232 settled Irish, 2039 British and 6255 European or world-wide individuals, we demonstrate evidence for population substructure within the Irish Traveller population, and estimate a time of divergence before the Great Famine of 1845-1852. We quantify the high levels of autozygosity, which are comparable to levels previously described in Orcadian 1(st)/2(nd) cousin offspring, and finally show the Irish Traveller population has no particular genetic links to the European Roma. The levels of autozygosity and distinct Irish origins have implications for disease mapping within Ireland, while the population structure and divergence inform on social history.

  20. Intermittency of solar system plasma turbulence near Venus and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Chang, Tom

    2016-04-01

    We analyze magnetic field data from Venus Express (VEX) and CLUSTER to investigate the turbulent properties of the solar wind and the Earth's and Venus' magnetosheaths. A systematic study of the PDFs (Probability Distribution Functions) of the measured magnetic fluctuations and their fourth order moments (kurtosis) reveals numerous intermittent time series. The presence of intermittency is marked by non-Gaussian PDFs with heavy wings and a scale dependent kurtosis. Higher order analyses on the scale dependence of several moment orders of the PDFs, the structure functions, along with the scaling of the kurtosis allow for a selection of scales that pertain to different scaling regimes, governed by different physics. On such sub-ranges of scales we investigate the fractal structure of fluctuations through the Rank Ordered Multifractal Analysis - ROMA (Chang and Wu, 2008). ROMA is applied to a selection of intermittent magnetic field time series in the solar wind and planetary magnetosheaths and helps to quantify the turbulence properties through the estimation of a spectrum of local Hurst exponents. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  1. Autonomous Operation of the Nanosatellite URSA MAIOR Micropropulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.

    Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza", Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Via Eudossiana 16, 00184 At Università di Roma "La Sapienza" a nanosatellite bus is under development, with one liter target volume and one kilogram target weight. This nanosatellite, called URSA MAIOR (Università di Roma "la SApienza" Micro Autonomous Imager in ORbit) has a micro camera on board to take pictures of the Earth. The nanosatellite is three axis stabilized, using a micro momentum wheel, with magnetic coils for active nutation damping and pointing control. An experimental micropropulsion system is present on-board, together with the magnetic attitude control system. The design, construction and testing of the satellite is carried on by academic personnel and by students, which are directly involved in the whole process, as it is in the spirit of in the microsatellite program at Università di Roma "La Sapienza". Few technological payloads are present on-board: an Earth imaging experiment, using a few grams commercial-off-the-shelf microcamera; commercial Li-Ion batteries are the only energy storage device; a microwheel developed at our University laboratories provides for attitude stabilization. In addition, a micropropulsion experiment is planned on-board. The Austrian Company Mechatronic, and INFM, an Italian Research Institute at Trieste are developing a microthruster for nanosatelite applications. In the frame of a cooperation established between these two Institutions and Università di Roma "La Sapienza", this newly developed hardware will be tested in orbit. The thruster is made basically of an integrated microvalve, built on a silicon chip, and a micronozzle, etched on the same silicon chip, to get supersonic expansion of the gas flow. The nominal thrust of the system is about 100microN. The throat section is about 100 micron diameter. The first phase in the construction of the microthruster has been the construction of the micronozzle on a silicon chip. A

  2. UNderstanding uptake of Immunisations in TravellIng aNd Gypsy communities (UNITING): a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Cath; Dyson, Lisa; Bedford, Helen; Cheater, Francine M; Condon, Louise; Crocker, Annie; Emslie, Carol; Ireland, Lana; Kemsley, Philippa; Kerr, Susan; Lewis, Helen J; Mytton, Julie; Overend, Karen; Redsell, Sarah; Richardson, Zoe; Shepherd, Christine; Smith, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gypsies, Travellers and Roma (referred to as Travellers) are less likely to access health services, including immunisation. To improve immunisation rates, we need to understand what helps and hinders individuals in these communities in taking up immunisations. AIMS (1) Investigate the barriers to and facilitators of acceptability and uptake of immunisations among six Traveller communities across four UK cities; and (2) identify possible interventions to increase uptake of immunisations in these Traveller communities that could be tested in a subsequent feasibility study. METHODS Three-phase qualitative study underpinned by the social ecological model. Phase 1: interviews with 174 Travellers from six communities: Romanian Roma (Bristol); English Gypsy/Irish Traveller (Bristol); English Gypsy (York); Romanian/Slovakian Roma (Glasgow); Scottish Showpeople (Glasgow); and Irish Traveller (London). Focus on childhood and adult vaccines. Phase 2: interviews with 39 service providers. Data were analysed using the framework approach. Interventions were identified using a modified intervention mapping approach. Phase 3: 51 Travellers and 25 service providers attended workshops and produced a prioritised list of potentially acceptable and feasible interventions. RESULTS There were many common accounts of barriers and facilitators across communities, particularly across the English-speaking communities. Scottish Showpeople were the most similar to the general population. Roma communities experienced additional barriers of language and being in a new country. Men, women and service providers described similar barriers and facilitators. There was widespread acceptance of childhood and adult immunisation, with current parents perceived as more positive than their elders. A minority of English-speaking Travellers worried about multiple/combined childhood vaccines, adult flu and whooping cough. Cultural concerns about vaccines offered during pregnancy and about human

  3. Poor mobilizer: a retrospective study on proven and predicted incidence according to GITMO criteria.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Nicola; Vacca, Michele; Lanti, Alessandro; Ipsevich, Francesco; Maresca, Maddalena; Fiorelli, Elena; Bianchi, Maria; Adorno, Gaspare; Pierelli, Luca; Majolino, Ignazio; Leone, Giuseppe; Zini, Gina

    2012-10-01

    The Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation (Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo, GITMO) recently formalized criteria for a shared definition of poor mobilizer in order to facilitate randomized clinical trials and study comparison focusing on the efficacy of current mobilizing regimens. The availability of a standardized tool for poor mobilizer definition suggested us to retrospectively test GITMO criteria feasibility and applicability. Therefore we analyzed medical and laboratory records of adult patients affected by myeloma (MM) or lymphoma undergoing mobilization for autologous peripheral blood HSC collection from January 2010 to June 2011, at Servizio di Emotrasfusione, Istituto di Ematologia, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Roma, UOC SIMT AO S. Camillo Forlanini Roma and SIMT Fondazione Policlinico Tor Vergata Roma. We collected data about 227 patients (134 male, 93 female) affected by MM (31.3%) NHL (58.6%) e HD (10.1%). Thirty-nine patients, 21 male and 18 female met proven poor mobilizer criteria definition resulting in a incidence of 17.2% (12.7% in MM, 21.8% in NHL and 4.3% in HD). Eleven patients, seven affected by lymphoma and four affected by myeloma, were defined predicted PM according to major criteria. Eight patients, seven affected by lymphoma and one affected by myeloma, were define predicted PM according to minor criteria. Sixteen out of 39 patients defined as poor mobilizer either according to major or minor criteria underwent collection procedures and eight (20.5%) achieved a cell dose ⩾2×10(6)/kg CD34(+) cells. GITMO criteria application was easy and resulted in poor mobilizer incidence comparable to current literature. Definitions of proven poor mobilizer and predicted poor mobilizer according to major criteria were very effective while minor criteria were less predictive. These results came from a retrospective analysis and therefore should be validated in future prospective trial. On the other hand these data could be

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  5. Porphyry of Russian Empires in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulakh, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Porphyry of Russian Empires in Paris A. G. Bulakh (St Petersburg State University, Russia) So called "Schokhan porphyry" from Lake Onega, Russia, belongs surely to stones of World cultural heritage. One can see this "porphyry" at facades of a lovely palace of Pavel I and in pedestal of the monument after Nicolas I in St Petersburg. There are many other cases of using this stone in Russia. In Paris, sarcophagus of Napoleon I Bonaparte is constructed of blocks of this stone. Really, it is Proterozoic quartzite. Geology situation, petrography and mineralogical characteristic will be reported too. Comparison with antique porphyre from the Egyptian Province of the Roma Empire is given. References: 1) A.G.Bulakh, N.B.Abakumova, J.V.Romanovsky. St Petersburg: a History in Stone. 2010. Print House of St Petersburg State University. 173 p.

  6. Marginalised social groups in contemporary weee management within social enterprises investments: A study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaoikonomou, K; Kipouros, S; Kungolos, A; Somakos, L; Aravossis, K; Antonopoulos, I; Karagiannidis, A

    2009-05-01

    This paper deals with the creation of appropriate conditions aimed at developing social services for reuse and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), by the inclusion of handicapped and Roma people in the workforce. Application areas for the project are the Hellenic (Greek) regions of Thessaly and North Aegean, where these groups suffer from professional and social exclusion. The efforts to reduce unemployment in the two aforementioned groups, together with the efforts to implement related Greek and European legislation for sustainable WEEE management, are examined here. Furthermore, networking and cooperation at local, regional and central levels between small enterprises, entrepreneurships and local authorities are examined, so that these social enterprises and their corresponding investments may support the development of the Greek alternative WEEE recycling system.

  7. Commentary: homicide-suicide in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Maisha K; Campbell, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    With the exception of Guyana and Trinidad, suicide rates in the Caribbean are relatively low compared with those in other countries. Homicide rates, however, have increased over the past 15 years, especially in Jamaica and Trinidad. The link between suicide, homicide, and homicide followed by suicide (H-S) is not well established. A newspaper review of H-S events in a selection of Caribbean territories revealed a surprising number of these events. Characteristics of perpetrators were similar to those documented in the literature. The authors agree with Roma et al. that national tracking systems for H-S are needed. Empirical research on this topic in the Caribbean is also desperately needed.

  8. BL LAC candidates for TeV observations

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; Errando, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2013-07-01

    BL Lac objects are the most numerous class of extragalactic TeV-detected sources. One of the biggest difficulties in investigating their TeV emission is due to their limited number, since only 47 BL Lac objects are known to be TeV emitters. In this paper, we propose new criteria to select TeV BL Lac candidates based on infrared and X-ray observations. We apply our selection criteria to the BL Lac objects listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog, thereby identifying 41 potential TeV emitters. We then perform a search over a more extended sample combining the ROSAT bright source catalog and the WISE all-sky survey, revealing 54 additional candidates for TeV observations. Our investigation also led to a tentative classification of 16 unidentified X-ray sources as BL Lac candidates. This analysis provides new interesting BL Lac targets for future observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.

  9. The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics. PMID:22312046

  10. Marginalised social groups in contemporary weee management within social enterprises investments: A study in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Papaoikonomou, K. Kipouros, S.; Kungolos, A.; Somakos, L.; Aravossis, K.; Antonopoulos, I.; Karagiannidis, A.

    2009-05-15

    This paper deals with the creation of appropriate conditions aimed at developing social services for reuse and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), by the inclusion of handicapped and Roma people in the workforce. Application areas for the project are the Hellenic (Greek) regions of Thessaly and North Aegean, where these groups suffer from professional and social exclusion. The efforts to reduce unemployment in the two aforementioned groups, together with the efforts to implement related Greek and European legislation for sustainable WEEE management, are examined here. Furthermore, networking and cooperation at local, regional and central levels between small enterprises, entrepreneurships and local authorities are examined, so that these social enterprises and their corresponding investments may support the development of the Greek alternative WEEE recycling system.

  11. The Realm of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In November 1995, an article published in Nature [1] put planetary sciences not only as a new hot field in both observational and theoretical astrophysics but also as a topic with a large impact toward the layman. This article was reporting the first discovery of a planet orbiting a star beyond our Sun, namely the solar-type star 51 Pegasi. Nearly four centuries after Giordano Bruno was burnt in public in Roma partly for having intuitively claimed the plurality of worlds, we were entering the extraordinary epoch in which one of the oldest inquiries of mankind-are we alone in the Universe?-can be tackled with the scientific method, leaving aside centuries of endless speculations. To date (July 2010), almost 500 extrasolar planets are known. We shall briefly review the main detection methods, together with the big surprises which arose during these last exciting fifteen years, without being exhaustive.

  12. Status of the SPARC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Pirro, G.Di; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; /Frascati /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /ENEA, Frascati /Milan, Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2006-01-25

    The SPARC project has entered its installation phase at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN: its main goal, the promotion of an R&D activity oriented to the development of a high brightness photoinjector to drive SASE-FEL experiments, is being vigorously pursued by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata-INFM-ST. In this paper we will report on the installation and test of some major components, like Ti:Sa laser system, RF gun and RF power system. Advancements in the control and beam diagnostics systems will also be reported, in particular on the emittance-meter device for beam emittance measurements in the drift space downstream the RF gun. Recent results on laser pulse shaping show the feasibility of producing 10 ps flat-top laser pulses in the UV with rise time below 1 ps. First FEL experiments have been proposed, using SASE, seeding and non-linear resonant harmonics.

  13. A double dc-SQUID device for flux locked loop operation

    SciTech Connect

    Foglietti, V.; Giannini, M.E.; Petrocco, G. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a double dc-SQUID device developed at the CNR-IESS in Roma. It consists of two SQUIDs in cascade configuration with the same electrical parameters but with a different geometry. This structure makes the device particularly suitable for flux-locked-loop operation without need of a modulation flux. Consequently the read-out electronic scheme is greatly simplified without degrading the noise performances of the first stage. The first dc-SQUID has a gradiometer configuration with extra damping resistors shunting the inductance. The technology used is similar to the seven layer IBM process with planar Nb---Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}---PbAuIn junctions and 2.5{mu}m minimum size lithography.

  14. Influence of soil water repellency on runoff and solute loss from New Zealand pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, P.; Müller, K.; Deurer, M.; van den Dijssel, C.; Mason, K.; Green, S.; Clothier, B. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has been reported in New Zealand, but knowledge on its importance for the country's economy and environment is limited. Our recent survey on the occurrence of SWR under pasture across the North Island of New Zealand showed that most soils exhibited SWR when dry independent of climate but influenced by the soil order. SWR is discussed as an important soil surface condition enhancing run-off and the transfer of fertilizers and pesticides from agricultural land into waterways. So far, the impact of SWR on run-off has rarely been measured. We developed a laboratory-scale run-off measurement apparatus (ROMA) to quantify directly the impact of SWR on run-off from undisturbed soil slabs. We compared the run-off resulting from the run-on of water with that resulting from an ethanol (30% v/v) solution, which is a fully-wetting liquid even in severely hydrophobic soils. Thus, the experiments with the ethanol solution can be understood as a proxy measure of the wetting-up behaviour of hydrophilic soils. We conducted ROMA run-off experiments with air-dried soil slabs (460 mm long x 190 mm wide x 50 mm deep) collected from pastoral sites, representing three major soil orders in the North Island: Recent Soil (Fluvisol), Gley Soil (Gleysol), and Organic Soil (Histosol), with water followed by the ethanol solution at a run-on rate of 60 mm/h. Bromide was applied at 80 kg KBr/ha prior to the water experiments to assess potential solute losses via run-off. The air-dried soils had a high degree and persistence of SWR (contact angles, 97, 98 and 104° , and potential water drop penetration times, 42, 54 and 231 min for the Fluvisol, Gleysol and Histosol, respectively). Under identical soil and experimental conditions, water generated run-off from all soils, but in the experiments with the ethanol solution, the entire ethanol solution infiltrated into the soils. The ranking of the run-off coefficients of the soils directly reflected their ranking in

  15. Teaching dying patient care in three universities in Argentina, Spain, and Italy.

    PubMed

    Mutto, Eduardo Mario; Cavazzoli, Carlos; Ballbé, Josepmaria Argemi; Ballbé, Josepmaria; Tambone, Vittoradolfo; Centeno, Carlos; Villar, Marcelo Jose

    2009-07-01

    We performed a multicenter comparative survey on undergraduate medical education regarding the care of dying patients at medical schools in three countries. We enrolled 380 first- and sixth-year medical students from Universidad Austral (Argentina), Universidad de Navarra (Spain), and Università Campus Biomedico di Roma (Italy). Answers to the questions were similar among the three universities. Students acknowledged interacting directly with dying patients in all cases. Attitudes toward dying patients were highly positive. Students spontaneously requested more training in end-of-life care. Some attitudes and wishes varied significantly from course to course. Students perceived that this issue received more attention in humanistic rather than in clinical subjects. Ninety-eight percent of students considered that death and helping patients to have a good death should be included in their training. Students' attitudes revealed high interest and poor training in end-of-life issues. Medical curricula should be improved to adequately address these issues.

  16. a Method for Virtual Anastylosis: the Case of the Arch of Titus at the Circus Maximus in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Falcolini, C.; Buonfiglio, M.; Pergola, S.; Saccone, M.; Mammì, B.; Romito, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is the first report about the development of a methodology for the virtual Anastylosis of elements belonging to an archaeological site, based on the 3d modeling of fragments. This research is the result of the cooperation between Università Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Architettura and Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali; several 3D survey, modeling, information systems and archaeology experts were involved. The purpose of the research was to study the complex and stratified site of the Arch of Titus at the Circus Maximus aiming, first of all, at completing the existing traditional graphic documentation using cataloguing and survey innovative methodologies, and, secondly, at supporting new proposals for the reconstruction and Anastylosis of the Arch itself. This tested methodology whose fundamental element is the three-dimensional textured model of each fragment, can also be used in other sites and contexts.

  17. Proposal of a management method of rockfall risk induced on a road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignelli, C.; Peila, D.; Lo Russo, S.

    2012-04-01

    Many kilometers of roads have adjacent rock slopes that are prone to rockfall. The analysis of risks associated with these types of instabilities is a complex operation requiring the precise assessment of hazard, the vulnerability and therefore the risk of vehicles on roads along the foothills. Engineering design of protection devices should aim to minimize risk while taking advantage of the most advanced technologies. Decision makers should be equipped with the technical tools permitting them to choose the best solution within the context of local maximum acceptable risk levels. The fulfilment of safety requirements for mountainside routes involves in many cases the implementation of protective measures and devices to control and manage rockfall and it is of key importance the evaluation of the positive effects of such measures in terms of risk reduction. A risk analysis management procedure for roads subject to rockfall phenomena using a specifically developed method named: Rockfall risk Management (RO.MA.) is presented and discussed. The method is based on statistic tools, using as input the data coming both from in situ survey and from historical data. It is important to highline that historical database are not often available and usually there is a lack of useful information due to a not complete setting of parameters. The analysis based only on historical data can be difficult to be developed. For this purpose a specific database collection system has been developed to provide geotechnical and geomechanical description of the studied rockside. This parameters and the data collected from historical database, define the input parameters of the Ro.Ma method. Moreover to allow the quantification of the harm, the data coming from the monitoring of the road by the road manager are required. The value of harm is proportional to the number of persons on the road (i.e. people in a vehicle) and the following traffic characteristics: type of vehicles (i.e. bicycles

  18. State Regulation of Heliport Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    services at airports because of aircraft performance, 330, Florida Statutes, and this rule chapter. safety, social , economic or other considerations. (w...service (manager or person In charge of the airport). d. Fire extinguisher. At least one fire extinguisher capable of extinguishing all clase of fires... rOMA S7-m,0RaiPSC L ’i7H/ ,v164r# c,4,Qe1/ ,rY v K& LO /’IC*AFA3 C� CVKPP(ZA7E USFA’S WL 9 L /q f L fv iT’£ /9vce SnaF67y ’’’r1F oP~f rfd’ws. 6

  19. Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Atzori, Simone; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Tolomei, Cristiano; Antonioli, Andrea; Trasatti, Elisa; Zoffoli, Simona; Coletta, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data Stefano Salvi (1), Simone Atzori (1), Giuseppe Pezzo (1), John Peter Merryman Boncori (1), Cristiano Tolomei (1), Andrea Antonioli (1), Elisa Trasatti (1), Simona Zoffoli (2), Alessandro Coletta (2) (1): Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy (2): Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Unità Osservazione della Terra, Viale Liegi 26, 00198, Roma, Italy The increased availability of Earth Observation optical and SAR data occurred in the last few years, has stimulated new applications in many different fields. The foreseen launch of new space platforms as the Sentinel satellites, providing good monitoring frequencies and free worldwide access to data is expected to increase the number of scientific and commercial activities exploiting EO data. In the sector of natural hazards the EO data have already demonstrated to be indispensable for the generation of information products for the prevention, and emergency management phases. In particular, the Italian Space Agency has promoted and funded, together with INGV, the development of dedicated infrastructures for the generation of advanced information products supporting different phases of the seismic and volcanic risk management cycles. These products were based mainly on SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation, and on optical data from commercial and scientific platforms, integrated with data from ground monitoring networks. During the last few years, such infrastructures have been tested under operational conditions and the products distributed to the Italian Civil Protection authority for validation and assessment. Here, with reference to the earthquake emergency management, we will present the infrastructure, the rapid mapping information products and some examples of activities during the latest seismic crises.

  20. The impact of the February 2012 cold spell on health in Italy using surveillance data.

    PubMed

    de'Donato, Francesca K; Leone, Michela; Noce, Damia; Davoli, Marina; Michelozzi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    In February 2012 Italy was hit by an exceptional cold spell with extremely low temperatures and heavy snowfall. The aim of this work is to estimate the impact of the cold spell on health in the Italian cities using data from the rapid surveillance systems. In Italy, a national mortality surveillance system has been operational since 2004 in 34 cities for the rapid monitoring of daily mortality. Data from this system were used to evaluate the impact of the February 2012 cold spell on mortality shortly after the occurrence of the event. Furthermore, a cause-specific analysis was conducted in Roma using the Regional Mortality Registry and the emergency visits (ER) surveillance system. Cold spell episodes were defined as days when mean temperatures were below the 10(th) percentile of February distribution for more than three days. To estimate the impact of the cold spell, excess mortality was calculated as the difference between observed and daily expected values. An overall 1578 (+25%) excess deaths among the 75+ age group was recorded in the 14 cities that registered a cold spell in February 2012. A statistically significant excess in mortality was observed in several cities ranging from +22% in Bologna to +58% in Torino. Cause-specific analysis conducted in Roma showed a statistically significant excess in mortality among the 75+ age group for respiratory disease (+64%), COPD (+57%), cardiovascular disease +20% ischemic heart disease (14%) and other heart disease (+33%). Similar results were observed for ER visits. Surveillance systems need to become are a key component of prevention plans as they can help improve public health response and are a valid data source to rapidly quantify the impact on health. Cold-related mortality is still an important issue and should not be underestimated by public health Authorities.

  1. Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Is Caused by Mutations in Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Guergueltcheva, Velina; Azmanov, Dimitar N.; Angelicheva, Dora; Smith, Katherine R.; Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Bynevelt, Michael; Nguyen, Thai; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Bojinova, Veneta; Kaprelyan, Ara; Angelova, Lyudmila; Morar, Bharti; Chandler, David; Kaneva, Radka; Bahlo, Melanie; Tournev, Ivailo; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital cerebellar ataxia was identified in Roma patients originating from a small subisolate with a known strong founder effect. Patients presented with global developmental delay, moderate to severe stance and gait ataxia, dysarthria, mild dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria and tremors, intellectual deficit, and mild pyramidal signs. Brain imaging revealed progressive generalized cerebellar atrophy, and inferior vermian hypoplasia and/or a constitutionally small brain were observed in some patients. Exome sequencing, used for linkage analysis on extracted SNP genotypes and for mutation detection, identified two novel (i.e., not found in any database) variants located 7 bp apart within a unique 6q24 linkage region. Both mutations cosegregated with the disease in five affected families, in which all ten patients were homozygous. The mutated gene, GRM1, encodes metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, which is highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays an important role in cerebellar development and synaptic plasticity. The two mutations affect a gene region critical for alternative splicing and the generation of receptor isoforms; they are a 3 bp exon 8 deletion and an intron 8 splicing mutation (c.2652_2654del and c.2660+2T>G, respectively [RefSeq accession number NM_000838.3]). The functional impact of the deletion is unclear and is overshadowed by the splicing defect. Although ataxia lymphoblastoid cell lines expressed GRM1 at levels comparable to those of control cells, the aberrant transcripts skipped exon 8 or ended in intron 8 and encoded various species of nonfunctional receptors either lacking the transmembrane domain and containing abnormal intracellular tails or completely missing the tail. The study implicates mGluR1 in human hereditary ataxia. It also illustrates the potential of the Roma founder populations for mutation identification by exome sequencing. PMID:22901947

  2. Pretreated cheese whey wastewater management by agricultural reuse: chemical characterization and response of tomato plants Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. under salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier; Patanita, Manuel; Dôres, Jóse

    2013-10-01

    The agricultural reuse of pretreated industrial wastewater resulting from cheese manufacture is shown as a suitable option for its disposal and management. This alternative presents attractive advantages from the economic and pollution control viewpoints. Pretreated cheese whey wastewater (CWW) has high contents of biodegradable organic matter, salinity and nutrients, which are essential development factors for plants with moderate to elevated salinity tolerance. Five different pretreated CWW treatments (1.75 to 10.02 dS m(-1)) have been applied in the tomato plant growth. Fresh water was used as a control run (average salinity level=1.44 dS m(-1)). Chemical characterization and indicator ratios of the leaves, stems and roots were monitored. The sodium and potassium leaf concentrations increased linearly with the salinity level in both cultivars, Roma and Rio Grande. Similar results were found in the stem sodium content. However, the toxic sodium accumulations in the cv. Roma exceeded the values obtained in the cv. Rio Grande. In this last situation, K and Ca uptake, absorption, transport and accumulation capacities were presented as tolerance mechanisms for the osmotic potential regulation of the tissues and for the ion neutralization. Consequently, Na/Ca and Na/K ratios presented lower values in the cv. Rio Grande. Na/Ca ratio increased linearly with the salinity level in leaves and stems, regardless of the cultivar. Regarding the Na/K ratio, the values demonstrated competition phenomena between the ions for the cv. Rio Grande. Despite the high chloride content of the CWW, no significant differences were observed for this nutrient in the leaves and stems. Thus, no nitrogen deficiency was demonstrated by the interaction NO3(-)/Cl(-). Nitrogen also contributes to maintain the water potential difference between the tissues and the soil. Na, P, Cl and N radicular concentrations were maximized for high salinity levels (≥2.22 dS m(-1)) of the pretreated CWW.

  3. Brief communication: new Y-chromosome binary markers improve phylogenetic resolution within haplogroup R1a1.

    PubMed

    Pamjav, Horolma; Fehér, Tibor; Németh, Endre; Pádár, Zsolt

    2012-12-01

    Haplogroup R1a1-M198 is a major clade of Y chromosomal haplogroups which is distributed all across Eurasia. To this date, many efforts have been made to identify large SNP-based subgroups and migration patterns of this haplogroup. The origin and spread of R1a1 chromosomes in Eurasia has, however, remained unknown due to the lack of downstream SNPs within the R1a1 haplogroup. Since the discovery of R1a1-M458, this is the first scientific attempt to divide haplogroup R1a1-M198 into multiple SNP-based sub-haplogroups. We have genotyped 217 R1a1-M198 samples from seven different population groups at M458, as well as the Z280 and Z93 SNPs recently identified from the "1000 Genomes Project". The two additional binary markers present an effective tool because now more than 98% of the samples analyzed assign to one of the three sub-haplogroups. R1a1-M458 and R1a1-Z280 were typical for the Hungarian population groups, whereas R1a1-Z93 was typical for Malaysian Indians and the Hungarian Roma. Inner and Central Asia is an overlap zone for the R1a1-Z280 and R1a1-Z93 lineages. This pattern implies that an early differentiation zone of R1a1-M198 conceivably occurred somewhere within the Eurasian Steppes or the Middle East and Caucasus region as they lie between South Asia and Eastern Europe. The detection of the Z93 paternal genetic imprint in the Hungarian Roma gene pool is consistent with South Asian ancestry and amends the view that H1a-M82 is their only discernible paternal lineage of Indian heritage.

  4. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    qualities, was illustrated. The TAUP Steering Committee recalls with deep gratitude that John Bahcall served continuously as a member of the TAUP International Advisory Committee and that he gave an inspired and brilliant conclusive talk at TAUP 2003 in Seattle. Our astroparticle community will miss him greatly. The TAUP 2005 Organizing Committee thanks Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Gobierno de Aragón, Zaragoza University, INFN, IUPAP, PaNAGIC and Ibercaja for sponsoring the Conference, and the Rector and Vice-Rector of the Zaragoza University for their hospitality in the magnificent Paraninfo Palace, where the meeting was held. We wish to thank Venya Berezinsky, José Bernabéu and José Angel Villar for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. Very special thanks are due to Ms Mercedes Fatás and Ms Franca Masciulli, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Leopolda Benazzato for her invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Cristina Gil, Francisco Javier Mena and Alfonso Ortiz de Solórzano for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2007 will be held in Sendai, Japan, hosted by the Tohoku University with the chairs of Professors Atsuto Suzuki and Kunio Inoue. COMMITTEES TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F. T. Avignone, U. South Carolina B. Barish, CALTECH E. Bellotti, U. Milano/INFN J. Bernabéu, U. Valenciav A. Bottino (chair), U. Torino/INFN V. de Alfaro, U. Torino/INFN T. Kajita, ICRR Tokyo C. W. Kim, JHU Baltimore/KIAS Seoul E. Lorenz U. München V. Matveev, INR Moscow J. Morales, U. Zaragoza D. Sinclair, U. Carleton TAUP 2005 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J. J. Aubert, CNRS Marseille J. Bahcall, U. Princeton M. Baldo-Ceolin, U. Padova/INFN L. Bergström, U. Stockholm R. Bernabei, U. Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A. Bettini, U. Padova/INFN S

  5. URSA MAIOR: a One Liter Nanosatellite Bus for Low Cost Access to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.

    One of the main limitations in the access to space for developing countries is the economical effort typically required by space missions. Secondly, space activity is a field of very high technology, requiring technical skills, education and practice, at a level which is seldom reached by developing countries. Interventions aimed to facilitate access to space for developing countries should be focussed primarily on the missions allowing access to space at reasonable cost. Moreover, perhaps more importantly, they should emphasize conducting the mission design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit as an open activity, accessible to developing countries personnel, in order to set up an education process, which is not just selling a product ready satellite. Universities could have a very important role in this activity. Many Universities around the world have designed, built and launched small satellites. Università di Roma "La Sapienza" set up a program for the construction of small satellites in an academic environment, involving directly the students in the design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit. The first satellite built in the framework of this program, UNISAT, was successfully launched in September 2000. The second, UNISAT-2, initially scheduled for launch in 2001, has been delayed by the launch provider to late 2002. These two satellites, based on a modular design, emphasizing ease of construction and assembly, weight roughly 10 kg. The realization of these satellites was made possible within the regular financing given to university research programs, keeping down cost by the use of commercial off the shelf components instead of space rated ones. The microsatellite experience at Università di Roma "La Sapienza", is going further with the development of a new nanosatellite bus, URSA MAIOR (Università di Roma "la SApienza" Micro Autonomous Imager in ORbit), aiming at cutting down cost and possibly improving performance. The

  6. Clarification of Tomato Juice with Polygalacturonase Obtained from Tomato Fruits Infected by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, A A; Peter-Albert, C F; Akeredolu, M; Shokunbi, A A

    2015-02-01

    Two varieties of tomato fruits commonly available in Nigerian markets are the Roma VF and Ibadan local varieties of tomato fruits. The Roma VF fruits are oval in shape. It is a common type of cultivar in the Northern region of Nigeria and it is not susceptible to cracking. The Ibadan local variety of tomato fruits is a local variety commonly found on farmers fields in South-western region of Nigeria. They are highly susceptible to cracking. The Ibadan local variety was employed for this research. There are lots of benefits derived from the consumption of tomato fruits. The fruits can be made into tomato juice clarified with pectinases. Polygalacturonase is one of the pectinases used commercially in the clarification of fruit juice from different fruits. This study examined the production of polygalacturonase during the deterioration of tomato fruits by Aspergillus niger and the role of the purified polygalacturonase in the clarification of tomato juice. Tomato fruits of the Ibadan local variety were inoculated with mycelia discs containing spores of a 96-h-old culture of Aspergillus niger served as the inoculum. The organism from the stock culture was subcultured onto potato dextrose agar plates. The extraction of polygalacturonase after 10 days of incubation at 27 degrees C was carried out by homogenizing the fruits with liquid extractant using the MSE homogenizer after the deteriorated fruits had been chilled for 30 min inside a freezer. Control fruits were similarly treated except that sterile potato dextrose agar served as the inoculum. The effect of different temperature of incubation and different volume of enzyme on the tomato juice from the tomato fruits was investigated. Extracts from the inoculated fruits exhibited appreciable polygalacturonase activity. The juice with polygalacturonase was visually clearer and more voluminous than the juice treated with water for all parameters studied. The highest volume of juice was obtained after an incubation period

  7. Dynamic deformations of shallow sediments in the Valley of Mexico, Part II: Single-station estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, S.K.; Santoyo, M.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    We develop simple relations to estimate dynamic displacement gradients (and hence the strains and rotations) during earthquakes in the lake-bed zone of the Valley of Mexico, where the presence of low-velocity, high-water content clays in the uppermost layers cause dramatic amplification of seismic waves and large strains. The study uses results from a companion article (Bodin et al., 1997) in which the data from an array at Roma, a lake-bed site, were analyzed to obtain displacement gradients. In this article, we find that the deformations at other lake-bed sites may differ from those at Roma by a factor of 2 to 3. More accurate estimates of the dominant components of the deformation at an individual instrumented lake-bed site may be obtained from the maximum horizontal velocity and displacement, ??max and umax, at the surface. The maximum surface strain ??max is related to ??max by ??max = ??max/C, with C ??? 0.6 km/sec. From the analysis of data from sites equipped with surface and borehole sensors, we find that the vertical gradient of peak horizontal displacement (??umax/??z) computed from sensors at 0 and 30 m equals (umax)z = 0/??z, ??z = 30 m, within a factor of 1.5. This is the largest gradient component, and the latter simple relation permits its estimation from surface records alone. The observed profiles of umax versus depth suggest a larger gradient in some depth range of 10 to 20 m, in agreement with synthetic calculations presented in Bodin et al. (1997). From the free-field recordings of the 19 September 1985 Michoacan earthquake, we estimate a maximum surface strain, ??max, between 0.05% and 0.11%, and a lower bound for the peak vertical gradient (??umax/??z) between 0.3% and 1.3%. This implies that (1) the extensive failure of water pipe joints during the Michoacan earthquake in the valley occurred at axial strains of about 0.1%, not 0.38% as previously reported, and (2) the clays of the valley behave almost linearly even at shear strain of about 1

  8. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

    2011-12-01

    The Symposium DISCRETE2010 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Sapienza Universitàa di Roma, Italy from 6-11 December 2010. This second edition, after the successful one in Valencia in 2008, covered all theoretical and experimental progress in the field, and aimed at a thorough discussion on the latest developments. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking; neutrino mass and mixing; cosmology and astroparticles, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, Super flavor factories, and new facilities. The Symposium was organized in plenary sessions with a total of 23 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 80 talks including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Achille Stocchi, Andreas Weiler, Kevin Pitts, Tim Gershon, Marco Sozzi, Neal Weiner, Vasiliki Mitsou, Bernard Sadoulet, Gianfranco Bertone, J. Eric Grove, Mauro Mezzetto, Alexei Yu Smirnov, Oliviero Cremonesi, Antonio Riotto, Reno Mandolesi, Brett Altschul, Jose Bernabeu, Lawrence Hall, Marco Grassi, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Riccardo Barbieri, Gigi Rolandi, Luciano Maiani. The Symposium venue was the CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) headquarter building, close to the Sapienza University. At the end of the Symposium a special open session, devoted to a wider audience, was held at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, in the historical center of Rome. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants, about half coming from Italy, and the rest mainly from other European countries and United States. Among the social events was a concert at the Aula Magna of the Sapienza University, and a social dinner in the historical Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi on the Quirinale Hill. The next symposium of the series will be organised by IST, Universidade Tàecnica de Lisboa

  9. PREFACE: 1st-2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome - Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YRMR Organizing Committee; Cannuccia, E.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2011-03-01

    Students in science, particularly in physics, face a fascinating and challenging future. Scientists have proposed very interesting theories, which describe the microscopic and macroscopic world fairly well, trying to match the quantum regime with cosmological scales. Between the extremes of this scenario, biological phenomena in all their complexity take place, challenging the laws we observe in the atomic and sub-atomic world. More and more accurate and complex experiments have been devised and these are now going to test the paradigms of physics. Notable experiments include: the Large Hadronic Collider (LHC), which is going to shed light on the physics of the Standard Model of Particles and its extensions; the Planck-Herschel satellites, which target a very precise measurement of the properties of our Universe; and the Free Electron Lasers facilities, which produce high-brilliance, ultrafast X-ray pulses, allowing the investigation of the fundamental processes of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. These projects are the result of huge collaborations spread across the world, involving scientists belonging to different and complementary research fields: physicists, chemists, biologists and others, keen to make the best of these extraordinary laboratories. Even though each branch of science is experiencing a process of growing specialization, it is very important to keep an eye on the global picture, remaining aware of the deep interconnections between inherent fields. This is even more crucial for students who are beginning their research careers. These considerations motivated PhD students and young post-docs connected to the Roman scientific research area to organize a conference, to establish the background and the network for interactions and collaborations. This resulted in the 1st and 2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome (http://ryrm.roma2.infn.it), one day conferences aimed primarily at graduate students and post-docs, working in physics in Italy

  10. COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Iurillo, Annalisa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Murgo, Angelo M; Loy, Clement; van Zwieten, Anita; Wong, Germaine; Tortelli, Rosanna; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing for executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, learning and memory, and complex attention) in patients on haemodialysis and association with clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of 750 adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with long-term haemodialysis has been recruited within haemodialysis centres in Italy (July 2013 to April 2014). Testing for neurocognitive function was carried out by a trained psychologist at baseline to assess cognitive functioning. The primary study factor is cognitive impairment and secondary study factors will be specific domains of cognitive function. The primary outcome will be total mortality. Secondary outcomes will be cause-specific mortality, major cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke, institutionalisation, and withdrawal from treatment at 12 months. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved before study conduct by the following responsible ethics committees: Catania (approval reference 186/BE; 26/09/2013), Agrigento (protocol numbers 61–62; 28/6/2013), USL Roma C (CE 39217; 24/6/2013), USL Roma F (protocol number 0041708; 23/7/2013), USL Latina (protocol number 20090/A001/2011; 12/7/2013), Trapani (protocol number 3413; 16/7/2013) and Brindisi (protocol number 40259; 6/6/2013). All participants

  11. Monitoring of urban air pollution from MODIS and AERONET Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, K.; Chiaradia, M.; Guerriero, L.; Pasquariello, G.; Morea, A.; Nutricato, R.; Preziosa, G.

    2012-12-01

    Air pollution, caused by fuel industries and urban traffic and its environmental impact, are of considerable interest to studies in air quality. In this paper, the monitoring of the air pollution over urban areas in Italy through Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements is presented. The high spatio-temporal frequency of MODIS AOT products (twice per day at 470nm, 1km full resolution) demonstrates that this satellite can be potentially used to routinely monitor the air pollution over land, especially urban area, which is the main source of aerosol particles. In this work AOT data derived by MODIS from November 2010 to February 2011 (winter period) and from May 2011 to August 2011 (summer period) were compared with AOT measurements from 6 different Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations over Italy (Bari, Lecce, Roma, Ispra, Potenza, Etna). The statistical analysis shows a good agreement between the ground based AOT measurements and the values retrieved using space based sensors, as shown in Figure 1. For all the stations the mean error is negligible, with a correlation ranging from 0.725 (in the worst case) to 0.96 (see Table 1). Moreover, LANDSAT-panchromatic images were used to discriminate urban and rural areas, based on the typical finger-like projections of urban land uses. The results of this study will be presented and commented. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Apulian Region in the framework of the ECOURB project. (Analisi e Modelli di inquinamento atmosferico e termico per sistemi di ECOlabeling URBano, 2009-2012). Figure 1: Scatter plot between AOT derived from MODIS and AERONET for Lecce City in summer period from May 2011 to August 2011. Y = - 0.023+0.86x (fit) ; Table 1: Statistical Analysis Report on the difference between AOT derived from MODIS and AERONET from May 2011 to August 2011 (summer period) for 6 different Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations

  12. Case report of ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian cancer as an uncommon late complication of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Arkadiusz; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) is an example of a partial hysterectomy, performed due to benign gynaecological complaints. Better endoscopic instruments and operational techniques have led to a great reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomies. It is believed that LSH is a safe and minimally invasive hysterectomy technique. The Cochrane Database meta-analysis proves the benefits of minimally invasive surgery compared with abdominal gynaecological surgery, including decreased pain, surgical-site infections and hospital stay, quicker return to activity, and fewer postoperative adhesions. According to recent publications, the overall complication rate of all hysterectomy methods is about 1-4.5%. Adnexal torsion is a correlated complication. About 3-5% of patients undergoing emergency surgery due to pelvic pain are diagnosed with this condition. It may be the cause of acute abdomen and correlated symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, or severe pain. To the best of our knowledge a case of asymptomatic, delayed ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian tumour has not been reported so far. In the presented case, torsion successfully imitated neoplastic process as both ROMA score and IOTA ‘simple rules’ indicated a malignancy with high degree of probability. This case demonstrates that, if ovarian tumour is detected in the postoperative period, a torsion of ovarian pedicle should be taken into consideration as it may mimic malignant neoplasm. PMID:28250728

  13. [Impact and state of the art of regional healthcare planning and management guidelines in a local health authority of the Lazio region (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Priori, Maria Rosaria; Barbato, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of health care planning and management guidelines, elaborated by the Lazio regional healthcare authority, on the organizational structure and operational processes of local health authorities and, more specifically, of the Roma C local health authority. The guidelines are made up of three volumes and mainly describe an operational model, rather than being a set of standard references aimed at standardizing the quality of information low systems in local healthcare authorities. The guidelines are essentially a didactic text, and were elaborated by a consulting firm, Engineering Management Consulting, on behalf of the Lazio regional authority. In the first section, the main concepts are defined, while in subsequent sections, detailed models regarding the specific subject matter are described. Although the guidelines represent a useful tool in the process of converting local health authorities of the Lazio region into "business" organizations, so far they have been of use only in the first phase of assessment of different organizational models for healthcare planning and management. There is still a long way ahead towards defining standard procedures and references for describing activities and costs. This is what should hopefully be achieved briefly and which will necessarily require the introduction of a data warehouse and business intelligence software that will allow monitoring of activities and making short term predictions through the use balanced scorecards and data mining.

  14. On the scaling features of magnetic field fluctuations at non-MHD scales in turbulent space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolini, G.; Giannattasio, F.; Yordanova, E.; Vörös, Z.; Marcucci, M. F.; Echim, M.; Chang, T.

    2016-11-01

    In several different contexts space plasmas display intermittent turbulence at magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) scales, which manifests in anomalous scaling features of the structure functions of the magnetic field increments. Moving to smaller scales, i.e. below the ion-cyclotron and/or ion inertial length, these scaling features are still observed, even though its is not clear if these scaling features are still anomalous or not. Here, we investigate the nature of scaling properties of magnetic field increments at non-MHD scales for a period of fast solar wind to investigate the occurrence or not of multifractal features and collapsing of probability distribution functions (PDFs) using the novel Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) method, which is more sensitive than the traditional structure function approach. We find a strong evidence for the occurrence of a near mono-scaling behavior, which suggests that the observed turbulent regime at non-MHD scales mainly displays a mono-fractal nature of magnetic field increments. The results are discussed in terms of a non-compact fractal structure of the dissipation field.

  15. Dissociation between the aversive and pharmacokinetic effects of ethanol in female Fischer and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Roma, Peter G; Chen, Scott A; Barr, Christina S; Riley, Anthony L

    2007-08-22

    In humans and laboratory animal models, vulnerability to alcohol abuse is influenced by endogenous factors such as genotype. Using the inbred Fischer and Lewis rat strains, we previously reported stronger conditioned taste aversions (CTA) in male Fischer rats that could not be predicted by genotypic differences in alcohol absorption [Roma PG, Flint WW, Higley JD, Riley AL. Assessment of the aversive and rewarding effects of alcohol in Fischer and Lewis rats. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2006;189:187-99]. The present study made similar assessments in Fischer and Lewis females via four-trial CTA induced by 1 or 1.5 g/kg intraperitoneal (IP) ethanol (n=10-12/strain/dose) as well as measures of blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) at 15, 60 and 180 min post-injection with 1.5 g/kg IP ethanol or saline (n=7-8/strain/dose). Dose-dependent CTAs were produced, but the strains did not differ from each other in these measures; however, BACs in the Lewis females were significantly higher than Fischer at all three time points. As with males of the Fischer and Lewis genotypes, a dissociation between BACs and the aversive effects of alcohol was observed. These data are the first assessments of these particular phenotypes in Fischer and Lewis females, and when considered with the historical data, suggest a Genotype x Sex interaction in the centrally mediated sensitivity to alcohol's aversive effects.

  16. Exploring old caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luana Belli, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Quarries, caves and mines often contain fossils. During the '30s in Rome, the urban expansion needs for building materials such as gravel, sand and clay were extracted from quarries that surrounded the city. One of these quarries in particular, in the area of Saccopastore (Nomentana area 3 km from the University Sapienza Roma) returned an ancient human fossil skull belonging to a Neanderthal (most likely a female) who lived in Latium about 120,000 years ago. Detailed studies of this fossil were carried out by Sergio Sergi, the son of the founder of the Museum of Anthropology in Rome, Giuseppe Sergi. The museum was founded in 1884 and was later transferred to the University City (1934) where it is still located. Professor Maria Luana Belli, a science teacher in the Liceo Scientifico "G. Keplero" is a volunteer and collaborator with the Museum "G. Sergi", and she and her students retrace the places of the discovery on the trail of the Neanderthals, for understanding the evolution of the territory in a perspective of interdisciplinary teaching.

  17. Isotopic evidence for age-related immigration to imperial Rome.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Tracy L; Schwarcz, Henry P; Garnsey, Peter; Knyf, Martin; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Bondioli, Luca

    2007-04-01

    Oxygen stable isotope ratios (delta(18)O) have been determined in carbonate in paired first and third molar teeth from individuals (N = 61) who lived in the town of Portus Romae ("Portus") and who were buried in the necropolis of Isola Sacra (First to Third centuries AD) near Rome, Italy. We compare these analyses with data for deciduous teeth of modern Roman children. Approximately one-third of the archaeological sample has first molar (M1) values outside the modern range, implying a large rate of population turnover at that time, consistent with historical data. Delta (18)O(ap) values suggest that a group within the sample migrated to the area before the third molar (M3) crown had completely formed (i.e., between 10 and 17.5 years of age). This is the first quantitative assessment of population mobility in Classical antiquity. This study demonstrates that migration was not limited to predominantly single adult males, as suggested by historical sources, but rather a complex phenomenon involving families. We hypothesize that migrants most likely came from higher elevations to the East and North of Rome. One individual with a higher delta(18)O value may have come (as a child) from an area isotopically similar to North Africa.

  18. Evolution of the Vesuvius magmatic-hydrothermal system before the 16 December 1631 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, Claudia; Marini, Luigi

    2008-04-01

    In a recently published manuscript [Guidoboni, E., Boschi, E., 2006. Vesuvius before the 1631 eruption, EOS, 87(40), 417 and 423]; [Guidoboni, E. (Ed.), 2006. Pirro Ligorio, Libro di diversi terremoti (1571), volume 28, codex Ja II 15, Archivio di Stato di Torino, Edizione Nazionale delle Opere di Pirro Ligorio, Roma, De Luca, 261 pp], Pirro Ligorio gives a detailed description of the phenomena occurring in the crater area of Vesuvius volcano, in 1570-1571 and previous years. Here, these phenomena are interpreted as the first clearly documented signals of unrest of this volcanic system caused by the shallow emplacement of a magma batch and leading to the 1631 eruption. Our interpretation is mainly based on the present understanding of the fluid geochemistry of magmatic-hydrothermal systems. In this way, it is possible to conclude that: (i) incandescent rocks were present at the surface, with temperatures > 500 °C approximately and (ii) either a magmatic-dominated or a magmatic-hydrothermal-type of conceptual geochemical model applies to Vesuvius in 1570-1571 and preceding years. The Ligorio's picture represents the first clear evidence that the magma involved in the 1631 eruption was present under the volcano more than sixty years before the eruption. Moreover, its emplacement produced a series of phenomena which were clearly observed although not understood at that time. A similar phenomenological pattern should be easily detected and correctly interpreted at present or in the future.

  19. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress Report From Rome 2016.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroya; Otani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-10-25

    From August 27th to 31st, the 2016 Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC 2016) was held in Fiera di Roma, Italy. Despite the socially unstable situation, more than 32,000 attendees, including clinical physicians, basic researchers, medical students, and paramedical personnel, as well as 5,000 exhibitors from 106 countries gathered in this historical city to share the latest findings and to discuss the present issues in cardiovascular medicine. There were scientific sessions, including 28 Hot Lines, 26 clinical trial updates, 24 registry studies, and 5 clinical practice guideline sessions. Japan had 1,170 attendees, with 1,743 submitted and 670 accepted abstracts, including the NIPPON trial presented in the hotline session. From 2011 to 2016, Japan has been the first abstract submitter and has had the most abstracts accepted, which indicates the great contribution of Japanese cardiologists and the Japanese Circulation Society. This report briefly introduces the key presentations and highlights from the ESC 2016 Scientific Sessions. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2282-2286).

  20. Analysis of Italian Earthquake catalogs in the context of intermediate-term prediction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashkova, Leontina; Peresan, Antonella

    2013-06-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of regional and global earthquake catalogs currently available for the territory of Italy. We consider: (a) instrumental seismic catalogs provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Roma (INGV) for earthquake forecasting experiment in Italy within the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP); (b) Global Hypocenters' Data provided by the USGS/NEIC, which is currently used in the real-time earthquake prediction experiment by CN and M8S algorithms in Italy, and (c) seismological Bulletin provided by the International Seismological Centre (ISC). We discuss advantages and shortcomings of these catalogs in the context of intermediate-term middle-range earthquake prediction problem in Italy, including the possibility of the catalog's combined or integrated use. Magnitude errors in the catalog can distort statistics of success-to-failure scoring and eventually falsify testing results. Therefore, the analysis of systematic and random errors in magnitude presented in Appendixes can be of significance in its own right.

  1. Behavioral risk factors and prevalence of HIV and other STIs among female sex workers in Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Qyra, Shp Tim; Basho, Moza; Bani, Roland; Dervishi, Marjeta; Ulqinaku, Dritan; Bino, Silva; Kakarriqi, Eduart; Alban, Ylli; Simaku, Artan; Vasili, Adela; Rjepaj, Klodjan; Pipero, Pellumd; Duro, Vjollca; Byku, Betim; Koraqi, Andi

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the research and a comparative analysis of findings on key indicators for the study population. The study instrument was a standardized behavior study questionnaire provided in the Family Health International published manual (Family Health International, 2000). The target group was female sex workers working in Tirana. The prevalence of biological infections was low. HIV was detected in one case. Syphilis and Hepatitis B rates resulted to be respectively 6.5% and 7.6%. The median age of the study participants is 28 years. Almost 38% of the participants were illiterate, and more than half belong to the Roma community. Almost 50% of the respondents had received money in exchange of sex for the first time 18 years earlier. Almost 65% of respondents reported two or more different sex partners in the last seven days, while almost 30% referred five or more. Condom use at last sex with a paying client was reported by almost 68%. Consistent condom use with paying clients in the last month was reported by almost 35% of the respondents.

  2. The recent activity of the lake Albano (Castelgandolfo, Italy) maar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, Renato; Giordano, Guido; de Rita, Donatella; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Barberi, Franco

    Lake Albano is a complex maar that fed the last phases of Colli Albani volcanic activity. The study of several new stratigraphic sections opened by archeological excavations and civil works has revealed the existence of two previously unknown, primary explosive volcanic deposits, and of several lahar deposits, distributed mainly in the Ciampino plain. Morphological analysis, radiometric dating, the distribution of the early human settlements in the area and the revision of the ancient history and myths of Roma, are coherent in indicating that the activity of lake Albano is much younger than previously believed and extends into Holocene. Until the 4th century B.C. catastrophic exondations have occurred from the lowest rim of the lake, with lahar emplacement on the northern slope. The repetition of these phenomena was prevented by a drain-tunnel dug by the Romans. The overflows were possibly triggered by sudden injections, in the lake bottom, of hot and CO2-rich fluids that are certainly present underneath the volcano. The presence of several gas emission sites, the high CO2 flux in zones corresponding to structural highs of the carbonate basement, the existence of pressurised aquifers also at shallow depth and the reported sudden increase of water temperature and gas release in relation to earthquakes, indicate that a similar hazard persists nowadays.

  3. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Obervatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'eman, Yu.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospherice lectric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS ofE milio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-offr igidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine thea tmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutroni ntensity and for multiplicities m ≥1, m ≥2, m ≥3, m ≥4,m ≥5, m ≥6, m ≥7, and m ≥8, as well as for m=1, m=2,m =3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison ande xcluding primary CR variations we use also data obtainedb y NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by catching ofs low negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping fewn eutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), theb iggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicitym =1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion ont he basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field._

  4. Impact of Different Treatment Approaches on Pregnancy Outcomes in 99 Women Treated for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Filippone, Francesco Romeo; Alfo, Marco; Muni, Roberta; Cavalieri, Elena; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Annechini, Giorgia; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Minniti, Giuseppe; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes in women with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) diagnosis, treated between 1972 and 1999 at Department of Radiotherapy and Hematology of University 'Sapienza' of Roma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 99 female patients that conceived after treatment for HL. Fifty-nine (59%) were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 32 (32%) with radiotherapy alone as supradiaphragmatic or as infradiaphragmatic and 8 (8%) patients with chemotherapy alone. Results: Ninety-nine patients reported 145 pregnancies. We observed 132 deliveries (2 of them twin births) after a median of 55 months (range, 14-278 months) from the end of therapy. Twelve women (12%) experienced 13 miscarriages after a median of 50 months (range, 13-120) from the end of therapy. We recorded 9/132 (7%) premature births and 3/134 babies (2%) were underweight at the time of birth. We recorded 2 cases of congenital malformations. No statistical differences were recorded when adverse pregnancy outcomes were analyzed with respect to chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, or combined therapy. Conclusions: No significant associations between pregnancy outcomes and therapeutic approaches were found. In particular, the infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy showed no statistical association with miscarriages, premature birth, and low birth weight at term when compared with other therapeutic approaches.

  5. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008.

    PubMed

    Boore, A L; Jungk, J; Russo, E T; Redd, J T; Angulo, F J; Williams, I T; Cheek, J E; Gould, L H

    2013-10-01

    In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study.

  6. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008

    PubMed Central

    Boore, A. L.; Jungk, J.; Russo, E.T.; Redd, J.T.; Angulo, F. J.; Williams, I. T.; Cheek, J. E.; Gould, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study. PMID:23228507

  7. Le « Harcèlement Entre Pairs » À L'école élémentaire Tchèque: Une Question D'interprétation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout-Diaz, Magdalena

    2008-07-01

    "PEER BULLYING" IN CZECH PRIMARY SCHOOLS: A QUESTION OF INTERPRETATION—This article questions adults' reports of an alleged increase in peer bullying at Czech primary schools. A survey on the school climate revealed that the pupils see it as a generally positive one and consider their relationships to be good. However, compared to France, their behaviour towards the adults is aggressive and rude. This apparent contradiction is linked to a conflict between the educational norms carried over from the old regime (behavioural control and conformism) and the new socio-economic paradigms (critical thinking and free enterprise). Public opinion, the media and a number of scientifically-questionable studies have drawn attention to the phenomenon of peer bullying ( šikana), and applied an imported concept to describe it ( school bullying). This makes it possible to avoid questioning the part played by the adults, the school and the researchers; justify segregating pupils from socially, culturally or economically disadvantaged backgrounds (Roma); and facilitate the country's socio-economic inclusion in the European Union by highlighting educational problems about whose nature there is general agreement.

  8. The O3-Vet project: integration of a standard nomenclature of clinical terms in a veterinary electronic medical record for veterinary hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zaninelli, M; Campagnoli, A; Reyes, M; Rojas, V

    2012-11-01

    In order to improve the hospital information system of the Chilean University Hospital, the Veterinary Medicine School of Universidad de Chile made a research cooperation with Università San Raffaele Roma to develop and test a new release of the O3-Vet software application. O3-Vet was selected by the Chilean University mainly for two reasons: (1) it uses human medicine standardized technologies such as "Health Level 7" (HL7) and "Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise" (IHE), which allow a good level of data sharing and hospital management; (2) it is open source, which means it can be adapted to specific hospital needs. In the new release, a subset of diagnostic terms was added from the "Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms" (SNOMED CT), selected by the "American Animal Hospital Association" (AAHA) to standardize the filing of clinical data and its retrieval. Results from a limited survey of veterinarians of the University (n=9) show that the new release improved the management of the Chilean University Hospital and the ability to retrieve useful clinical data.

  9. The Representation of Cultural Heritage from Traditional Drawing to 3d Survey: the Case Study of Casamary's Abbey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Saccone, M.

    2016-06-01

    In 3D survey the aspects most discussed in the scientific community are those related to the acquisition of data from integrated survey (laser scanner, photogrammetric, topographic and traditional direct), rather than those relating to the interpretation of the data. Yet in the methods of traditional representation, the data interpretation, such as that of the philological reconstruction, constitutes the most important aspect. It is therefore essential in modern systems of survey and representation, filter the information acquired. In the system, based on the integrated survey that we have adopted, the 3D object, characterized by a cloud of georeferenced points, defined but their color values, defines the core of the elaboration. It allows to carry out targeted analysis, using section planes as a tool of selection and filtering data, comparable with those of traditional drawings. In the case study of the Abbey of Casamari (Veroli), one of the most important Cistercian Settlement in Italy, the survey made for an Agreement with the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and University of RomaTre, within the project "Accessment of the sismic safety of the state museum", the reference 3D model, consisting of the superposition and geo-references data from various surveys, is the tool with which yo develop representative models comparable to traditional ones. It provides the necessary spatial environment for drawing up plans and sections with a definition such as to develop thematic analysis related to phases of construction, state of deterioration and structural features.

  10. Estimation of the time-dependent radioactive source-term from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident using atmospheric transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeppner, M.; Plastino, W.; Budano, A.; De Vincenzi, M.; Ruggieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Several nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant have been severely damaged from the Tōhoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Due to the extremely difficult on-site situation it has been not been possible to directly determine the emissions of radioactive material. However, during the following days and weeks radionuclides of 137-Caesium and 131-Iodine (amongst others) were detected at monitoring stations throughout the world. Atmospheric transport models are able to simulate the worldwide dispersion of particles accordant to location, time and meteorological conditions following the release. The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model Flexpart is used by many authorities and has been proven to make valid predictions in this regard. The Flexpart software has first has been ported to a local cluster computer at the Grid Lab of INFN and Department of Physics of University of Roma Tre (Rome, Italy) and subsequently also to the European Mediterranean Grid (EUMEDGRID). Due to this computing power being available it has been possible to simulate the transport of particles originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant site. Using the time series of the sampled concentration data and the assumption that the Fukushima accident was the only source of these radionuclides, it has been possible to estimate the time-dependent source-term for fourteen days following the accident using the atmospheric transport model. A reasonable agreement has been obtained between the modelling results and the estimated radionuclide release rates from the Fukushima accident.

  11. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. I. A NEW METHOD FOR THE ASSOCIATION OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method for identifying blazar candidates by examining the locus, i.e., the region occupied by the Fermi {gamma}-ray blazars in the three-dimensional color space defined by the WISE infrared colors. This method is a refinement of our previous approach that made use of the two-dimensional projection of the distribution of WISE {gamma}-ray-emitting blazars (the Strip) in the three WISE color-color planes. In this paper, we define the three-dimensional locus by means of a principal component analysis of the color distribution of a large sample of blazars composed of all the ROMA-BZCAT sources with counterparts in the WISE All-Sky Catalog associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL; the WISE Fermi blazars sample, WFB). Our new procedure yields a total completeness of c {sub tot} {approx} 81% and a total efficiency of e {sub tot} {approx} 97%. We also obtain local estimates of the efficiency and completeness as functions of the WISE colors and galactic coordinates of the candidate blazars. The catalog of all WISE candidate blazars associated with the WFB sample is also presented, complemented by archival multi-frequency information for the alternative associations. Finally, we apply the new association procedure to all {gamma}-ray blazars in the 2FGL and provide a catalog containing all the {gamma}-ray candidate blazars selected according to our procedure.

  12. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  13. Theoretical and numerical characterization of the city-site effect: the Mexico city case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, O. A.; Mezher, N.; Clouteau, D.

    2003-04-01

    In the past years, the damage inflicted to large cities by strong earthquakes introduced new issues in earthquake engineering research: does the presence of a city significantly modify the seismic field? Based on the theoretical study of wave propagation in a random media, this paper presents some of the necessary conditions of the existence of the so called ''city-site effect''. This approach assimilates buildings to resonant scatterers distributed on the free surface. An analytical expression of the scattering cross-section of one isolated resonant building is given in the classical framework of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI). The mean free path l(ω), indicator of the wave propagation regime: single scattering or multiple scattering approximation, is then estimated using the image technique. After this theoretical part, those indicators are calculated and compared for numerical simulations in Roma Norte district (Mexico city) model and in a city with arandom distribution of buildings. When the attention is turned to the mean effective field it is shown from numerical simulations that significatives desamplifications are obtained.

  14. New aspects of the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    2010-03-01

    The fundamental properties of the famous metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide are obscured in traditional samples by domain structure. In contrast, single-crystal nanobeams of the material can be prepared in such a way that the frustration is absent, and the stress is zero or almost uniform, even while the transition is taking place. Studying nanobeams using a combination of transport and optical methods has allowed us to obtain a number of new results, including the following. First, the uniform metallic phase can be dramatically supercooled. Second, the so-called M2 insulating phase shows a temperature-independent resistivity at the transition, implicating electron-electron interactions in the controlling mechanism. Third, the M1 and M2 insulating phases have the same thermal electronic gap. Fourth, we establish a new phase diagram of the material as a function of stress along the rutile c-axis which helps to explain a number of recent experiments and some anomalies in the older literature. Work done in collaboration with Jiang Wei, Jae Park, Vinny Roma, Andrew Jones, Sam Berweger, and Markus Raschke.

  15. "There's no kind of respect here" A qualitative study of racism and access to maternal health care among Romani women in the Balkans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Roma, the largest minority group in Europe, face widespread racism and health disadvantage. Using qualitative data from Serbia and Macedonia, our objective was to develop a conceptual framework showing how three levels of racism--personal, internalized, and institutional--affect access to maternal health care among Romani women. Methods Eight focus groups of Romani women aged 14-44 (n = 71), as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews with gynecologists (n = 8) and key informants from NGOs and state institutions (n = 11) were conducted on maternal health care seeking, experiences during care, and perceived health care discrimination. Transcripts were coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Themes were categorized into domains. Results Twenty-two emergent themes identified barriers that reflected how racism affects access to maternal health care. The domains into which the themes were classified were perceptions and interactions with health system, psychological factors, social environment and resources, lack of health system accountability, financial needs, and exclusion from education. Conclusions The experiences of Romani women demonstrate psychosocial and structural pathways by which racism and discrimination affect access to prenatal and maternity care. Interventions to address maternal health inequalities should target barriers within all three levels of racism. PMID:22094115

  16. ASTROKIDS: from a bookshop to the stars!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Nichelli, E.; Fulco, M. T.

    2012-09-01

    The achievements of mankind are based on the interaction of discovery, invention, and innovation. Once man learnt how to utilize the laws of nature, he advanced to a being who attained greatest strength upon other creatures. An analogy can be drawn for civilisations: Those conducting fundamental research will gain strategical power. Among the sciences, astronomy and astrophysics provide the largest potential for discoveries that reach far beyond our intellectual limits. They trigger technology and have a decisive impact on the society. Within the frame of this nationwide initiative, the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology (Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, IAPS), with the collaboration of OAR (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma), organized and realized in 2012 a number of events that took place in Rome. Thanks to the wide range of scientific activities carried out by IAPS scientists, topics ranged from Moon exploration to shooting stars, from gravity to stars' birth. In each appointment, kids had the chance to learn about planetology and astrophysics, participating to games, creating clay models, building paper spacecrafts, listening to stories and…just having fun. In this talk we will present some of the most interesting and successful stories in the Astrokids project.

  17. Cap +1 mutation; an unsuspected cause of beta thalassaemia transmission in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Karim, Muhammad Usman Abdul; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Babar, Sadia Usman

    2009-12-05

    AMAÇ: Talasemi dünya genelinde en yaygın genetik bozukluklardan biridir. ‘Sessiz beta talasemi’ye neden olan Cap +1 mutasyonu Pakistan’daki tüm etnik gruplarda görülmektedir. Bu çalışma Pakistan nüfusu içinde Cap +1 mutasyonun sıklığını belirlemek için tasarlanmıştır. YÖNTEMLER: Cap +1 beta talasemik mutasyon tayini Genomik DNA Purifikasyon Kiti (Gentra system ABD) kullanılarak kandan ekstre edildi. Normal ve mutant DNA tespiti için Amplifikasyon Refrakter Mutasyon Sistemi (ARMS) primerleri tasarlandı.Temel hematolojik parametreler otomatik analizör (Sysmex KX-21) kullanılarak çalışıldı. Selüloz asetat hemoglobin elektroforezi yarı-otomatik teknik (INTERLAB Roma Microtech Series Electrophoresis system 4.23) kullanılarak yapıldı.

  18. An orientable solar panel system for nanospacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Candini, Gian Paolo; Perelli, Massimo; Negri, Andrea; Marino, Michele

    2014-08-01

    An orientable deployed solar array system for 1-5 kg weight nanospacecraft is described, enhancing the achievable performance of these typically power-limited systems. The system is based on a deployable solar panel system, previously developed with cooperation between Laboratorio di Sistemi Aerospaziali of University of Roma “la Sapienza” and the company IMT (Ingegneria Marketing Tecnologia). The system proposed is a modular one, and suitable in principle for the 1U, 2U and 3U standard Cubesat bus, even if the need for three axis attitude stabilization makes it typically preferred for 3U Cubesats. The size of each solar panel is the size of a lateral Cubesat surface. A single degree of freedom maneuvering capability is given to the deployed solar array, in order to follow the apparent motion of the sun as close as possible, given the mission requirements on the spacecraft attitude. Considerable effort has been devoted to design the system compatible with the Cubesat standard, being mounted outside on the external spacecraft structure, without requiring modifications on the standard prescriptions. The small available volume is the major constraint, which forces to use miniaturized electric motor technology. The system design trade-off is discussed, leading to the selection of an architecture based on two independently steerable solar array wings.

  19. The controversy on the early history of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Löwy, I

    2005-12-01

    Recently historians of medicine have proposed three distinctive accounts of early history of Chagas disease (American trypasonomiasis). According to the first the disease, described by the Brazilian researcher Carlos Chagas in 1909, was "deconstructed" in the 1920s and disappeared for about twenty years, then was recovered in the 1940s, mainly through the epidemiological studies of Emmanuel Dias and his colleagues in Minas Gerais (Brazil). According to the second Chagas disease could not be "deconstructed" in the 1920s because it did not exist at that time. Chagas observations were inaccurate and unreliable and did not define a new human pathology. The entity called today "Chagas disease" appeared in the 1930, principally as the result of investigations of Cecilio Romaña in Argentina. Finally, a third view assumes that "Chagas disease" was constructed gradually between 1909 and the 1950s through the collective efforts of numerous Latino-American researchers. This paper juxtaposes different histories of Chagas disease, and argues that their divergences stems from allegiance to distinct, partly incommensurable epistemological "thought styles". The co-existence of divergent styles of historical investigation, this text proposes, should be perceived as potential source of enrichment of our understanding of the past.

  20. Astrocomp: web technologies for high performance computing on a network of supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Becciani, U.; Miocchi, P.; Antonuccio, V.; Capuzzo Dolcetta, R.; Di Matteo, P.; Rosato, V.

    2005-02-01

    Astrocomp is a project developed by the INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Catania, University of Roma La Sapienza and Enea in collaboration with Oneiros s.r.l. The project has the goal of building a web-based user-friendly interface which allows the international community to run some parallel codes on a set of high-performance computing (HPC) resources, with no need for specific knowledge about Unix and Operating Systems commands. Astrocomp provides CPU times, on parallel systems, available to the authorized user. The portal makes codes for astronomy available: FLY code, a cosmological code for studying three-dimensional collisionless self-gravitating systems with periodic boundary conditions [Becciani, Antonuccio, Comput. Phys. Comm. 136 (2001) 54]. ATD treecode, a parallel tree-code for the simulation of the dynamics of self-gravitating systems [Miocchi, Capuzzo Dolcetta, A&A 382 (2002) 758]. MARA a code for stellar light curves analysis [Rodonò et al., A&A 371 (2001) 174]. Other codes will be added to the portal in the future.

  1. Marker and pen graffiti cleaning on diverse calcareous stones by different laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, S. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Daurelio, G.; Albanese, A.

    2007-05-01

    Industries nowadays continuously produce new types of inks for markers and pens, so new different graffiti appear . In this paper laser cleaning tests on 41 new marker and pen types ( fluorescent, permanent, water-based, acrylic tempera, metallic paint, waterproof inks ), applied into laboratory on different litho- type samples (Chianca, Travertino di Roma, Tufo Carparo fine grain, Sabbie), typical stones employed in much more monuments in Puglia and Italian architectures were carried out. The same ones, were exposed for twelve months to outdoor ageing, subject to sunshine, rain, wind, IR and UV solar radiations. Ablation experiments and tests by using different cleaning techniques, each one in Dry and Wet condition (classic technique, Daurelio technique 1 and Daurelio technique 2 and others new techniques) and two different Nd:YAG laser systems (Palladio by QUANTA SYSTEM and SMART CLEAN II by EL.EN.), were adopted. The experimental modes, N-Mode (1064nm - 150, 300 and 500 μs pulse duration), Q-Switch (1064nm - 8 ns pulse duration) and SFR (Short Free Running - 1064 nm - 40 to 110μs pulse duration) were tested on each marked stones. It was found that according to the different ink types and stone substrate, Q-Switch laser cleaning ablation with optimized laser technique are the best solution to marker an pen graffiti removal. The work is still in progress.

  2. ATP Synthase Deficiency due to TMEM70 Mutation Leads to Ultrastructural Mitochondrial Degeneration and Is Amenable to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Braczynski, Anne K.; Vlaho, Stefan; Müller, Klaus; Wittig, Ilka; Blank, Anna-Eva; Tews, Dominique S.; Drott, Ulrich; Kleinle, Stephanie; Abicht, Angela; Horvath, Rita; Plate, Karl H.; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H.; Schulze, Andreas; Harter, Patrick N.; Kieslich, Matthias; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    TMEM70 is involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ATP synthase and mutations in the TMEM70 gene impair oxidative phosphorylation. Herein, we report on pathology and treatment of ATP synthase deficiency in four siblings. A consanguineous family of Roma (Gipsy) ethnic origin gave birth to 6 children of which 4 were affected presenting with dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, cardiomyopathy, metabolic crises, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as clinical symptoms. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.317-2A>G) in the TMEM70 gene. While light microscopy was unremarkable, ultrastructural investigation of muscle tissue revealed accumulation of swollen degenerated mitochondria with lipid crystalloid inclusions, cristae aggregation, and exocytosis of mitochondrial material. Biochemical analysis of mitochondrial complexes showed an almost complete ATP synthase deficiency. Despite harbouring the same mutation, the clinical outcome in the four siblings was different. Two children died within 60 h after birth; the other two had recurrent life-threatening metabolic crises but were successfully managed with supplementation of anaplerotic amino acids, lipids, and symptomatic treatment during metabolic crisis. In summary, TMEM70 mutations can cause distinct ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration and almost complete deficiency of ATP synthase but are still amenable to treatment. PMID:26550569

  3. Cranial trauma in iron age Samnite agriculturists, Alfedena, Italy: implications for biocultural and economic stress.

    PubMed

    Paine, R R; Mancinelli, D; Ruggieri, M; Coppa, A

    2007-01-01

    The Samnites are an Iron Age protohistoric people from the central region of Italy. The skeletal remains are from the Alfedena necropolis, 6th through 5th centuries B.C. Macchiarelli et al. (Antropologia Contemporanea 4 (1981) 239-243) were the first to report on cranial trauma for this population, presenting four cases with extreme injuries. We re-examined this well documented skeletal population for additional examples of trauma. Previously unexamined remains from Alfedena, excavated at the turn of the 20th century, are also included in our analysis (Mariani. 1901. "Aufidena", ricerche archeologiche e storiche del Sannio settentrionale. Roma: Acc Naz Dei Lincei). Of the 209 adult crania examined, 12.9% of them exhibited trauma. Analysis of location and frequency of cranial trauma revealed that cranial injuries to the head appear to originate from all directions. The high rate of cranial trauma underscores the violent circumstances experienced during the Iron Age protohistoric period of central Italy. Males are much more likely to exhibit cranial injury than females (P = 0.009). We conclude that the injuries received by Samnite male farmer-warriors occurred while defending pastoral-agricultural resources. Trauma rates are similar for some Iron Age populations and not for others. Behavior associated with violence during the Iron Age period can not be generalized for all populations found in Italy.

  4. Lo Gnomone Clementino Astronomia Meridiana in Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Costruito per chiara volontà del papa 70 anni dopo il caso Galileo, lo Gnomone Clementino è un grande telescopio solare che non fa uso di lenti a 92 anni dall’invenzione del cannocchiale. Queste due caratteristiche basterebbero da sole a giustificare l’interesse verso questo strumento. L’astronomia meridiana è alla base dell’astrometria e dell’astrofisica moderna. Lo Gnomone Clementino sta oggi all’astronomia, come il veliero “Amerigo Vespucci” sta alla Marina Italiana. E’ possibile svolgere ogni genere di osservazione e studio su questo strumento, e dal 2002 vi tengo lezioni teorico-pratiche del corso di Storia dell’Astronomia e La Terra nel Sistema Solare della Sapienza, Università di Roma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia. Questo testo aggiunge alcuni tasselli alla ricerca storica sulla meridiana, appoggiandosi, com’è naturale, sulle spalle di giganti che mi hanno preceduto in questi studi. In particolare la misura dell’azimut della meridiana, ed il suo inquadramento tra gli strumenti simili ed alcuni studi di astrometria sui dati del 1701-1703 di Bianchini, che sono apparsi fin’ora soltanto su riviste specializzate ed in Inglese vengono qui proposti in Italiano e semplificati, per valorizzare sempre più questa straordinaria opera d’arte e di scienza.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 1(st)-2(nd) century CE southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stephanie; Prowse, Tracy L; Herring, D Ann; Klunk, Jennifer; Kuch, Melanie; Duggan, Ana T; Bondioli, Luca; Holmes, Edward C; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2016-12-05

    The historical record attests to the devastation malaria exacted on ancient civilizations, particularly the Roman Empire [1]. However, evidence for the presence of malaria during the Imperial period in Italy (1st-5th century CE) is based on indirect sources, such as historical, epigraphic, or skeletal evidence. Although these sources are crucial for revealing the context of this disease, they cannot establish the causative species of Plasmodium. Importantly, definitive evidence for the presence of malaria is now possible through the implementation of ancient DNA technology. As malaria is presumed to have been at its zenith during the Imperial period [1], we selected first or second molars from 58 adults from three cemeteries from this time: Isola Sacra (associated with Portus Romae, 1st-3rd century CE), Velia (1st-2nd century CE), and Vagnari (1st-4th century CE). We performed hybridization capture using baits designed from the mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes of Plasmodium spp. on a prioritized subset of 11 adults (informed by metagenomic sequencing). The mtDNA sequences generated provided compelling phylogenetic evidence for the presence of P. falciparum in two individuals. This is the first genomic data directly implicating P. falciparum in Imperial period southern Italy in adults.

  6. Interference of Bilirubin in the Determination of Magnesium with Methyl Thymol Blue

    PubMed Central

    Maksinovic, Rada; Ketin, Sonja; Biocanin, Rade

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Jaundice is a disease named for the yellow color of the skin. This color is the result of elevated levels of bilirubin in the blood serum. In Roma from Krusevac region in the last few years have seen the emergence of jaundice. Material and methods: In 80 of them (40 suffering and 40 from control group) were performed tests of numerous parameters in the laboratories of the Health Center in Krusevac. Magnesium was determined by spectrophotometry with methyl thymol blue, titanium yellow and blue xylidene. Bilirubin was determined by Jandrešek Grofov’s method. Results: The results were within the expectations, in addition to magnesium which was determined with methyl thymol blue. In all patients suffering from jaundice concentration of magnesium (0.67 ±0.14 mmol/l) statistically was significantly lower than tested of the control group (0.91± 0.059 mmol/). There is no theoretical data to reduce the concentration of magnesium in serum as a result of jaundice. That’s why we determined magnesium both in the control group and in sufferings with two methods as the titanium yellow, and xylidene blew. With these two methods we obtained results that were examined were within normal limits. Conclusion: This has led us to conclude that the determination of bilirubin interferes with magnesium methyl thymol blue. PMID:26244045

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Non-Fermi blazar sample (Xiong+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, D.; Zhang, X.; Bai, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-11-01

    The selection criteria for the sample were that we tried to select the largest group of blazars included in the multi-frequency catalogue of blazars (the Roma BZCAT; Massaro et al.. 2009, Cat. J/A+A/495/691) with reliable broad-line luminosity (used as a proxy for disc luminosity), redshift, black hole mass and jet kinetic power. The sample of FBs was directly from Xiong & Zhang (2014MNRAS.441.3375X). The νpeak and Lpeak of our FBs were collected from Finke (2013ApJ...763..134F) and Meyer et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/740/98), and the νpeak and Lpeak of NFBs from Nieppola et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/445/441; 2008, Cat. J/A+A/488/867), Meyer et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/740/98), Wu, Gu & Jiang (2009RAA.....9..168W) and Aatrokoski et al. (2011A&A...536A..15P). (1 data file).

  8. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    Otsuka, and Ms Yuri Endo, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Chiyo Itoh, and Ms Machiko Mizutani, for their invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Tomoaki Takayama, Hiromitsu Hanada, Takashi Nakajima, for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2009 will be held in Gran Sasso, Italy, hosted by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) with the chair of Professor Eugenio Coccia. Kunio Inoue, Atsuto Suzuki and Tadao Mitsui COMMITTEES TAUP Steering Committee F T Avignone U South Carolina B C Barish CALTECH E Bellotti U Milano/INFN J Bernabéu U Valencia A Bottino (chair) U Torino/INFN V de Alfaro U Torino/INFN T Kajita ICRR U Tokyo C W Kim Johns Hopkins Univ /KIAS E Lorenz U München V Matveev INR Moskow J Morales U Zaragoza D Sinclair U Carleton M Spiro IN2P3 TAUP 2007 International Advisory Committee J J Aubert CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin U Padova/INFN V Berezinsky INFN-LNGS/INR L Bergström U Stockholm R Bernabei U Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A Bettini U Padova/INFN S Bilenky JINR Dubna D O Caldwell U C Santa Barbara E Coccia INFN-LNGS/U Roma Tor Vergata J Cronin U Chicago A Dar Technion Haifa G Domogatsky INR Moscow H Ejiri U Osaka J Ellis CERN E Fernández IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini U Milano/INFN G Fogli U Bari/INFN T Gaisser U Delaware G Gelmini UCLA G Gerbier CEA Saclay F Halzen U Wisconsin W Haxton U Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani U Roma/INFN A McDonald Queen's U K Nakamura KEK E Peterson U Minneapolis R Petronzio INFN/U Roma Tor Vergata G Raffelt MPI München R Rebolo IAC Tenerife L Resvanis U Athens P Salati U Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A Smirnov ICTP Trieste N Spooner U Sheffield S Ting MIT/CERN Y Totsuka U Tokyo M S Turner FNAL/U Chicago J W F Valle IFIC Valencia D Vignaud APC Paris F von Feilitzsch T U München G Zatsepin INR Moscow TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee A Bottino U Torino/INFN D

  9. Tour of Jupiter Galilean moons: Winning solution of GTOC6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasurdo, Guido; Zavoli, Alessandro; Longo, Alessandro; Casalino, Lorenzo; Simeoni, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents the trajectory designed by the Italian joint team Politecnico di Torino & Sapienza Università di Roma (Team5), winner of the 6th edition of the Global Trajectory Optimization Competition (GTOC6). In the short time available in these competitions, Team5 resorted to basic knowledge, simple tools and a powerful indirect optimization procedure. The mission concerns a 4-year tour of the Jupiter Galilean moons. The paper explains the strategy that was preliminarily devised and eventually implemented by looking for a viable trajectory. The first phase is a capture that moves the spacecraft from the arrival hyperbola to a low-energy orbit around Jupiter. Six series of flybys follow; in each one the spacecraft orbits Jupiter in resonance with a single moon; criteria to construct efficient chains of resonant flybys are presented. Transfer legs move the spacecraft from resonance with a moon to another one; precise phasing of the relevant moons is required; mission opportunities in a 11-year launch window are found by assuming ballistic trajectories and coplanar circular orbits for the Jovian satellites. The actual trajectory is found by using an indirect technique.

  10. D Visualization and Photo-Realistic Reconstruction of the Great Temple of Bel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, A.

    2017-02-01

    The Great Temple of Bel in Palmyra was a unique edifice which had blended the well established lines of Greco-Roman architecture with the art and taste of the Orient. With the gilded bronze capitals of its 41 Corinthian columns it was the product of enormous effort and budget. It was the gem of a remarkable epoch of wealthy Palmyra and mighty Roma. With its splendidly decorated adyta ceilings it became a source of inspiration and imagination for Western architecture and decorative arts. While continuing to captivate the World, it was leveled and vanished as a grim result of conflict based vandalism. The aim of this work is to piece together this, the most eloquent and stupendous monument of the Roman East, from its ruins and reconstruct it as it was once extant. Its loss is irreplacable, but its photo-realistic reconstruction can offer some solace by waking the memories of the great temple as in the past. The lost reality of the Great Temple of Bel is revived here by digitally constructing its "ghost images".

  11. Considerations for building climate-based species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bucklin, David N.; Basille, Mathieu; Romanach, Stephanie; Brandt, Laura A.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Watling, James I.

    2016-01-01

    Climate plays an important role in the distribution of species. A given species may adjust to new conditions in-place, move to new areas with suitable climates, or go extinct. Scientists and conservation practitioners use mathematical models to predict the effects of future climate change on wildlife and plan for a biodiverse future. This 8-page fact sheet written by David N. Bucklin, Mathieu Basille, Stephanie S. Romañach, Laura A. Brandt, Frank J. Mazzotti, and James I. Watling and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how, with a better understanding of species distribution models, we can predict how species may respond to climate change. The models alone cannot tell us how a certain species will actually respond to changes in climate, but they can inform conservation planning that aims to allow species to both adapt in place and (for those that are able to) move to newly suitable areas. Such planning will likely minimize loss of biodiversity due to climate change.

  12. Thermal neutron dosimeter by synthetic single crystal diamond devices.

    PubMed

    Almaviva, S; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Tucciarone, A; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Angelone, M; Pillon, M

    2009-07-01

    We report on a new solid state dosimeter based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University laboratories. The dosimeter has been specifically designed for direct neutron dose measurements in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The response to thermal neutrons of the proposed diamond dosimeter is directly due to (10)B and, therefore, the dosimeter response is directly proportional to the boron absorbed doses in BNCT. Two single crystal diamond detectors are fabricated in a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and are sandwiched together with a boron containing layer in between the metallic contacts (see Fig.1). Neutron irradiations were performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) using the 2.5 MeV neutrons produced through the D(d,n)(3)He fusion reaction. Thermal neutrons were then produced by slowing down the 2.5 MeV neutrons using a cylindrical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) moderator. The diamond dosimeter was placed in the center of the moderator. The products of (10)B(n,alpha)Li nuclear reaction were collected simultaneously giving rise to a single peak. Stable performance, high reproducibility, high efficiency and good linearity were observed.

  13. Dog filariosis in the Lazio region (Central Italy): first report on the presence of Dirofilaria repens

    PubMed Central

    Scaramozzino, Paola; Gabrielli, Simona; Di Paolo, Michele; Sala, Marcello; Scholl, Francesco; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2005-01-01

    Background Epidemiological investigations were carried out in the Lazio Region to assess the status of canine filariosis and to evaluate the actual risk for veterinary and medical public health. Methods Since August 2001 to June 2003, a total of 972 canine blood samples, collected in public kennels and from private owners animals of the 5 Provinces of the Region, were tested. The presence of filarial parasites was evaluated by microscopy and bio-molecular techniques; the species identification was performed by means of the same diagnostic tools. Results A total of 17/972 (1.75%; 95%CI 1.06%–2.85%) blood samples were parasitized by D. repens,13 out them drawn by dogs resident in the Province of Roma, and 4 in the other provinces. Multivariate analysis was performed in order to evaluate the association between filariosis and risk factors. The origin from coastal territories seems to be a significant risk factor to acquire the infection. Conclusion This is the first report of canine filariosis in the Lazio Region, where D. repens was before reported only in foxes. The risk of human zoonotic infection is stressed, and the absence of other filarial species is discussed PMID:16185352

  14. In vitro effect of myo-inositol on sperm motility in normal and oligoasthenospermia patients undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Artini, P G; Casarosa, E; Carletti, E; Monteleone, P; Di Noia, A; Di Berardino, O M

    2017-02-01

    It is a known fact that abnormal seminal liquid specimens contain abnormal amounts of oxygen free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that the use of antioxidant molecules both in vivo and in vitro leads to improvement of semen quality in terms of motility, reduction in DNA damage, with obvious consequences on the fertilization potential. Myo-inositol has been observed to have anti-oxidant properties and be present in much greater concentrations specifically in seminal liquid than in the blood. Moreover, there seems to be a direct relationship between myo-inositol and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and sperm motility. Studies performed in vivo have demonstrated that a dietary supplementation with myo-inositol in men undergoing assisted reproduction techniques may improve sperm quality and motility in oligoasthenospermia (OAT) patients. In the following study we utilized myo-inositol in vitro to verify its effect on semen quality in both normal and OAT patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with respect to standard sperm medium. In vitro incubation of seminal liquid carried out using myo-inositol (Andrositol-Lab, Lo.Li. Pharma-Roma, Italy) at a concentration of 15 μl/ml improved progressive motility in both normospermia and OAT subjects. In our opinion, myo-inositol may prove to be a useful strategy to improve sperm preparation for clinical use in IVF.

  15. Survey of Expert Opinion on Intelligence: Causes of International Differences in Cognitive Ability Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rindermann, Heiner; Becker, David; Coyle, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Following Snyderman and Rothman (1987, 1988), we surveyed expert opinions on the current state of intelligence research. This report examines expert opinions on causes of international differences in student assessment and psychometric IQ test results. Experts were surveyed about the importance of culture, genes, education (quantity and quality), wealth, health, geography, climate, politics, modernization, sampling error, test knowledge, discrimination, test bias, and migration. The importance of these factors was evaluated for diverse countries, regions, and groups including Finland, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, the Arabian-Muslim world, Latin America, Israel, Jews in the West, Roma (gypsies), and Muslim immigrants. Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions). PMID:27047425

  16. Characterization of the Aerothermal Environment of the IXV Experimental Vehicle by Means of WTT and CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, E.; Soler, J.; Pierre, V.; Binetti, P.; Walloschek, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with all the aerothermodynamic (ATD) activities carried out so far in the framework of the IXV project, in order to characterize the aerothermal environment experienced by the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) during its atmospheric re- entry. The ATD synthesis activity is led by EADS Astrium, with support from DLR (tests in HEG and H2K facilities, CFD), VKI (tests in the Long-Shot facility, survey on IXV Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials properties), CIRA (CFD), University of Roma (CFD) and CFS Engineering (CFD). During the Phases A and B1 of the project (before SRR), only Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to build the IXV aerothermodynamic database and specify the sizing heat fluxes over the vehicle; in Phase B2/C1, both wind tunnel tests (WTT) - HEG, H2K and Long- Shot - and CFD have been used in order to reach Preliminary Design Review maturity. This paper presents: how wind tunnel test results have allowed improving the criterion of natural laminar-to-turbulent transition in the body-flap flow separation (flap heating being one critical aspect on IXV); a methodology for the ground-to-flight transposition based on dedicated WTT rebuilding CFD; the improvement of ATD margin policy thanks to wind tunnel data; the investigation of the sensitivities to chemical and physical models with some flight-condition CFD.

  17. The UNISAT program: Lessons learned and achieved results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Graziani, Filippo

    2009-07-01

    More than ten years experience in hands-on space education has been achieved at Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale of Università di Roma "la Sapienza", where the UNISAT program was established in the early nineties. The students participating in this program are involved in a microsatellite design, manufacturing, test, launch and operation in orbit activity, from initial mission concept to operation in orbit. The microsatellite program develops in a two years timeline, fitting with the graduate student program curricular activity at Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale. Four microsatellites have been launched every other year since 2000 from the Baikonour Cosmodrome by the DNEPR LV. In this way there was the opportunity to exploit the UNISAT platform to perform small scientific and technological experiments in orbit. Besides education, a main goal of the UNISAT program is testing in orbit commercial off-the-shelf components, which allow to keep the program cost low and compatible with the University research budget. The main spacecraft subsystems, including the in orbit technological and scientific experiments, and the ground station operations are briefly described in the paper, focussing on the education and research aspects.

  18. GB-InSAR monitoring and observational method for landslide emergency management: the Montaguto earthflow (AV, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrigno, F.; Gigli, G.; Fanti, R.; Casagli, N.

    2015-12-01

    On 10 March 2010, due to the heavy rainfall that occurred on the previous days, the Montaguto earthflow reactivated, involving the road SS 90 "Delle Puglie", as had happened previously in May 2005 and in September 2009, and reaching the Roma-Bari railway. This determined a special attention of the National Civil Protection Department and a widespread monitoring and analysis program was initiated. A monitoring activity using GB-InSAR (Ground Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) system began, in order to investigate the landslide kinematics, to plan urgent safety measures for risk mitigation and to design long term stabilization work. In this paper the GB-InSAR monitoring system results and its applications in the Observational Method (OM) approach are presented. The paper also highlights how the OM based on the GB-InSAR technique can produce savings in cost and time on engineering projects, without compromising safety, and how it can also benefit the geotechnical community by increasing scientific knowledge. This study focuses on the very much active role played by the monitoring activities, in both the design and plan modifications; with a special consideration for the emergency phase.

  19. [Reemergence of measles. Epidemic situation in the Valencian Community during the years 2011 and 2012].

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Silvia Guiral; Calatrava, Rosana Guaita; Vicenta Rigo Medrano, M; Vidal, Miquel Amat; Martín-Sierra Balibrea, Miguel; Zarco, Isabel Huertas; Ramón, Jorge Roda; Cifre, Antonio Salazar; Morán, Francisco González

    2014-02-01

    Measles incidence declined until becomes a sporadic reporting and infrequent notification in the last decade. The reemergence of the disease reached 744 cases in 2012, a rate of 14.50×10(5) inhabitants. A classic design in Public Health Surveillance was performed: retrospective analysis of cumulative incidence and characteristics of the affected subjects. Those dates were in record linkage with Valencia Microbiology Network (RedMIVA). Finally, 976 cases of measles were confirmed in 2011-2012 epidemic period. Time-line distribution shows three waves with amplitude length on 12-15 weeks. Proportion of unvaccinated or unknown subjects came up to 85% of cases. 25 outbreaks were reported, 499 cases associated. In 7 of the 10 community outbreaks early cases were from Roma population unvaccinated. In the city of Valencia was applied post-exposure prophylaxis in 32 schools and was observed low coverage: between 63% and 77% in 8 schools and less than 50% in 4. Serum negative rate was 12.4% and we highlight the rate under 16 months: 44.8%. Cohorts of 20-59 years had negative rates between 13.5 to 5.9%. The origin of the epidemic was the importation of cases to a territory with inadequate immune protection against measles. Its impact and development was conditioned by previous immunization coverage, the social and ethnic pattern of different areas or quarters and the extensive application of post-exposure prophylaxis at school and family contacts of cases.

  20. Resurgence of measles in Serbia 2010-2011 highlights the need for supplementary immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Nedeljković, J; Rakić Adrović, S; Tasić, G; Kovačević-Jovanović, V; Lončarević, G; Hübschen, J M; Muller, C P

    2016-04-01

    Between December 2010 and August 2011 an outbreak of measles occurred in Serbia with 363 reported cases. Sera and/or nose/throat swabs were collected from 193 patients and tested for measles-specific IgM antibodies by ELISA and viral RNA by RT-PCR, respectively. Epidemiological data were obtained from the surveillance database of the Institute of Public Health of Serbia. Of the 363 cases involved in the outbreak, 113 were laboratory confirmed. More than one third of the patients were hospitalized (n = 130, 35·8%) and for 15 (4·1% of the reported outbreak cases) the infection was complicated by pneumonia. Mostly pre-school children aged ⩽4 years (37·8%) and adults aged ⩾30 years (27·3%) were affected. The majority of patients belonged to the Roma population with a preponderance of female cases (57·0%). Nearly 94% of the patients were either unvaccinated or of unknown vaccination status. The main outbreak virus was the D4-Hamburg strain. The outbreak in Serbia occurred after several years of very low measles incidence despite a high routine immunization coverage in the general population, suggesting that special efforts to identify and vaccinate susceptible population groups are required even in countries with apparently good disease control.

  1. Learning epigenetic regulation from mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sanjeev; Sharma, Garima; Yaseen, Imtiyaz

    2016-01-01

    In a eukaryotic cell, the transcriptional fate of a gene is determined by the profile of the epigenetic modifications it is associated with and the conformation it adopts within the chromatin. Therefore, the function that a cell performs is dictated by the sum total of the chromatin organization and the associated epigenetic modifications of each individual gene in the genome (epigenome). As the function of a cell during development and differentiation is determined by its microenvironment, any factor that can alter this microenvironment should be able to alter the epigenome of a cell. In the study published in Nature Communications (Yaseen 2015 Nature Communications 6:8922 doi: 10.1038/ncomms9922), we show that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis has evolved strategies to exploit this pliability of the host epigenome for its own survival. We describe the identification of a methyltransferase from M. tuberculosis that functions to modulate the host epigenome by methylating a novel, non-canonical arginine, H3R42 in histone H3. In another study, we showed that the mycobacterial protein Rv2966c methylates cytosines present in non-CpG context within host genomic DNA upon infection. Proteins with ability to directly methylate host histones H3 at a novel lysine residue (H3K14) has also been identified from Legionella pnemophilia (RomA). All these studies indicate the use of non-canonical epigenetic mechanisms by pathogenic bacteria to hijack the host transcriptional machinery. PMID:28357339

  2. A New Fast Silicon Photomultiplier Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddi, F.; Ambrosino, F.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Bruni, I.; Ruggieri, A.; Sestito, S.

    2012-05-01

    The realization of low-cost instruments with high technical performance is a goal that deserves some efforts in an epoch of fast technological developments; indeed, such instruments can be easily reproduced and therefore allow new research programs to be opened in several observatories. We realized a fast optical photometer based on the SiPM technology, using commercially available modules. Using low-cost components, we have developed a custom electronic chain to extract the signal produced by a commercial MPPC module produced by Hamamatsu Photonics, in order to obtain submillisecond sampling of the light curve of astronomical sources (typically, pulsars). In the early 2011 February, we observed the Crab pulsar with the Cassini telescope with our prototype photometer, deriving its period and power spectrum and the shape of its light curve, in very good agreement with the results obtained in the past with other instruments. Based on observations made with the 152 cm Cassini telescope at the Loiano station of the Bologna Observatory and with the 50 cm telescope of the Università di Roma “La Sapienza” at Vallinfreda (Rome).

  3. Meiotic studies of infertile men in case of non-obstructive azoospermia with normal karyotype and no microdeleted Y-chromosome precise the clinical couple management.

    PubMed

    North, Marie-Odile; Lellei, Ilona; Erdei, Edit; Barbet, Jacques Patrick; Tritto, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    To identify meiotic criteria for infertility management in non-obstructive azoospermic men, a prospective and multicentric study was organized in Andrological Departments of Paris (France), Roma (Italy) and Budapest (Hungary). In 117 non-obstructive azoospermic men with normal karyotype and no Y-chromosome microdeletion, histology and meiotic studies on bilateral bipolar testicular biopsies were done. Histologically, 40 patients (34%) presented spermatocyte or spermatid arrest, 39 (33%) hypospermatogenesis whereas no meiotic cell could be observed in the remaining patients (33%). Cytogenetically, meiotic figures could only be obtained from the two first histological groups. Meiotic abnormalities were observed in a total of 44 patients (37.6%) including nine patients (7.7%) with severe class I and class IIB anomalies and 19 patients (16.2%) with class IIC environmentally linked meiotic abnormalities. These results provided essential clues for an accurate clinical management. For patients with no meiotic figures and patients with class I and class IIB anomalies, an hormonal stimulation is illusory and a sperm gift should be directly proposed. An hormonal stimulation should be proposed to all the other patients, either directly or following the treatment of the testicular microenvironment for the patients presenting class IIC anomalies. The genetic risk and possibility of prenatal chromosomal analysis in case of pregnancy should be clearly exposed to all the couples in all the cases where type IIA, III or IV anomalies are present. This therapeutical strategy has been applied to all the patients in our series.

  4. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  5. Accumulation of heavy metals by vegetables grown in mine wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, G.P.; Sands, K.; Waters, M.; Wixson, B.G.; Dorward-King, E.

    2000-03-01

    Lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc were quantified in mine wastes and in soils mixed with mine wastes. Metal concentrations were found to be heterogeneous in the wastes. Iceberg lettuce, Cherry Belle radishes, Roma bush beans, and Better Boy tomatoes were cultivated in mine wastes and in waste-amended soils. Lettuce and radishes had 100% survival in the 100% mine waste treatments compared to 0% and 25% survival for tomatoes and beans, respectively. Metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues to determine uptake and distribution of metals in the edible plant parts. Individual soil samples were collected beneath each plant to assess metal content in the immediate plant environment. This analysis verified heterogeneous metal content of the mine wastes. The four plant species effectively accumulated and translocated lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc. Tomato and bean plants contained the four metals mainly in the roots and little was translocated to the fruits. Radish roots accumulated less metals compared to the leaves, whereas lettuce roots and leaves accumulated similar concentrations of the four metals. Lettuce leaves and radish roots accumulated significantly more metals than bean and tomato fruits. This accumulation pattern suggests that consumption of lettuce leaves or radish roots from plants grown in mine wastes would pose greater risks to humans and wildlife than would consumption of beans or tomatoes grown in the same area. The potential risk may be mitigated somewhat in humans, as vegetables grown in mine wastes exhibited stunted growth and chlorosis.

  6. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  7. Growth and development of tomato plants Lycopersicon Esculentum Mill. under different saline conditions by fertirrigation with pretreated cheese whey wastewater.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier; Patanita, Manuel; Dôres, Jóse

    2013-01-01

    Pretreated cheese whey wastewater (CWW) has been used at different salinity levels: 1.75, 2.22, 3.22, 5.02 and 10.02 dS m(-1) and compared with fresh water (1.44 dS m(-1)). Two cultivars (cv.) of the tomato plant Lycopersicon Esculentum Mill. (Roma and Rio Grande) were exposed to saline conditions for 72 days. Salinity level (treatment) had no significant effects on the fresh weight and dry matter of the leaves, stems and roots. Similar results were found when specific leaf area, leaflet area, ramifications number of 1st order/plant, stem diameter and length, nodes number/stem and primary root length were considered. Conversely, the salinity level significantly influenced the Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) index and the distance between nodes in the plant stem. In the first case, an increase of 21% was obtained in the salinity levels of 5.02 and 10.02 dS m(-1) for cv. Rio Grande, compared with the control run. The results showed that the pretreated CWW can be a source of nutrients for tomato plants, with reduced effects on growth and development.

  8. [Exposure to organic halogen compounds in drinking water of 9 Italian regions: exposure to chlorites, chlorates, thrihalomethanes, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene].

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Aggazzotti, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Giacobazzi, P; Kanitz, S; Barbone, F; Sansebastiano, G; Ricci, C; Leoni, V; Fabiani, L; Triassi, M

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the exposure to organohalogens compounds in drinking water from 9 Italian towns (Udine, Genova, Parma, Modena, Siena, Roma, L'Aquila, Napoli and Catania). Overall, 1199 samples collected from 72 waterworks were analyzed. THMs, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were evaluated using the head-space gas chromatographic technique (detection limit of 0.01 microg/l; chlorite and chlorate analysis was performed by ion chromatography (detection limit of 20 microg/l). THMs were evidenced in 925 samples (77%) (median value: 1.12 micro/l; range: 0.01-54 mciro/l) and 7 were higher than the THMs Italian limit of 30 microg/l. Chlorite and chlorate levels were higher than the detection limit in 45% for chlorite and in 34% for chlorate samples; median values were 221 microg/l and 76 microg/l, respectively. Chlorite values were higher than the chlorite Italian limit (700 microg/l) in 35 samples (8.7%). Trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were measured in 29% and 44% of the investigated samples and showed values lower than the Italian limit (highest levels of 6 microg/l and 9 microg/l, respectively). The low levels detected of THMs, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene have no potentials effects on human health, whereas, the levels of chlorite and chlorates should be further evaluated and their potential effects for the populations using these drinking waters, better understood.

  9. First evidence of pathology in the forelimb of the late Miocene saber-toothed felid Promegantereon ogygia (Machairodontinae, Smilodontini).

    PubMed

    Salesa, Manuel J; Antón, Mauricio; Siliceo, Gema; Pesquero, María Dolores; Alcalá, Luis

    2014-06-01

    We examined the first evidence of pathology in the forelimb of the primitive saber-toothed felid Promegantereon ogygia, observed in a radius from the late Miocene (Vallesian, MN 10) site of La Roma 2 (Teruel, Spain). This fossil is the first evidence of a member of the Machairodontinae in this locality, and the first fossil of this species found in the Miocene basin of Teruel. The radius shows an exostosis shaped as a rough and wide bony crest probably caused by the lesion and posterior ossification of part of the tendon of the muscle abductor pollicis longus, an important extensor and abductor of the thumb. The lesion was probably due to a tearing or to high levels of exertion experienced by this muscle over a relatively long time, a general type of lesion also observed in other vertebrate fossils. With saber-toothed felids using their thumbs to immobilize prey during the hunt, the studied lesion probably affected in a significant manner the predatory abilities of the animal, causing at least a decrease in its hunting success rate.

  10. Association between oral habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Grippaudo, C; Paolantonio, E G; Antonini, G; Saulle, R; La Torre, G; Deli, R

    2016-10-01

    The ratio of bad habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion is an important issue in view of prevention and early treatment of disorders of the craniofacial growth. While bad habits can interfere with the position of the teeth and normal pattern of skeletal growth, on the other hand obstruction of the upper airway, resulting in mouth breathing, changes the pattern of craniofacial growth causing malocclusion. Our crosssectional study, carried out on 3017 children using the ROMA index, was developed to verify if there was a significant correlation between bad habits/mouth breathing and malocclusion. The results showed that an increase in the degree of the index increases the prevalence of bad habits and mouth breathing, meaning that these factors are associated with more severe malocclusions. Moreover, we found a significant association of bad habits with increased overjet and openbite, while no association was found with crossbite. Additionally, we found that mouth breathing is closely related to increased overjet, reduced overjet, anterior or posterior crossbite, openbite and displacement of contact points. Therefore, it is necessary to intervene early on these aetiological factors of malocclusion to prevent its development or worsening and, if already developed, correct it by early orthodontic treatment to promote eugnatic skeletal growth.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a review with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Hemmige, Vagish; Tanowitz, Herbert; Sethi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, an infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the Reduuvid insect vector, remains a major cause of morbidity in Central and South America over a century after its discovery in 1909. Though major advances in preventing the spread of this disease have been made in recent decades, millions of individuals remain chronically infected due to prior exposure to T. cruzi and are at risk for future complications from the disease. Dermatologic manifestations of acute infection may include localized swelling at the site of inoculation (chagoma), conjunctivitis (Romaña’s sign), and a generalized morbilliform eruption (schizotrypanides). Reactivation of quiescent infection in immunocompromised hosts due to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or organ transplantation can present with fever and skin lesions including panniculitis. The wide-spread emigration of chronic carriers of T. cruzi to North America, Europe, and Australia makes it imperative that dermatologists worldwide be familiar with this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22515575

  12. Vŗkşăyurvĕda of parăśara--an ancient treatise on plant science.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G P; Neelima, G; Pratap, G P; Swamy, G K

    2006-01-01

    Vŗkşăyurvĕda of Parăśara is a great contribution to the Botany in ancient India. N.N. Sircar and Roma sarkar edited this text with English translation. Notes with comparative references of modern botany were added. This book can be placed in all probability in between 1st century B.C to 4th century A.D by its linguistic style. Many scientific branches of Botany including origin of life, ecology, distribution of forests, morphology, classification, nomenclature, histology and physiology were dealt in this ancient work. Though it is presumed that this book was written by Parăśara to teach Botany to preparatory to Ayurvĕda studies to ancient Ayurvĕda students, it is true to the Ayurvĕda personals and other disciplines related to Botany of present day as well. Aim of this article is to attract the attention of all scholars who are related to Ayurvĕda and Botany and to feel the depth of the knowledge of ancient Indian botany.

  13. Carrier screening for inherited haemoglobin disorders among secondary school students and young adults in Latium, Italy.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Lerone, Maria; Colosimo, Alessia; Grisanti, Paola; Ponzini, Donatella; Di Biagio, Paola; Perri, Maria; Gianni, Debora; Rinaldi, Silvana; Piscitelli, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    To reduce the incidence of β-thalassaemia major and other severe haemoglobin-related disorders by the early identification of healthy carriers, the Centro Studi Microcitemie Roma has been organising since 1975 a prevention programme in Latium, an Italian central region. This programme entails two different types of carrier screening on a voluntary basis: a universal screening offered to secondary school students and a screening offered to young adults. In 36 years of scholastic screening (from 1975 until 2011), 1,466,100 students have been examined and 26,786 (1.8 %) carriers of non-α thalassaemia have been identified. In the extra-scholastic screening, 388,690 adult subjects (including the carriers' relatives) have been examined and a total of 38,457 (9.9 %) carriers of non-α thalassaemia have been detected. These results demonstrate that the precocious identification of healthy carriers allowed the identification of at-risk couples and reduced to zero the birth of affected babies in the Latium native population. This programme does not involve huge resources and is relatively inexpensive and, as such, it is essential to be offered to the total Latium scholastic and extra-scholastic population, which is epidemiologically changing due to migratory fluxes from countries in which haemoglobin disorders are common.

  14. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an inner city elementary school.

    PubMed

    Ntelioglou, Burcu Yaman; Fannin, Jennifer; Montanera, Mike; Cummins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality, and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students' academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students' lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies, and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning.

  15. Typical and atypical lymphatic flows in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Vittorio; Monteleone, Francesco; D'Orazi, Valerio; Del Vecchio, Luca; Sottile, Daniela; Iacobelli, Silvia; Monti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    La pratica, universalmente riconosciuta, della ricerca e biopsia del linfonodo sentinella nella stadiazione dei tumori ha evidenziato una serie di situazioni anatomiche e fisiologiche che hanno consentito una più approfondita conoscenza del comportamento del flusso linfatico nel soggetto sano e nel paziente affetto da neoplasia. In particolar modo abbiamo concentrato la nostra attenzione sulle pazienti sottoposte a ricerca linfoscintigrafica del linfonodo sentinella in vista di interventi chirurgici per carcinoma mammario; abbiamo valutato statisticamente la sede in cui è stato reperito il LS e nell’eventualità di drenaggio in sedi anomale il percorso del flusso linfatico. Si è fatto riferimento, per questo studio, alla casistica del Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche dell’Università La Sapienza di Roma maturata negli ultimi 2 anni. Lo scopo del nostro studio è stato quello di valutare statisticamente la sede del linfonodo sentinella, le possibilità di flussi linfatici in direzione non usuale e in questi casi dove, quando e perché. Ne sono emersi riscontri degni di analisi critica e considerazioni oggetto del presente lavoro.

  16. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an inner city elementary school

    PubMed Central

    Ntelioglou, Burcu Yaman; Fannin, Jennifer; Montanera, Mike; Cummins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality, and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students’ academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students’ lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies, and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning. PMID:24994986

  17. PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, E.G.; Antonini, G.; Saulle, R.; La Torre, G.; Deli, R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The ratio of bad habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion is an important issue in view of prevention and early treatment of disorders of the craniofacial growth. While bad habits can interfere with the position of the teeth and normal pattern of skeletal growth, on the other hand obstruction of the upper airway, resulting in mouth breathing, changes the pattern of craniofacial growth causing malocclusion. Our crosssectional study, carried out on 3017 children using the ROMA index, was developed to verify if there was a significant correlation between bad habits/mouth breathing and malocclusion. The results showed that an increase in the degree of the index increases the prevalence of bad habits and mouth breathing, meaning that these factors are associated with more severe malocclusions. Moreover, we found a significant association of bad habits with increased overjet and openbite, while no association was found with crossbite. Additionally, we found that mouth breathing is closely related to increased overjet, reduced overjet, anterior or posterior crossbite, openbite and displacement of contact points. Therefore, it is necessary to intervene early on these aetiological factors of malocclusion to prevent its development or worsening and, if already developed, correct it by early orthodontic treatment to promote eugnatic skeletal growth. PMID:27958599

  18. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    ) Georgi Dvali (NYU, USA) Sergio Ferrara (CERN) Gian Francesco Giudice (CERN) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Edward W. Kolb (Fermilab, USA) Luca Lusanna (INFN Firenze, Italy) Roy Maartens (Univ. Portsmouth, UK) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Tullio Regge (Politecnico di Torino, Italy) Augusto Sagnotti (Univ. Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Kellogg S. Stelle (Imperial College London, UK) Ruth Williams (DAMTP, Cambridge, UK) SPONSORS Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Università di Cagliari Università di Torino University of Mississippi Università di Pisa Regione autonoma della Sardegna Tiscali LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Eun-Joo Ahn (University of Chicago, USA) David Alba (Università di Firenze, Italy) Stanislav Alexeyev (Lomonosov Moscow State U., Russia) Damiano Anselmi (Università di Pisa, Italy) Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Maria Da Conceicao Bento (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Orfeu Bertolami (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Massimo Bianchi (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Mariam Bouhmadi-Lopez (University of Portsmouth, UK) Raphael Bousso (University of California at Berkeley, USA) Mariano Cadoni (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Steven Carlip (University of California at Davis, USA) Roberto Casadio (Università di Bologna, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Demian Cho (Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Chryssomalis Chryssomalakos (Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares - UNAM, Mexico) Diego Julio Cirilo-Lombardo (JINR, Dubna, Russia) Denis Comelli INFN, Sezione di Ferrara, Italy ) Ruben Cordero-Elizalde (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico) Lorenzo Cornalba (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Branislav Cvetkovic (Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia ) Maro Cvitan (University of Zagreb, Croatia) Alessandro D'Adda (Università di Torino, Italy) Claudio Dappiaggi (Università di Pavia, Italy) Roberto De Leo (Università di

  19. Cycloolefin effect in cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Soon; Seo, Dong Chul; Lee, Chang Soo; Park, Sang Wok; Kim, Sang Jin; Shin, Dae Hyeon; Shin, Jin Bong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2008-11-01

    One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low transmittance in COMA type copolymer most researchers were interested in developing of (meth)acryl type copolymer again for ArF photoresist. On the other hand, we have studied various polymer platforms suitable ArF photoresist except for meth(acryl) type copolymer. As a result of this study we had developed ROMA type polymers and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymers. Among the polymers cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer has many attractions such as etch roughness, resist reflow which needs low glass transition temperature and solvent solubility. In this study, we intend to find out cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer characteristics compared with (meth)acryl copolymer. And, we have tried to find out any differences between acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate type copolymer with various evaluation results. As a result of this study we are going to talk about the reason that the resist using acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer show good pattern profile while acrylate type copolymer show poor pattern profile. We also intend to explain the role of cycloolefin as a function of molecular weight variation and substitution ratio variation of cycloolefin in cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate resin.One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low

  20. Deformation analysis through the SBAS-DInSAR technique and geotechnical methods for structural damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonano, M.; Arangio, S.; Calò, F.; Di Mauro, M.; Manunta, M.; Marsella, M.; Sansosti, E.; Sonnessa, A.; Tagliafierro, V.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    a small separation between the acquisition orbits (baseline) in order to mitigate the noise effects, thus maximizing the coherent pixel density in the investigated area. The SBAS approach allows us to work at the full spatial resolution scale of the SAR acquisitions (Lanari et al., 2004), thus detecting and analyzing localized deformation affecting single structures or portions of them (intra-building movements). More recently, the full resolution SBAS approach has been extended in order to deal with multi-sensor SAR data collected by different radar systems acquiring with the same illumination geometry as for the case of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellites (Bonano et al., 2012), thus effectively exploiting the huge ESA SAR data archive for generating very long-term deformation time-series spanning almost 20 years. In this work, we apply the multi-sensor full-resolution SBAS-DInSAR technique for investigating the deformation phenomena occurring within the urban area of Roma (Italy), where almost 20 years of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT SAR data are available. The achieved results are effectively exploited for analyzing the correlation between the ground deformation and the structural damage detected on some buildings located within the urban area of the city of Roma. To this aim, we benefit of the well-known geotechnical approaches, usually aimed at preventing buildings and infrastructures from settlements-induced damages, for better understanding and interpreting the temporal behavior of the detected displacements.

  1. YRMR Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    University of Roma "Tor Vergata" and the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth, within the context of the European Cotutela project. His thesis represents a detailed analysis of the cosmological perturbations through needlets, a statistical tool he developed together with his colleagues in Rome. In particular he focused on two main open questions in cosmology: dark energy and non-Gaussianity. He gained his Bachelors degree in physics from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and his Masters in physics at the University of Roma "Tor Vergata". He spent three months at the University of California Irvine as a visiting student and is now a postdoc at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Francesco Stellato has studied the role of metals in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinsons and Alzheimers during his PhD. To this purpose, he mainly used synchrotron radiation-based techniques, e.g. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. He is interested in the development of new-generation light sources such as high-brilliance synchrotron and Free Electron Lasers, and in their application to the structural and dynamical study of biomolecules. Marcella Veneziani is a postdoc fellow at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Rome "La Sapienza". In February 2009 she gained her PhD in Astronomy at the University of Rome "La Sapienza", and in Physics, Particles and Matter at the University of Paris Diderot. Her fields of interest are: physics of the interstellar medium and star formation; cosmic microwave background radiation; analysis of data from orbital and suborbital experiments, and instrumental calibration. She is a member of the Herschel-HiGal, the Planck-HFI and the BOOMERanG collaborations. Part of her work has been undertaken at the European Space Agency Astronomy Center and at the University of California Irvine.

  2. Identification of Tumor Suppressors and Oncogenes from Genomic and Epigenetic Features in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Varadan, Vinay; Byrnes, James; Lum, Elena; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Levine, Douglas A.; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Zhang, Michael Q.; Lucito, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations from primary tumor cells has become a common method to identify genes critical to the development and progression of cancer. We seek to identify those genetic and epigenetic aberrations that have the most impact on gene function within the tumor. First, we perform a bioinformatic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and DNA methylation covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumor cells. We separately examined CNV and DNA methylation for 42 primary serous ovarian cancer samples using MOMA-ROMA assays and 379 tumor samples analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We have identified 346 genes with significant deletions or amplifications among the tumor samples. Utilizing associated gene expression data we predict 156 genes with altered copy number and correlated changes in expression. Among these genes CCNE1, POP4, UQCRB, PHF20L1 and C19orf2 were identified within both data sets. We were specifically interested in copy number variation as our base genomic property in the prediction of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in the altered ovarian tumor. We therefore identify changes in DNA methylation and expression for all amplified and deleted genes. We statistically define tumor suppressor and oncogenic features for these modalities and perform a correlation analysis with expression. We predicted 611 potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors candidates by integrating these data types. Genes with a strong correlation for methylation dependent expression changes exhibited at varying copy number aberrations include CDCA8, ATAD2, CDKN2A, RAB25, AURKA, BOP1 and EIF2C3. We provide copy number variation and DNA methylation analysis for over 11,500 individual genes covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumors. We show the extent of genomic and epigenetic alterations for known tumor suppressors and oncogenes and also use these defined features to identify potential ovarian cancer gene candidates. PMID

  3. LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Tom Abel, Stanford University Odylio Aguiar, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Tal Alexander, Wizemann Institute Peter Bender, University of Colorado Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Robert Byer, Stanford University Manuela Campanelli, University of Texas Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Neil Cornish, Montana State University Michael Cruise, University of Birmingham Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Karsten Danzmann, University of Hannover Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Gerhard Heinzel, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik Craig Hogan, University of Washington Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Scott Hughes, MIT Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Alberto Lobo, ICE-CSIC and IEEC Avi Loeb, Harvard University Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Peter Michelson, Stanford University Guido Mueller, University of Florida Sterl Phinney, Caltech Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Ke-Xun Sun, Stanford University Kip Thorne, Caltech Michele Vallisneri, NASA/JPL Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Rai Weiss, MIT Nick White, NASA/Goddard Local Organising Committee (LOC) Sasha Buchman (Stanford University) Robert Byer (Stanford University) Sara Charbonneau-Lefort (Stanford University) Nancy Christianson (Stanford University) John Conklin (Stanford University) Dan DeBra (Stanford University) Jan Goebel (Stanford University) Vivian Drew (Stanford University) Ke-Xun Sun (Stanford University) Lucy Zhou (Stanford University) Andrea Zoellner (Stanford University)

  4. The fantastic four.. elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsili, Antonella; D'Addezio, Giuliana; Rubbia, Giuliana; Ramieri, Caterina; Todaro, Riccardo; Scipilliti, Francesca; Tosto, Eleonora

    2015-04-01

    With a "Sunday between territory and music to 'National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology," October 12, 2014 the headquarters of INGV Roma kicked off the activities of the second edition of the Week of Planet Earth. The laboratory of scientific outreach and museum activities together with volunteers of the National Civil Service have organized the whole day dedicated to the dissemination of earth sciences, involving adults and children. Especially for primary school children a laboratory was made involving three amusing activities all aimed at inspiring respect for the Earth: a theatrical representation called "The Fantastic 4... elements", a behavioral game and a nursery rhyme reading. The theater as a means of communication of science is an innovative and creative way to introduce children to important scientific concepts. The use of this methodology and simple language favoring the emotional involvement of the child facilitating learning. The main character is a child, chosen to facilitate the identification of the spectators with the protagonist, that through a fantastic journey discovers the importance of the four elements of our planet: earth, fire, air and water. As a second step, volunteers involved children in reading a nursery rhyme "the ABC to become a Friend of the Earth" inviting them to protect and respect the environment and its resources. Finally, the behavioral game gave indications about behaviors to adopt to safeguard the planet. Volunteers introduced a billboard divided into two colors, green to indicate the right behaviors and red for the wrong ones. Each child, after reading a card with indication on the behavior to adopt, had to decide if they were correct or not with respect to the environment safeguard. After listening to the children's answer, the volunteer gave the correct explanation about the appropriate behavior to adopt. At the end of the activities, each child received a certificate as "a friend of Planet Earth".

  5. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  6. The Reverse Modelling Realized by Digital Scans and Fotomodellazione: Based on Post-Processing Compared Several Noteworthy Episodes Contained in the Basilical Complex of San Lorenzo Fuori le Mura in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mantia, M.; Lanfranchi, F.

    2013-02-01

    In the last decade, the subject area of the survey, and also that of representation, have undergone major changes with the introduction and use of advanced technologies that have revolutionized both the operational processes dedicated to the withdrawal of the measures that those graphic display data in terms of return and performance. The three-dimensional vision deriving from direct observation, or photogrammetric instrumental with the application of images, constitutes the most complete display means of the formal, morphological and material aspects of the detected object. 3D modeling offers many advantages, such as managing even the most complex geometric surfaces and its use is investing many sectors: in particular in the field of architecture serves many purposes including documentation, representation, diagnostics, materials and degradation, the enhancement and conservation of the property, etc.. The laser scanner technology together with that of fotomodellazione, is aimed to the acquisition, modeling and rendering threedimensional (3D) surface observed physical. The laser system to scan, as well as that of photographing, provides as a direct result of the measurement session a set of three-dimensional coordinates, in a reference system linked with the instrument. The high amount of sampled data, in the order of thousands per second, allows to obtain a high level of detail offering an acquisition that could be called pseudo-continuous. In this context, there is a complex major project work on the Basilica di San Lorenzo flm in Roma, - whose first partial results have recently been published - in the course of an activity which has been carried out to study and research for the establishment of procedures for processing the most appropriate and valid to be applied during post-processing for the eventual realization of a proper three-dimensional model. This paper will illustrate, through the analysis of some significant episodes of the Basilica, as the criteria

  7. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  8. Conditions for long-lasting gas eruptions: The 2013 event at Fiumicino International Airport (Rome, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G.; Carapezza, M. L.; Monica, G. Della; Todesco, M.; Tuccimei, P.; Carlucci, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Gattuso, A.; Lucchetti, C.; Piersanti, M.; Ranaldi, M.; Tarchini, L.; Pagliuca, N. M.; Ricci, T.; Facchini, S.; D'Ambrosio, F.; Misuraca, M.; Bonamico, A.; Geshi, N.

    2016-10-01

    A hazardous gas eruption from two very close shallow boreholes occurred near the Fiumicino International Airport of Roma (Italy) from August to December 2013. The erupted gas was mostly CO2 of deep origin and gas output was high and sustained over time reaching values of nearly 20 t day- 1. After 3 months, the gas flux was still above 5 t day- 1 and was only stopped in December 2013 by long and expensive works of closure of the boreholes. The gas eruption was uncommon as being associated with the building of two mud volcanoes. This style of sustained deep CO2 eruptions contrasts with the more common short-lived eruptions of shallow biogenic methane-dominated gas pockets. In this work, we present the chronology of the event, the results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical monitoring and a numerical modeling. We propose that the August-December 2013 sustained and prolonged event does not relate to the simple degassing of a shallow, isolated pocket of gas. On the contrary, it reflects very specific conditions in a shallow reservoir (hosted in a 10 m thick gravel layer at - 40 m within the Tiber river delta deposits), related to the interplay between the total pressure and the fraction of free CO2 initially present, across very narrow value ranges around 0.59 MPa and 0.18, respectively. The coexistence of short-lived and long-lived eruptions from the same reservoir suggest that these conditions are not achieved everywhere in the gas reservoir, despite its homogeneous properties. This consideration implies either a pressure compartmentalization of the reservoir, or the occurrence of a transient, possibly associated with an impulsive release of gas from greater depths. The involvement of deeper and larger gas reservoirs connected along faults is evidenced by geophysical investigations. This conceptual model bears significant implications for gas hazard studies.

  9. Multiwavelength studies of X-ray selected extragalactic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    The joint catalogue of Active Galactic Nuclei selected from optical identications of X-ray sources was created as a combination of two samples: Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both are based on optical identications of X-ray sources from ROSAT catalogues using low-dispersion spectra of Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS). However, HRC and BHRC contain a number of misidentications and using the recent optical and multiwavelength (MW) catalogues we have revised both samples excluding false AGN and adding new genuine ones. Thus a new large homogeneous complete sample of 4253 X-ray selected AGN was created. 3352 of them are listed in the Catalogue of QSOs and Active Galaxies and 387 also are in Roma Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars. 901 candidate AGN are subjects for further study. We classified 173 of these objects using their SDSS DR12 spectra. Following activity types were revealed: 61 AGN, 21 HII galaxies, 12 emission-line galaxies without definite type, 71 absorption-line galaxies, 2 stars, and 6 were classified as "Unknown". A special emphasis is made on narrow-line Sy1.0-Sy1.5 galaxies and QSOs, as many of them have soft X-ray, strong FeII lines, and relatively narrow lines coming from BLR ("narrow broad lines"). As a result, the sample of genuine AGN was enlarged to 3413 objects. We have retrieved MW data from recent catalogues and carried out statistical investigations for the whole AGN sample. An attempt to find connections between fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and to identify their characteristics thus confirming candidate AGNs has been carried out. We have analyzed X-ray properties of these sources to nd a limit between normal galaxies and X-ray AGN.

  10. INTEGRAL high-energy monitoring of the X-ray burster KS 1741-293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, G.; Bazzano, A.; Martínez Núñez, S.; Stratta, G.; Tarana, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P.

    2007-09-01

    KS 1741-293, discovered in 1989 by the X-ray camera TTM on the Kvant module of the Mir space station and identified as an X-ray burster, had not been detected in the hard X-ray band until the advent of the INTEGRAL observatory. Moreover, this source has recently been the object of scientific discussion, being also associated with a nearby extended radio source that in principle could be the supernova remnant produced by the accretion-induced collapse in the binary system. Our long-term monitoring with INTEGRAL, covering the period from 2003 February to 2005 May, confirms that KS 1741-293 is transient in the soft and hard X-ray bands. When the source is active, from a simultaneous JEM-X and IBIS data analysis, we provide a wide-band spectrum from 5 to 100 keV, which can be fitted by a two-component model: a multiple blackbody for the soft emission and a Comptonized or a cut-off power-law model for the hard component. Finally, by the detection of two X-ray bursters with JEM-X, we confirm the bursting nature of KS 1741-293, including this source in the class of hard-tailed X-ray bursters. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), the Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA. E-mail: giovanni.decesare@iasf-roma.inaf.it ‡ INAF personnel resident at ASDC.

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Guest editors: Professor Valentin Vlad National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Romania Professor Eugenio Fazio Università di Roma `La Sapienza', Italy Professor Mike Damzen Imperial College, London, UK A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new results in the field of photorefractive effects and their applications in photonics. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletnew photorefractive materials (fast, sensitive in IR) bulletwave mixing in photorefractives bulletphotorefractive phase conjugators bulletholographic storage in photorefractive materials bulletphotorefractive spatial solitons bulletadaptive interconnection with photorefractive devices bulletphase conjugate interferometry bulletoptical analogue and digital computing (including optical correlators) bulletother applications and devices using photorefractive effects. The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2003. All papers will be peer reviewed and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. Manuscripts should be prepared according to the general guidelines for authors published in the journal. Full details on how to structure an article, including specific information on figures, tables and references, are available from our Web site at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. There are no page charges. In addition to the usual 25 free offprints, the contributing author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 May 2003, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics special issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Blay

  12. Variation in tomato host response to Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in relation to acyl sugar content and presence of the nematode and potato aphid resistance gene Mi.

    PubMed

    Nombela, G; Beitia, F; Muñiz, M

    2000-04-01

    Two commercial cultivars of tomato, Alta and Peto 95, the accession line number LA716 of Lycopersicon pennellii and lines 94GH-006 and 94GH-033 (backcrosses between Peto 95 and LA716), with different leaf acyl sugar contents were screened for resistance to Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring (corresponding to the Spanish B-biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)), in greenhouse- and field-no-choice experiments. There was no oviposition on LA716 (with the highest acyl sugar content) while the greatest fecundity and fertility values were observed on the cultivar Alta (no acyl sugar content). However, no clear relationship was found between the low acyl sugar content in the other tomato cultivars tested and whitefly reproduction. Thus, resistance to B. tabaci did not appear to correlate with acyl sugar content below a threshold level of 37.8 microg cm-2 leaf. In a greenhouse choice-assay, B. tabaci exhibited reduced host preference and reproduction on the commercial tomato cultivars Motelle, VFN8 and Ronita all of which carry the Mi gene resistance to Meloidogyne nematodes and the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), than on the Mi-lacking cultivars Moneymaker, Rio Fuego and Roma. When data of Mi-bearing plants were pooled, the mean values for daily infestation and pupal production of B. tabaci were significantly lower than those of Mi-lacking plants. This reflected a level of antixenosis- and antibiosis-based resistance in commercial tomato and indicated that Mi, or another closely linked gene, might be implicated in a partial resistance which was not associated either with the presence of glandular trichomes or their exudates. These findings support the general hypothesis for the existence of similarities among the resistance mechanisms to whiteflies, aphids and nematodes in commercial tomato plants.

  13. Analysis of Ca II K images aiming to determine long-term trends in solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Anuradha; Ermolli, Ilaria; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2013-04-01

    The change in radiative output of the Sun on time scales longer than a day is attributed to the variability in solar surface magnetic fields. Direct irradiance measurements are only available for less than four decades. To reconstruct long term trends in solar total and spectral irradiance, proxies of solar surface magnetism like sunspot, facular and network areas are needed. Currently, sunspot records alone are used for this purpose, from which the deduction of facular and network areas is rather indirect. Historical records of full disk images of the Sun taken in the Ca II K spectral line (393.3 nm) have the potential to provide far more direct information about the distribution and evolution of faculae and network elements. The latter appear as bright regions in the Ca II K spectroheliograms and their intensity is correlated with the magnetic field strength of the features on the solar surface. Solar full disk images in the Ca II K line have been recorded since the beginning of the 20th century at a number of solar observatories such as at Arcetri (Italy), Mount Wilson(California, US) and Kodaikanal (India). The images are available in digitized archives that contain the data processed for standard instrumental calibrations. To utilize these records for irradiance studies, the next step is to identify the bright magnetic features from the images using feature recognition techniques. We test different feature identification methods which are first applied to a set of recent images from the PSPT instrument at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, taken during three periods characterized by high, medium and low levels of activity. Then the performance of these methods to historical images from Arcetri, Mt. Wilson and Kodaikanal archives is tested. The results will be presented and discussed here.

  14. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  15. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2004-12-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  16. Cranial osteology of the ankylosaurian dinosaur formerly known as Minmi sp. (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) from the Lower Cretaceous Allaru Mudstone of Richmond, Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Leahey, Lucy G; Molnar, Ralph E; Carpenter, Kenneth; Witmer, Lawrence M; Salisbury, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Minmi is the only known genus of ankylosaurian dinosaur from Australia. Seven specimens are known, all from the Lower Cretaceous of Queensland. Only two of these have been described in any detail: the holotype specimen Minmi paravertebra from the Bungil Formation near Roma, and a near complete skeleton from the Allaru Mudstone on Marathon Station near Richmond, preliminarily referred to a possible new species of Minmi. The Marathon specimen represents one of the world's most complete ankylosaurian skeletons and the best-preserved dinosaurian fossil from eastern Gondwana. Moreover, among ankylosaurians, its skull is one of only a few in which the majority of sutures have not been obliterated by dermal ossifications or surface remodelling. Recent preparation of the Marathon specimen has revealed new details of the palate and narial regions, permitting a comprehensive description and thus providing new insights cranial osteology of a basal ankylosaurian. The skull has also undergone computed tomography, digital segmentation and 3D computer visualisation enabling the reconstruction of its nasal cavity and endocranium. The airways of the Marathon specimen are more complicated than non-ankylosaurian dinosaurs but less so than derived ankylosaurians. The cranial (brain) endocast is superficially similar to those of other ankylosaurians but is strongly divergent in many important respects. The inner ear is extremely large and unlike that of any dinosaur yet known. Based on a high number of diagnostic differences between the skull of the Marathon specimen and other ankylosaurians, we consider it prudent to assign this specimen to a new genus and species of ankylosaurian. Kunbarrasaurus ieversi gen. et sp. nov. represents the second genus of ankylosaurian from Australia and is characterised by an unusual melange of both primitive and derived characters, shedding new light on the evolution of the ankylosaurian skull.

  17. Dispersion interactions in room-temperature ionic liquids: results from a non-empirical density functional.

    PubMed

    Kohanoff, Jorge; Pinilla, Carlos; Youngs, Tristan G A; Artacho, Emilio; Soler, José M

    2011-10-21

    The role of dispersion or van de Waals (VDW) interactions in imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids is studied within the framework of density functional theory, using a recently developed non-empirical functional [M. Dion, H. Rydberg, E. Schröder, D. C. Langreth, and B. I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], as efficiently implemented in the SIESTA code [G. Román-Pérez and J. M. Soler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 096102 (2009)]. We present results for the equilibrium structure and lattice parameters of several crystalline phases, finding a general improvement with respect to both the local density (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximations (GGA). Similar to other systems characterized by VDW bonding, such as rare gas and benzene dimers as well as solid argon, equilibrium distances and volumes are consistently overestimated by ≈7%, compared to -11% within LDA and 11% within GGA. The intramolecular geometries are retained, while the intermolecular distances and orientations are significantly improved relative to LDA and GGA. The quality is superior to that achieved with tailor-made empirical VDW corrections ad hoc [M. G. Del Pópolo, C. Pinilla, and P. Ballone, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144705 (2007)]. We also analyse the performance of an optimized version of this non-empirical functional, where the screening properties of the exchange have been tuned to reproduce high-level quantum chemical calculations [J. Klimes, D. Bowler, and A. Michaelides, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22, 074203 (2010)]. The results for solids are even better with volumes and geometries reproduced within 2% of experimental data. We provide some insight into the issue of polymorphism of [bmim][Cl] crystals, and we present results for the geometry and energetics of [bmim][Tf] and [mmim][Cl] neutral and charged clusters, which validate the use of empirical force fields.

  18. The TOPOMOD-ITN project: unravel the origin of Earth's topography from modelling deep-surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.

    2012-04-01

    EC-Marie Curie Initial Training Networks (ITN) projects aim to improve the career perspectives of young generations of researchers. Institutions from both academic and industry sectors form a collaborative network to recruit research fellows and provide them with opportunities to undertake research in the context of a joint research training program. In this frame, TOPOMOD - one of the training activities of EPOS, the new-born European Research Infrastructure for Geosciences - is a funded ITN project designed to investigate and model how surface processes interact with crustal tectonics and mantle convection to originate and develop topography of the continents over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The multi-disciplinary approach combines geophysics, geochemistry, tectonics and structural geology with advanced geodynamic numerical/analog modelling. TOPOMOD involves 8 European research teams internationally recognized for their excellence in complementary fields of Earth Sciences (Roma TRE, Utrecht, GFZ, ETH, Cambridge, Durham, Rennes, Barcelona), to which are associated 5 research institutions (CNR-Italy, Univ. Parma, Univ. Lausanne, Univ. Montpellier, Univ. Mainz) , 3 high-technology enterprises (Malvern Instruments, TNO, G.O. Logical Consulting) and 1 large multinational oil and gas company (ENI). This unique network places emphasis in experience-based training increasing the impact and international visibility of European research in modeling. Long-term collaboration and synergy are established among the overmentioned research teams through 15 cross-disciplinary research projects that combine case studies in well-chosen target areas from the Mediterranean, the Middle and Far East, west Africa, and South America, with new developments in structural geology, geomorphology, seismology, geochemistry, InSAR, laboratory and numerical modelling of geological processes from the deep mantle to the surface. These multidisciplinary projects altogether aim to

  19. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of γ-Ray Blazar Candidates. III. The 2013/2014 Campaign in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, M.; Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Masetti, N.; Smith, H. A.; Tosti, G.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of our exploratory program carried out with the southern Astrophysical Research telescope aimed at associating counterparts and establishing the nature of the Fermi Unidentified γ-ray Sources (UGSs). We selected the optical counterparts of six UGSs from the Fermi catalog on the basis of our recently discovered tight connection between infrared and γ-ray emission found for the γ-ray blazars detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer in its all-sky survey. We perform for the first time a spectroscopic study of the low-energy counterparts of the Fermi UGSs, in the optical band, confirming the blazar-like nature of the whole sample. We also present new spectroscopic observations of six active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources which appear to be BL Lac objects. Finally, we report the spectra collected for six known γ-ray blazars belonging to the Roma BZCAT that were obtained to establish their nature or better estimate their redshifts. Two interesting cases of high redshift and extremely luminous BL Lac objects (z ≥ 1.18 and z ≥ 1.02, based on the detection of Mg ii intervening systems) are also discussed. Based on observations obtained at the southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  20. Deltaic margins vulnerability: the role of landscape patches in flood regulation and climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, E.; Taramelli, A.; Nguyen Xuan, A.; Filipponi, F.; Casarotti, C.; Morelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    Andrea Taramelli1,2,3, Emiliana Valentini2,3, Alessandra Nguyenxuan2, Federico Filipponi3, Chiara Casarotti2, Arianna Morelli1 1IUSS Institute for Advanced Study, Piazza della Vittoria 15, 27100, Pavia, ITALY 2Eucentre Foundation, European Centre for Training and Research in Earthquake Engineering, Pavia, Italy 3ISPRA, Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, Via Vitaliano Brancati 48, 00144, Roma Deltas are widely identified as vulnerable hotspots at the interface of the continental land mass and the world's coastal boundaries. With respect to increasing risks related to global change, the concept of ecosystem services has a capacity to contribute to safety of both, social and natural systems and vulnerability reduction. Here we study the role of the pool of ecosystem services in terms of flood mitigation and vulnerability reduction model, in a deltaic margins of the European coast (the complex land-sea system of the Waddenzee, comprising the Netherland inner coast and the islands, North Sea) then applicable to a wide variety of deltaic regions in developing areas. Extensive tidal mud flats, saltmarshes, dune ridges and sandy spits between the mainland and the chain of islands, support valuable sediment and primary production regulation along the seaside of these ecosystems. The system includes an incentive ecosystem structure (dune system) whereby economic agents would choose development activities that reduce vulnerability (flooding protection and erosion prevention) as well as satisfy production objectives (recreation and tourism). Vulnerability values extracted using remote sensing processors represent an innovative development of systems and methodologies. Using remote sensing observations, we investigate the distribution of spatial vegetation and substrate patterns controlled by changes in environmental variables acting on deltas, and we speculate the conditions under which the Real Elementary area can be defined.

  1. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. V. TNG, KPNO, AND OAN OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR CANDIDATES OF UNCERTAIN TYPE IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; Landoni, M.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; Torrealba, J.; D’Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Latronico, L.; Tosti, G.

    2016-02-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by emission from blazars, a peculiar class of active galactic nuclei. Many of the γ-ray sources included in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope Third Source catalog (3FGL) are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) because there are no optical spectra available in the literature to confirm their nature. In 2013, we started a spectroscopic campaign to look for the optical counterparts of the BCUs and of the unidentified γ-ray sources to confirm their blazar nature. Whenever possible we also determine their redshifts. Here, we present the results of the observations carried out in the northern hemisphere in 2013 and 2014 at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in San Pedro Mártir. In this paper, we describe the optical spectra of 25 sources. We confirmed that all of the 15 BCUs observed in our campaign and included in our sample are blazars and we estimated the redshifts for three of them. In addition, we present the spectra for three sources classified as BL Lacs in the literature but with no optical spectra available to date. We found that one of them is a quasar (QSO) at a redshift of z = 0.208 and the other two are BL Lacs. Moreover, we also present seven new spectra for known blazars listed in the Roma-BZCAT that have an uncertain redshift or are classified as BL Lac candidates. We found that one of them, 5BZB J0724+2621, is a “changing look” blazar. According to the spectrum available in the literature, it was classified as a BL Lac, but in our observation we clearly detected a broad emission line that led us to classify this source as a QSO at z = 1.17.

  2. Movement of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 to Ripe Tomato Fruit Following Various Routes of Contamination.

    PubMed

    Deering, Amanda J; Jack, Dan R; Pruitt, Robert E; Mauer, Lisa J

    2015-11-05

    Salmonella serovars have been associated with the majority of foodborne illness outbreaks involving tomatoes, and E. coli O157:H7 has caused outbreaks involving other fresh produce. Contamination by both pathogens has been thought to originate from all points of the growing and distribution process. To determine if Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 could move to the mature tomato fruit of different tomato cultivars following contamination, three different contamination scenarios (seed, leaf, and soil) were examined. Following contamination, each cultivar appeared to respond differently to the presence of the pathogens, with most producing few fruit and having overall poor health. The Micro-Tom cultivar, however, produced relatively more fruit and E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the ripe tomatoes for both the seed- and leaf- contaminated plants, but not following soil contamination. The Roma cultivar produced fewer fruit, but was the only cultivar in which E. coli O157:H7 was detected via all three routes of contamination. Only two of the five cultivars produced tomatoes following seed-, leaf-, and soil- contamination with Salmonella Typhimurium, and no Salmonella was found in any of the tomatoes. Together these results show that different tomato cultivars respond differently to the presence of a human pathogen, and for E. coli O157:H7, in particular, tomato plants that are either contaminated as seeds or have a natural opening or a wound, that allows bacteria to enter the leaves can result in plants that have the potential to produce tomatoes that harbor internalized pathogenic bacteria.

  3. A New Root-Knot Nematode Parasitizing Sea Rocket from Spanish Mediterranean Coastal Dunes: Meloidogyne dunensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae)

    PubMed Central

    Palomares Rius, J. E.; Vovlas, N.; Troccoli, A.; Liébanas, G.; Landa, B. B.; Castillo, P.

    2007-01-01

    High infection rates of European sea rocket feeder roots by an unknown root-knot nematode were found in a coastal dune soil at Cullera (Valencia) in central eastern Spain. Morphometry, esterase and malate dehydrogenase electrophoretic phenotypes and phylogenetic trees demonstrated that this nematode species differs clearly from other previously described root-knot nematodes. Studies of host-parasite relationships showed a typical susceptible reaction in naturally infected European sea rocket plants and in artificially inoculated tomato (cv. Roma) and chickpea (cv. UC 27) plants. The species is herein described and illustrated and named as Meloidogyne dunensis n. sp. The new root-knot nematode can be distinguished from other Meloidogyne spp. by: (i) perineal pattern rounded-oval, formed of numerous fine dorsal and ventral cuticle striae and ridges, lateral fields clearly visible; (ii) female excretory pore at the level of stylet knobs, EP/ST ratio 1.6; (iii) second-stage juveniles with hemizonid located 1 to 2 annuli anteriorly to excretory pore and long, narrow, tapering tail; and (iv) males with lateral fields composed of four incisures anteriorly and posteriorly, while six distinct incisures are observed for large part at mid-body. Phylogenetic trees derived from distance and maximum parsimony analyses based on 18S, ITS1–5.8S-ITS2 and D2-D3 of 28S rDNA showed that M. dunensis n. sp. can be differentiated from all described root-knot nematode species, and it is clearly separated from other species with resemblance in morphology, such as M. duytsi, M. maritima, M. mayaguensis and M. minor. PMID:19259488

  4. Prenatal PCB Exposure and Thymus Size at Birth in Neonates in Eastern Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Youn; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Petrik, Jan; Palkovicova, Lubica; Kocan, Anton; Trnovec, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental toxicants, for which animal studies demonstrate immunotoxic effects, including thymic atrophy and suppressed immune responses; human investigations of similar end points are sparse. The thymus is essential for the differentiation and maturation of T-cell lymphocytes. Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the association between prenatal PCB exposures and estimated thymus volume in infants from eastern Slovakia, a region where PCBs were produced until 1984. Methods Mothers were enrolled at delivery, and maternal blood samples were collected for analysis of 15 PCB congeners, p,p′-DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2′-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane], and p,p′-DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene]. Each mother was interviewed to obtain information on sociodemographic characteristics, past pregnancies, occupational history, medication history, and living environment. Neonatal thymus volume was estimated using ultrasound measurements on the third or fourth day after birth. Thymic index was calculated on 982 newborns from mothers with PCB measurements. We developed a predictive model of the natural log of the thymic index using multiple linear regression with covariates selected from the bivariate analyses. Results Prenatal PCB exposure was associated with a smaller thymic index at birth [β= −36 (natural log-transformed; nanograms per gram lipids); p = 0.047]. District of residence and delivery also predicted thymic index. Male sex, later gestational age, larger birth weight z-score, and Roma ethnicity were associated with a larger thymic index, whereas respiratory illness was associated with a lower thymic index. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence to date that PCB exposure in neonates is associated with a smaller thymic volume, suggesting possible impaired immunologic development. PMID:18197307

  5. Dynamics of charged current sheets at high-latitude magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, S.; Amata, E.; Zelenyi, L.; Dunlop, M.; Andre, M.; Song, P.; Blecki, J.; Buechner, J.; Rauch, J. L.; Skalsky, A.

    E. Amata (2), L. Zelenyi (1), M. Dunlop (3), M. Andre (4), P. Song (5), J. Blecki (6), J. Buechner (7), J.L Rauch, J.G. Trotignon (8), G. Consolini, F. Marcucci (2), B. Nikutowski (7), A. Skalsky, S. Romanov, E. Panov (1) (2) IFSI, Roma, Italy, (3) RAL, UK, (4) IRFU, Uppsala, Sweden, (5) U. Mass. Lowell, USA, (6) SRC, Warsaw, Poland, (7) MPAe, Germany, (8) LPCE, Orleans, France; We study dynamics of thin current sheets over polar cusps from data of Interball-1 and Cluster. At the high-beta magnetopause current sheet width often reaches ion gyroradius scales, that leads to their Hall dynamics in the presence of local surface charges. Respective perpendicular electric fields provide the means for momentum coupling through the current sheets and are able to accelerate ions with gyroradius of the order or larger than the sheet width. At borders of large diamagnetic cavities this mechanism is able to support mass exchange and accelerate/ heat incoming magnetosheath particles. At larger scales the inhomogeneous electric fields at the current sheet borders can accelerate incident plasma downtail along magnetopause via inertial drift. It serves to move external plasma away for dynamic equilibrium supporting. Farther away from magnetopause similar nonlinear electric field wave trains, selfconsistently produced by interaction of reflected from the obstacle waves with magnetosheath fluctuations, destroy the incident flux into accelerated magnetosonic jets and decelerated Alfvenic flows and generate small-scale current sheets due to different sign of electron and ion inertial drift in the nonlinear electric field bursts. We suggest that this direct kinetic energy transformation creates current sheets with anomalous statistics of field rotation angles in the turbulent boundary layer in front of magnetopause, which have been attributed earlier to an intermittent turbulence. We compare measured spectra with a model of nonlinear system with intermittent chaotic behavior. Work was

  6. Cranial osteology of the ankylosaurian dinosaur formerly known as Minmi sp. (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) from the Lower Cretaceous Allaru Mudstone of Richmond, Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Ralph E.; Carpenter, Kenneth; Witmer, Lawrence M.; Salisbury, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Minmi is the only known genus of ankylosaurian dinosaur from Australia. Seven specimens are known, all from the Lower Cretaceous of Queensland. Only two of these have been described in any detail: the holotype specimen Minmi paravertebra from the Bungil Formation near Roma, and a near complete skeleton from the Allaru Mudstone on Marathon Station near Richmond, preliminarily referred to a possible new species of Minmi. The Marathon specimen represents one of the world’s most complete ankylosaurian skeletons and the best-preserved dinosaurian fossil from eastern Gondwana. Moreover, among ankylosaurians, its skull is one of only a few in which the majority of sutures have not been obliterated by dermal ossifications or surface remodelling. Recent preparation of the Marathon specimen has revealed new details of the palate and narial regions, permitting a comprehensive description and thus providing new insights cranial osteology of a basal ankylosaurian. The skull has also undergone computed tomography, digital segmentation and 3D computer visualisation enabling the reconstruction of its nasal cavity and endocranium. The airways of the Marathon specimen are more complicated than non-ankylosaurian dinosaurs but less so than derived ankylosaurians. The cranial (brain) endocast is superficially similar to those of other ankylosaurians but is strongly divergent in many important respects. The inner ear is extremely large and unlike that of any dinosaur yet known. Based on a high number of diagnostic differences between the skull of the Marathon specimen and other ankylosaurians, we consider it prudent to assign this specimen to a new genus and species of ankylosaurian. Kunbarrasaurus ieversi gen. et sp. nov. represents the second genus of ankylosaurian from Australia and is characterised by an unusual melange of both primitive and derived characters, shedding new light on the evolution of the ankylosaurian skull. PMID:26664806

  7. The ATLAS Software Installation System v2: a highly available system to install and validate Grid and Cloud sites via Panda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salvo, A.; Kataoka, M.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Installation System v2 is the evolution of the original system, used since 2003. The original tool has been completely re-designed in terms of database backend and components, adding support for submission to multiple backends, including the original Workload Management Service (WMS) and the new PanDA modules. The database engine has been changed from plain MySQL to Galera/Percona and the table structure has been optimized to allow a full High-Availability (HA) solution over Wide Area Network. The servlets, running on each frontend, have been also decoupled from local settings, to allow an easy scalability of the system, including the possibility of an HA system with multiple sites. The clients can also be run in multiple copies and in different geographical locations, and take care of sending the installation and validation jobs to the target Grid or Cloud sites. Moreover, the Installation Database is used as source of parameters by the automatic agents running in CVMFS, in order to install the software and distribute it to the sites. The system is in production for ATLAS since 2013, having as main sites in HA the INFN Roma Tier 2 and the CERN Agile Infrastructure. The Light Job Submission Framework for Installation (LJSFi) v2 engine is directly interfacing with PanDA for the Job Management, the Atlas Grid Information System (AGIS) for the site parameter configurations, and CVMFS for both core components and the installation of the software itself. LJSFi2 is also able to use other plugins, and is essentially Virtual Organization (VO) agnostic, so can be directly used and extended to cope with the requirements of any Grid or Cloud enabled VO. In this work we will present the architecture, performance, status and possible evolutions to the system for the LHC Run2 and beyond.

  8. ESPERIA: an Equatorial Magnetic, Plasma and Particle Mission for Monitoring Perturbations in the Topside Ionosphere and for Defining the Near-Earth Magnetic Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgrigna, V.; Console, R.; Buzzi, A.; Conti, L.; Galper, A. M.; Malvezzi, V.; Parrot, M.; Picozza, P.; Scrimaglio, R.; Spillantini, P.; Zilpimiani, D.

    2004-05-01

    ESPERIA is an equatorial space mission planned with a LEO small-satellite and a multi-instrument payload. The project has been ideally conceived to define the near-Earth electromagnetic, plasma, and particle environment, both in steady-state and perturbed-state conditions. In recent times has been observed that either Earth's interior processes or near-Earth space phenomena have a privileged and sensitive zone of investigation constituted by the ionosphere-magnetosphere transition region, at altitudes ranging around 500 / 1000 km. In fact, sun and cosmic rays as well as, seismic, anthropogenic and thunderstorm activities, influence the structure and dynamics of the zone. These external and internal contributions play an important role in defining the particle and electromagnetic field character of the region, both in steady-state and perturbed-state conditions. So, a suitable monitoring of the topside ionosphere may give an help in studying many important physical phenomena as pre-earthquake and anthropogenic electromagnetic emissions, solar wind and flares, as well as in mapping the geomagnetic field. Concerning the Earth's magnetic field mapping, ESPERIA can be seen as an equatorial coordinated and simultaneous complement to polar missions, like SWARM. The first step in realizing the project was an opportunity given by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) for a Phase A Study, concerned with detecting any tectonic and preseismic related signals, and studying seismo-associated perturbations and instabilities in the topside ionosphere. The study has been performed by an International Consortium lead by the University Roma Tre, and the ESPERIA Phase A report is now available. The ASI constrains restricted the scientific objectives of the above-mentioned ideally conceived project, but recent contacts with other missions and science teams give indications to reconcile the project to its original aims.

  9. PREFACE: 14th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2010-04-01

    , Sezione di Roma, Rome, Italy Chair, GWDAW-14 Scientic Organizing Committee

  10. A semi-empirical model for the prediction of fouling in railway ballast using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Alani, Amir M.; Loizos, Andreas; D'Amico, Fabrizio; Calvi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The first step in the planning for a renewal of a railway network consists in gathering information, as effectively as possible, about the state of the railway tracks. Nowadays, this activity is mostly carried out by digging trenches at regular intervals along the whole network, to evaluate both geometrical and geotechnical properties of the railway track bed. This involves issues, mainly concerning the invasiveness of the operations, the impacts on the rail traffic, the high costs, and the low levels of significance concerning such discrete data set. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can represent a useful technique for overstepping these issues, as it can be directly mounted onto a train crossing the railway, and collect continuous information along the network. This study is aimed at defining an empirical model for the prediction of fouling in railway ballast, by using GPR. With this purpose, a thorough laboratory campaign was implemented within the facilities of Roma Tre University. In more details, a 1.47 m long × 1.47 m wide × 0.48 m height plexiglass framework, accounting for the domain of investigation, was laid over a perfect electric conductor, and filled up with several configuration of railway ballast and fouling material (clayey sand), thereby representing different levels of fouling. Then, the set of fouling configurations was surveyed with several GPR systems. In particular, a ground-coupled multi-channel radar (600 MHz and 1600 MHz center frequency antennas) and three air-launched radar systems (1000 MHz and 2000 MHz center frequency antennas) were employed for surveying the materials. By observing the results both in terms of time and frequency domains, interesting insights are highlighted and an empirical model, relating in particular the shape of the frequency spectrum of the signal and the percentage of fouling characterizing the surveyed material, is finally proposed. Acknowledgement The Authors thank COST, for funding the Action TU1208 "Civil

  11. Microstructural record of cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation processes from shallow crustal carbonate strike-slip faults, Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The concept of coseismic slip and aseismic creep deformation along faults is supported by the variability of natural fault rocks and their microstructures. Faults in carbonate rocks are characterized by very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) containing (ultra)cataclastic fault rocks that accommodate most of the fault displacement. Fluidization of ultracataclastic sub layers and thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating have been proposed as possible indicators for seismic slip. Dissolution-precipitation (DP) processes are possible mechanism of aseismic sliding, resulting in spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins, indicating diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. We investigated exhumed, sinistral strike-slip faults in carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The study presents microstructural investigations of natural carbonate fault rocks that formed by cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation related deformation processes. Faults belong to the eastern segment of the Salzachtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system that was formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The investigated faults accommodated sinistral slip between several tens and few hundreds of meters. Microstructural analysis of fault rocks was done with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Deformation experiments of natural fault rocks are planned to be conducted at the Sapienza University of Roma and should be available at the meeting. The investigated fault rocks give record of alternating cataclastic deformation and DP creep. DP fault rocks reveal various stages of evolution including early stylolites, pervasive pressure solution seams and cleavage, localized shear zones with syn-kinematic calcite fibre growth and mixed DP/cataclastic microstructures, involving pseudo sc- and scc'-fabrics. Pressure solution seams host fine grained kaolinit, chlorite

  12. Made in Italy for hernia: the Italian history of groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Negro, Paolo; Gossetti, Francesco; Ceci, Francesca; D'Amore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    La storia della chirurgia erniaria è lunga quanto la storia della chirurgia. Per secoli medici, anatomisti e chirurghi si sono dedicati a questa patologia, che ha afflitto il genere umano durante tutto il corso della sue evoluzione. Fin dall’antichità il ruolo della chirurgia italiana è stato significativo, con numerosi illustri personaggi che hanno lasciato una traccia indelebile. Sono numerosi gli autori, i ricercatori ed i pionieri che hanno offerto il loro contributo in ogni periodo, dall’epoca classica attraverso il Medio Evo ed il Rinascimento, fino al ‘700. Nel 18o secolo, le nuove acquisizioni nel campo dell’anatomia umana, ad opera principalmente di Antonio Scarpa, hanno preparato la strada al rivoluzionario metodo di Bassini, che può a ragione essere definito come la prima procedura moderna di riparazione dell’ernia inguinale su base anatomica. La tecnica di Bassini ha avuto una grandissima diffusione, fino a diventare l’intervento più eseguito nel mondo. Dopo la II Guerra Mondiale, con l’introduzione delle protesi sintetiche è iniziata una nuova era che ha visto ancora una volta i chirurghi italiani pronti ad offrire un sostanziale contributo, primo fra tutti Ermanno Trabucco. Ma il ruolo italiano nella chirurgia dell’ernia inguinale va ben oltre la chirurgia estendendosi all’educazione, con la creazione a Roma della prima scuola di chirurgia della parete addominale, ed alla partecipazione di numerosi chirurghi alle società scientifiche internazionali, in ruoli di prestigio. Il presente lavoro ha voluto riassumere questa lunga storia ed evidenziare il “made in Italy” nella chirurgia dell’ernia inguinale.

  13. Match analysis and temporal patterns of fatigue in rugby sevens.

    PubMed

    Granatelli, Giampietro; Gabbett, Tim J; Briotti, Gianluca; Padulo, Johnny; Buglione, Antonio; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Ruscello, Bruno M

    2014-03-01

    Rugby sevens is a rapidly growing sport. Match analysis is increasingly being used by sport scientists and coaches to improve the understanding of the physical demands of this sport. This study investigated the physical and physiological demands of elite men's rugby sevens, with special reference to the temporal patterns of fatigue during match play. Nine players, 4 backs and 5 forwards (age 25.1 ± 3.1 years) participated during 2 "Roma 7" international tournaments (2010 and 2011). All the players were at the professional level in the highest Italian rugby union, and 5 of these players also competed at the international level. During the matches (n = 15), the players were filmed to assess game performance. Global positioning system, heart rate (HR), and blood lactate (BLa) concentration data were measured and analyzed. The mean total distance covered throughout matches was 1,221 ± 118 m (first half = 643 ± 70 m and second half = 578 ± 77 m; with a decrease of 11.2%, p > 0.05, Effect Size [ES] = 0.29). The players achieved 88.3 ± 4.2 and 87.7 ± 3.4% of the HRmax during the first and second halves, respectively. The BLa for the first and second halves was 3.9 ± 0.9 and 11.2 ± 1.4 mmol·L, respectively. The decreases in performance occurred consistently in the final 3 minutes of the matches (-40.5% in the distance covered per minute). The difference found in relation to the playing position, although not statistically significant (p = 0.11), showed a large ES (η = 0.20), suggesting possible practical implications. These results demonstrate that rugby sevens is a demanding sport that places stress on both the anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic oxidative energy systems. Strength and conditioning programs designed to train these energy pathways may prevent fatigue-induced reductions in physical performance.

  14. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  15. Onomatopoeias: a new perspective around space, image schemas and phoneme clusters.

    PubMed

    Catricalà, Maria; Guidi, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Onomatopoeias (Roma Tre, Rome, 2013; algorithms: Asaga et al. in Onomatopedia, pp 601-612, 2008) has been related to onomatopoeias since Cratilo's analysis of the analogical dimension of verbal language. Nonetheless, it is still difficult to accept a (semantic, functional or grammatical) descriptive and explicative model of onomatopoeia, because the rules that constrain processes of selection and construction remain idiosyncratic and variable (Dogana in Le parole dell'incanto. FrancoAngeli, Milano, 2002; Catricalà 2011). This article proposes a classification model based on spatial cognition criteria. The hypothesis (Catricalà 2011) is that onomatopoeias are related to image schemas (Johnson in The body in the mind. University Press, Chicago, 1987), i.e. to the visual mapping of a movement. We also refer to force dynamic (Talmy in Language typology and lexical description, pp 36-149, 1985; Jackendoff in Semantic structures. MIT Press, Cambridge, 1990) as a basic model of conceptual maps (Langacker in Grammar and conceptualization. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, 1999). Categories are related to the presence of specific phonemes and phoneme clusters, while visual patterns correspond to different image schemas. The association between specific categories of pseudo-onomatopoeias and specific spatial/movement patterns is also the object of an experiment focused on onomatopoeia interpretation. Most part of data confirms a correlation between image schemas as CONTAINER/CONTAINMENT (crunch, plop) or SOURCE-PATH-GOAL (tattarrattat 'shots') and an occlusive consonant, while liquid

  16. GlioLab-a space system for Glioblastoma multiforme cells on orbit behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Twiggs, Robert J.

    Microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation pose significant health risks for human life in space. This is a concern for future missions and also for future space tourism flights. Nev-ertheless, at the same time it is very interesting to study the effects of these conditions in unhealthy organism like biological samples affected by cancer. It is possible that space envi-ronment increases, decreases or doesn't have any effect on cancer cells. In any case the test results give important informations about cancer treatment or space tourism flight for people affected by cancer. GlioLab is a joint project between GAUSS-Group of Astrodynamics at the "Sapienza" University of Roma and the Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center in Kentucky. The main goal of this project is the design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system to investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on a human glioblastoma multiforme cell line derived from a 65-year-old male and on Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA). In particular the samples are Glioblastoma multiforme cancer cells because the radiotherapy using ionizing radiation is the only treatment after surgery that can give on ground an improvement on the survival rate for this very malignant cancer. During a mission on the ISS, GlioLab mission has to test the in orbit behavior of glioblastoma cancer cells and healthy neuronal cells, which are extremely fragile and require complex experimentation and testing. In this paper engineering solutions to design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system that can allow to keep alive these kind of cells are described. This autonomous system is characterized also by an optical device dedicated to cells behavior analysis and by microdosimeters for monitoring space radiation environment.

  17. Assessment of function and clinical utility of alcohol and other drug web sites: An observational, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity and use of the internet makes it an attractive option for providing health information and treatment, including alcohol/other drug use. There is limited research examining how people identify and access information about alcohol or other drug (AOD) use online, or how they assess the usefulness of the information presented. This study examined the strategies that individuals used to identify and navigate a range of AOD websites, along with the attitudes concerning presentation and content. Methods Members of the general community in Brisbane and Roma (Queensland, Australia) were invited to participate in a 30-minute search of the internet for sites related to AOD use, followed by a focus group discussion. Fifty one subjects participated in the study across nine focus groups. Results Participants spent a maximum of 6.5 minutes on any one website, and less if the user was under 25 years of age. Time spent was as little as 2 minutes if the website was not the first accessed. Participants recommended that AOD-related websites should have an engaging home or index page, which quickly and accurately portrayed the site's objectives, and provided clear site navigation options. Website content should clearly match the title and description of the site that is used by internet search engines. Participants supported the development of a portal for AOD websites, suggesting that it would greatly facilitate access and navigation. Treatment programs delivered online were initially viewed with caution. This appeared to be due to limited understanding of what constituted online treatment, including its potential efficacy. Conclusions A range of recommendations arise from this study regarding the design and development of websites, particularly those related to AOD use. These include prudent use of text and information on any one webpage, the use of graphics and colours, and clear, uncluttered navigation options. Implications for future website

  18. Coupling Functions for NM-64 and NM Without Lead Derived on the Basis of Calculated Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for CR Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L.I.; Danilova, O.A.; Tyasto, M.I.; Ptitsina, N.G.; Villoresi, G.; Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.

    L. I. Dorman (1,2), O. A. Danilova (3), M. I. Tyasto (3), N. G. Ptitsina (3), G. Villoresi (4), N. Iucci (4) and M. Parisi (4) ? (1) Israel Cosmic Ray Center affiliated to Tel Aviv University, Technion and Israel Space Agency, Israel; (2) IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Russia; (3) SPbFIZMIRAN, St. Petersburg, Russia; (4) Dipartimento di Fisica "E. Amaldi", Università "Roma Tre", Rome, Italy In Dorman et al. (2007) it was calculate the apparent cut-off rigidities for the backward route (Antarctica-Italy) of the CR latitude survey performed on a ship during 1996-1997 solar minimum. These computations were done on the basis of results of trajectory calculations for inclined cut-off rigidities for various azimuth and zenith angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°) and azimuth directions changing from 0° to 360° in steps of 45°. The information on integral multiplicities of secondary neutrons detected by neutron monitor in dependence of zenith angle of incoming primary CR particles have been also used. This information is based on the theoretical calculations of meson-nuclear cascades of primary protons with different rigidities arriving to the Earth's atmosphere at zenith angles 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°. By using this information and data of CR latitude survey from Antarctica to Italy in minimum of solar activity we determine coupling functions for NM-64 and NM without lead. Reference: L.I. Dorman et al. “Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for Cosmic Ray Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity”, Adv. Space Res., 2007 (in press).

  19. Single crystal artificial diamond detectors for VUV and soft X-rays measurements on JET thermonuclear fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Coffey, I.; Murari, A.; Tartoni, N.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2010-11-01

    Diamond appears to be a promising material for VUV and soft X-ray radiation detection. Its wide band-gap (5.5 eV) results in a very low leakage current (it can operate above room temperature) and its electronic properties (high carrier mobility) allow a fast time response. More importantly, it is optimally suited for harsh environment applications, like those in the JET Tokamak located at the Culham laboratory (UK). Its extreme radiation hardness is well known and another interesting feature, again related to the wide band-gap, is its selective sensitivity to radiation with wavelengths shorter than 225 nm (visible-blind detectors).We report on the performances of two photodetectors based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) single crystal diamonds, one optimized for extreme UV detection, the other for soft X-ray radiation detection in the 0.8-8 keV range. These detectors have been fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University using a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and they behave like photodiodes allowing operation with no external applied voltage. They have been installed on JET inside a vacuum chamber with a direct horizontal view of JET plasma without any wavelength selection. Their low thickness, low sensitivity to gamma ray and the unbiased operation mode make both detectors ideal for a Tokamak environment. The measurements routinely performed at JET show a low intrinsic dark current (˜0.01 pA) and very high signal to noise ratio (50 dB). Both detectors show a fast response and their signals are acquired using an electronic chain and ADC able to operate at 200 kHz, providing very interesting results for MHD and Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) instability studies on fusion plasmas.

  20. Tightly-Coupled Plant-Soil Nitrogen Cycling: Comparison of Organic Farms across an Agricultural Landscape.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Timothy M; Hollander, Allan D; Steenwerth, Kerri; Jackson, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    How farming systems supply sufficient nitrogen (N) for high yields but with reduced N losses is a central challenge for reducing the tradeoffs often associated with N cycling in agriculture. Variability in soil organic matter and management of organic farms across an agricultural landscape may yield insights for improving N cycling and for evaluating novel indicators of N availability. We assessed yields, plant-soil N cycling, and root expression of N metabolism genes across a representative set of organic fields growing Roma-type tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in an intensively-managed agricultural landscape in California, USA. The fields spanned a three-fold range of soil carbon (C) and N but had similar soil types, texture, and pH. Organic tomato yields ranged from 22.9 to 120.1 Mg ha-1 with a mean similar to the county average (86.1 Mg ha-1), which included mostly conventionally-grown tomatoes. Substantial variability in soil inorganic N concentrations, tomato N, and root gene expression indicated a range of possible tradeoffs between yields and potential for N losses across the fields. Fields showing evidence of tightly-coupled plant-soil N cycling, a desirable scenario in which high crop yields are supported by adequate N availability but low potential for N loss, had the highest total and labile soil C and N and received organic matter inputs with a range of N availability. In these fields, elevated expression of a key gene involved in root N assimilation, cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1, confirmed that plant N assimilation was high even when inorganic N pools were low. Thus tightly-coupled N cycling occurred on several working organic farms. Novel combinations of N cycling indicators (i.e. inorganic N along with soil microbial activity and root gene expression for N assimilation) would support adaptive management for improved N cycling on organic as well as conventional farms, especially when plant-soil N cycling is rapid.

  1. Some evidence of ground power enhancements at frequencies of global magnetospheric modes at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francia, P.; Villante, U.

    1997-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the power spectra of the geomagnetic field components H and D for periods ranging between 3 min and 1 h was conducted at a low-latitude observatory (LÁquila, L=1.6) at the minimum and maximum of the solar cycle. For both components, during daytime intervals, we found evidence of power enhancements at frequencies predicted for global modes of the Earthś magnetosphere and occasionally observed at auroral latitudes in the F-region drift velocities (approximately at 1.3, 1.9, 2.6, and 3.4 mHz). Nighttime observations reveal a relative low frequency H enhancement associated with the bay occurrence together with a peak in the H/D power ratio which sharply emerges at 1.2 mHz in the premidnight sector. The strong similarity between solar minimum and maximum suggests that these modes can be considered permanent magnetospheric features. A separate analysis on a two-month interval shows that the observed spectral characteristics are amplified by conditions of high-velocity solar wind. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.->

  2. Electron cyclotron waves in the presence of parallel electric fields in the Earthś auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Dixit, S. K.; Gwal, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    The electron cyclotron waves that originate at low altitudes (<0.5 RE) and observed by ground facilities have been studied in the presence of a weak parallel electric field in auroral magnetoplasma consisting of trapped energetic auroral electrons and cold background electrons of ionospheric origin. The model distribution for auroral trapped electrons is taken as Maxwellian ring distribution. An expression for the growth rate has been obtained in the presence of parallel electric field assuming that the real frequency in the whistler mode is not affected by the presence of the electric field. The results show that waves grow (or damp) in amplitude for a parallel (or antiparallel) electric field. The influence of the electric field is more pronounced at a shorter wavelength spectrum. An increase in population of energetic electrons increases the growth rate and thus, plays a significant role in the wave excitation process in the auroral regions. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  3. Characteristics of very large aspect angle E-region coherent echoes at 933 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, B. J.; Moorcroft, D. R.; Schlegel, K.

    1997-01-01

    The EISCAT UHF radar system was used to study the characteristics of E-region coherent backscatter at very large magnetic aspect angles (5-11°). Data taken using 60 s pulses during elevation scans through horizontally uniform backscatter permitted the use of inversion techniques to determine height profiles of the scattering layer. The layer was always singly peaked, with a mean height of 104 km, and mean thickness (full width at half maximum) of 10 km, both independent of aspect angle. Aspect sensitivities were also estimated, with the Sodankylä-Tromsø link observing 5 dB/degree at aspect angles near 5°, decreasing to 3 dB/degree at 10° aspect angle. Observed coherent phase velocities from all three stations were found to be roughly consistent with LOS measurements of a common E-region phase velocity vector. The E-region phase velocity had the same orientation as the F-region ion drift velocity, but was approximately 50% smaller in magnitude. Spectra were narrow with skewness of about +1 (for negative velocities), increasing slightly with aspect angle. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  4. Movement of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 to Ripe Tomato Fruit Following Various Routes of Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Deering, Amanda J.; Jack, Dan R.; Pruitt, Robert E.; Mauer, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars have been associated with the majority of foodborne illness outbreaks involving tomatoes, and E. coli O157:H7 has caused outbreaks involving other fresh produce. Contamination by both pathogens has been thought to originate from all points of the growing and distribution process. To determine if Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 could move to the mature tomato fruit of different tomato cultivars following contamination, three different contamination scenarios (seed, leaf, and soil) were examined. Following contamination, each cultivar appeared to respond differently to the presence of the pathogens, with most producing few fruit and having overall poor health. The Micro-Tom cultivar, however, produced relatively more fruit and E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the ripe tomatoes for both the seed- and leaf- contaminated plants, but not following soil contamination. The Roma cultivar produced fewer fruit, but was the only cultivar in which E. coli O157:H7 was detected via all three routes of contamination. Only two of the five cultivars produced tomatoes following seed-, leaf-, and soil- contamination with Salmonella Typhimurium, and no Salmonella was found in any of the tomatoes. Together these results show that different tomato cultivars respond differently to the presence of a human pathogen, and for E. coli O157:H7, in particular, tomato plants that are either contaminated as seeds or have a natural opening or a wound, that allows bacteria to enter the leaves can result in plants that have the potential to produce tomatoes that harbor internalized pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27682118

  5. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Stagnitti, A; Marini, A; Impara, L; Drudi, F M; Lo Mele, L; Lillo Odoardi, G

    2012-06-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: La fisiologia articolare dell’articolazione temporo-mandibolare (ATM) può essere esaminata sia dal punto di vista clinico che strumentale. La diagnostica per immagini ha da tempo contribuito con la risonanza magnetica (RM) e anche con la radiografia (Rx) e la tomografia computerizzata (TC) all’analisi della morfologia dei capi articolari e della cinetica condilare. L’esame duplex-ecodoppler è una metodica di largo impiego nello studio delle strutture in movimento in particolar modo a livello delle strutture del sistema vascolare. MATERIALI E METODI: È stata utilizzata un’apparecchiatura Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A, con l’uso di tecnica duplex-ecodoppler multi display, che consente la visualizzazione contemporanea dell’immagine ecografica e dei segnali Doppler utilizzando una sonda lineare del tipo phased array con cristalli trasduttori funzionanti ad una frequenza fondamentale di 6 MHz per gli spettri Doppler pulsati e 7.5 MHz per l’imaging ecografico. Sono stati esaminati nel Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomo-patologiche dell’Università “Sapienza” di Roma, 30 pazienti del reparto di Ortognatodonzia dell’Istituto di Odontoiatria della stessa Università. RISULTATI: Nei pazienti normali si è ottenuta un’alternanza regolare degli spettri Doppler, mentre nei soggetti con disfunzioni del complesso condilo-meniscale, si è persa la regolarità della sommatoria degli spettri di Fourier, con altezze incostanti in relazione a spostamenti irregolari del complesso condilo-meniscale. CONCLUSIONI: L’esame ecodoppler si è dimostrato, in tutti i pazienti, capace di discriminare quelli normali dai patologici e tra questi ultimi ha permesso di identificare gli aspetti più significativi delle patologie disfunzionali.

  6. Cosmic ray snow effect in different multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Observatory NM hourly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Iucci, N.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of cosmic ray hourly data obtained by NM of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the snow effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m?1, m?2, m?3, m?4, m?5, m?6, m?7, and m?8, as well as for m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also hourly data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level,cutoff rigidity 6.7 GV) and hourly data of total intensity of NM of the University of Athens (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 8.7 GV). In this paper we will analize effects of snow in periods from 4 January 2000 to 15 April 2000 (with maximal absorption effect about 5%) and from 21 December 2000 up to 31 March 2001 with maximal effect 13% in the total neutron intensity. We use the periods without snow to determine regeression coefficients between primary CR variations observed by NM of Emilio Segre' Observatory, by Rome NM and Athens NM. On the basis of obtained results we develop a method to correct data on snow effect by using several NM hourly data.On the basis of our data we estimate the accuracy with what can be made correction of NM data of stations where the snow effect can be important.

  7. UNderstanding uptake of Immunisations in TravellIng aNd Gypsy communities (UNITING): protocol for an exploratory, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Cath; Crocker, Annie; Emslie, Carol; Dyson, Lisa; Gallagher, Bridget; Schicker, Frieda; Shepherd, Christine; Smith, Lesley; Vousden, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gypsies, Travellers and Roma (referred to here as Travellers) experience significantly poorer health and have shorter life expectancy than the general population. They are also less likely to access health services including immunisation. To improve immunisation rates, we need to understand what helps and hinders individuals in these communities in taking up immunisations. This study has two aims: (1) Investigate the barriers and facilitators to acceptability and uptake of immunisations among six Traveller communities in the UK; (2) Identify potential interventions to increase uptake in these Traveller communities. Methods and analysis A three-phase qualitative study with six Traveller communities. PHASE 1: In each community, we will explore up to 45 Travellers’ views about the influences on their immunisation behaviours and ideas for improving uptake in their community. PHASE 2: In each community, we will investigate 6–8 service providers’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators to childhood and adult immunisations for Traveller communities with whom they work, and ideas to improve uptake. Interview data will be analysed using the Framework approach. PHASE 3: The findings will be discussed and interventions prioritised in six workshops, each with 10–12 phase 1 and 3–4 phase 2 participants. Ethics and dissemination This research received approval from NRES Committee Yorkshire and The Humber-Leeds East (Ref. 13/YH/02). It will produce (1) findings on the barriers and facilitators to uptake of immunisations in six Traveller communities; (2) a prioritised list of potentially feasible and acceptable interventions for increasing uptake in these communities; and (3) methodological development in undertaking research with diverse Traveller communities. The study has the potential to inform new ways of delivering services to ensure high immunisation uptake. Findings will be disseminated to participants, relevant UK organisations with responsibility

  8. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin

  9. GeoWall use in an Introductory Geology laboratory: Impacts in Student Understanding of Field Mapping Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, L. E.; Kelly, M.; Springer, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    In the Fall semester of 2003, Northern Arizona University will introduce the GeoWall to its introductory geology courses. This presents an opportunity to assess the impact of this new technology on students' understanding of basic topographic concepts and the spatial relationships between geology, topography, and hydrology on a field trip. Introductory Geology fulfills the Lab Science component of the Liberal Studies Program at Northern Arizona University. The class is open to all Northern Arizona University students, and is most commonly taken by non-science majors. In this class students learn to: locate their position using maps, identify common minerals and rocks, recognize the relationship between geology and geomorphology, visualize how rocks exposed at the surface continue into the subsurface, and to draw conclusions about possible geologic hazards in different settings. In this study we will report how a GeoWall 3D visualization technology was used in a field study of a graben south of Flagstaff. The goal of the field exercise is to improve students' ability to synthesize data collected at field stops into a conceptual model of the graben, linking geology, geomorphology and hydrology. We plan to present a quantitative assessment of the GeoWall learning objectives from data collected from a paired test and control group of students. Teaching assistants (TAs) with two or more lab classes have been identified; these TAs will participate in both GeoWall and non-GeoWall lab exercises. The GeoWall use will occur outside of normal lab hours to avoid disrupting the lab schedule during the eighth week of lab. This field preparation exercise includes a 3D visualization of the Lake Mary graben rendered with the ROMA software. The following week, all students attend the graben field trip; immediately following the trip, students will interviewed about their gain in understanding of the geologic features illustrated during the field trip. The results of the post

  10. Distribution patterns and sources of metals and PAHs in an intensely urbanized area: The Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano conurbation (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Stefano; Lima, Annamaria; Rezza, Carmela; Ferullo, Giampiero; De Vivo, Benedetto; Chen, Wei; Qi, Shihua

    2014-05-01

    agricultural intensive land use. PAHs distribution pattern showed anomalous values across the whole study area. Especially, Benzo[a]pyrene values exceeds the trigger limits established by the Italian Environmental law (D.Lgs. 152/2006) in most of the analyzed soils and the diagnostic ratios calculated among several PAHs compounds suggested that the biomass burning in the rural sector of the study area could be a relevant source of pollution. The palm oil fuelled power plant in the northern sector of Acerra could not be excluded as a source of PAHs in the environment. [1] Albanese et al (2007) JGE 93, 21-34. [2] Cicchella et al (2008) GEEA 8 (1), 19-29. [3] De Vivo et al (2006) Aracne Editrice, Roma. 324 pp.

  11. The Dynamic Organization of the Perinucleolar Compartment in the Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sui; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Spector, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The perinucleolar compartment (PNC) is a unique nuclear structure preferentially localized at the periphery of the nucleolus. Several small RNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase III (e.g., the Y RNAs, MRP RNA, and RNase P H1 RNA) and the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB; hnRNP I) have thus far been identified in the PNC (Ghetti, A., S. PinolRoma, W.M. Michael, C. Morandi, and G. Dreyfuss. 1992. Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3671–3678; Matera, A.G., M.R. Frey, K. Margelot, and S.L. Wolin. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 129:1181–1193; Lee, B., A.G. Matera, D.C. Ward, and J. Craft. 1996. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 93: 11471–11476). In this report, we have further characterized this structure in both fixed and living cells. Detection of the PNC in a large number of human cancer and normal cells showed that PNCs are much more prevalent in cancer cells. Analysis through the cell cycle using immunolabeling with a monoclonal antibody, SH54, specifically recognizing PTB, demonstrated that the PNC dissociates at the beginning of mitosis and reforms at late telophase in the daughter nuclei. To visualize the PNC in living cells, a fusion protein between PTB and green fluorescent protein (GFP) was generated. Time lapse studies revealed that the size and shape of the PNC is dynamic over time. In addition, electron microscopic examination in optimally fixed cells revealed that the PNC is composed of multiple strands, each measuring ∼80–180 nm diam. Some of the strands are in direct contact with the surface of the nucleolus. Furthermore, analysis of the sequence requirement for targeting PTB to the PNC using a series of deletion mutants of the GFP–PTB fusion protein showed that at least three RRMs at either the COOH or NH2 terminus are required for the fusion protein to be targeted to the PNC. This finding suggests that RNA binding may be necessary for PTB to be localized in the PNC. PMID:9166399

  12. D Survey and Augmented Reality for Cultural Heritage. The Case Study of Aurelian Wall at Castra Praetoria in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Conigliaro, E.; Del Grasso, M.; Papalini, P.; Saccone, M.

    2016-06-01

    The development of close-range photogrammetry has produced a lot of new possibility to study cultural heritage. 3D data acquired with conventional and low cost cameras can be used to document, investigate the full appearance, materials and conservation status, to help the restoration process and identify intervention priorities. At the same time, with 3D survey a lot of three-dimensional data are collected and analyzed by researchers, but there are a very few possibility of 3D output. The augmented reality is one of this possible output with a very low cost technology but a very interesting result. Using simple mobile technology (for iPad and Android Tablets) and shareware software (in the case presented "Augment") it is possible to share and visualize a large number of 3D models with your own device. The case study presented is a part of an architecture graduate thesis, made in Rome at Department of Architecture of Roma Tre University. We have developed a photogrammetric survey to study the Aurelian Wall at Castra Praetoria in Rome. The surveys of 8000 square meters of surface have allowed to identify stratigraphy and construction phases of a complex portion of Aurelian Wall, specially about the Northern door of Castra. During this study, the data coming out of 3D survey (photogrammetric and topographic), are stored and used to create a reverse 3D model, or virtual reconstruction, of the Northern door of Castra. This virtual reconstruction shows the door in the Tiberian period, nowadays it's totally hidden by a curtain wall but, little and significative architectural details allow to know its original feature. The 3D model of the ancient walls has been mapped with the exact type of bricks and mortar, oriented and scaled according to the existing one to use augmented reality. Finally, two kind of application have been developed, one on site, were you can see superimposed the virtual reconstruction on the existing walls using the image recognition. On the other hand

  13. Ethnobotanical remarks on Central and Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Guarrera, Paolo Maria; Lucia, Leporatti Maria

    2007-01-01

    Background The present paper is a brief survey on the ethnobotanical works published by the Authors since 1981, concerning the research carried out in some southern and central Italian regions. Before Roman domination these territories were first inhabited by local people, while the southern areas were colonized by the Greeks. These different cultural contributions left certain traces, both in the toponyms and in the vernacular names of the plants and, more generally, in the culture as a whole. Methods Field data were collected through open interviews, mainly of farmers, shepherds and elderly people, born or living in these areas for a long time. Voucher specimens of collected plants are preserved in the respective herbaria of the Authors and in the herbarium of "Roma Tre" University. Important contributions have been made by several students native to the areas under consideration. A comparative analysis with local specific ethnobotanical literature was carried out. Results The paper reports several examples concerning human and veterinary popular medicine and in addition some anti-parasitic, nutraceutic, dye and miscellaneous uses are also described. Moreover vernacular names and toponyms are cited. Eight regions of central and southern Italy (particularly Latium, Abruzzo, Marche and Basilicata) were investigated and the data obtained are presented in 32 papers. Most of the species of ethnobotanical interest have been listed in Latium (368 species), Marche (274) and Abruzzo (203). The paper also highlights particularly interesting aspects or uses not previously described in the specific ethnobotanical literature. Conclusion Phyto-therapy in central and southern Italy is nowadays practised by a few elderly people who resort to medicinal plants only for mild complaints (on the contrary food uses are still commonly practised). Nowadays therapeutic uses, unlike in the past, are less closely or not at all linked to ritual aspects. Several plants deserve to be taken

  14. Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2016-04-01

    function of the targeted system (solar wind/magnetospheres/geomagnetic indices), solar cycle phase (minimum versus maximum), type of result (PSDs, PDFs, Multifractals). The results catalogues, available online from http://www.storm-fp7.eu, include 4094 PSD spectra, 9566 PDFs and 15633 multifractal spectra (from partition function and respectively Rank Ordered (ROMA) formalisms). These results are obtained at solar maximum (2001-2002, both in the solar wind and the terrestrial magnetosheath) and solar minimum (1997-1998 in the solar wind, 2007-2008 in the solar wind, Venus and Earth magnetosheath and selected regions of the magnetosphere). Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM.

  15. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Discussion Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Summary Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community. Additionally, it is imperative

  16. They see us as less than human: Metadehumanization predicts intergroup conflict via reciprocal dehumanization.

    PubMed

    Kteily, Nour; Hodson, Gordon; Bruneau, Emile

    2016-03-01

    Although the act of dehumanizing an outgroup is a pervasive and potent intergroup process that drives discrimination and conflict, no formal research has examined the consequences of being dehumanized by an outgroup-that is, "metadehumanization." Across 10 studies (N = 3,440) involving several real-world conflicts spanning 3 continents, we provide the first empirical evidence that metadehumanization (a) plays a central role in outgroup aggression that is (b) mediated by outgroup dehumanization, and (c) distinct from metaprejudice. Studies 1a and 1b demonstrate experimentally that Americans who learn that Arabs (Study 1a) or Muslims (Study 1b) blatantly dehumanize Americans are more likely to dehumanize that outgroup in return; by contrast, experimentally increasing outgroup dehumanization did not increase metadehumanization (Study 1c). Using correlational data, Study 2 documents indirect effects of metadehumanization on Americans' support for aggressive policies toward Arabs (e.g., torture) via Arab dehumanization. In the context of Hungarians and ethnic minority Roma, Study 3 shows that the pathway for Hungarians from metadehumanization to aggression through outgroup dehumanization holds controlling for outgroup prejudice. Study 4 examines Israelis' metaperceptions with respect to Palestinians, showing that: (a) feeling dehumanized (i.e., metadehumanization) is distinct from feeling disliked (i.e., metaprejudice), and (b) metadehumanization uniquely influences aggression through outgroup dehumanization, controlling for metaprejudice. Studies 5a and 5b explore Americans' metaperceptions regarding ISIS and Iran. We document a dehumanization-specific pathway from metadehumanization to aggressive attitudes and behavior that is distinct from the path from metaprejudice through prejudice to aggression. In Study 6, American participants learning that Muslims humanize Americans (i.e., metahumanization) humanize Muslims in turn. Finally, Study 7 experimentally contrasts

  17. C/O: Effects on Habitability of Stellar Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.; Sevin Peckmezci, Gül; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2015-11-01

    We assess how differences in the composition of exoplanet host stars might affect the availability of water in their systems, particularly the role of carbon and oxygen abundances. Water, one of the key chemical ingredients for habitability, may be in short supply in carbon-rich, oxygen-poor systems even if planets exist in the ‘habitable zone’. For the solar system, C/O = 0.55 is particularly important in determining the refractory (silicate and metal) to volatile ice ratio expected in material condensed beyond the snow line (Gaidos E. J. Icarus 145, 637, 2000; Wong M. H. et al. in Oxygen in the Solar System, G.J. MacPherson, Ed., 2008). Our analysis of published compositions for a set of exoplanet host stars (Johnson T. V. et al. ApJ. 757(2), 192, 2012) showed that the amount of condensed water ice in those systems might range from as much as 50% by mass for sub-solar C/O = 0.35 to less than a few percent for super-solar C/O = 0.7. A recent analysis using similar techniques (Pekmezci G. S., Dottorato di Ricerca in Astronomia, Università Degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, 2014) of a much larger stellar composition data set for 974 FGK stars (Petigura E. and Marcy G. Journal of Astrophysics 735, 2011), allows us to assess the possible range of water ice abundance in the circumstellar accretion disks of these ‘solar-type’ stars (of which 72 were known to have one or more planets as of 2011). Stellar C/O in a subset (457 stars) of this stellar database with reported C, O, Ni, and Fe abundances ranges from 0.3 to 1.4. The resulting computed water ice fractions and refractory (silicate + metal) fractions range from ~0 to 0.6 and 0.3 to 0.9 respectively. These results have implications for assessing the habitability of exoplanets since they constrain the amount of water available beyond the snow line for dynamical delivery to inner planets, depending on the host stars’ C/O in the circumstellar nebula. TVJ acknowledges government support at JPL

  18. Pre-supernova Evolution of Rotating Solar Metallicity Stars in the Mass Range 13-120 M ⊙ and their Explosive Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M ⊙, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public_html. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M ⊙, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s-1 do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M ⊙ in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  19. Volcanology, history and myths of the Lake Albano maar (Colli Albani volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; Diano, G.; Caprilli, E.; Paterne, M.

    2008-10-01

    The polygenetic Albano maar is the most recent centre of the Colli Albani volcano, located just few kilometres to the south-east of Roma. Presently the maar hosts a 167.5 m deep crater lake, the deepest in Europe. The maar is to be considered quiescent, as phreatic activity is documented throughout the Holocene. This paper illustrates the close relationships between the activity of the maar and the history of settlement in the Roman region as recorded in the geology, archaeology, history and legends of the area. Severe fluctuations of the groundwater table and catastrophic overflows of the Lake Albano from the maar rim had occurred prior to and after the early prehistoric settlements dated in the maar area at the Eneolithic times (ca. III millennium B.C.). Repeated lahars occurred along the northwestern slope of the maar filling in the paleodrainage network and forming a vast plain. Paleohydraulic analyses on fluvial and lahar deposits originated from the Holocene phreatic activity of the Albano maar indicate sediment-water flows in excess of hundreds of cubic metres per second. Absolute age determinations of the paleosoil underlying one of the most recent deposits of the lahar succession at 5800 ± 100 yr B.P. ( 14C CAL) are in perfect agreement with the age of the overlying Eneolithic age settlements. The last catastrophic overflow is described in the Roman literature as a consequence of the anger of Poseidon against the Romans in 398 B.C. for their war against the Etruscans. In 394 B.C. the Romans decided to prevent the repetition of such events by the excavation through the maar crater wall of a 1.5 km long drain tunnel, which is still operational, keeping the lake 70 m below the lowest point of the maar rim. This tunnel drain may be regarded as the first prevention device for volcanic hazard in history and shows an unprecedented development of the engineering technology under the pressure of hazard perception. The surprising and still largely unknown results

  20. Magnetic classification of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Consolmagno, G.; Denise, M.; Folco, L.; Gattacceca, J.; Osete, M.; Pesonen, L.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (X) provides a versatile rapid and non destructive way to quantify the amount of magnetic minerals (FeNi metal, magnetic oxides and sulfides) on large volume of material. As petrological studies of meteorites suggest that this parameter should be quite discriminant, we assembled a database of measurements on about 1200 stony meteorites from various European collections: Helsinki, Madrid, Moscou, Paris, Prague, Roma, Siena, Vatican, and other smaller collections. From 1 to >20 pieces and 1 to >100 cc per meteorite allow to define a representative mean value, using a large coil (8 cm) Kappabridge. For ordinary chondrites, it appears that weathering is responsible for a systematic bias toward low X for Antarctic (Frontier Mountain) and non Antarctic (mainly from Sahara) finds. Once only falls are considered a quite narrow range of X is observed for a given class, with no effect of petrological grade except for LL. This does not support suggested decrease of metal amount with metamorphism for L chondrites. High grade LLs (heated above 400°C) develop the weakly magnetic antitaenite-tetrataenite phases during slow cooling, explaining the difference with low grade taenite-bearing LLs. Once a few % of outliers are excluded, well defined means for H and L are observed with no overlap at 2 s.d.; this agrees with the lack of overlap on metal amount. For non ordinary chondrites and achondrites, weakly magnetic classes are HED, Aubrites and SNC (below LL), strongly ones are E (above H) and Ureilites (in the L-H range), while C chondrites are spread in the whole range, again with each class showing restricted variation. Outliers appeared to be in most cases either misclassified meteorites or misindentified samples, based on petrographic and microprobe investigations of thin sections from outlying samples. It appears that systematic magnetic screening of large collections is an efficient way to detect erroneous sample identification, due to exchange with

  1. High-energy sources at low radio frequency: the Murchison Widefield Array view of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, M.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Lico, R.; Burlon, D.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Morgan, J.; Pavlidou, V.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ewall-Rice, A.; Emrich, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Feng, L.; Jacobs, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-frequency radio arrays are opening a new window for the study of the sky, both to study new phenomena and to better characterize known source classes. Being flat-spectrum sources, blazars are so far poorly studied at low radio frequencies. Aims: We characterize the spectral properties of the blazar population at low radio frequency, compare the radio and high-energy properties of the gamma-ray blazar population, and search for radio counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. Methods: We cross-correlated the 6100 deg2 Murchison Widefield Array Commissioning Survey catalogue with the Roma blazar catalogue, the third catalogue of active galactic nuclei detected by Fermi-LAT, and the unidentified members of the entire third catalogue of gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi-LAT. When available, we also added high-frequency radio data from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz catalogue. Results: We find low-frequency counterparts for 186 out of 517 (36%) blazars, 79 out of 174 (45%) gamma-ray blazars, and 8 out of 73 (11%) gamma-ray blazar candidates. The mean low-frequency (120-180 MHz) blazar spectral index is ⟨αlow⟩ = 0.57 ± 0.02: blazar spectra are flatter than the rest of the population of low-frequency sources, but are steeper than at ~GHz frequencies. Low-frequency radio flux density and gamma-ray energy flux display a mildly significant and broadly scattered correlation. Ten unidentified gamma-ray sources have a (probably fortuitous) positional match with low radio frequency sources. Conclusions: Low-frequency radio astronomy provides important information about sources with a flat radio spectrum and high energy. However, the relatively low sensitivity of the present surveys still misses a significant fraction of these objects. Upcoming deeper surveys, such as the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-Sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, will provide further insight into this population. Tables 5-7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  2. Demagnetization Analysis in Excel (DAIE) - An open source workbook in Excel for viewing and analyzing demagnetization data from paleomagnetic discrete samples and u-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    demagnetization plots; - Complete control of the whole workflow and possibility of implementation of the workbook by any user; - Modular structure in distinct worksheets for each type of analyses and plots, in order to make implementation and personalization easier; - Opportunity to use the workbook for educational purposes, since all the computations and analyses are easily traceable and accessible; - Automatic and fast analysis of a large batch of demagnetization data, such as those measured on u-channel samples. The DAIE workbook and the "User manual" are available for download on a dedicated web site (http://roma2.rm.ingv.it/en/facilities/software/49/daie).

  3. Linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation: a collaborative study of Italian populations.

    PubMed

    Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Bachis, Valeria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Bertoncini, Stefania; Biondi, Gianfranco; Boattini, Alessio; Boschi, Ilaria; Brisighelli, Francesca; Caló, Carla Maria; Carta, Marilisa; Coia, Valentina; Corrias, Laura; Crivellaro, Federica; De Fanti, Sara; Dominici, Valentina; Ferri, Gianmarco; Francalacci, Paolo; Franceschi, Zelda Alice; Luiselli, Donata; Morelli, Laura; Paoli, Giorgio; Rickards, Olga; Robledo, Renato; Sanna, Daria; Sanna, Emanuele; Sarno, Stefania; Sineo, Luca; Taglioli, Luca; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Tofanelli, Sergio; Vona, Giuseppe; Pettener, Davide; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The animal and plant biodiversity of the Italian territory is known to be one of the richest in the Mediterranean basin and Europe as a whole, but does the genetic diversity of extant human populations show a comparable pattern? According to a number of studies, the genetic structure of Italian populations retains the signatures of complex peopling processes which took place from the Paleolithic to modern era. Although the observed patterns highlight a remarkable degree of genetic heterogeneity, they do not, however, take into account an important source of variation. In fact, Italy is home to numerous ethnolinguistic minorities which have yet to be studied systematically. Due to their difference in geographical origin and demographic history, such groups not only signal the cultural and social diversity of our country, but they are also potential contributors to its bio-anthropological heterogeneity. To fill this gap, research groups from four Italian Universities (Bologna, Cagliari, Pisa and Roma Sapienza) started a collaborative study in 2007, which was funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research and received partial support by the Istituto Italiano di Antropologia. In this paper, we present an account of the results obtained in the course of this initiative. Four case-studies relative to linguistic minorities from the Eastern Alps, Sardinia, Apennines and Southern Italy are first described and discussed, focusing on their micro-evolutionary and anthropological implications. Thereafter, we present the results of a systematic analysis of the relations between linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation. Integrating the data obtained in the course of the long-term study with literature and unpublished results on Italian populations, we show that a combination of linguistic and geographic factors is probably responsible for the presence of the most robust signatures of genetic isolation. Finally, we evaluate the magnitude of the diversity

  4. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the

  5. Effect of tomato consumption on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level: a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; Chávez-Manzanera, Emma; Meza-Arana, Clara Elena; Brito-Córdova, Griselda; Mehta, Roopa; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiologic evidence suggests that tomato-based products could reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. One of the main cardiovascular risk factors is low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). This study aimed to prospectively evaluate the effect of tomato consumption on HDL-C levels. Subject and methods We conducted a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. We screened 432 subjects with a complete lipid profile. Those individuals with low HDL-C (men <40 mg/dL and women <50 mg/dL) but normal triglyceride levels (<150 mg/dL) were included. Selected participants completed a 2-week run-in period on an isocaloric diet and then were randomized to receive 300 g of cucumber (control group) or two uncooked Roma tomatoes a day for 4 weeks. Results A total of 50 individuals (women = 41; 82%) with a mean age of 42 ± 15.5 years and a mean body mass index of 27.6 ± 5.0 kg/m2 completed the study. A significant increase in HDL-C levels was observed in the tomato group (from 36.5 ± 7.5 mg/dL to 41.6 ± 6.9 mg/dL, P < 0.0001 versus the control group). After stratification by gender, the difference in HDL-C levels was only significant in women. The mean HDL-C increase was 5.0 ± 2.8 mg/dL (range 1–12 mg/dL). Twenty patients (40%) finished the study with levels >40 mg/dL. A linear regression model that adjusted for those parameters that impact HDL-C levels (age, gender, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting triglyceride concentration, simple sugars, alcohol, physical activity, and omega-3 consumption) showed an independent association between tomato consumption and the increase in HDL-C (r2 = 0.69; P < 0.0001). Conclusion Raw tomato consumption produced a favorable effect on HDL-C levels in overweight women. PMID:23935376

  6. Frictional evolution, acoustic emissions activity, and off-fault damage in simulated faults sheared at seismic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, François. X.; Spagnuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    We present a series of high-velocity friction tests conducted on Westerly granite, using the Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA) installed at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Roma with acoustic emissions (AEs) monitored at high frequency (4 MHz). Both atmospheric humidity and pore fluid (water) pressure conditions were tested, under effective normal stress σneff in the range 5-20 MPa and at target sliding velocities Vs in the range 0.003-3 m/s. Under atmospheric humidity two consecutive friction drops were observed. The first one is related to flash weakening, and the second one to the formation and growth of a continuous layer of melt in the slip zone. In the presence of fluid, a single drop in friction was observed. Average values of fracture energy are independent of effective normal stress and sliding velocity. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities on the sheared samples suggested that larger damage was induced for 0.1 < Vs<0.3 m/s. This observation is supported by AEs recorded during the test, most of which were detected after the initiation of the second friction drop, once the fault surface temperature was high. Some AEs were detected up to a few seconds after the end of the experiments, indicating thermal rather than mechanical cracking. In addition, the presence of pore water delayed the onset of AEs by cooling effects and by reducing of the heat produced, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat during sliding. Using a thermoelastic crack model developed by Fredrich and Wong (1986), we confirm that damage may be induced by heat diffusion. Indeed, our theoretical results predict accurately the amount of shortening and shortening rate, supporting the idea that gouge production and gouge comminution are in fact largely controlled by thermal cracking. Finally, we discuss the contribution of thermal cracking in the seismic energy balance. In fact, while a dichotomy exists in the literature regarding

  7. [Food intake, nutritional status and physical activity between elderly with and without chronic constipation. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Vargas-García, Elisa Joan; Vargas-Salado, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: el estreñimiento es uno de los trastornos gastrointestinales más comunes en la población de edad avanzada porque con el paso de los años los factores implicados en su causa se modifican y repercuten en la ingestión de alimentos, el estado de nutrición y la actividad física. Objetivo: evaluar en el adulto mayor el efecto en el estreñimiento crónico del consumo de alimentos con alto contenido de fibra, el estado nutricio, y la actividad física. Material y métodos: estudio comparativo, prospectivo y transversal efectuado en 140 adultos mayores de la consulta externa de la Unidad de Medicina Familiar51 del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social en la ciudad de León, Guanajuato, durante el periodo del 4 mayo al 30 de octubre de 2009. Se valoró si padecían o no estreñimiento de acuerdo con los criterios de Roma III. Se valoró: peso,talla, circunferencia del brazo, pliegue cutáneo tricipital; se aplicó un cuestionario de actividad física validado, y se obtuvo el registro dietético de tres días (dos de entre semana y uno de sábado o domingo). Resultados: la ingestión promedio de fibra y agua no esultó estadísticamente diferente entre los grupos estudiados. Los pacientes con estreñimiento tuvieron dietas menos completas y variadas (p < 0.02; p < 0.03). El estado nutricio predominante en los adultos mayores de ambos grupos fue de sobrepeso (p= 0.49) pero el grupo sin estreñimiento tuvo niveles más altos de actividad física en comparación con los estreñidos (1664 vs 1049 METs, p= 0.004).Conclusiones: el menor nivel de actividad física, la monotonía en la dieta, y no incluir todos los grupos de alimentos son factores que se asocian con el estreñimiento en el adulto mayor. De acuerdo con los resultados de este estudio la menor ingestión de fibra no se relacionó con el estreñimiento.

  8. A new Gis-based map of villa Adriana, a multimedia guide for ancient paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Chiappetta, F.; Michelini, M.; Pallottino, E.; Saccone, M.; Scortecci, A.,

    2014-06-01

    For the last fifteen years the Faculty of Architecture at the University of Roma Tre, has been working on the famous Villa Adriana in Tivoli, studying its ruins and its ancient paths, in order to better understand how the villa was originally laid out. In this paper, we will talk about one of these studies, which reconnect previous works and creates a new GIS based map of Villa Adriana. The goal of this study is to create a cultural heritage evaluation. In order to achieve this aim, we have created a multimedia guide with text, drawings, 3D reconstructions and augmented reality. This work can be summarized in five steps; first of all, a new georeferenced plan was created. This drawing is based on an orthophoto and brings together all existing surveys (from historical drawings to recent surveys). In this new work we show the current status of the ruins and the original layout of Villa Adriana according to the most recent study. The second step was a 3D survey, with extensive use of photogrammetry to verify and upgrade drawings. The next and third step involved creating the Database, within which to store, edit, analyze, share, and display linked data relating to both ancient and contemporary buildings and pathways. This GIS is based on the new plan and gathers together different orders of information: original function, paving, the old paths of each original user (Hadrian, his wife Sabina, the retinue, guests and servants) as well as the ancient system of underground tunnels. It collects all the existing data relating to Villa Adriana relevant to solving the "what/where" question. The fourth step was to create a complete 3D model of Villa Adriana. The 3D reconstruction started from the existing surveys, the documentation of recent excavation and the input of the hypothetical reconstruction of lost or buried buildings. Finally we created a multimedia guide, based on a mobile app, which took information from the database to show, in real time, during the tour, where

  9. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  10. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  11. The first marine record of the Bartonian Nummulites and Calcareous nannofossils at the Tihoiyeh section of the Jiroft area (Central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Mehdi; Parandavar, Mohammad; Kiani-Shahvandi, Madineh; Dabaghi Sadr, Fatemeh

    2016-04-01

    The studied shallow marine sediments are situated south and southwest of Jiroft town, 180 km south of Keman, from the Tihoiyeh section (near Tihoiyeh village). These deposits at the top of the section include marly limestones with index Nummulites species such as N. perforatus (De Montfort), N. lyelli (D'Archiac and Haime). According to Schaub's nummulitic time scale (1981) and shallow benthic zonation of Serra-Kiel et al. (1998), this interval referred to Bartonian age and SBZ17 zone, respectively. Also, the calcareous nannofossil study on this interval led to identification of 19 well-preserved species belonging to 11 genera of this plankton group. Based on determined index calcareous nannofossiltaxa such as Reticulofenestra bisecta, Sphenolithus obtusus, Sphenolithus intercalaris, Cribrocentrum erbae and associated species such as Sphenolithus pseudoradians, Reticulofenestra wadeae, Cribrocentrum reticulatum and Blackites spinosus this interval assigned to the CNE15 zone of Agnini et al. (2014) that corresponds to upper part of NP16 and lower part of NP17 zones of Martini (1971). It is resulted that, the detected shallow benthic foraminifera zone, corresponds to the calcareous nannofossil zones both indicating Bartonian age. Keywords: Bartonian, Calcareous nannofossil, Nummulites, Central Iran, Tihoiyeh section. References: Agnini, C., Fornaciari, E., Raffi, I, Rita Catanzariti, R., Palike, H., Backman, J. and Rio, D., 2014. Biozonation and biochronology of Paleogene calcareous nannofossils from low and middle latitudes. Newsletters on Stratigraphy, Vol. 47 (2), Pp. 131-181. Martini, E., 1971. Standard Tertiary and Quaternary calcareous nannoplankton zonation. In: Farinacci, A. (Ed.), Proceedings 2nd International Conference Planktonic Microfossils Roma: Rome (Ed. Tecnosci.), 2, Pp. 739-785. Serra-Kiel, J., Hottinger, L., Caus, E., Drobne, K., Fernandez, C., Jauhri, A.K., Less, G., Pavlovec, R., Pignatti, J., Samso, J.M., Schaub, H., Sirel, E., Strougo, A

  12. The ESI scale, an ethical approach to the evaluation of seismic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfido, Sabina; Nappi, Rosa; De Lucia, Maddalena; Gaudiosi, Germana; Alessio, Giuliana; Guerrieri, Luca

    2015-04-01

    studies have been reviewed: the destructive 1976 February 4 Guatemala, earthquake (M 7.5) and the 1743 February 20 Nardò, historical earthquake (Salento, Southern Italy). The re-analysis of both earthquakes contributes to define more realistic seismic scenarios in terms of intensities assessment and consequent regional seismic hazards. References Michetti A.M., Esposito E., Guerrieri L., Porfido S., Serva L., Tatevossian R., Vittori E., Audemard F., Azuma T., Clague J., Comerci V., Gurpinar A., Mccalpin J., Mohammadioun B., Mörner N.A, Ota Y. And E. Roghozin - 2007. Intensity Scale ESI 2007, Mem. Descrittive della Carta Geologica d'Italia, Roma, 74, 53 pp

  13. CONFERENCE NOTE: International Workshop on Advanced Mathematical Tools in Metrology, Villa Gualino, Torino, Italy, 20 22 October 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary Programme The three-day programme features approximately twenty-five invited contributions. Participants may present a poster on the topic "Applications for Industrial Measurements", concerning applied mathematics, software development and computer-based measurements. 20 October Two plenary talks on mathematical methods and metrological applications "Numerical Methods and Modelling" Partial differential equations and integral equations Methods of identification and validation Algorithms for approximation Geometrical shape determination of industrial solids Round Table 21 October "Data Analysis" Spectral analysis and wavelets Calibration of precision instrumentation Comparison measurement of standards Statistical methods in metrology Robust estimation and outliers Applications of the bootstrap method Round Table 22 October (in cooperation with SIMAI and ASP) "Applications for Industrial Measurements" Data acquisition Measurement software, standard computational modules and their validation Round Table Industrial presentations Discussion of poster presentations Conclusions Lecturers Mathematicians from the international metrological community; mathematicians from Italian universities (Politecnico of Torino, Milano, Università di Genova, Milano, Padova, Roma, Trento); scientists and mathematicians from national standards institutes and the Italian National Research Council. The workshop will be of interest to people in universities, research centres and industry who are involved in measurement and need advanced mathematical tools to solve their problems, and to those who work in the development of these mathematical tools. Metrology is concerned with measurement at the highest level of precision. Advances in metrology depend on many factors: improvements in scientific and technical knowledge, instrumentation quality, better use of advanced mathematical tools and the development of new tools. In some countries, metrological institutions have a tradition of

  14. Fault roughness evolution with slip (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Griffith, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    interaction distance and are consumed faster with slip than larger ones. However, in faults, production of cataclasites and pseudotachylytes changes the contact area of sliding surfaces by interposing a layer of wear products. This layer may preserve from wearing asperities that are smaller in amplitude than the layer thickness, thus providing a mechanism that is likely to preserve small amplitude/wavelength roughness. These processes have been considered in a new spectral model of wear, which allows to model wear for self-affine surfaces and includes the accumulation of wear products within the fault zone. This model can be used to generalize our results and contribute to reconstruct a realistic model of a seismogenic fault zone (http://roma1.rm.ingv.it/laboratori/laboratorio-hp-ht/usems-project).

  15. Hominin responses to environmental changes during the Middle Pleistocene in Central and Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, R.; Lebreton, V.; Russo Ermolli, E.; Sémah, A.-M.; Nomade, S.; Shao, Q.; Bahain, J.-J.; Thun Hohenstein, U.; Peretto, C.

    2012-10-01

    The palaeobotanical record of early Palaeolithic sites from Western Europe indicates that hominins settled in different kinds of environments. During the "Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT)", from about 1 to 0.6 Ma, the transition from 41-ka to 100-ka dominant climatic oscillations, occurring within a long-term cooling trend, was associated with an aridity crisis which strongly modified the ecosystems. Starting from the MPT the more favorable climate of central and southern Italy provided propitious environmental conditions for long-term human occupations even during the glacial times. In fact, the human strategy of territory occupation was certainly driven by the availabilities of resources. Prehistoric sites such as Notarchirico (ca. 680-600 ka), La Pineta (ca. 600-620 ka), Gaudo San Nicola (ca. 380-350 ka) or Ceprano (ca. 345-355 ka) testify to a preferential occupation of the central and southern Apennines valleys during interglacial phases, while later interglacial occupations were oriented towards the coastal plains, as attested by the numerous settlements of the Roma basin (ca. 300 ka). Faunal remains indicate that human subsistence behaviors benefited of a diversity of exploitable ecosystems, from semi-open to closed environments. In central and southern Italy, several palynological records have already illustrated the regional and local scale vegetation dynamic trends. During the Middle Pleistocene climate cycles, mixed mesophytic forests developed during the interglacial periods and withdrew in response to increasing aridity during the glacial episodes. New pollen data from the Boiano basin (Molise, Italy), attest to the evolution of vegetation and climate between OIS 13 and 9 (ca. 500 to 300 ka). In this basin, the persistence of high edaphic humidity, even during the glacial phases, could have favored the establishment of a refuge area for the arboreal flora and provided subsistence resources for the animal and hominin communities during the Middle

  16. Hominin responses to environmental changes during the Middle Pleistocene in central and southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, R.; Lebreton, V.; Russo Ermolli, E.; Sémah, A.-M.; Nomade, S.; Shao, Q.; Bahain, J.-J.; Thun Hohenstein, U.; Peretto, C.

    2013-03-01

    The palaeobotanical record of early Palaeolithic sites from Western Europe indicates that hominins settled in different kinds of environments. During the "mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT)", from about 1 to 0.6 Ma, the transition from 41- to 100-ka dominant climatic oscillations, occurring within a long-term cooling trend, was associated with an aridity crisis which strongly modified the ecosystems. Starting from the MPT the more favourable climate of central and southern Italy provided propitious environmental conditions for long-term human occupations even during the glacial times. In fact, the human strategy of territory occupation was certainly driven by the availabilities of resources. Prehistoric sites such as Notarchirico (ca. 680-600 ka), La Pineta (ca. 600-620 ka), Guado San Nicola (ca. 380-350 ka) or Ceprano (ca. 345-355 ka) testify to a preferential occupation of the central and southern Apennines valleys during interglacial phases, while later interglacial occupations were oriented towards the coastal plains, as attested by the numerous settlements of the Roma Basin (ca. 300 ka). Faunal remains indicate that human subsistence behaviours benefited from a diversity of exploitable ecosystems, from semi-open to closed environments. In central and southern Italy, several palynological records have already illustrated the regional- and local-scale vegetation dynamic trends. During the Middle Pleistocene climate cycles, mixed mesophytic forests developed during the interglacial periods and withdrew in response to increasing aridity during the glacial episodes. New pollen data from the Boiano Basin (Molise, Italy) attest to the evolution of vegetation and climate between MIS 13 and 9 (ca. 500 to 300 ka). In this basin the persistence of high edaphic humidity, even during the glacial phases, could have favoured the establishment of a refuge area for the arboreal flora and provided subsistence resources for the animal and hominin communities during the Middle

  17. SABRE observations of Pi2 pulsations: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, E. G.; Lester, M.

    1997-01-01

    (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  18. Microbial dynamics of indicator microorganisms on fresh tomatoes in the supply chain from Mexico to the USA.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, Claire; Venegas, Fabiola; Churey, John J; Dávila-Aviña, Jorge; Grohn, Yrjo T; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma; Worobo, Randy W

    2016-12-05

    Quality and safety of fresh produce are important to public health and maintaining commerce between Mexico and USA. While preventive practices can reduce risks of contamination and are generally successful, the variable environment of the supply chain of fresh produce can be suitable for introduction or proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms. As routine surveillance of these pathogens is not practical, indicator microorganisms are used to assess the sanitary conditions of production and handling environments. An opportunity exists to use indicators on fresh produce to measure how handling and transport from field to market may affect microbial populations that contribute to their quality or safety. The objective was to quantify indicator microorganisms on tomatoes sampled along the supply chain during the harvest year, in order to observe the levels and changes of populations at different locations. Roma tomatoes (n=475) were taken from the same lots (n=28) at four locations of the postharvest supply chain over five months: at arrival to and departure from the packinghouse in México, at the distribution center in Texas, and at retail in USA. Samples were analyzed individually for four microbial populations: aerobic plate count (APC), total coliforms (TC), generic Escherichia coli, and yeasts and molds (YM). APC population differed (p<0.05) from 1.9±1.1, 1.7±1.1, 2.3±1.1 and 3.5±1.4logCFU/g at postharvest, packing, distribution center and supermarket, respectively. TC populations were <1logCFU/g at postharvest, increased at packing (0.7±1.0logCFU/g), decreased in distribution (0.4±0.8logCFU/g) and increased in supermarkets (1.4±1.5logCFU/g). Generic E. coli was not identified from coliform populations in this supply chain. YM populations remained <1logCFU/g, with the exception of 1.1±1.3logCFU/g at supermarkets and tomatoes were not visibly spoiled. The levels reported from this pilot study demonstrated the dynamics within populations as influenced by

  19. Cosmic rays, thunderstorm clouds, and possible influence on climate, 2. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Observatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L.; Dorman, I.; Iucci, N.; Eman, Y. Ne; Parisi, M.; Pustil Nik, L.; Signoretti, F.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR fortotal neutron intensity and for multiplicities m 1, m 2, m 3, m 4, m 5, m 6, m7, and m8, as well as for m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thunderstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 periods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in December 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (2002) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman and Dorman (2002), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. We consider also the possible influence of CR air ionization (especially by secondary energetic electrons) on thunderstorms and lightnings, and through this - on climate. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 2002. Report on COSPAR2002

  20. Cosmic Rays and Clouds, 2. Atmospheric Electric Field Effect In Different Neutron Multiplicities According To Emilio Segre' Observatory One Minute Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'Eman, Yu.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thun- derstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 pe- riods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in De- cember 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 1995. "Cosmic-ray atmospheric electric field effects". Canadian J. of Physics, Vol. 73, pp. 440-443. L.I. Dorman, I.V. Dorman, N. Iucci, M. Parisi, G. Villoresi, and I.G. Zuk- erman, 1999. "Emilio Segre' Observatory and Expected Time-Variations of Neutron Monitor Total and Multiplicities Counting Rates Caused by Cosmic Ray Particle

  1. PREFACE: 12th Conference on ''Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    These Proceedings contain the invited and contributed papers presented at the 12th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 8-10 October 2008. As usual, the meeting was held at il Palazzone, a 16th century castle owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennal conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of Nuclear Physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to promote collaborations between different groups. There were about 50 participants at the conference, coming from 14 Italian Universities (Cagliari, Catania, Ferrara, Firenze, Genova, Lecce, Milano, Napoli, Padova, Pavia, Pisa, Roma, Trento, Trieste). The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on six main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems, Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics, Nuclear Astrophysics, Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter, Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes. Winfried Leidemann, Maria Colonna, Marcello Lissia, Elena Santopinto, Silvia Lenzi and Omar Benhar took the burden of giving general talks on these topics and reviewing the research activities of the various Italian groups. In addition, 19 contributed papers were presented, most of them by young participants. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Gianfranco Prete from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the Italian radioactive ion beam facility SPES and the status of the European project EURISOL, while Nicola Colonna from the INFN, Bari, gave an overview of the perspectives of development of fourth-generation nuclear reactors. We would like to thank the authors of the general reports for their hard work in reviewing the main achievements in

  2. An adaptive, formally second order accurate version of the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Boyce E.; Hornung, Richard D.; McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-04-01

    Like many problems in biofluid mechanics, cardiac mechanics can be modeled as the dynamic interaction of a viscous incompressible fluid (the blood) and a (visco-)elastic structure (the muscular walls and the valves of the heart). The immersed boundary method is a mathematical formulation and numerical approach to such problems that was originally introduced to study blood flow through heart valves, and extensions of this work have yielded a three-dimensional model of the heart and great vessels. In the present work, we introduce a new adaptive version of the immersed boundary method. This adaptive scheme employs the same hierarchical structured grid approach (but a different numerical scheme) as the two-dimensional adaptive immersed boundary method of Roma et al. [A multilevel self adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, Ph.D. Thesis, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 1996; An adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, J. Comput. Phys. 153 (2) (1999) 509-534] and is based on a formally second order accurate (i.e., second order accurate for problems with sufficiently smooth solutions) version of the immersed boundary method that we have recently described [B.E. Griffith, C.S. Peskin, On the order of accuracy of the immersed boundary method: higher order convergence rates for sufficiently smooth problems, J. Comput. Phys. 208 (1) (2005) 75-105]. Actual second order convergence rates are obtained for both the uniform and adaptive methods by considering the interaction of a viscous incompressible flow and an anisotropic incompressible viscoelastic shell. We also present initial results from the application of this methodology to the three-dimensional simulation of blood flow in the heart and great vessels. The results obtained by the adaptive method show good qualitative agreement with simulation results obtained by earlier non-adaptive versions of the method, but the flow in the vicinity of the model heart valves

  3. Appraising the Early-est earthquake monitoring system for tsunami alerting at the Italian candidate Tsunami Service Provider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Lomax, A.; Michelini, A.; Lauciani, V.; Piatanesi, A.; Lorito, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present the procedure for earthquake location and characterization implemented in the Italian candidate Tsunami Service Provider at INGV in Roma. Following the ICG/NEAMTWS guidelines, the first tsunami warning messages are based only on seismic information, i.e. epicenter location, hypocenter depth and magnitude, which are automatically computed by the software Early-est. Early-est is a package for rapid location and seismic/tsunamigenic characterization of earthquakes. The Early-est software package operates on offline-event or continuous-realtime seismic waveform data to perform trace processing and picking, and, at a regular report interval, phase association, event detection, hypocenter location, and event characterization. In this paper we present the earthquake parameters computed by Early-est from the beginning of 2012 till the end of December 2014 at global scale for events with magnitude M ≥ 5.5, and the detection timeline. The earthquake parameters computed automatically by Early-est are compared with reference manually revised/verified catalogs. From our analysis the epicenter location and hypocenter depth parameters do not differ significantly from the values in the reference catalogs. The epicenter coordinates generally differ less than 20 ∓ 20 km from the reference epicenter coordinates; focal depths are less well constrained and differ generally less than 0 ∓ 30 km. Early-est also provides mb, Mwp and Mwpd magnitude estimations. mb magnitudes are preferred for events with Mwp ≲ 5.8, while Mwpd are valid for events with Mwp ≳ 7.2. The magnitude mb show wide differences with respect to the reference catalogs, we thus apply a linear correction mbcorr = mb · 0.52 + 2.46, such correction results into δmb ≈ 0.0 ∓ 0.2 uncertainty with respect the reference catalogs. As expected the Mwp show distance dependency. Mwp values at stations with epicentral distance Δ ≲ 30° are significantly overestimated

  4. Magnetic Classification of Meteorites and Asteroid Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Sagnotti, L.; Chevrier, V.; Consolmagno, G.; Denise, M.; Folco, L.; Osete, M.; Pesonen, L.

    Magnetic susceptibility (X) provides a versatile rapid and non destructive way to quan- tify the amount of magnetic minerals (FeNi metal, magnetic oxides and sulfides) on large volume of material. As petrological studies of meteorites suggest that this param- eter should be quite discriminant, we assembled a database of measurements on about 1000 stony meteorites from various European collections: Helsinki, Madrid, Paris, Prague, Roma, Siena, Vatican, and other smaller collections. From 1 to >20 pieces and 1 to >100 cc per meteorite allow to define a representative mean value, using a large coil (8 cm) Kappabridge. For ordinary chondrites, it appears that weathering is responsible for a systematic bias toward low logc for Antarctic (Frontier Mountain) and non Antarctic (mainly from Sahara) finds. Once only falls are considered a quite narrow range of logc is observed for a given class, with no effect of petrological grade except for LL. High grade LLs (heated above 400C) develop the weakly magnetic antitaenite-tetrataenite phases [3] during slow cooling, explaining the difference with low grade taenite-bearing LLs. Outliers from H and L classes are grade 6 material (showing metal segregation) or intermediate types: H/L and L/LL. Once these out- liers are excluded, well defined means for H and L are observed with no overlap at 2 s.d.; this agrees with the lack of overlap on metal amount. The standard deviation for all falls of a given class is only slightly higher than the averaged standard deviation for multiple pieces of the same fall. This supports the hypothesis that all falls from a given ordinary chondrite class (H or L) may come from the same homogeneous par- ent body. For non ordinary chondrites and achondrites, weakly magnetic classes are HED, Aubrites and SNC (below LL), strongly ones are E (above H) and Ureilites (in the L-H range), while C chondrites are spread in the whole range, again with each class showing restricted variation. On objects without

  5. Evidence of human-induced morphodynamic changes along the Campania coastal areas (southern Italy) since the 3rd-4th cent. AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Ermolli, Elda; Romano, Paola; Liuzza, Viviana; Amato, Vincenzo; Ruello, Maria Rosaria; Di Donato, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    the first archaic settlement (late 6th cent. BC) was unearthed. The Graeco-Roman town expanded downhill, exploiting the growth of a coastal plain, where occasional phases of flooding coexisted with the life of the citizens [6]. The onset of the 3rd cent. AD was characterized by phases of extreme floods which also occurred during the 4th and 5th cent. AD leading to several meters of ground-level aggradation and the burial of buildings [6, 7]. Although the three investigated sites are located in rather different morphological context, they show the evidence of a disequilibrium in the morphodynamics which started in the 3rd-4th cent. AD. The vast amount of collected data strongly suggest that this disequilibrium is a clear sign of a socio-economic decline which affected the Roman Empire during this period rather than the consequence of a climatic deterioration towards dryer conditions, for which no detailed data are available in the Mediterranean area [8]. The abandonment of the towns and their surroundings triggered increased soil erosion on the slopes suffering deforestation and in the farmlands for reduced maintenance, enhancing accumulation rates at the foothills and along coastal areas. References [1] D'Agostino, B., Giampaola, D., 2005. Osservazioni storiche e archeologiche sulla fondazione di Neapolis, in: Harris, W.V., Lo Cascio, E. (Eds.), Noctes Campanae, studi di storia antica e archeologia dell'Italia pre-romana e romana in memoria di Martin W. Frederiksen, Napoli, 63-72. [2] Giampaola, D., Carsana, V., Boetto, G., Bartolini, M., Capretti, C., Galotta, G., Giachi, G., Macchioni, N., Nugari, M. P., Pizzo, B., 2006. La scoperta del porto di Neapolis: dalla ricostruzione topografica allo scavo e al recupero dei relitti. Arch. Mar. Medit., Int. J. Underwat. Arch. 2, 47-91, Ist. Ed. Poligr.Int. MMVI, Pisa - Roma. [3] Allevato, E., Russo Ermolli, E., Boetto, G., Di Pasquale, G., 2010. Pollen-wood analysis at the Neapolis harbour site (1st-3rd century AD, southern

  6. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge Francesco Paci (fpaci@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@berkeley.edu) University of California at Berkeley Emanuela Pusceddu (emanuela.pusceddu@gmail.com) Institute of Biometeorology CNR Francesco Stellato (francesco.stellato@roma2.infn.it) INFN Roma Tor Vergata ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The organisers of the 5th Young Researcher Meeting would like to thank all the scientists who participated to the meeting. We furthermore thank all our sponsors that are listed below for supporting the event. We are grateful to the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) for hosting the conference for the second time, and to its director, Prof. Guido Martinelli, for his support and advice. We owe gratitude to SISSA Medialab, for organising the public event on science communication and providing technical support throughout the entire meeting. The publication of the proceedings of the conference is partially supported by the Solar Physics group in Tor Vertaga; we also acknowledge support from the University of Udine. The event was broadcast live by OggiScienza (http://oggiscienza.wordpress.com). The complete videos of the meeting can be found at the YRM Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw3roeK9oC4NPc-sRQ2t0rg SISSAInternational School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste PRINPRIN 2010-2011 (MIUR 2010YJ2NYW_001) - "Symmetries, Masses and Mysteries: Electroweak symmetry breaking, flavor mixing and CP violation, and Dark Matter in the LHC era" - SISSA, Trieste BIOMolecular and Statistical Biophysics Group - SISSA, Trieste THEOPRIN 2012 (2012CPPYP7_006) - "Theoretical Astroparticle Physics" - SISSA, Trieste ASTROPRIN 2010-2011 (MIUR 2010NHBSBE_008) - "L'Universo oscuro e l'evoluzione cosmica dei barioni: dalle survey attuali a Euclid" - SISSA, Trieste UDINEDepartment of Chemistry, Physics and Environment of the University of Udine BERRILLISolar Physics

  7. Alloriite, Na5K1.5Ca(Si6Al6O24)(SO4)(OH)0.5 · H2O, a new mineral species of the cancrinite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Pekov, I. V.; Zadov, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    Alloriite, a new mineral species, has been found in volcanic ejecta at Mt. Cavalluccio (Campagnano municipality, Roma province, Latium region, Italy) together with sanidine, biotite, andradite, and apatite. The mineral is named in honor of Roberto Allori (b. 1933), an amateur mineralogist and prominent mineral collector who carried out extensive and detailed field mineralogical investigations of volcanoes in the Latium region. Alloriite occurs as short prismatic and tabular crystals up to 1.5 × 2 mm in size. The mineral is colorless, transparent, with a white streak and vitreous luster. Alloriite is not fluorescent and brittle; the Mohs’ hardness is 5. The cleavage is imperfect parallel to {10overline 1 0}. The density measured with equilibration in heavy liquids is 2.35g/cm3 and calculated density ( D calc) is 2.358 g/cm3 (on the basis of X-ray single-crystal data) and 2.333 g/cm3 (from X-ray powder data). Alloriite is optically uniaxial, positive, ω = 1.497(2), and ɛ = 1.499(2). The infrared spectrum is given. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, H2O determined using the Penfield method, CO2, with selective sorption, wt %) is: 13.55 Na2O, 6.67 K2O, 6.23 CaO, 26.45 Al2O3, 34.64 SiO2, 8.92 SO3, 0.37 Cl, 2.1 H2O, 0.7 CO2, 0.08-O = Cl2, where the total is 99.55. The empirical formula ( Z = 1) is Na19.16K6.21Ca4.87(Si25.26Al22.74O96)(SO4)4.88(CO3)0.70Cl0.46(OH)0.76 · 4.73H2O. The simplified formula (taking into account the structural data, Z = 4) is: [Na(H2O)][Na4K1.5(SO4)] · [Ca(OH,Cl)0.5](Si6Al6O24). The crystal structure has been studied ( R = 0.052). Alloriite is trigonal, the space group is P31 c; the unit-cell dimensions are a = 12.892(3), c = 21.340(5) Å, and V = 3071.6(15) Å3. The crystal structure of alloriite is based on the same tetrahedral framework as that of afghanite. In contrast to afghanite containing clusters [Ca-Cl]+ and chains ...Ca-Cl-Ca-Cl..., the new mineral contains clusters [Na-H2O]+ and chains ...Na-H2O-Na-H2O.... The

  8. ERS-ENVISAT InSAR deformation time-series: a powerful tool to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Satellite time series have already provided key measurements to retrieve information on the dynamic nature of Earth surface processes. We exploit in this work the availability of the large archives of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT sensors of the European Space Agency (ESA) during the 1992-2009 time period, in order to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas. To achieve this result we take advantage of the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002), which allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding time-series by exploiting temporally overlapping SAR dataset collected by the ERS and ENVISAT sensors (Pepe et al., 2005). In particular, we focus on the results obtained by retrieving ERS-ENVISAT deformation time-series from 1992 till today in selected case studies relevant to different scenarios. We start from the analysis of the Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) and the Napoli Bay area (Italy), the latter including three volcanic systems (the Campi Flegrei caldera, the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex and the Ischia island) and the city of Napoli. In addition, we present the results relevant to the cities of Istanbul (Turkey) and Roma (Italy). The overall analyses are carried out by using averaged (multilook) InSAR interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. Moreover, in selected zones we further investigate localized phenomena by zooming in the areas of interest and carrying out a InSAR analysis at full spatial resolution scale (Lanari et al., 2004). In these cases we also exploit the doppler centroid variations of the post-2000 acquisitions of the ERS-2 sensor and the carrier frequency difference between the ERS-1/2 and the ENVISAT systems in order to maximize the number of investigated SAR pixels and to improve their geocoding. The presented results demonstrate the unique

  9. The importance of plagioclase in the reflectance spectra of Fe, Mg mixtures: a better understanding of spectra from Lunar and Hermean terrains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serventi, G.; Sgavetti, M.; Carli, C.; Pompilio, L.

    2012-04-01

    Spectra obtained on Lunar highland and on Mercury show low contrast features. We suggest the interference of adjacent absorptions bands due to different minerals as a possible cause of low contrast spectra. While the combined effects of Fe2+ absorptions in various clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine mixtures have been widely studied, the spectroscopic effects of plagioclase have been considered only for <0,26 wt% FeO-bearing compositions, even if plagioclase is considered an important constituent of Lunar and Hermean terrains. Here we consider mixtures composed by various abundances of multimineral grains and plagioclase, separated from cumulate rocks of a layered intrusion belonging to the anorthosite kindred. Three different Fe, Mg multimineral compositions have been considered. The first is olivine-free and consists of clinopyroxene En45-Wo46 (43.9%) and orthopyroxene En77 (56.1%). The second one is olivine-poor and includes orthopyroxene En86 (70%) and olivine Fo87 (30%). The third one, olivine-rich, is composed by orthopyroxene En82 (28.2%), clinopyroxene En45-Wo46 (3.4%), olivine Fo84 (68.4%). Two distinct plagioclase compositions, having FeO wt.% concentration of 0.36 (medium-iron), and 0.5 (rich-iron) were systematically mixed to each starting assemblage. The amount of plagioclase in the mixtures ranges between 30% and 90%. Mixtures with grain sizes of 63-125 μm and 125-250 μm were prepared. Bidirectional reflectance spectra (i=30°, e=0° angle phase) on these mixtures were acquired at the SLAB (Spectroscopy Laboratory, Iasf-INAF, Roma) in the VIS-NIR range (0.3-2.5 µm). Preliminary results show that increasing plagioclase content produces higher albedo and lower spectral contrast. In olivine-free mixtures, plagioclase produces a flattening in the 1.2 µm region at about 70% of medium-iron plagioclase and 50% of iron-rich plagioclase; for higher content of plagioclase a clear absorption band appears. In olivine-poor mixtures, the presence of

  10. Host Star C/O: Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan; Sevin Peckmezci, Gul; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    many sub-solar C/O (0.3-0.4) systems which might have ice fractions of 40-60% (Pekmezci, Dottorato di Ricerca in Astronomia, Università Degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", 2014). Thus we argue that host star C/O abundance is an important ingredient in assessing a key factor in habitability of exoplanet systems - the availability of abundant ice beyond the ice line. Efforts should continue to improve and further validate techniques for measuring this important metric. TVJ acknowledges government support at JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. JIL was supported by the JWST Project through NASA. O.M. acknowledges support from CNES.

  11. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    . We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill

  12. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  13. The Gas Pixel Detector as a solar X-ray polarimeter and imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; di Cosimo, Sergio; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Muleri, Fabio; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    The sun is the nearest astrophysical source with an interesting emission in the X-ray band. The study of energetic events, such as solar flares, can help us to understand the behaviour of the magnetic field of our star. There are in literature numerous studies published about polarization predictions, for a wide range of solar flare models. All these models involve emission from thermal and/or nonthermal processes. Furthermore, results of flare observations in the X-ray band have never been exhaustive. We want to present a new kind of instrument with polarimetric and imaging capabilities in the X-ray band. This instrument is the Gas Pixel Detector (GPD). It has been developed by the INFN and the IASF-Roma / INAF Italian research institutes. The GPD was born to achieve X-ray polarimetric measurements as well as X-ray images for astrophysical sources. It has a good spectroscopic sensitivity thanks to an energy resolution of some per cent and it allows also to perform timing measurements. Differently from all the other kinds of today's polarimeters, it doesn't need rotation! The GPD exploits the dependence of photoelectric cross section to photon polarization direction to the aim of measuring polarization. This instrument is essentially a ionization chamber: a cell filled by gas into which radiation enters through a window of 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm. The cell has a depth of some centimeters: typically from 1 to 2 cm. Every time that a photon is absorbed by the gas, a photoelectron is emitted with more probability in the direction of the electric vector of the photon absorbed. The photoelectron propagates and produces a track of ionization that is drifted, amplified and actually collected on a fine sub-divided pixeled detector, whose pixels have a dimension of 50 µm. At the present the chip integrates more than 16.5 millions of transistors. It has an active area of 105600 pixels organized in a honeycomb matrix 300x352. It is a self triggered system able to select itself the

  14. Characterization and provenance of the building stones from Pompeii's archaeological site (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balassone, G.; Kastenmeier, P.; di Maio, G.; Mormone, A.; Joachimski, M.

    2009-04-01

    ). Preliminary results on source localities indicate a local provenance for a set of volcanic rock samples, whereas the possible source areas of the sedimentary litotypes seem to be more complex. New minero-petrographic data of samples from surrounding outcrops are presented and compared to the related Pompeii building stones. References Seiler F. (2006) - Current research projects. In: Aktuelle Forchungsprojeckte, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Zentrale, 34-35. Seiler F. (2008) - Rekonstruktion der antiken Kulturlandschaften des Sarno-Beckens. Ein multidisziplinäres Kooperationsprojekt mit Partnern aus Naturwissenschaften und Altertumswissenschaften in Deutschland, Italien und England. In: P. G. Guzzo - M. P. Guidobaldi (Eds), Nuove ricerche archeologiche nell'area vesuviana (scavi 2003-2006). Convegno Internazionale, Roma 1-3 febbraio, 485-490. Kastenmeier P., Seiler F. (2007) - La ricostruzione dei paleo-paesaggi nella piana del Sarno. Quaderni Autorità di Bacino del Sarno. Studi, documentazione e ricerca, 1, 24-26.

  15. Republic of Italy (country profile).

    PubMed

    Hakkert, R

    1986-02-01

    This discussion of Italy focuses on the following: cities and regions; population growth; households and families; housing and construction; ethnicity and religion; education; economy and labor force; consumption; and transport and communications. Italy, with its total area of 116,374 square miles, is about the size of Florida and Georgia combined. Its 56.6 million people form the 2nd largest population in Western Europe, after West Germany, but slightly larger than Great Britain and France. The main administrative divisions are 20 regions, subdivided into 95 provinces. The provinces in turn are divided into 8090 "comuni" or municipalities. The 6 cities with more than 500,000 people are Roma, Milano, Napoli, Torino, Genova, and Palermo. They account for 14% of the population. The 43 cities with between 100,000-500,000 account for another 13%. There are 373 middle-sized communities with between 20,000 and 100,000 people, accounting for 26% of population. Italy has a regional problem. The line separating the regions of Emilia Romagna, Toscana, Umbria, and Lazio from the regions to the south and east is important. The regions north of it hold 62% of the population but are responsible for 73% of the gross national product (GNP) and 78% of the industrial product. The regions to the south are economically much weaker. At the time of the last Italian census on October 25, 1981, the country counted 56.6 million inhabitants. Compared to 33.5 million at the turn of the century, this implies an average annual growth rate of .61%. Between 1900-70, nearly 20 million Italians left their country. Most settled in the US, Argentina, and Brazil. Beginning in the 1960s, a new sort of migration was added as young Italians temporarily left to work in the more prosperous countries of northern Europe. The birthrate, which had declined slowly to 18/1000 during the 1960s, fell more rapidly during the 1970s, to 10.9/1000 in 1981 and 10.3 in 1984. The death rate in Italy has changed little

  16. Detection and Localization of Subsurface Two-Dimensional Metallic Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, S.; Pajewski, L.; Schettini, G.

    2009-04-01

    "Roma Tre" University, Applied Electronics Dept.v. Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome, Italy Non-invasive identification of buried objects in the near-field of a receiver array is a subject of great interest, due to its application to the remote sensing of the earth's subsurface, to the detection of landmines, pipes, conduits, to the archaeological site characterization, and more. In this work, we present a Sub-Array Processing (SAP) approach for the detection and localization of subsurface perfectly-conducting circular cylinders. We consider a plane wave illuminating the region of interest, which is assumed to be a homogeneous, unlossy medium of unknown permittivity containing one or more targets. In a first step, we partition the receiver array so that the field scattered from the targets result to be locally plane at each sub-array. Then, we apply a Direction of Arrival (DOA) technique to obtain a set of angles for each locally plane wave, and triangulate these directions obtaining a collection of crossing crowding in the expected object locations [1]. We compare several DOA algorithms such as the traditional Bartlett and Capon Beamforming, the Pisarenko Harmonic Decomposition (PHD), the Minimum-Norm method, the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) and the Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Techinque (ESPRIT) [2]. In a second stage, we develop a statistical Poisson based model to manage the crossing pattern in order to extract the probable target's centre position. In particular, if the crossings are Poisson distributed, it is possible to feature two different distribution parameters [3]. These two parameters perform two density rate for the crossings, so that we can previously divide the crossing pattern in a certain number of equal-size windows and we can collect the windows of the crossing pattern with low rate parameters (that probably are background windows) and remove them. In this way we can consider only the high rate parameter windows (that most

  17. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, Francois; Spanuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of high-velocity shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in recent years improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1-10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite, at INGV Roma, on a Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), coupled with a high frequency monitoring (4MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at sliding velocities (V) comprised between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed. The first drop is independent of the normal stress and occurs when V become higher than a critical value (Vc≈0.15 m/s). The second friction drop occurs after a critical slip weakening distance which decreases as a power law with the power density (τV). The first, abrupt, drop is explained by flash heating and weakening mechanism while the second, smooth, drop is due to the formation and growth of molten patches on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity at V > 0.01 m/s. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1 < V < 0.3 m/s for a same finite displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AE) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high. Some AEs are even recorded few seconds after the end of the experiments, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the apparition of AEs at equivalent effective pressure, supporting the link

  18. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  19. Influence of slip rate and normal stress on off-fault damage in high-velocity friction experiments on crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, F. X.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Nielsen, S. B.; Di Toro, G.; Schubnel, A.

    2013-12-01

    With the advent of high-velocity shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in recent years improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1-10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite, at INGV Roma, on a Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), coupled with a high frequency monitoring (4MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at sliding velocities (V) comprised between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed. The first drop is independent of the normal stress and occurs when V become higher than a critical value (Vc≈0.15 m/s). The second friction drop occurs after a critical slip weakening distance which decreases as a power law with the power density (τV). The first, abrupt, drop is explained by flash heating and weakening mechanism while the second, smooth, drop is due to the formation and growth of molten patches on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity at V > 0.01 m/s. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1 < V < 0.3 m/s for a same finite displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AE) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high. Some AEs are even recorded few seconds after the end of the experiments, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the apparition of AEs at equivalent effective pressure, supporting the link

  20. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani