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Sample records for room temperature ferromagnetism

  1. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  2. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y W; Lu, Y H; Yi, J B; Feng, Y P; Herng, T S; Liu, X; Gao, D Q; Xue, D S; Xue, J M; Ouyang, J Y; Ding, J

    2012-03-06

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  5. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays.

    PubMed

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A; Fisher, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ∼4.67 emu cm(-3) and coercivity of ∼105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm(-3) and ∼75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals. PMID:21264436

  6. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ~4.67 emu cm-3 and coercivity of ~105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm-3 and ~75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals.

  7. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect. PMID:24732685

  8. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Z. Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  9. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  10. Room temperature luminescence and ferromagnetism of AlN:Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Cai, G. M.; Wang, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    AlN:Fe polycrystalline powders were synthesized by a modified solid state reaction (MSSR) method. Powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results reveal the single phase nature of the doped samples. In the doped AlN samples, Fe is in Fe2+ state. Room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is observed in AlN:Fe samples. Two photoluminescence peaks located at about 592 nm (2.09 eV) and 598 nm (2.07 eV) are observed in AlN:Fe samples. Our results suggest that AlN:Fe is a potential material for applications in spintronics and high power laser devices.

  11. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-01

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  12. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  13. Room-temperature local ferromagnetism and its nanoscale expansion in the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge1–xFex

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Sakamoto, Shoya; Takeda, Yuki-haru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Takahashi, Yukio; Saitoh, Yuji; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the local electronic structure and magnetic properties of the group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor, Ge1−xFex (GeFe), using soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Our results show that the doped Fe 3d electrons are strongly hybridized with the Ge 4p states, and have a large orbital magnetic moment relative to the spin magnetic moment; i.e., morb/mspin ≈ 0.1. We find that nanoscale local ferromagnetic regions, which are formed through ferromagnetic exchange interactions in the high-Fe-content regions of the GeFe films, exist even at room temperature, well above the Curie temperature of 20–100 K. We observe the intriguing nanoscale expansion of the local ferromagnetic regions with decreasing temperature, followed by a transition of the entire film into a ferromagnetic state at the Curie temperature. PMID:26996202

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in zinc-blende and deformed CrAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J. F.; Zhao, J. H.; Deng, J. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Li, S. S.; Wu, X. G.; Jia, Q. J.

    2006-04-01

    We try to clarify the controversy about the origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in a CrAs compound. Two kinds of CrAs thin films were grown on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy. Structural analyses confirm that the as-grown CrAs film is a pure zinc-blende phase. Magnetic measurements suggest that room-temperature ferromagnetism exists in zinc-blende CrAs. In contrast, the CrAs film turns into a mixture of zinc-blende and deformed CrAs after annealing. A ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature demonstrates that zinc-blende CrAs remains room-temperature ferromagnetism even when it is partly deformed into a non-zinc-blende phase.

  15. Room temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO using non-magnetic dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Atri, Asha; Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic properties of Ag and Cu doped ZnO thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in the films. Comparative to Cu doped films Ag doped films shows significant increase in ferromagnetism. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies are also done to see the change in band structure with different metal doping content.

  16. First principle prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism above room temperature in half-heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Van An Dinh; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2010-01-04

    A first principle study of half-metallicity and ferromagnetism in half-heusler alloys NiMnZ (Z = Si, P, Ge, As, and Sb) is given. The half-metallicity and ferromagnetism are predicted via the calculation of electronic structure, and Curie temperature. The stability of the orthorhombic and tetragonal structures and C1{sub b} at various values of lattice parameters is also studied by means of the pseudo-potential method. All alloys exhibit the half-metallicity and ferromagnetism above room temperature.

  17. Ferromagnetism at room temperature in Cr-doped anodic titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yulong E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Li, Jie; Yu, Guoliang; Zhong, Zhiyong; Bai, Feiming; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Shihong; Zhong, Peng

    2014-05-07

    This study reports the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) synthesized via the electrochemical method followed by a novel Cr-doping process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the TiO{sub 2} NTs were highly ordered with length up to 26 μm, outer diameter about 110 nm, and inner diameter about 100 nm. X-ray diffraction results indicated there were no magnetic contaminations of metallic Cr clusters or any other phases except anatase TiO{sub 2}. The Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} NTs were further annealed in oxygen, air and argon, and room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed in all Cr-doped samples. Moreover, saturation magnetizations and coercivities of the Cr-doped under various annealing atmosphere were further analyzed, and results indicate that oxygen content played a critical role in the room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  18. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    2011-08-12

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

  19. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn- and Fe-doped indium tin oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, M.; Gunning, R. D.; Stamenov, P.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2008-04-01

    Undoped and transition-metal doped indium tin oxide films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition technique, on single crystalline c-plane (0001) and r-plane (1102) sapphire substrates maintained at 500-850°C. Magnetization measurements of films deposited at different temperatures indicate that ferromagnetism appears for deposition temperatures, Tdep>600°C, with the highest moment for films deposited around 750°C. Qualitative different ferromagnetic behavior has been observed at room temperature in Fe- and Mn-doped thin films. The stable, hysteretic ferromagnetism of the Fe-doped films is due to the presence of magnetite, as seen in transmission Mössbauer spectra. The Mn-doped films show anhysteretic ferromagnetism which decays over time. It is somehow intrinsic, but not due to the Mn ions, which remains paramagnetic down to 4K. No anomalous Hall effect is observed.

  20. Room temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Larumbe, S.; Pastor, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles is analyzed in the present work. Undoped and N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained employing sol-gel procedure using urea as the nitrogen source. The obtained gels were first dried at 70 °C and afterwards calcined in air at 300 °C. A residual carbon concentration was retained in the samples as a consequence of the organic decomposition process. Post-annealing treatments at 300 °C under air and vacuum conditions were also performed. The crystallographic structure of nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, obtaining a single anatase crystalline phase after the calcinations (mean nanoparticle diameters around 5-8 nm). SQUID magnetometry was employed to analyze the magnetic response of the samples. Whereas for the undoped samples synthesized with hydrolysis rate h = 6, paramagnetic like behavior is observed at room temperature, the N-doped nanoparticles (h = 3) show a weak ferromagnetic response (saturation magnetization ≈10-3 emu/g). Moreover, a clear reinforcement of the room-temperature ferromagnetism response is found with the post-annealing treatments, in particular that performed in vacuum. Thus, the results indicate the dominant role of the oxygen stoichiometry and the oxygen vacancies in the room temperature ferromagnetic response of these TiO2 nanoparticles.

  1. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal; Song, Qunliang

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150 mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  2. Reversible room-temperature ferromagnetism in Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Lü, W. M.; Lim, S. L.; Qiu, X. P.; Bao, N. N.; Motapothula, M.; Yi, J. B.; Yang, M.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando

    2013-06-01

    The search for oxide-based room-temperature ferromagnetism has been one of the holy grails in condensed matter physics. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals is reported in this Rapid Communication. The ferromagnetism can be eliminated by air annealing (making the samples predominantly diamagnetic) and can be recovered by subsequent vacuum annealing. The temperature dependence of magnetic moment resembles the temperature dependence of carrier density, indicating that the magnetism is closely related to the free carriers. Our results suggest that the ferromagnetism is induced by oxygen vacancies. In addition, hysteretic magnetoresistance was observed for magnetic field parallel to the current, indicating that the magnetic moments are in the plane of the samples. The x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, the static time-of-flight and the dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy and proton induced x-ray emission measurements were performed to examine the magnetic impurities, showing that the observed ferromagnetism is unlikely due to any magnetic contaminant.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-08-14

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  5. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in n-type Cu-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D. L.; Ye, X. J.; Zhao, X. Y.; Meng, H. J.; Zhou, H. J.; Li, X. L.; Zhen, C. M.

    2007-08-01

    A series of n-type Cu-doped ZnO thin films was prepared by magnetron sputtering. Such films have shown ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. The Cu ion is in a univalent state as identified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The moment per Cu ion decreases as the Cu concentration increases. The largest moment about 0.52 {mu}{sub B}/Cu was observed for Zn{sub 0.95}Cu{sub 0.05}O thin film. The Curie temperature about 360 K was observed for Zn{sub 0.95}Cu{sub 0.05}O:N film. To explore the relationship between ferromagnetism and carrier density, nitrogen was introduced into the samples which resulted magnetization and the transition temperature decreasing. These results indicate that the electron density plays an important role in ferromagnetism.

  6. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  7. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  8. Ballistic spin filtering across ferromagnet/semiconductor interfaces at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, A.; Steinmueller, S. J.; Cho, W. S.; Xu, Y. B.; Guertler, C. M.; Wastlbauer, G.; Bland, J. A.; Holmes, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    Circularly polarized light was used to generate spin-polarized electrons at room temperature in ferromagnet/GaAs Schottky diode structures (with spin polarization perpendicular to the film plane). The Schottky barrier dependence of the helicity-dependent photocurrent was observed using various ferromagnetic materials (NiFe, Co, and Fe) and GaAs doping densities. A change in the helicity-dependent photocurrent was obtained in all cases in reverse bias when the ferromagnetic layer magnetization was realigned from perpendicular to parallel to the photon helicity. This effect is attributed to spin filtering of photoexcited electrons generated in the GaAs due to the spin split density of states at the Fermi level in the ferromagnet which occurs when the magnetization is aligned with the photon helicity. NiFe shows significant spin filtering, Fe shows either strong or weak spin filtering according to the Schottky barrier strength, while Co shows almost none. Antiferromagnetic Cr/GaAs shows no spin-dependent effects as expected. These spin transport effects in all cases vanish for very high doping due to the collapse of the Schottky barrier. As the photon energy approaches the energy gap of the GaAs, the effects associated with the optically induced spin polarization in the GaAs become larger, confirming that polarized electrons are first excited in the semiconductor and then filtered by the ferromagnetic layer. The spin filtering effects in all cases increase with increasing ferromagnetic layer thickness, and are much larger than the estimated magnetocircular dichroism in permalloy. These results unambiguously indicate that highly efficient spin transport from the semiconductor to the ferromagnet occurs at room temperature and that strong spin filtering occurs in reverse bias.

  9. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; Esquinazi, P.; Arenholz, E.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-05-01

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the average magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite. Also, our findings show that the magnetic properties of graphite surfaces, thin films or two dimensional graphene samples can be reliably studied using soft x-ray dichroism. Fundamental new insight into the magnetic properties of carbon based systems can thus be obtained.

  10. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles of the series Ni1-xMnxO (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) are successfully synthesized using a low temperature hydrothermal method. Samples up to 6% Mn-doping are single phase in nature as observed from powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data shows that all the single phase samples crystallize in the NaCl like fcc structure with space group Fm-3m. Unit cell volume decreases with increasing Mn-doping. Pure NiO nanoparticles show weak ferromagnetism, may be due to nanosize nature. Introduction of Mn within NiO lattice improves the magnetic properties significantly. Room temperature ferromagnetism is found in all the doped samples whereas the magnetization is highest for 2% Mn-doping and then decreases with further doping. The ZFC and FC branches in the temperature dependent magnetization separate well above 350 K indicating transition temperature well above room temperature for 2% Mn-doped NiO Nanoparticle. The ferromagnetic Curie temperature is found to be 653 K for the same sample as measured by temperature dependent magnetization study using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in high vacuum.

  11. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aigu L; Rodrigues, J N B; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A H Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m(2)/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. PMID:26100970

  12. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite.

  13. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in TiO2 Nanocrystals Synthesized by the Controlled Hydrolysis Procedure.

    PubMed

    Gu, Deen; Sun, Zhanhong; Zhou, Lv; Hu, Yongda; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 nanocrystals were prepared by a controlled hydrolysis procedure at room temperature. The effect of V-doping, N-doping and V/N codoping on the lattice parameters and magnetic properties of TiO2 nanocrystals was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibration sample magnetometry. Doping performed at room temperature causes the expansion of lattice parameters. Undoped and doped TiO2 nanocrystals show room-temperature ferromagnetism. A monotonic correlation between saturation magnetization and the ratio of the lattice parameter c to a (c/a) was observed. Saturation magnetization of TiO2 nanocrystals increases with the value of c/a.

  14. Experimental evidence for ferromagnetism at room temperature in MgO thin films.

    PubMed

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Xu, Jun; Rao, K V; Belova, Lyuba; Carlegrim, Elin; Fahlman, Mats

    2010-09-01

    Ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature (RTFM) in MgO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering under various atmospheric conditions and temperatures is reported. A saturation magnetization (M(S)) value as high as 1.58 emu g(-1) is (0.046 μB/unit cell) observed for a 170 nm film deposited at RT under an oxygen pressure of 1.3 × 10(-4) mbar. In contrast, films deposited at elevated temperature (under an identical oxygen pressure), or at higher oxygen pressures, as well as under a nitrogen atmosphere at RT show significantly suppressed magnetization. The ferromagnetic order in the MgO matrix is believed to be defect induced.

  15. Tiny Ni-NiO nanocrystals with exchange bias induced room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaghouri, Hanan Al; Tuna, F.; Santhosh, P. N.; Thomas, P. John

    2016-03-01

    Ni nanocrystals coated with a thin layer of NiO with a diameter of 5.0 nm show exchange bias induced ferromagnetism at room temperature. These particulates are freely dispersible in water and were obtained by annealing Ni nanoparticles coated with a thin amorphous layer of NiO. Particulates with diameters between 5.0 and 16.8 nm are studied. Detailed magnetic measurements reveal signs consistent with strong exchange bias including elevated blocking temperatures and tangible loop shifts. The structure of the particulates are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and x-ray diffraction.

  16. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Ferromagnet/Topological Insulator Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sarmita; Guchhait, Samaresh; Dey, Rik; Register, Leonard Franklin; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-07-01

    We report magnetoresistance for current flow through iron/topological insulator (Fe/TI) and Fe/evaporated-oxide/TI contacts when a magnetic field is used to initially orient the magnetic alignment of the incorporated ferromagnetic Fe bar, at temperatures ranging from 100 K to room temperature. This magnetoresistance is associated with the relative orientation of the Fe bar magnetization and spin-polarization of electrons moving on the surface of the TI with helical spin-momentum locking. The magnitude of the observed magnetoresistance is relatively large compared to that observed in prior work.

  17. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H. S.; Chien, P. C.; Sun, S. J.; Chang, Y. Y.; Lee, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    This study provides conclusive evidence of room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band. These composites are constructed from discontinuous [Co(3 nm)/a-C(dc nm)]5 multilayers with dc = 3 nm and dc = 6 nm. Only remnant circular dichroism (CD) was observed from the dc = 3 nm sample but not when dc = 6 nm. In addition, the remnant CD peaks at 5.5 eV, which is comparable with the absorption peak associated with the C σ-σ* gap transition. We suggest that the possible mechanism for this coupling can be considered as a magnetic proximity effect in which a ferromagnetic moment in the C medium is induced by Co/C interfaces.

  18. Strong Facet-Induced and Light-Controlled Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Semiconducting β-FeSi2 Nanocubes.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Shijie; Wu, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaobin; Meng, Ming; Wu, Xinglong

    2015-09-01

    Crystalline β-FeSi2 nanocubes with two {100} facets and four {011} lateral facets synthesized by spontaneous one-step chemical vapor deposition exhibit strong room-temperature ferromagnetism with saturation magnetization of 15 emu/g. The room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed from the β-FeSi2 nanocubes larger than 150 nm with both the {100} and {011} facets. The ferromagnetism is tentatively explained with a simplified model including both the itinerant electrons in surface states and the local moments on Fe atoms near the surfaces. The work demonstrates the transformation from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a magnetic one by exposing specific facets and the room-temperature ferromagnetism can be manipulated under light irradiation. The semiconducting β-FeSi2 nanocubes may have large potential in silicon-based spintronic applications. PMID:26302086

  19. Deterministic switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature using an electric field.

    PubMed

    Heron, J T; Bosse, J L; He, Q; Gao, Y; Trassin, M; Ye, L; Clarkson, J D; Wang, C; Liu, Jian; Salahuddin, S; Ralph, D C; Schlom, D G; Iñiguez, J; Huey, B D; Ramesh, R

    2014-12-18

    The technological appeal of multiferroics is the ability to control magnetism with electric field. For devices to be useful, such control must be achieved at room temperature. The only single-phase multiferroic material exhibiting unambiguous magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature is BiFeO3 (refs 4 and 5). Its weak ferromagnetism arises from the canting of the antiferromagnetically aligned spins by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Prior theory considered the symmetry of the thermodynamic ground state and concluded that direct 180-degree switching of the DM vector by the ferroelectric polarization was forbidden. Instead, we examined the kinetics of the switching process, something not considered previously in theoretical work. Here we show a deterministic reversal of the DM vector and canted moment using an electric field at room temperature. First-principles calculations reveal that the switching kinetics favours a two-step switching process. In each step the DM vector and polarization are coupled and 180-degree deterministic switching of magnetization hence becomes possible, in agreement with experimental observation. We exploit this switching to demonstrate energy-efficient control of a spin-valve device at room temperature. The energy per unit area required is approximately an order of magnitude less than that needed for spin-transfer torque switching. Given that the DM interaction is fundamental to single-phase multiferroics and magnetoelectrics, our results suggest ways to engineer magnetoelectric switching and tailor technologically pertinent functionality for nanometre-scale, low-energy-consumption, non-volatile magnetoelectronics. PMID:25519134

  20. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    DOE PAGES

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlir, Vojtech; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-03

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry breaking induced at themore » Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.« less

  1. Room temperature d 0 ferromagnetism in hole doped Y2O3: widening the choice of host to tailor DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal-free-ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is of much current interest in view of the search for more efficient DMS materials for spintronics applications. Our DFT results predict for the first time, that impurities from group1A (Li+, Na+, K+) doped on Y2O3 can induce a magnetic signature with a magnetic moment around 2.0 μ B per defect at hole concentrations around 1.63  ×  1021 cm‑3, which is one order less than the critical hole density of ZnO with ferromagnetic coupling large enough to promote room temperature ferromagnetism. The induction of room temperature ferromagnetism by hole doping with an impurity atom from group 1A, which injects two holes per defect in the system, implies that the recommendation of three holes per defect given in the literature, which puts a restriction on the choice of host material and the impurity, is not a necessary criterion for hole induced room temperature ferromagnetism. DFT simulations with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), confirmed by the more sophisticated hybrid functional, Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof (HSE06), predict that the magnetic moment is mostly contributed by O atoms surrounding the impurity atom and the magnetic moment scale up with impurity concentration which is a positive indicator for practical applications. We quantitatively and extensively demonstrate through the analysis of the density of states and ferromagnetic coupling that the Stoner criterion is satisfied by pushing the Fermi level inside the valence band to activate room temperature ferromagnetism. The stability of the structure and the persistence of ferromagnetism at room temperature were demonstrated by ab initio MD simulations and computation of Curie temperature through the mean field approximation. This study widens the choice of host oxides to tailor DMS for spintronics applications.

  2. Room temperature d 0 ferromagnetism in hole doped Y2O3: widening the choice of host to tailor DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal-free-ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is of much current interest in view of the search for more efficient DMS materials for spintronics applications. Our DFT results predict for the first time, that impurities from group1A (Li+, Na+, K+) doped on Y2O3 can induce a magnetic signature with a magnetic moment around 2.0 μ B per defect at hole concentrations around 1.63  ×  1021 cm-3, which is one order less than the critical hole density of ZnO with ferromagnetic coupling large enough to promote room temperature ferromagnetism. The induction of room temperature ferromagnetism by hole doping with an impurity atom from group 1A, which injects two holes per defect in the system, implies that the recommendation of three holes per defect given in the literature, which puts a restriction on the choice of host material and the impurity, is not a necessary criterion for hole induced room temperature ferromagnetism. DFT simulations with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), confirmed by the more sophisticated hybrid functional, Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06), predict that the magnetic moment is mostly contributed by O atoms surrounding the impurity atom and the magnetic moment scale up with impurity concentration which is a positive indicator for practical applications. We quantitatively and extensively demonstrate through the analysis of the density of states and ferromagnetic coupling that the Stoner criterion is satisfied by pushing the Fermi level inside the valence band to activate room temperature ferromagnetism. The stability of the structure and the persistence of ferromagnetism at room temperature were demonstrated by ab initio MD simulations and computation of Curie temperature through the mean field approximation. This study widens the choice of host oxides to tailor DMS for spintronics applications.

  3. Room temperature d (0) ferromagnetism in hole doped Y2O3: widening the choice of host to tailor DMS.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M

    2016-08-24

    Transition metal-free-ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is of much current interest in view of the search for more efficient DMS materials for spintronics applications. Our DFT results predict for the first time, that impurities from group1A (Li(+), Na(+), K(+)) doped on Y2O3 can induce a magnetic signature with a magnetic moment around 2.0 μ B per defect at hole concentrations around 1.63  ×  10(21) cm(-3), which is one order less than the critical hole density of ZnO with ferromagnetic coupling large enough to promote room temperature ferromagnetism. The induction of room temperature ferromagnetism by hole doping with an impurity atom from group 1A, which injects two holes per defect in the system, implies that the recommendation of three holes per defect given in the literature, which puts a restriction on the choice of host material and the impurity, is not a necessary criterion for hole induced room temperature ferromagnetism. DFT simulations with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), confirmed by the more sophisticated hybrid functional, Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06), predict that the magnetic moment is mostly contributed by O atoms surrounding the impurity atom and the magnetic moment scale up with impurity concentration which is a positive indicator for practical applications. We quantitatively and extensively demonstrate through the analysis of the density of states and ferromagnetic coupling that the Stoner criterion is satisfied by pushing the Fermi level inside the valence band to activate room temperature ferromagnetism. The stability of the structure and the persistence of ferromagnetism at room temperature were demonstrated by ab initio MD simulations and computation of Curie temperature through the mean field approximation. This study widens the choice of host oxides to tailor DMS for spintronics applications. PMID:27351301

  4. Strain induced room temperature ferromagnetism in epitaxial magnesium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Zhenghe; Kim, Ki Wook; Nori, Sudhakar; Lee, Yi-Fang; Narayan, Jagdish; Kumar, D.; Wu, Fan; Prater, J. T.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the epitaxial growth and room-temperature ferromagnetic properties of MgO thin films deposited on hexagonal c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The epitaxial nature of the films has been confirmed by both θ-2θ and φ-scans of X-ray diffraction pattern. Even though bulk MgO is a nonmagnetic insulator, we have found that the MgO films exhibit ferromagnetism and hysteresis loops yielding a maximum saturation magnetization up to 17 emu/cc and large coercivity, H{sub c} = 1200 Oe. We have also found that the saturation magnetization gets enhanced and that the crystallization degraded with decreased growth temperature, suggesting that the origin of our magnetic coupling could be point defects manifested by the strain in the films. X-ray (θ-2θ) diffraction peak shift and strain analysis clearly support the presence of strain in films resulting from the presence of point defects. Based on careful investigations using secondary ion mass spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies, we have ruled out the possibility of the presence of any external magnetic impurities. We discuss the critical role of microstructural characteristics and associated strain on the physical properties of the MgO films and establish a correlation between defects and magnetic properties.

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaspal Vashihth, A.; Gill, Pritampal Singh; Verma, N. K.

    2015-06-24

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O (x = 0, 0,10) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the synthesized nanoparticles possess wurtzite phase having hexagonal structure. Morphological analysis was carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which depicts the spherical morphology of ZnO nanoparticles. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed the presence of Mg in ZnO nanoparticles. Electron spin resonance (ESR) signal was found to be decreasing with increasing of Mg-doping concentration. The room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in undoped and Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles. The increase of Mg-doping concentration resulted in decrease of saturation magnetization value which could be attributed to decrease of oxygen vacancies present in host nanoparticles.

  6. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Cu Doped ZnO Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Zaheer Ahmed; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2011-07-15

    We report on the growth of Cu doped ZnO thin films for different Cu concentration from 0.1%, to10% by RF magnetron sputtering. The X-ray diffraction study has shown single phase wurtzite type ZnO thin films with no evidence of copper/copper oxide or any other secondary phases. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in RF sputtered Cu doped ZnO films with magnetic moment per Cu atom first increasing and then decreasing with an increasing Cu content. Decrease of band gap with Cu doping, indicating strong p-d mixing of O and Cu is clear by the absorption spectroscopy study. The surface morphology by AFM of pure and Cu doped ZnO thin films show average grain size of 110nm and RMS surface roughness of 2.15 nm.

  7. Electronic structure and room temperature ferromagnetism of C doped TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablat, Abduleziz; Wu, Rong; Mamat, Mamatrishat; Ghupur, Yasin; Aimidula, Aimierding; Bake, Muhammad Ali; Gholam, Turghunjan; Wang, Jiaou; Qian, Haijie; Wu, Rui; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-10-01

    C-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a simple hydrothermal synthesis method. After this preparation, a portion of the samples were annealed separately in air on the one hand, and in argon on the other, and another portion remained untreated. The results of X-ray diffraction show that the untreated samples primarily display anatase and rutile structures. However, after annealing, the samples displayed the rutile structure only. The Ti K-edge and L-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure analyses clearly show that C atoms were successfully incorporated into the TiO2 host lattice. All doped samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. The saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercive fields (Hc) tend to decrease after the samples are annealed in argon and in air. The maximum Ms of the untreated samples was approximately 0.038 emu/g.

  8. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co defused CdTe nanocrystalline thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Kaleemulla, S.; Begam, M. Rigana

    2014-04-24

    Nanocrystalline Co defused CdTe thin films were prepared using electron beam evaporation technique by depositing CdTe/Co/CdTe stacked layers with different Co thickness onto glass substrate at 373 K followed by annealing at 573K for 2 hrs. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties of of all the Co defused CdTe thin films has been investigated. XRD pattern of all the films exhibited zinc blende structure with <111> preferential orientation without changing the crystal structure of the films. The grain size of the films increased from 31.5 nm to 48.1 nm with the increase of Co layer thickness from 25nm to 100nm. The morphological studies showed that uniform texture of the films and the presence of Co was confirmed by EDAX. Room temperature magnetization curves indicated an improved ferromagnetic behavior in the films with increase of the Co thickness.

  9. Above room-temperature ferromagnetism of Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. T.; Wadekar, P. V.; Kao, H. S.; Chen, T. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Tu, L. W.; Huang, H. C.; Ho, N. J.

    2014-02-10

    One-dimensional nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductors were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Delta-doping technique was adopted to dope GaN nanorods with Mn. The structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The GaMnN nanorods with a single crystalline structure and with Ga sites substituted by Mn atoms were verified by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, respectively. Secondary phases were not observed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the magnetic hysteresis curves show that the Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods are ferromagnetic above room temperature. The magnetization with magnetic field perpendicular to GaN c-axis saturates easier than the one with field parallel to GaN c-axis.

  10. Peculiarly strong room-temperature ferromagnetism from low Mn-doping in ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Zheng; Morshed, Muhammad; Liu Jianlin; Beyermann, W. P.; Zheng Jianguo; Xin Yan

    2013-03-15

    Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in single crystalline Mn-doped ZnO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Very low Mn doping concentration is investigated, and the measured magnetic moment is much larger than what is expected for an isolated ion based on Hund's rules. The ferromagnetic behavior evolves with Mn concentration. Both magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect confirm the intrinsic nature of ferromagnetism. While the Mn dopant plays a crucial role, another entity in the system is needed to explain the observed large magnetic moments.

  11. Enhancement of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of rf sputtered Ni-CeO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Ni-doped CeO2 thin films were prepared under Ar+ atmosphere on glass substrates using rf magnetron sputtering. To assess the properties of the prepared thin films, the influence of various amounts of Ni dopant on structural, morphological, optical, vibrational, compositional and magnetic properties of the CeO2 films were studied by using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), photoluminescence (PL), micro-Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD patterns for all the samples revealed the expected CeO2 cubic fluorite-type structure and Ni ions were uniformly distributed in the samples. AFM images of the prepared samples indicate high dense, columnar structure with uniform distribution of CeO2. Room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and micro-Raman spectroscopic studies revealed an increase of oxygen vacancies with higher concentration of Ni in CeO2. XPS results confirm the presence of Ni2p, O1s and Ce and depict that cerium is present as both Ce4+ and Ce3+ oxidation states in Ce1-xNixO2 (x = 15%) thin film. Field dependent magnetization measurements revealed a paramagnetic behavior for pure CeO2, while a ferromagnetic behavior appeared when Ni is doped in CeO2 films. Doping dependent magnetization measurements suggest that the observed ferromagnetism is due to the presence of metallic Ni clusters with nanometric size and broad size distribution.

  12. Design of dilute magnetic semiconductors with room temperature ferromagnetism by controlling spinodal decompostion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    Owing to the recent development of the first-principles method for calculating magnetic properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), it has been recognized that the magnetic percolation effect is disastrous to the high temperature ferromagnetism in DMS in particular for low concentrations [1]. The exchange interactions calculated from first-principles are strong for nearest neighbors, but those interactions are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high- TC because the solubility of magnetic impurities into DMS is too low to achieve magnetic percolation. To overcome this difficulty and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we focus on the spinodal decomposition in DMS, and suggest that by controlling the spinodal decomposition high blocking temperature can be realized leading to ferromagnetic behaviour at high temperature [2]. We calculate electronic structure of DMS from first-principles by using the Korringa- Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. Then, chemical pair interactions and magnetic exchange interactions between magnetic are calculated. We use the Monte Carlo techniques to simulate spinodal decomposition of DMS and to estimate the magnetic properties of them [3]. The computer simulations for the magnetization process of the decomposition phases indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the clusters by changing the crystal growth condition. This simulation suggests the material design of high blocking temperature DMS by controlling the spinodal decomposition [2].As another approach for realizing high-Tc DMS we propose co-doping method to increase solubility limit of transition metal impurities in DMS [4]. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Katayama-Yoshida and T. Fukushima. [1] L. Bergqvist et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 137202 (2004), K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 201202 (2004) [2] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46, L682

  13. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO₂(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy C.; Heald, Steve M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; McCready, David E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Mun, B. S.

    2006-01-01

    Ferromagnetic Cr-doped rutile TiO₂ single crystals were synthesized by high-temperature ion implantation. The associated structural, compositional and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, proton induced x-ray emission, x-ray diffraction, Cr K- and L-shell near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Cr was distributed uniformly to the depth of about 300 nm with an average concentration of ~1 at. %. The samples are semiconducting and ferromagnetic as implanted, with a saturation magnetization of 0.29 B/Cr atom at room temperature. Cr is in a formal oxidation state of +3 throughout the implanted region, and no CrO₂ is detected.

  14. Structure, electrical and magnetic properties, and the origin of the room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. F.; Granovsky, A. B.; Balagurov, L. A.; Kulemanov, I. V.; Parkhomenko, Yu. N.; Perov, N. S.; Gan'shina, E. A.; Bublik, V. T.; Shcherbachev, K. D.; Kartavykh, A. V.; Vdovin, V. I.; Sapelkin, A.; Saraikin, V. V.; Agafonov, Yu. A.; Zinenko, V. I.; Rogalev, A.; Smekhova, A.

    2009-10-01

    The structure and the electrical and magnetic properties of Mn-implanted Si, which exhibits ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, are studied. Single-crystal n- and p-type Si wafers with high and low electrical resistivities are implanted by manganese ions to a dose of 5 × 1016 cm-2. After implantation and subsequent vacuum annealing at 850°C, the implanted samples are examined by various methods. The Mn impurity that exhibits an electric activity and is incorporated into the Si lattice in interstitial sites is found to account for only a few percent of the total Mn content. The main part of Mn is fixed in Mn15Si26 nanoprecipitates in the Si matrix. The magnetization of implanted Si is found to be independent of the electrical resistivity and the conductivity type of silicon and the type of implanted impurity. The magnetization of implanted Si increases slightly upon short-term postimplantation annealing and disappears completely upon vacuum annealing at 1000°C for 5 h. The Mn impurity in Si is shown to have no significant magnetic moment at room temperature. These results indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si is likely to be caused by implantation-induced defects in the silicon lattice rather than by a Mn impurity.

  15. Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Litzius, Kai; Krüger, Benjamin; Im, Mi-Young; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Mann, Maxwell; Krone, Andrea; Reeve, Robert M.; Weigand, Markus; Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Fischer, Peter; Kläui, Mathias; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit fascinating physical behaviours and large potential in highly energy-efficient spintronic device applications. The main obstacles so far are that skyrmions have been observed in only a few exotic materials and at low temperatures, and fast current-driven motion of individual skyrmions has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the observation of stable magnetic skyrmions at room temperature in ultrathin transition metal ferromagnets with magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy. We demonstrate the ability to generate stable skyrmion lattices and drive trains of individual skyrmions by short current pulses along a magnetic racetrack at speeds exceeding 100 m s-1 as required for applications. Our findings provide experimental evidence of recent predictions and open the door to room-temperature skyrmion spintronics in robust thin-film heterostructures.

  16. Room-temperature ferromagnetism with high magnetic moment in Cu-doped AlN single crystal whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang-Bao; Liu, Yu; Zuo, Si-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Ferromagnetism is investigated in high-quality Cu-doped AlN single crystal whiskers. The whiskers exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism with a magnetic moment close to the results from first-principles calculations. High crystallinity and low Cu concentrations are found to be indispensable for high magnetic moments. The difference between the experimental and theoretical moment values is explored in terms of the influence of nitrogen vacancies. The calculated results demonstrate that nitrogen vacancies can reduce the magnetic moments of Cu atom. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB932901), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51372267, 51210105026, and 51172270), the Funds from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the International Centre for Diffraction Data, USA (2013 Ludo Frevel Crystallography Scholarship Award), and the Funds from the Ministry of Education of China (2012 Academic Scholarship Award for Doctoral Candidates).

  17. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co and Nb co-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, M.; Mori, K.; Hyodo, K.; Morimoto, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2015-02-27

    Co- and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles encapsulated with amorphous SiO{sub 2} were synthesized by our novel preparation method. An anatase TiO{sub 2} single-phase structure was confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The particle size could be controlled to be about 5 nm. The composition of these nanoparticles was investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra showed that the Ti{sup 4+} and Co{sup 2+} states were dominant in our prepared samples. A reduction in the coordination number was also confirmed. The dependence of the electrical conductivity on the frequency was measured by an LCR meter, and the carrier concentration was determined. The magnetization curves for the nanoparticles indicated ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. We concluded that the ferromagnetism originated in oxygen vacancies around the transition metal ions.

  18. Room temperature p-type conductivity and coexistence of ferroelectric order in ferromagnetic Li doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, Saif Ullah E-mail: ullahphy@gmail.com; Hasanain, S. K.; Anjum, D. H.; Awan, M. S.; Shah, Saqlain A.

    2014-10-28

    Memory and switching devices acquired new materials which exhibit ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order simultaneously. We reported multiferroic behavior in Zn{sub 1−y}Li{sub y}O(0.00≤y≤0.10) nanoparticles. The analysis of transmission electron micrographs confirmed the hexagonal morphology and wurtzite crystalline structure. We investigated p-type conductivity in doped samples and measured hole carriers in range 2.4 × 10{sup 17}/cc to 7.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc for different Li contents. We found that hole carriers are responsible for long range order ferromagnetic coupling in Li doped samples. Room temperature ferroelectric hysteresis loops were observed in 8% and 10% Li doped samples. We demonstrated ferroelectric coercivity (remnant polarization) 2.5 kV/cm (0.11 μC/cm{sup 2}) and 2.8 kV/cm (0.15 μC/cm{sup 2}) for y = 0.08 and y = 0.10 samples. We propose that the mechanism of Li induced ferroelectricity in ZnO is due to indirect dipole interaction via hole carriers. We investigated that if the sample has hole carriers ≥5.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc, they can mediate the ferroelectricity. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic measurements showed that higher electric polarization and larger magnetic moment is attained when the hole concentration is larger and vice versa. Our results confirmed the hole dependent coexistence of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric behavior at room temperature, which provide potential applications for switchable and memory devices.

  19. Growth and characterization of room temperature ferromagnetic manganese:gallium nitride and manganese:gallium indium nitride for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Meredith Lynn

    Dilute magnetic semiconductors Mn:GaN and Mn:InGaN showing ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature and above were achieved. Light emitting diode devices doped with Mn via diffusion produced operational devices with ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. Mn:GaN films were grown by: Mn diffusion into metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown GaN; ion implantation of Mn into MOCVD grown GaN substrates; and MOCVD growth of Mn:GaN using (Et,Cp)2Mn as a Mn precursor. Curie temperatures of these Mn:GaN films ranged from 228 to 520 K, as determined by temperature dependent super conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and extraordinary Hall effect (EHE) measurements. Ferromagnetic properties were observed over a Mn concentration range of 0.09--3.5% depending on the growth technique used. The Mn:GaN coercivity ranged from 100--1500 Oe, where the saturation magnetization varied from 2 to 45 emu/cm3. The easy axes for these films were determined to be along the c direction (i.e. out of plane). The electrical properties of the Mn:GaN films indicated that the films were highly resistive or n-type. Temperature dependent SQUID and EHE measurements verified the absence of superparamagnetism in the films, confirming the absence of small phase separated particles within the films. XRD and TEM determined that no secondary phases were present in any of the films studied, confirming that the ferromagnetic properties result from a solid solution of Mn in the GaN lattice. Mn:InGaN films were grown by Mn diffusion into InGaN films and by MOCVD using (Et,Cp)2Mn as a Mn precursor. All Mn:InGaN films were grown on an undoped GaN template. We report on the room temperature ferromagnetic properties of Mn-doped InxGa1- xN with x < 0.15. The Curie temperatures for these Mn:InGaN films ranged from 300 to 700 K, which was confirmed by temperature dependent SQUID measurements. The ferromagnetic properties were observed in a Mn concentration range of 0.12--8% depending

  20. Room temperature weak ferromagnetism in Sn1-xMnxSe2 2D films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Yoo, Taehee; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss growth and magnetic properties of high-quality two dimensional (2D) Sn1-xMnxSe2 films. Thin films of this 2D ternary alloy with a wide range of Mn concentrations were successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Mn concentrations up to x ≈ 0.60 were achieved without destroying the crystal structure of the parent SnSe2 2D system. Most important, the specimens show clear weak ferromagnetic behavior above room temperature, which should be of interest for 2D spintronic applications.

  1. Coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching for TiO{sub 2} film at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Shaoqing; Qin, Hongwei; Bu, Jianpei; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Hu, Jifan E-mail: hu-jf@vip.163.com

    2015-08-10

    The Ag/TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}/Ag device exhibits the coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching in Ag/TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}/Ag device may be dominated by the modulation of Schottky-like barrier with the electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}. We suggest that the electric field-induced magnetization modulation originates mainly from the creation/annihilation of lots of oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub 2}.

  2. Room temperature ferromagnetism and luminescent behavior of Ni doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by coprecipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Deepawali; Ashokan, K.; Mahajan, Aman; Kaur, Parvinder; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-05-01

    The samples of Zn1-xNixO (x= 0.00 and 0.05) were prepared using coprecipitation method and annealed at different temperatures. The effect of Ni ion substitution on the structural and optical properties has been studied using X-ray Diffraction, UV-Visible, Photoluminescence and Magnetic measurements. XRD measurements demonstrate that all the prepared samples are wurtzite polycrystalline single phase in nature, ruling out the presence of any secondary phase formation. Ultraviolet visible measurements showed a decrease in band gap with the increase in annealing temperature and doping concentration. The PL data shows the red shift in all the samples and luminescence quenching with Ni doping. Compared to undoped ZnO, Ni doped ZnO showed room temperature ferromagnetism

  3. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  5. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    DOE PAGES

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a highmore » temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.« less

  6. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in Nd-doped In2O3 dilute magnetic semiconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhanpeng; Zhang, Junran; Niu, Wei; Zhang, Minhao; Song, Li; Zhu, Hairong; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Nd-doped In2O3 nanowires were fabricated by an Au-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition method. Nd atoms were successfully doped into the In2O3 host lattice structure, as revealed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Nd-doped In2O3 nanowires, which was attributed to the long-range-mediated magnetization among Nd3+-vacancy complexes through percolation-bound magnetic polarons. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274003), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China.

  7. Room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N. Sai; Kaleemulla, S. Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.; Begam, M. Rigana; Amarendra, G.

    2015-06-24

    Undoped and Ni (5 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were deposited on glass substrate using electron beam evaporation technique and Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were annealed at 450 oC. A systematic study was carried out on the structural, chemical and magnetic properties of the as deposited and annealed thin films. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that all the films were cubic in structure and exhibied ferromagnetism at room temperature. The undoped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films exhibited a saturation magnetization of 24.01 emu/cm3. Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films annealed at 450 oC showed a saturation magnetization of 53.81 emu/cm3.

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si achieved by controlling atomic structure, Cr concentration, and carrier densities: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xin-Yuan; Yang, Zhong-Qin; Zhu, Yan; Li, Yun

    2015-04-28

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigated how to achieve a strong ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si by controlling the atomic structure and Cr concentration as well as carrier densities. We found that the configuration in which the Cr atom occupies the tetrahedral interstitial site can exist stably and the Cr atom has a large magnetic moment. Using this doping configuration, room-temperature ferromagnetism can be achieved in both n-type and p-type Si by tuning Cr concentration and carrier densities. The results indicate that the carrier density plays a crucial role in realizing strong ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si achieved by controlling atomic structure, Cr concentration, and carrier densities: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xin-Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Yang, Zhong-Qin; Li, Yun

    2015-04-01

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigated how to achieve a strong ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si by controlling the atomic structure and Cr concentration as well as carrier densities. We found that the configuration in which the Cr atom occupies the tetrahedral interstitial site can exist stably and the Cr atom has a large magnetic moment. Using this doping configuration, room-temperature ferromagnetism can be achieved in both n-type and p-type Si by tuning Cr concentration and carrier densities. The results indicate that the carrier density plays a crucial role in realizing strong ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  10. Defects in room-temperature ferromagnetic Cu-doped ZnO films probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Prater, J T; Sudakar, C; Rosenberg, R A; Narayan, J

    2012-08-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the defects in room-temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) Cu-doped ZnO thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The films are doped with 2 at.% Cu, and are prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD), respectively. The results reveal unambiguously that atomic point defects exist in these RTFM thin films. The valence states of the Cu ions in both films are 2(+). In the film prepared by PLD, the oxygen vacancies (V(O)) form around both Zn ions and Cu ions in the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Upon annealing of the film in O(2), the V(O) population reduces and so does the RTFM. In the film prepared by RMS, the V(O)s around Cu ions are not detected, and the V(O) population around Zn ions is also smaller than in the PLD-prepared film. However, zinc vacancies (V(Zn)) are evidenced. Given the low doping level of spin-carrying Cu ions, these results provide strong support for defect-mediated ferromagnetism in Cu-doped ZnO thin films.

  11. Enlarged Mn 3s splitting and room-temperature ferromagnetism in epitaxially grown oxygen doped Mn{sub 2}N{sub 0.86} films

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2014-11-07

    Single-phase and oxygen doped Mn{sub 2}N{sub 0.86} thin films have been grown on MgO (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The films grow under tensile strain and, remarkably, they show ferromagnetic-like interactions at low temperature and ferromagnetic ordering agreed well with the Bloch-law T{sup 3/2} at room-temperature. We further demonstrate the enlarged Mn 3s splitting (6.46 eV) and its possible relation to the observed ferromagnetism. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on oxygen doped manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on utilizing its room-temperature FM property to fabricate spintronic devices.

  12. Room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence in Cu-doped ZnO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kong, Liming; Yu, Bin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Pan, Jing; Su, Yuanchang; Hu, Jingguo

    2014-08-01

    The Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O (x = 0.0-3.5%) nanocrystals have been synthesized by a simple sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements were employed to validate consistently the incorporation of Cu ions into the ZnO wurtzite lattice without formation of secondary phases for Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O (x < 2.0%). Meanwhile, it was found that the substituted Cu-doping leads to the reduction of the band gap and the appearance of the structured green emission. Magnetization measurement showed that the low Cu-doping (x < 1.0%) develops the ferromagnetism, but the high Cu-doping destroys sharply the ferromagnetism due to the formation of the antiferromagnetic coupling among the neighboring Cu ions. It is indicated that the rational Cu-doping can tune optical and magnetic properties in ZnO.

  13. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125-1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  14. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  15. Band gap tuning and room temperature ferromagnetism in Co doped Zinc stannate nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumithra, S.; Victor Jaya, N.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of Co doping on structural, optical and magnetic behavior of pure and Co doped Zinc stannate (ZTO) nanostructures was investigated. Pure and Co (1%, 3% & 5%) doped Zn2SnO4 compounds were prepared through simple precipitation route. Formation of cubic inverse spinel structure and metal oxide vibrations of the samples were investigated using XRD and FTIR. Co doping influences the crystallite size producing micro strain in ZTO lattice. Poly dispersed rod like shape of the particles was examined by FESEM. Elemental composition of prepared samples was identified by EDAX analysis. Optical Absorption spectra shows significant red shift on increasing the dopant concentration which indicates the reduction in optical band gap. Visible luminescence observed from photoluminescence studies confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and trap sites in the lattice. Magnetization analysis reveals the enhanced ferromagnetic behavior in all Co doped ZTO samples. The amplified ferromagnetic ordering in Co doped ZTO compounds has been explained in terms of defects serving as free spin polarized prophetic carriers.

  16. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  17. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  18. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m-1 and with coercivity in the range 100-240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e-e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy-zinc interstitial defect complex (V O-I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  19. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m‑1 and with coercivity in the range 100–240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e–e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy–zinc interstitial defect complex (V O–I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  20. Post-annealing effect on the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-Min; Li, Sih-Sian; Kuang, Chein-Hsiun; Han, Tai-Chun; Yu, Chin-Chung

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the structural and magnetic properties of both as-deposited and post-annealed Cu-doped ZnO thin films for better understanding the possible mechanisms of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) in ZnO-based diluted magnetic oxides. All of the films have a c-axis-oriented wurtzite structure and display RT-FM. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the incorporated Cu ions in as-deposited films are in 1+ valence state merely, while an additional 2+ valence state occurs in post-annealed films. The presence of Cu2+ state in post-annealed film accompanies a higher magnetization value than that of as-deposited film and, in particular, the magnetization curves at 10 K and 300 K of the post-annealed film separate distinctly. Since Cu1+ ion has a filled 3d band, the RT-FM in as-deposited Cu-doped ZnO thin films may stem solely from intrinsic defects, while that in post-annealed films is enhanced due to the presence of CuO crystallites.

  1. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence behavior of Cu-doped ZnO co-doped with Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, M.; Muthukumaran, S.

    2015-05-01

    Cu, Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the sol-gel technique. XRD pattern described that Mn-doping did not affect the hexagonal wurtzite structure of the samples and no secondary phases were found. The reduced crystallite size at Mn=2% is due to the suppression of grain surface growth by foreign impurity. The enhancement of crystal size after Mn=2% is due to the expansion of lattice volume produced by the distortion around the dopant ion. The better dielectric constant and conductivity noticed at Mn=2% are explained by charge carrier density and crystallite size. The suppression of broad UV band by Mn-doping is discussed based on the generation of non-radiative recombination centers. Hysteresis loop showed the clear room temperature ferromagnetism in all the samples and the magnetization increased with Mn-doping. Better electrical and magnetic behavior of Zn0.94Cu0.04Mn0.02O sample is suggested for effective opto-magnetic devices.

  2. Enhanced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism by Fe Doping in Zn0.96Cu0.04O Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, S.; Ashokkumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Zn0.96- x Cu0.04Fe x O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles synthesized via the sol-gel technique had a hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure without any Fe/Cu-related secondary phases. The crystallite size was reduced from Fe = 0% (23 nm) to Fe = 4% (16 nm) due to the suppression of grain surface growth by foreign impurities. Doping of higher Fe concentrations into Zn-Cu-O suppressed the ultra-violet (UV) emission band and balanced the defect-related visible emissions. The decrease of the UV and green emission intensity ratio ( I UV/ I green) and the UV and blue emission intensity ratio ( I UV/ I blue) in photoluminescence spectra implied an increase of defect states with the increase of Fe concentrations. All the samples showed clear room temperature ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization was increased by Fe co-doping which was attributed to the interaction between Fe-Fe ions. X-ray photoelectron spectra confirmed the absence of secondary phases like Fe3O4.

  3. Post-annealing effect on the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yu-Min Kuang, Chein-Hsiun; Han, Tai-Chun; Yu, Chin-Chung; Li, Sih-Sian

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we investigated the structural and magnetic properties of both as-deposited and post-annealed Cu-doped ZnO thin films for better understanding the possible mechanisms of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) in ZnO-based diluted magnetic oxides. All of the films have a c-axis-oriented wurtzite structure and display RT-FM. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the incorporated Cu ions in as-deposited films are in 1+ valence state merely, while an additional 2+ valence state occurs in post-annealed films. The presence of Cu{sup 2+} state in post-annealed film accompanies a higher magnetization value than that of as-deposited film and, in particular, the magnetization curves at 10 K and 300 K of the post-annealed film separate distinctly. Since Cu{sup 1+} ion has a filled 3d band, the RT-FM in as-deposited Cu-doped ZnO thin films may stem solely from intrinsic defects, while that in post-annealed films is enhanced due to the presence of CuO crystallites.

  4. Synthesis aspects, structural, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and room temperature ferromagnetism of zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakila, K.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of complex compound of zinc iodide with thiocarbamide by slow evaporation method. The single crystal XRD study reveals that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group and powder XRD analysis shows that the perfect crystalline nature of the crystal. The presence of functional group and element were confirmed from FT-IR and EDAX analysis. Optical absorbance of the grown crystal was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical constants were calculated from the optical absorbance data such as refractive index (n), extinction coefficient (K) and reflectance (R). The optical band gap (Eg) of thiocarbamide zinc iodide crystal is 4.22 eV. The magnetic properties of grown crystal have been determined by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM). Room temperature magnetization revealed a ferromagnetic behaviour for the grown crystal. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by well diffusion method and MIC method against the standard bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and against fungus like Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus sps and Penicillium sps. Thermal behaviour of the crystal has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA).

  5. Room-temperature ferromagnetism induced by Cu vacancies in Cux(Cu2O)1-x granular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin-Jian; Li, Hao-Bo; Wang, Wei-Chao; Lu, Feng; Yu, Hong-Yun; Wang, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Ya-Hui; Zheng, Rong-Kun; Liu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    CuxCu2O1-x (0.09 ⩽ x ⩽ 1.00) granular films with thickness about 280 nm have been fabricated by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering. The atomic ratio x can be controlled by the oxygen flow rate during CuxCu2O1-x deposition. Room-temperature ferromagnetism (FM) is found in all of the samples. The saturated magnetization increases at first and then decreases with the decrease of x. The photoluminescence spectra show that the magnetization is closely correlated with the Cu vacancies in the CuxCu2O1-x granular films. Fundamentally, the FM could be understood by the Stoner model based on the charge transfer mechanism. These results may provide solid evidence and physical insights on the origin of FM in the Cu2O-based oxides diluted magnetic semiconductors, especially for systems without intentional magnetic atom doping. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104148, 51101088, and 51171082), the Tianjin Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant Nos. 14JCZDJC37700 and 13JCQNJC02800), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20110031110034), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China.

  6. Thermal ionization induced metal-semiconductor transition and room temperature ferromagnetism in trivalent doped ZnO codoped with lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagamasundari, A.; Chandrasekar, S.; Pugaze, R.; Kannan, R.; Rajagopan, S.

    2014-03-07

    Thermal ionization induced metallic to semiconductor (MST) transition occurring at 460 K for Zn{sub 0.97}Al{sub 0.03}O, 463 K for Zn{sub 0.94}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}O, and 503 K for Zn{sub 0.91}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}Mn{sub 0.03}O has been found in the sol-gel synthesized (using hexamethylenetetramine), trivalent doped (Al, Mn) ZnO codoped with lithium. Increase in the thermally ionized carrier concentration due to Al doping is responsible for near band edge (NBE) peak shift causing Fermi level to move into conduction band making it metallic consistent with resistivity results. Free carrier (thermally activated) neutralization with ionized donor is responsible for semiconducting nature, which is supported from the free carrier screening produced energy shift in the NBE of photoluminescence peak. Furthermore, independently band gap shrinkage is also obtained from UV-Visible studies confirming localization induced MST. An anti-correlation is found between defect density (DLE) and room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) indicating intrinsic defects are not directly responsible for RTFM.

  7. Synthesis aspects, structural, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and room temperature ferromagnetism of zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand.

    PubMed

    Shakila, K; Kalainathan, S

    2015-01-25

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of complex compound of zinc iodide with thiocarbamide by slow evaporation method. The single crystal XRD study reveals that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group and powder XRD analysis shows that the perfect crystalline nature of the crystal. The presence of functional group and element were confirmed from FT-IR and EDAX analysis. Optical absorbance of the grown crystal was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical constants were calculated from the optical absorbance data such as refractive index (n), extinction coefficient (K) and reflectance (R). The optical band gap (Eg) of thiocarbamide zinc iodide crystal is 4.22 eV. The magnetic properties of grown crystal have been determined by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM). Room temperature magnetization revealed a ferromagnetic behaviour for the grown crystal. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by well diffusion method and MIC method against the standard bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and against fungus like Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus sps and Penicillium sps. Thermal behaviour of the crystal has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA).

  8. Effect of Cu doping on room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of Mn doped LiNbO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Dechong; Fu, Yuting; Sun, Ning; Li, Chunjing; Li, Yanghua; An, Yukai; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-11-01

    Cu and Mn co-doped LiNbO3 films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by rf-magnetron sputtering. XRD shows a randomly oriented polycrystalline R3C structure of LiNbO3 was formed in the films annealed at 1000 °C for 1 h in air. XPS and XAFS determine that Mn2+ substitutes on the Li site with a Li vacancy and Cu2+ substitutes on the Nb site with an oxygen vacancy in the LiNbO3 lattice. SQUID measurements indicate that all the films exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism, attributed to a strong d-d electron interaction between Mn and Nb and the bound magnetic polarons resulting from the oxygen vacancies. The saturated magnetization increases but the atom magnetic moment decreases with increasing Cu content in the films. The drop of the atom magnetic moment may arise from the antiferromagnetic coupling among adjacent Cu ions and an antiparallel configuration between Cu2+ ions and their trapped electrons.

  9. Irradiation induced ferromagnetism at room temperature in TiO{sub 2} thin films: X-ray magnetic circular dichroism characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Hardeep; Sharma, K. K.; Thakur, P.; Brookes, N. B.; Kumar, Ravi; Singh, A. P.; Kumar, Yogesh; Gautam, S.; Chae, K. H.

    2011-05-09

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism in the swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated TiO{sub 2} thin films by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments at the O K and Ti L{sub 3,2} absorption edges. The XAS/XMCD measurements provide direct evidence of magnetic polarization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals. The unquenched orbital magnetic moment within the O 2p shell is ferromagnetically coupled to the neighboring Ti moments, which illustrates the intense hybridization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals induced by SHI irradiation.

  10. A study on the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in Ni1-xGdxO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokul, B.; Saravanan, P.; Vinod, V. T. P.; Černík, Miroslav; Sathyamoorthy, R.

    2015-11-01

    We herein report the existence of room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism (FM) in Gd-doped NiO nanoparticles prepared by hydrothermal process. The Gd-content in Ni1-xGdxO was varied from 0.01 to 0.1 and the resultant structural and magnetic properties due to Gd-doping were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro- Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The composition analysis and charge state were obtained from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Both pure and Gd-doped NiO nanoparticles retained face centered cubic crystal structure. Formation of any secondary phases or metallic clusters related to pure Gd or Ni is not evident in the as-synthesized samples. TEM analysis revealed that the particles are spherical with sizes in the range of 8-18 nm. Micro-Raman spectra showed increase in Ni-vacancies with increase of Gd-concentration. XPS spectra of Gd-doped NiO revealed a shift in binding energy compared to the pure NiO, implies the replacement of Gd atoms in Ni-vacancies. Interesting RT-FM behavior is observed for the Gd concentrations of 7 and 10%; while the pure NiO and the other lower concentrations of Gd-doping demonstrated paramagnetic nature. The observed RT-FM can be attributed to the Ni vacancies induced by the doping of Gd3+ ions and this fact is explained on the basis of bound magnetic polaron model.

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetism in conducting α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Akaiwa, K.; Kaneko, K.; Fujita, S.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.

    2015-02-09

    We have studied electronic transport and magnetic properties of α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy films. Temperature dependence of resistivity of the films showed semiconducting behavior of conductivity. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed. Relatively high coercive fields indicated that observed ferromagnetism in α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} films were not arisen from magnetic metallic iron nano-precipitates. Remanence measurement revealed the Curie temperature of 520 K and 620 K for α-(In{sub 0.52}Fe{sub 0.48}){sub 2}O{sub 3} and α-(In{sub 0.23}Fe{sub 0.77}){sub 2}O{sub 3} films, corresponding to a weakening of superexchange interactions in these alloys (with less magnetic iron cations) with respect to canted antiferromagnet α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Nevertheless, Curie temperatures remain much higher than 300 K, and semiconducting behavior with low activation energy in resistivity for middle composition alloy, exhibiting combined multi-functionality of room ferromagnetism and semiconducting properties, in corundum alloys such as α-(Ga{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} or α-Fe{sub 2−x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}.

  12. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in (Zn,Mn,Sn)As2 Thin Films Applicable to InP-Based Spintronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchitomi, Naotaka; Oomae, Hiroto; Asubar, Joel T.; Endo, Hironori; Jinbo, Yoshio

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the growth and magnetic properties of ternary ZnSnAs2 thin films doped with a various degrees of Mn content. It was confirmed that Mn-doped ZnSnAs2 thin films are pseudomorphically grown on nearly lattice-matched InP(001) substrates. Magnetization measurements on Mn-doped ZnSnAs2 thin films revealed a ferromagnetic transition temperature of around 330 K, and clearly showed hysteresis loops even at room temperature. No evidence of magnetic secondary-phase MnAs formation in the host ZnSnAs2 thin films was observed within the limit of our measurement system. We also prepared a trilayer structure consisting of Mn-doped ZnSnAs2 layers and an undoped ZnSnAs2 intermediary layer as a preliminary structure for a tunneling magnetic junction. This structure was confirmed to demonstrate ferromagnetism at room temperature. The present results suggest that diluted ferromagnetic (Zn,Mn,Sn)As2 thin films are one of the most promising building blocks for InP-based spintronic devices.

  13. Observation of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in cluster-free, Co doped HfO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. H.; Soo, Y. L.; Lee, W. C.; Huang, M. L.; Lee, Y. J.; Weng, S. C.; Sun, W. H.; Hong, M.; Kwo, J.; Lee, S. F.; Ablett, J. M.; Kao, C.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Extensive structural and magnetic analyses of Hf1-xCoxO2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are reported. Nearly cobalt cluster-free film with x =0.04-0.1 was obtained via 100°C growth, and Co ions are inferred to be located at interstitial site. Ferromagnetic behavior was observed up to 300K in both magnetization curves and temperature dependence of the moment. Via post-oxygen-annealing studies, a qualitative correlation between saturation magnetization and oxygen vacancy concentration is established, consistent with the impurity-band exchange model, and that the occurrence of ferromagnetic insulator behavior in the Co doped HfO2 is more probable than Co doped ZnO, TiO2, and SnO2 systems for doping concentrations under cation percolation threshold.

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism of Cu-doped ZnO films probed by soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Herng, T S; Qi, D-C; Berlijn, T; Yi, J B; Yang, K S; Dai, Y; Feng, Y P; Santoso, I; Sánchez-Hanke, C; Gao, X Y; Wee, Andrew T S; Ku, W; Ding, J; Rusydi, A

    2010-11-12

    We report direct evidence of room-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in O-deficient ZnO:Cu films by using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption. Our measurements have revealed unambiguously two distinct features of Cu atoms associated with (i) magnetically ordered Cu ions present only in the oxygen-deficient samples and (ii) magnetically disordered regular Cu2+ ions present in all the samples. We find that a sufficient amount of both oxygen vacancies (V(O)) and Cu impurities is essential to the observed ferromagnetism, and a non-negligible portion of Cu impurities is uninvolved in the magnetic order. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose a microscopic "indirect double-exchange" model, in which alignments of localized large moments of Cu in the vicinity of the V(O) are mediated by the large-sized vacancy orbitals.

  15. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism of Cu-Doped ZnO Films Probed by Soft X-Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Herng, T.S.; Ku, W.; Qi, D.-C.; Berlijn, T.; Yi, J.B.; Yang, K.S.; Dai, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Santoso, I.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Gao, X.Y.; Wee, A.T.S.; Ding, J.; Rusydi, A.

    2010-11-08

    We report direct evidence of room-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in O-deficient ZnO:Cu films by using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption. Our measurements have revealed unambiguously two distinct features of Cu atoms associated with (i) magnetically ordered Cu ions present only in the oxygen-deficient samples and (ii) magnetically disordered regular Cu{sup 2+} ions present in all the samples. We find that a sufficient amount of both oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) and Cu impurities is essential to the observed ferromagnetism, and a non-negligible portion of Cu impurities is uninvolved in the magnetic order. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose a microscopic 'indirect double-exchange' model, in which alignments of localized large moments of Cu in the vicinity of the V{sub O} are mediated by the large-sized vacancy orbitals.

  16. Indication of intrinsic room-temperature ferromagnetism in Ti1-xCoxO2-δ thin film: An x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, K.; Koide, T.; Fujimori, A.; Tokano, H.; Manaka, H.; Tanaka, A.; Toyosaki, H.; Fukumura, T.; Kawasaki, M.

    2006-08-01

    Soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at the Co L2,3 edges of Co-doped rutile TiO2 at room temperature revealed clear multiplet features characteristic of ferromagnetic Co2+ ions coordinated by O2- ions, being in sharp contrast to the featureless XMCD spectrum of Co metal or metallic clusters. The absorption and XMCD spectra agree well with a full atomic-multiplet calculation for the Co2+ high-spin state in the D2h-symmetry crystal field at the Ti site in rutile TiO2. The results indicate that the ferromagnetism arises from the Co2+ ions substituting the Ti4+ ions.

  17. Driving Curie temperature towards room temperature in the half-metallic ferromagnet K2Cr8O16 by soft redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pirrotta, I; Fernández-Sanjulián, J; Moran, E; Alario-Franco, M A; Gonzalo, E; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F

    2012-02-14

    The half-metallic ferromagnet K(2)Cr(8)O(16) with the hollandite structure has been chemically modified using soft chemistry methods to increase the average oxidation state of chromium. The synthesis of the parent material has been performed under high pressure/high temperature conditions. Following this, different redox reactions have been carried out on K(2)Cr(8)O(16). Oxidation to obtain potassium-de-inserted derivatives, K(2-x)Cr(8)O(16) (0 ≤x≤ 1), has been investigated with electrochemical methods, while the synthesis of sizeable amounts was achieved chemically by using nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate as a highly oxidizing agent. The maximum amount of extracted K ions corresponds to x = 0.8. Upon oxidation the hollandite structure is maintained and the products keep high crystallinity. The de-insertion of potassium changes the Cr(3+)/Cr(4+) ratio, and therefore the magnetic properties. Interestingly, the Curie temperature increases from ca. 175 K to 250 K, getting therefore closer to room temperature.

  18. Free-standing and single-crystalline Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism and excellent magnetic response.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiu; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Tang, Jianshi; Lin, Ching-Chun; Hou, Te-Chien; Jiang, Xiaowei; Wang, Kang L; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2012-06-26

    High-aspect-ratio Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method in one step. This is the first report of ternary silicide nanowires using magnetic Mn ions to partially replace metal sites in the host matrix. Here we report the excellent magnetic characteristics of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, which exhibit strong ferromagnetism at room temperature and high magnetoresistance (MR) variation. As-synthesized Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires show a hyperbranched morphology and a spin-disorder behavior. The strong spin interaction in Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, induced by the substitution of Fe sublattices for magnetic Mn ions, was revealed in the hysteresis loops. The magnetization versus magnetic field (M-H) curves of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires are much less sensitive to the temperature variation from 10 to 300 K than those of FeSi nanowires. Remarkably, the excellent MR performance, -41.6% at 25 K with a magnetic field of 9 T, was demonstrated in an individual Fe(0.88)Mn(0.12)Si nanowire.

  19. Evidence for room temperature ferromagnetism in CuxZn1-xO from magnetic studies in CuxZn1-xO/CuO composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehra, M. S.; Dutta, P.; Singh, V.; Zhang, Y.; Wender, I.

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic studies in bulk 57% CuxZn1-xO/43% CuO composite prepared chemically with x =0.10 (0.03) are reported. Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility shows clear signature of the Néel temperature TN≃230K for pure CuO. Hysteresis loop studies in the zero-field-cooled sample show room-temperature ferromagnetism with coercivity Hc≃50Oe at 300K with strong temperature dependence for T <300K. A negative exchange bias He at 5K is observed when the sample is cooled from RT in H =20kOe, and its temperature dependence yields He→0 at TN=230K of CuO. These results and the temperature dependence of remanence Mr provide strong evidence that the CuxZn1-xO phase with x ≃0.10 is a ferromagnet with Tc≃400K. An electron magnetic resonance signal due to Cu2+ substituting for Zn2+ in CuxZn1-xO is also observed.

  20. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic semiconductors prepared by sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Dinia, A.; Schmerber, G.; Meny, C.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.; Beaurepaire, E.

    2005-06-15

    We have used magnetron cosputtering to grow Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic dilute semiconductors. The growth has been performed on SiO{sub 2}/Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. The Co concentration has been varied between 0.1 and 0.25 and the substrate temperature between room temperature and 600 deg. C. X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that for the films grown on Si substrates the structural quality of the film is improved by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. The films are textured with c axis of the wurtzite structure along the growth direction. However, for the films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate quasi-epitaxial films have been obtained for 600 deg. C substrate temperature. Magnetization measurements have shown that the ferromagnetism is directly correlated to the structural quality and appears by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. Moreover, for the highly textured film a clear magnetic perpendicular anisotropy has been evidenced with the easy magnetization axis along the growth direction. To evidence the intrinsic nature of the ferromagnetism in the films, transmission optical measurements have been used. They show three absorption bands that are characteristics of d-d transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Co{sup 2+}. This has been supported by nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic thermal variation.

  1. Theoretical studies on electronic states of Rh-C60. Possibility of a room-temperature organic ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Nakano, S; Kitagawa, Y; Kawakami, T; Okumura, M; Nagao, H; Yamaguchi, K

    2004-01-01

    A possible mechanism for a ferromagnetic interaction in the rhombic (Rh) form of C60 (Rh-C60) is suggested on the basis of theoretical studies in relation to cage distortion of the C60 unit in the polymerized 2D-plane. Band structure calculations on Rh-C60 show that cage distortion leads to competition between diamagnetic and ferromagnetic states,which give rise to the possibility of thermally populating the ferromagnetic state.

  2. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700–1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering. PMID:27527493

  3. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700–1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering.

  4. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700-1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering. PMID:27527493

  5. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in electrodeposited Co-doped ZnO nanostructured thin films by controlling the oxygen vacancy defects

    SciTech Connect

    Simimol, A.; Anappara, Aji A.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2015-06-07

    We report the growth of un-doped and cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures fabricated on FTO coated glass substrates using electrodeposition method. A detailed study on the effects of dopant concentration on morphology, structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the ZnO nanostructures has been carried out systematically by varying the Co concentration (c.{sub Co}) from 0.01 to 1 mM. For c.{sub Co }≤ 0.2 mM, h-wurtzite phase with no secondary phases of Co were present in the ZnO nanostructures. For c.{sub Co} ≤ 0.2 mM, the photoluminescence spectra exhibited a decrease in the intensity of ultraviolet emission as well as band-gap narrowing with an increase in dopant concentration. All the doped samples displayed a broad emission in the visible range and its intensity increased with an increase in Co concentration. It was found that the defect centers such as oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials were the source of the visible emission. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed, Co was primarily in the divalent state, replacing the Zn ion inside the tetrahedral crystal site of ZnO without forming any cluster or secondary phases of Co. The un-doped ZnO nanorods exhibited diamagnetic behavior and it remained up to a c.{sub Co} of 0.05 mM, while for c.{sub Co }> 0.05 mM, the ZnO nanostructures exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. The coercivity increased to 695 G for 0.2 mM Co-doped sample and then it decreased for c.{sub Co }> 0.2 mM. Our results illustrate that up to a threshold concentration of 0.2 mM, the strong ferromagnetism is due to the oxygen vacancy defects centers, which exist in the Co-doped ZnO nanostructures. The origin of strong ferromagnetism at room temperature in Co-doped ZnO nanostructures is attributed to the s-d exchange interaction between the localized spin moments resulting from the oxygen vacancies and d electrons of Co{sup 2+} ions. Our findings provide a new insight for tuning the

  6. On the temperature dependence of spin pumping in ferromagnet-topological insulator-ferromagnet spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. A.; Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    Topological insulators (TIs) have a large potential for spintronic devices owing to their spin-polarized, counter-propagating surface states. Recently, we have investigated spin pumping in a ferromagnet-TI-ferromagnet structure at room temperature. Here, we present the temperature-dependent measurement of spin pumping down to 10 K, which shows no variation with temperature.

  7. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    SciTech Connect

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a high temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.

  8. X-ray spectroscopic study of the charge state and local orderingof room-temperature ferromagnetic Mn oped ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.; Gupta, Amita; Sharma, Parmanand; Rao, K.V.; Marcus,M.A.; Dong, C.L.; Guillen, J.M.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Mattesini, M.; Glans,P.A.; Smith, K.E.; Chang, C.L.; Ahuja, R.

    2007-08-07

    The charge state and local ordering of Mn doped into a pulsed laser deposited single-phase thin film of ZnO are investigated by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the O K-, Mn K- and L-edges, and X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K- and Mn L-edge. This film is found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. EXAFS measurement shows that Mn{sup 2+} replaces Zn site in tetrahedral symmetry, and there is no evidence for either metallic Mn or MnO in the film. Upon Mn doping, the top of O 2p valence band extends into the bandgap indicating additional charge carries being created.

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material.

  10. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material. PMID:25667996

  11. Influence of interstitial Mn on spin order and dynamics in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alice

    Mn1+δSb is a well-known, high Curie temperature, ferromagnetic metal. It has particular importance because it, and closely related MnBi, show promise as alternatives to rare-earth-containing permanent magnets, and as magneto-optic media. To exploit these materials' useful properties, it is desirable to tune and optimize the magnetic properties. To achieve this, the magnetic interactions, and the effects of doping and defects must be understood. In Mn1+δSb the magnetic order is highly sensitive to the interstitial Mn ion content, δ, suggesting a route to tune the properties. However, detailed theoretical and experimental investigations of the effect of the interstitial ion, Mn2, have been lacking, probably due to a prevailing view in the literature that the Mn2 site is nonmagnetic. We examine the magnetic state of Mn2, and its influence on the magnetic properties of Mn1+δSb. We use a combination of neutron scattering techniques alongside detailed calculations to show that the Mn2 site is in-fact magnetic, and has a dramatic impact on the magnetic dynamics in Mn1+δSb. An unusual, broad, intense feature is identified in the magnetic dynamics which cannot be explained by the long-range symmetry of the material. This reveals an area in which current theoretical/modeling techniques limit our ability to understand the magnetic excitations revealed by neutron scattering. This investigation elucidates important aspects of the behavior of Mn1+δSb, whilst highlighting requirements for future research to understand the major influence of the interstitial ion on the magnetic properties.

  12. Visible photoluminescence and room temperature ferromagnetism in high In-content InGaN:Yb nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, K.; Palai, R.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W. M.; Guinel, M. J.-F.; Huhtinen, H.; Mundle, R.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2015-09-28

    We report the growth of high indium content InGaN:Yb nanorods grown on c-plane sapphire (0001) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns recorded during and after the growth revealed crystalline nature of the nanorods. The nanorods were examined using electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The photoluminescence studies of the nanorods showed the visible emissions. The In composition was calculated from x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the photoluminescence spectroscopy. The In-concentration was obtained from photoluminescence using modified Vegard's law and found to be around 37% for InGaN and 38% for Yb (5 ± 1%)-doped InGaN with a bowing parameter b = 1.01 eV. The Yb-doped InGaN showed significant enhancement in photoluminescence properties compared to the undoped InGaN. The Yb-doped InGaN nanorods demonstrated the shifting of the photoluminescence band at room temperature, reducing luminescence amplitude temperature dependent fluctuation, and significant narrowing of excitonic emission band as compared to the undoped InGaN. The magnetic properties measured by superconducting quantum interference devices reveals room temperature ferromagnetism, which can be explained by the double exchange mechanism and magnetostriction.

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in the mixtures of the TiO2 and Co3O4 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, A.; Pinel, E. Fernandez; Quesada, A.; Lorite, I.; Plaza, M.; Pérez, L.; Jiménez-Villacorta, F.; de La Venta, J.; Martín-González, M. S.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.; Fernandez, J. F.; Llopis, J.; García, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    We report here the observation of ferromagnetism (FM) at 300 K in mixtures of TiO2 and Co3O4 powders despite the antiferromagnetic and diamagnetic characters of both oxides, respectively. The ferromagnetic behavior is found in the early stages of reaction and only for TiO2 in anatase structure; no FM is found for identical samples prepared with rutile- TiO2 . Optical spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectra confirm a surface reduction of octahedral Co+3→Co+2 in the mixtures which is in the origin of the observed magnetism.

  14. Role of sp-d exchange interactions in room-temperature photoluminescence and ferromagnetism of CuCo Co-doped ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javed; Wang, Baiqi; Liu, Xiaofang; Zhu, Huichao; Yu, Dapeng; Yu, Ronghai

    2009-12-01

    CuCo co-doped ZnO nanorods have been synthesized via a soft chemistry route without using any surfactant, seed and catalyst. Structural analyses reveal that the samples of nominal compositions Cu0.01Co0.02Zn0.97O and Cu0.02Co0.01Zn0.97O have single hexagonal wurtzite structure without forming any extra secondary phase. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the Cu co-doping in Co doped ZnO nanorods strongly influences the optical band structure and gives significant red shifts in the PL spectra. Furthermore, magnetic measurements of CuCo co-doped ZnO nanorods exhibit obvious room temperature ferromagnetism at low concentrations of Cu (< 1%) co-doping, while at higher concentrations of Cu co-doping, magnetization drops off sharply. An experimental relationship has been found to explain the redshift of E(g) edge in PL and the origin of observed ferromagnetism as function of Cu co-dopant concentration due to the spin exchange interactions between the sp band and localized spins of d electrons of dopants, which is useful for future semiconductor based spintronic devices.

  15. Room temperature ferromagnetism of Cr-doped In2O3 bi-layer consisted of a triangular crystal-amorphous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhong, Dai-Jhen; Chen, Bo-Yu; Hsu, Chun-Yu; Liang, Yaun-Chao; Chou, Hsiung

    In2O3 film is a very conductive and can be modified to exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism upon doping of Cr. In this study, we developed a method, based on the RF power, to control the Cr-doped In2O3 (CIO) thin-films to form a crystalline phase, at a high power region, or an amorphous phase, at a low power region. When the RF power is set at a medium power, the CIO film self-assemble into a two layers system consisted of crystalline and amorphous layers with interface manifests zig-zag feature. The two layer system has a saturation magnetization Ms, of ~0.27 to ~1.78 emu/c.c. with increase of Cr-doping content. In contrast, the Ms of the amorphous films are ~0.45 emu/c.c independent of Cr content. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements suggested that Cr existed in mixed oxidation states in all films. The Cr with lower oxidation state prefers crystalline structure, while the higher oxidation state Cr prefers an amorphous structure. Due to this charge imbalance, a transport of charge across the interface originates the ferromagnetic interaction, and hence, we observe enhanced MS in crystal-amorphous interface system. Corresponding Author.

  16. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    PubMed

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  17. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, X.; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P.; He, Q.; Paull, R. J.; Clarkson, J. D.; Kudrnovský, J.; Turek, I.; Kuneš, J.; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C. T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  18. Investigation of local structural environments and room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Fe,Cu)-codoped In2O3 diluted magnetic oxide films.

    PubMed

    An, Yukai; Xing, Yaya; Pan, Fei; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-05-11

    The local structural, optical, magnetic and transport properties of (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 (0.06 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering have been systemically studied by different experimental techniques. Detailed structural analyses using XRD, XPS, EXAFS and full multiple-scattering ab initio theoretical calculations of Fe K-edge XANES show that the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films have the same cubic bixbyite structure as pure In2O3. The doped Fe ions exist at both +2 and +3 oxidation states, substituting for the In(3+) sites in the In2O3 lattice and forming a FeIn + 2VO complex with the O vacancy in the first coordination shell of Fe. However, the co-doped Cu atoms are not incorporated into the In2O3 lattice and form the Cu metal clusters due to high ionization energy. UV-Vis measurements show that the optical band gap Eg decreases monotonically with the increase of Fe concentration, implying an increasing s-pd exchange interaction in the films. All the films display intrinsic room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism and the saturated magnetization (Ms) increases monotonically with Fe doping. The temperature dependence of the resistivity data suggests the conduction mechanism of Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) at low temperature, confirming that the carriers are localized. It can be concluded that the observed RT ferromagnetism in the films originates from the overlapping of polarons mediated by oxygen vacancies based on the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model. The variation of the localization effect of carriers with Fe doping can obviously adjust the magnetic exchange interaction in the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films. PMID:27139011

  19. Investigation of local structural environments and room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Fe,Cu)-codoped In2O3 diluted magnetic oxide films.

    PubMed

    An, Yukai; Xing, Yaya; Pan, Fei; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-05-11

    The local structural, optical, magnetic and transport properties of (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 (0.06 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering have been systemically studied by different experimental techniques. Detailed structural analyses using XRD, XPS, EXAFS and full multiple-scattering ab initio theoretical calculations of Fe K-edge XANES show that the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films have the same cubic bixbyite structure as pure In2O3. The doped Fe ions exist at both +2 and +3 oxidation states, substituting for the In(3+) sites in the In2O3 lattice and forming a FeIn + 2VO complex with the O vacancy in the first coordination shell of Fe. However, the co-doped Cu atoms are not incorporated into the In2O3 lattice and form the Cu metal clusters due to high ionization energy. UV-Vis measurements show that the optical band gap Eg decreases monotonically with the increase of Fe concentration, implying an increasing s-pd exchange interaction in the films. All the films display intrinsic room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism and the saturated magnetization (Ms) increases monotonically with Fe doping. The temperature dependence of the resistivity data suggests the conduction mechanism of Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) at low temperature, confirming that the carriers are localized. It can be concluded that the observed RT ferromagnetism in the films originates from the overlapping of polarons mediated by oxygen vacancies based on the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model. The variation of the localization effect of carriers with Fe doping can obviously adjust the magnetic exchange interaction in the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films.

  20. Room temperature ferromagnetism in epitaxial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films grown on r-sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Punugupati, Sandhyarani Narayan, Jagdish; Hunte, Frank

    2015-05-21

    We report on the epitaxial growth and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films grown on r-sapphire substrate using pulsed laser deposition. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) (2θ and Φ) and TEM characterization confirm that the films are grown epitaxially. The r-plane (011{sup ¯}2) of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grows on r-plane of sapphire. The epitaxial relations can be written as [011{sup ¯}2] Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} ‖ [011{sup ¯}2] Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (out-of-plane) and [1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}20] Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} ‖ [1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}20] Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in-plane). The as-deposited films showed ferromagnetic behavior up to 400 K but ferromagnetism almost vanishes with oxygen annealing. The Raman spectroscopy data together with strain measurements using high resolution XRD indicate that ferromagnetism in r-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films is due to the strain caused by defects, such as oxygen vacancies.

  1. Comments on "Synthesis aspects, structural, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and room temperature ferromagnetism of zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand" by K. Shakila and S. Kalainathan, Spectrochim. Acta 135 A (2015) 1059-1065

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Nadkarni, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    Shakila and Kalainathan report on the synthetic and structural aspects of a zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand, which exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism. In this comment, many points of criticism, concerning the characterization of this so called zinc iodide complex of Schiff based ligand are highlighted to prove that the title paper is completely erroneous.

  2. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; et al

    2015-06-15

    We repormore » t elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1+δSb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.« less

  3. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  4. Oxygen vacancy induced phase formation and room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Co-doped TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P.; Mishra, N. C.; Choudhary, R. J.; Banerjee, A.; Shripathi, T.; Lalla, N. P.; Annapoorni, S.; Rath, Chandana

    2012-08-01

    TiO2 and Co-doped TiO2 (CTO) thin films deposited at various oxygen partial pressures by pulsed laser deposition exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) independent of their phase. Films deposited at 0.1 mTorr oxygen partial pressure show a complete rutile phase confirmed from glancing angle x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. At the highest oxygen partial pressure, i.e. 300 mTorr, although the TiO2 film shows a complete anatase phase, a small peak corresponding to the rutile phase along with the anatase phase is identified in the case of CTO film. An increase in O to Ti/(Ti+Co) ratio with increase in oxygen partial pressure is observed from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is revealed from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that oxygen vacancies are found to be higher in the CTO film than TiO2, while the valency of cobalt remains in the +2 state. Therefore, the CTO film deposited at 300 mTorr does not show a complete anatase phase unlike the TiO2 film deposited at the same partial pressure. We conclude that RTFM in both films is not due to impurities/contaminants, as confirmed from XPS depth profiling and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), but due to oxygen vacancies. The magnitude of moment, however, depends not only on the phase of TiO2 but also on the crystallinity of the films.

  5. Achieving High-Temperature Ferromagnetic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat

    Topological insulators (TIs) are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic and spintronic devices, including TI-based quantum computation. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a TI system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to a realization of several predicted novel physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the TI surface at specific locations without introducing spin scattering centers could open up new possibilities for devices. Here, we demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) to a TI (Bi2Se3); this interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the FMI (EuS) is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The induced magnetism at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and spin-momentum locking feature of the TI surface is found to greatly enhance the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of the TI/FMI bilayer system. Due to the short range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a TI, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered TI could allow for an efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies. Work supported by MIT MRSEC through the MRSEC Program of NSF under award number DMR-0819762, NSF Grant DMR-1207469, the ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301, and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF grant DMR-1231319.

  6. Room temperature ferromagnetic properties of epitaxial (111) Y0.225Sr0.775CoO3-δ thin film grown on single crystalline (111) MgO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Yeog Son, Jong

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxial (111) Y0.225Sr0.775CoO3-δ (YSCO) thin films were deposited on single crystalline (111) MgO substrates by a pulsed laser deposition method. The YSCO thin film exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism with a remanent magnetization of 1.5×10-5 emu. The magnetic force microscopy (MFM) study revealed that the YSCO thin film had a mosaic MFM domain structure. The comparison of domain wall energy for the YSCO and PZT indicates that the large domain wall energy induce the large domain size, though the large magnetization value reduce the magnetic domain size in the case of Co. According to the optical conductivity analysis by spectroscopic ellipsometry, it is inferred that the transition from the intermediate spin state to the high spin state of the YSCO thin film is attributed to the ferromagnetism of the Co4+ ion.

  7. Degradation of the remanent ferromagnetic state under the action of ferroelectric relaxation processes in Co/(1-x)PMN-xPT/Co hybrids: Possible implications on cryogenic and room-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Zeibekis, M.; Vertsioti, G.; Zhang, S. J.

    2014-08-01

    Low-dimensional hybrid structures of heterogeneous constituents usually exhibit abnormal properties, a fact that makes such hybrids attractive for various cryogenic and room-temperature applications. Here, we studied Co/(1 - x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3/Co (Co/PMN-xPT/Co) with x = 0.29 and 0.30, specifically focusing on the evolution of the remanent ferromagnetic state, mrem of the Co outer layers in the whole temperature range from 300 K down to 10 K, upon application of an external electric field, Eex. We observed that mrem was vulnerable to degradation through the occurrence of electric field-induced magnetic instabilities (EMIs) that appeared only when Eex ≠ 0 kV/cm and were facilitated as Eex increases. However, EMIs completely ceased below a characteristic temperature Tces = 170 K even for the maximum |Eex| = 5 kV/cm applied in this work. A direct comparison of the magnetization data of the Co/PMN-xPT/Co hybrids reported here with the electromechanical properties of the parent PMN-xPT crystals plausibly indicates that EMIs are motivated by the coupling of the ferromagnetic domains of the Co outer layers with the ferroelectric domains of the PMN-xPT crystal. These results highlight the drawback of EMIs in relevant hybrids and delimit the temperature regime for the reliable operation of the Co/PMN-xPT/Co ones studied here.

  8. Switchable hardening of a ferromagnet at fixed temperature.

    PubMed

    Silevitch, D M; Aeppli, G; Rosenbaum, T F

    2010-02-16

    The intended use of a magnetic material, from information storage to power conversion, depends crucially on its domain structure, traditionally crafted during materials synthesis. By contrast, we show that an external magnetic field, applied transverse to the preferred magnetization of a model disordered uniaxial ferromagnet, is an isothermal regulator of domain pinning. At elevated temperatures, near the transition into the paramagnet, modest transverse fields increase the pinning, stabilize the domain structure, and harden the magnet, until a point where the field induces quantum tunneling of the domain walls and softens the magnet. At low temperatures, tunneling completely dominates the domain dynamics and provides an interpretation of the quantum phase transition in highly disordered magnets as a localization/delocalization transition for domain walls. While the energy scales of the rare earth ferromagnet studied here restrict the effects to cryogenic temperatures, the principles discovered are general and should be applicable to existing classes of highly anisotropic ferromagnets with ordering at room temperature or above.

  9. Room temperature polyesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.S.; Stupp, S.I. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new room temperature polymerization method has been developed for the synthesis of high molecular weight polyesters directly from carboxylic acids and phenols. The solution polymerization reaction proceeds under mild conditions, near neutral pH, and also avoids the use of preactivated acid derivatives for esterification. The reaction is useful in the preparation of isoregic ordered chains with translational polar symmetry and also in the polymerization of functionalized or chiral monomers. The conditions required for polymerization in the carbodiimide-based reaction included catalysis by the 1:1 molecular complex formed by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and p-toluenesulfonic acid. These conditions were established through studies on a model system involving esterification of p-toluic acid and p-cresol. Self-condensation of several hydroxy acid monomers by this reaction has produced routinely good yields of polyesters with molecular weights greater than 15,000. It is believed that the high extents of reaction required for significant degrees of polymerization result from suppression of the side reaction leading to N-acylurea. The utility of this reaction in the formation of polar chains from sensitive monomers is demonstrated hereby the polycondensation of a chiral hydroxy acid.

  10. Finding the Curie Temperature for Ferromagnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizowski, Czeslaw; Budzik, Sylwia; Cebulski, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    The laboratory exercise described in this paper is based on a well-known qualitative demonstration of Curie temperature. A long ferromagnetic wire, in the form of a spiral, is attracted to a strong permanent magnet placed near its midpoint (see Fig. 1). The temperature of the wire is increased by passing a current through it. When the temperature…

  11. Understanding the magnetic interaction between intrinsic defects and impurity ions in room-temperature ferromagnetic Mg1-x Fe x O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Wang, Yung Jui; Li, Xin; Glans, Per-Anders; Fang, Mei; Riazanova, Anastasia V.; Belova, Lyubov M.; Rao, K. V.; Luo, Yi; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Guo, Jinghua

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the nature and characteristics of the intrinsic defects and impurities in the dielectric barrier separating the ferromagnetic electrodes in a magnetic tunneling junction is of great importance for understanding the often observed ‘barrier-breakdown’ therein. In this connection, we present herein systematic experimental (SQUID and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy) and computational studies on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mg1-x Fe x O thin films. Our studies reveal: (i) defect aggregates comprised of basic and trimer units (Fe impurity coupled to 1 or 2 Mg vacancies) and (ii) existence of two competing magnetic orders, defect- and dopant-induced, with spin densities aligning anti-parallel if the trimer is present in the oxide matrix. These findings open up new avenues for designing tunneling barriers with high endurance and tunneling effect upon tuning the concentration/distribution of the two magnetic orders.

  12. Understanding the magnetic interaction between intrinsic defects and impurity ions in room-temperature ferromagnetic Mg1-xFexO thin films.

    PubMed

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Wang, Yung Jui; Li, Xin; Glans, Per-Anders; Fang, Mei; Riazanova, Anastasia V; Belova, Lyubov M; Rao, K V; Luo, Yi; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Guo, Jinghua

    2016-04-20

    Understanding the nature and characteristics of the intrinsic defects and impurities in the dielectric barrier separating the ferromagnetic electrodes in a magnetic tunneling junction is of great importance for understanding the often observed 'barrier-breakdown' therein. In this connection, we present herein systematic experimental (SQUID and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy) and computational studies on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mg1-xFexO thin films. Our studies reveal: (i) defect aggregates comprised of basic and trimer units (Fe impurity coupled to 1 or 2 Mg vacancies) and (ii) existence of two competing magnetic orders, defect- and dopant-induced, with spin densities aligning anti-parallel if the trimer is present in the oxide matrix. These findings open up new avenues for designing tunneling barriers with high endurance and tunneling effect upon tuning the concentration/distribution of the two magnetic orders. PMID:26987741

  13. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  14. Ferromagnetism in one dimension: Critical temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curilef, S.; Del Pino, L. A.; Orellana, P.

    2005-12-01

    Ferromagnetism in one dimension is a observation which has been reported in a recent work [Gambardella , Nature (London) 416, 301 (2002)], and it is thought that anisotropy barriers are responsible in that relevant effect. In the present work, transitions between two different magnetic ordering phases are obtained as a result of an alternative approach. The critical temperature has been estimated by the Binder method. Ferromagnetic long-range interactions have been included in a special Hamiltonian through a power law that decays at large interparticle distance r as r-α for α⩾0 . If the range of interactions decreases (α→∞) , the trend of the critical temperature disappears, but if the range of interactions increases (α→0) , the trend of the critical temperature approaches to the mean field approximation. The crossover between these two limiting situations is discussed.

  15. Switchable hardening of a ferromagnet at fixed temperature.

    PubMed

    Silevitch, D M; Aeppli, G; Rosenbaum, T F

    2010-02-16

    The intended use of a magnetic material, from information storage to power conversion, depends crucially on its domain structure, traditionally crafted during materials synthesis. By contrast, we show that an external magnetic field, applied transverse to the preferred magnetization of a model disordered uniaxial ferromagnet, is an isothermal regulator of domain pinning. At elevated temperatures, near the transition into the paramagnet, modest transverse fields increase the pinning, stabilize the domain structure, and harden the magnet, until a point where the field induces quantum tunneling of the domain walls and softens the magnet. At low temperatures, tunneling completely dominates the domain dynamics and provides an interpretation of the quantum phase transition in highly disordered magnets as a localization/delocalization transition for domain walls. While the energy scales of the rare earth ferromagnet studied here restrict the effects to cryogenic temperatures, the principles discovered are general and should be applicable to existing classes of highly anisotropic ferromagnets with ordering at room temperature or above. PMID:20133728

  16. Corneal storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sachs, U; Goldman, K; Valenti, J; Kaufman, H E

    1978-06-01

    Short-term eye banking is based mainly on moist chamber and McCarey-Kaufman medium (M-K medium) preservation. Both involve a controlled 4 C temperature for storage. Warming the cornea to room temperature, however, drastically affects the endothelial viability. On enzymatic staining and histological study, the M-K medium-stored rabbit corneas had more normal endothelium than did "moist chamber" eyes when storage was prolonged for seven days at room temperature. In human corneas that were kept at 4 C for 24 hours and then exposed to a temperature of 25 C, destruction of organelles had occurred by six hours and was increased by 12 hours. Corneas that were kept in M-K medium had relatively intact endothelium after four days, but cell disruption and vacuolation was present by the seventh day. The M-K medium, therefore, affords protection to tissue warmed to room temperature, where metabolic activity is resumed. PMID:350203

  17. Temperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar; Harold J. , Harris; Christopher Kelvin

    2012-07-17

    A heater is described. The heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The ferromagnetic conductor is positioned relative to the electrical conductor such that an electromagnetic field produced by time-varying current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor confines a majority of the flow of the electrical current to the electrical conductor at temperatures below or near a selected temperature.

  18. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  19. Ferromagnetic resonance in nanostructures with temperature-controlled interlayer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishchuk, D. M.; Tykhonenko-Polishchuk, Yu. O.; Kravets, A. F.; Tovstolytkin, A. I.; Dzhezherya, Yu. I.; Pogorily, A. M.; Korenivski, V.

    2016-09-01

    This study is a comprehensive analysis of a multilayer F1/f(d)/F2pin structure's magnetic resonance properties, wherein F1 and F2pin are the free and exchange-coupled strong magnetic layers, and f is the weakly magnetic layer with a Curie point in the room temperature region. Depending on the magnetic state of the spacer f (ferromagnetic or paramagnetic) the exchange interaction between the F2 and F2pin layers becomes a function of the temperature, which opens up opportunities for practical applications. The obtained results show that the interlayer exchange coupling can be enhanced by decreasing the thickness of the spacer d, or by lowering the temperature. Strengthening the exchange coupling leads to a stronger manifestation of unidirectional anisotropy in the ferromagnetic resonance layer F1, as well as to a broadening of the resonance line that is atypical for thin films. The observed features are analyzed in the context of comparing the effects of two different natures: the influence of the spacer d and the influence of the temperature. Thus, the behavior of changes to the unidirectional anisotropy remains the same given variation of both the thickness of the spacer and the temperature. However the broadening of the magnetic resonance line is more sensitive to changes in the interlayer interaction caused by variation of d, and is less susceptible to changes caused by temperature.

  20. Inherent room temperature ferromagnetism and dopant dependent Raman studies of PbSe, Pb{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}Se, and Pb{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}Se

    SciTech Connect

    Gayner, Chhatrasal; Kar, Kamal K.

    2015-03-14

    Polycrystalline lead selenide (PbSe) doped with copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) was prepared to understand its magnetic behaviour and Raman activity. The processing conditions, influence of dopants (magnetically active and non-active) and their respective compositions on the magnetic properties and Raman active mode were studied. A surprising/anomalous room temperature ferromagnetism (hysteresis loop) is noticed in bulk diamagnetic PbSe, which is found to be natural or inherent characteristic of material, and depends on the crystallite size, dopant, and developed strain due to dopant/defects. The magnetic susceptibility (−1.71 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) and saturated magnetic susceptibility (−2.74 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) are found to be higher than the earlier reported value (diamagnetic: −1.0 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) in bulk PbSe. With increase of Cu concentration (2% to 10%) in PbSe, the saturated magnetic susceptibility decreases from −1.22 × 10{sup −4} to −0.85 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe. Whereas for Ni dopant, the saturated magnetic susceptibility increases to −2.96 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe at 2% Ni doped PbSe. But it further decreases with dopant concentration. In these doped PbSe, the shifting of longitudinal (LO) phonon mode was also studied by the Raman spectroscopy. The shifting of LO mode is found to be dopant dependent, and the frequency shift of LO mode is associated with the induced strain that created by the dopants and vacancies. This asymmetry in LO phonon mode (peak shift and shape) may be due to the intraband electronic transition of dopants. The variation in magnetic susceptibility and Raman shifts are sensitive to crystallite size, nature of dopant, concentration of dopants, and induced strain due to dopants.

  1. Evidence for weak ferromagnetic moment within the basal plane of hematite natural crystals at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Hernandez, Fatima; Hirt, Ann M.

    2013-10-01

    Low-temperature magnetization of hematite within the basal plane has been studied in a collection of natural crystals by means of torque magnetometry. Comparison between the torque curves at room temperature and at 77 K allows identification of a weak ferromagnetic moment constrained within the basal plane at temperatures well below the Morin transition. Annealing the samples produces the expected reduction of the weak ferromagnetic moment, but there is also a relationship between the ferromagnetic moment before and after annealing. Low-temperature measurements after the annealing experiment reveal the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that survives the annealing. This observation suggests the magnetic structure of natural hematite crystals below the Morin transition can still be a carrier of magnetization.

  2. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  3. Two-dimensional organometallic porous sheets with possible high-temperature ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Kan, Erjun; Wu, Xiaojun; Lee, Changhoon; Shim, Ji Hoon; Lu, Ruifeng; Xiao, Chuanyun; Deng, Kaiming

    2012-09-01

    With the rapid development of modern nanotechnology, molecular self-assembly has become an important method to fabricate new functional devices, and to provide an arena for theoretical material designs. In this paper, we propose that freestanding two-dimensional organometallic porous sheets (PSs), which can be formed by molecular self-assembly on metal surfaces, are ideal low-dimensional magnetic materials with room-temperature ferromagnetism. Through comprehensive first-principles calculations, we show that the freestanding organometallic sheets, which are assembled by transition metals (TMs) (Mn and V) and benzene molecules, favor ferromagnetic coupling with strong exchange interactions. More importantly, we predict that the Curie-temperature of V-PS is close to room temperature using a simplified mean-field expression, compared to any organometallic sheets discovered previously. In terms of the recent progress in the molecular self-assembly approach, our results indicate great potential for building room-temperature magnetic organometallic sheets with small magnetic molecules.

  4. Temperature limited heaters using phase transformation of ferromagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Vitek, John Michael [Oak Ridge, TN; Brady, Michael Patrick [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-06

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Systems and methods for making heaters are described herein. At least one heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The heater provides a first amount of heat at a lower temperature. The heater may provide a second reduced amount of heat when the heater reaches a selected temperature, or enters a selected temperature range, at which the ferromagnetic conductor undergoes a phase transformation.

  5. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    DOE PAGES

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Parker, David S.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Williams, T. J.; Taylor, A. E.

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientationmore » that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.« less

  6. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  7. Prospects for high temperature ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, T.; Masek, J.; Goncharuk, N. A.; Wang, K. Y.; Edmonds, K. W.; Rushforth, A. W.; Campion, R. P.; Zhao, L. X.; Foxon, C. T.; Gallagher, B. L.; MacDonald, A. H.; Polini, M.; Sawicki, M.; Koenig, J.

    2006-03-01

    We report on a comprehensive combined experimental and theoretical study of Courie temperature trends in (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductors. Broad agreement between theoretical expectations and measured data allows us to conclude that Tc in high-quality metallic samples increases linearly with the number of uncompensated local moments on MnGa acceptors, with no sign of saturation. Room temperature ferromagnetism is expected for a 10% concentration of MnGa. Based on the analysis of magnetotransport and magnetization data we find no fundamental obstacle to substitutional MnGa doping in high-quality materials beyond our current maximum level of 6.8%, although this achievement will require further advances in growth control. Modest charge compensation does not limit the maximum Tc possible in ferromagnetic semiconductors based on (Ga,Mn)As. Ref: Jungwirth et al. Phys. Rev. B 72, 165204 (2005).

  8. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  9. Room temperature long range ferromagnetic ordering in Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} nano magnetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Sarveena, Chand, Jagdish; Verma, S.; Singh, M.; Kotnala, R. K.; Batoo, K. M.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and magnetic behavior of sol-gel autocombustion synthesized nanocrystalline Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer(VSM). Sample of high purity and high homogeneity was obtained by calcination at low temperature (500°C) resulting in nanoparticles of average diameter ∼15nm as determined by XRD and further confirmed by TEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selective area diffraction (SAED) confirmed the single phase of the sample. Mössbauer results are supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic coupling at room temperature finding material utility in magnetic storage data. The existence of iron in ferric state confirmed by isomer shift is a clear evidence of improved magnetic properties of the present system.

  10. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling.

    PubMed

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S; Assaf, Badih A; Jamer, Michelle E; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-05-26

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends ~2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies. PMID:27225124

  11. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling.

    PubMed

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S; Assaf, Badih A; Jamer, Michelle E; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-05-09

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends ~2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies.

  12. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S.; Assaf, Badih A.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W.; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends ~2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies.

  13. Exchange bias and room-temperature magnetic order in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Manuel; Ibrahim, Fatima; Boukari, Samy; Isshiki, Hironari; Joly, Loïc; Peter, Moritz; Studniarek, Michał; Da Costa, Victor; Jabbar, Hashim; Davesne, Vincent; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Chen, Jinjie; Arabski, Jacek; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Chen, Kai; Ohresser, Philippe; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Scheurer, Fabrice; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mebarek; Beaurepaire, Eric; Bowen, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Molecular semiconductors may exhibit antiferromagnetic correlations well below room temperature. Although inorganic antiferromagnetic layers may exchange bias single-molecule magnets, the reciprocal effect of an antiferromagnetic molecular layer magnetically pinning an inorganic ferromagnetic layer through exchange bias has so far not been observed. We report on the magnetic interplay, extending beyond the interface, between a cobalt ferromagnetic layer and a paramagnetic organic manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) layer. These ferromagnetic/organic interfaces are called spinterfaces because spin polarization arises on them. The robust magnetism of the Co/MnPc spinterface stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature within subsequent MnPc monolayers away from the interface. The inferred magnetic coupling strength is much larger than that found in similar bulk, thin or ultrathin systems. In addition, at lower temperature, the antiferromagnetic MnPc layer induces an exchange bias on the Co film, which is magnetically pinned. These findings create new routes towards designing organic spintronic devices.

  14. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  15. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  16. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  17. Evidence For Weak Ferromagnetic Moment Within The Basal Plane Of Hematite Natural Crystals At Low-Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. M.; Hirt, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hematite is an iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) that represents the most oxidized state in the wüstite-magnetite-hematite system. Hematite is antiferromagnetic (AFM) at room temperature with a small canted moment lying within the crystal symmetry plane or basal plane (weak ferromagnetism, WFM). Al low temperatures hematite undergoes a magnetic phase transition from WFM to a pure antiferromagnetic configuration (AF), which is known as the Morin transition. Low-temperature magnetization of hematite within the basal has been studied in a collection of natural crystals by means of torque magnetometry. Comparison between the torque curves at room temperature and at 77 K allows identification of a weak ferromagnetic moment constrained within the basal plane at temperatures well below the Morin transition. Annealing the samples produces the expected reduction of the weak ferromagnetic moment, but there is also a relationship between the ferromagnetic moment before and after annealing. Low temperature measurements after the annealing experiment reveal the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that survives the annealing. This observation suggests the magnetic structure of natural hematite crystals below the Morin transition can still be a carrier of magnetization.

  18. Experimental Demonstration of Room-Temperature Spin Transport in n-Type Germanium Epilayers.

    PubMed

    Dushenko, S; Koike, M; Ando, Y; Shinjo, T; Myronov, M; Shiraishi, M

    2015-05-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of room-temperature spin transport in n-type Ge epilayers grown on a Si(001) substrate. By utilizing spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance, which inherently endows a spin battery function for semiconductors connected with a ferromagnet, a pure spin current is generated in the n-Ge at room temperature. The pure spin current is detected by using the inverse spin-Hall effect of either a Pt or Pd electrode on n-Ge. From a theoretical model that includes a geometrical contribution, the spin diffusion length in n-Ge at room temperature is estimated to be 660 nm. Moreover, the spin relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature, in agreement with a recently proposed theory of donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Room-Temperature Spin Transport in n -Type Germanium Epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushenko, S.; Koike, M.; Ando, Y.; Shinjo, T.; Myronov, M.; Shiraishi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of room-temperature spin transport in n -type Ge epilayers grown on a Si(001) substrate. By utilizing spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance, which inherently endows a spin battery function for semiconductors connected with a ferromagnet, a pure spin current is generated in the n -Ge at room temperature. The pure spin current is detected by using the inverse spin-Hall effect of either a Pt or Pd electrode on n -Ge . From a theoretical model that includes a geometrical contribution, the spin diffusion length in n -Ge at room temperature is estimated to be 660 nm. Moreover, the spin relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature, in agreement with a recently proposed theory of donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

  20. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-15

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1+δSb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  1. Towards a new class of heavy ion doped magnetic semiconductors for room temperature applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juwon; Subramaniam, Nagarajan Ganapathi; Agnieszka Kowalik, Iwona; Nisar, Jawad; Lee, Jaechul; Kwon, Younghae; Lee, Jaechoon; Kang, Taewon; Peng, Xiangyang; Arvanitis, Dimitri; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The article presents, using Bi doped ZnO, an example of a heavy ion doped oxide semiconductor, highlighting a novel p-symmetry interaction of the electronic states to stabilize ferromagnetism. The study includes both ab initio theory and experiments, which yield clear evidence for above room temperature ferromagnetism. ZnBixO1−x thin films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique. The room temperature ferromagnetism finds its origin in the holes introduced by the Bi doping and the p-p coupling between Bi and the host atoms. A sizeable magnetic moment is measured by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the O K-edge, probing directly the spin polarization of the O(2p) states. This result is in agreement with the theoretical predictions and inductive magnetometry measurements. Ab initio calculations of the electronic and magnetic structure of ZnBixO1−x at various doping levels allow to trace the origin of the ferromagnetic character of this material. It appears, that the spin-orbit energy of the heavy ion Bi stabilizes the ferromagnetic phase. Thus, ZnBixO1−x doped with a heavy non-ferromagnetic element, such as Bi, is a credible example of a candidate material for a new class of compounds for spintronics applications, based on the spin polarization of the p states. PMID:26592564

  2. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  3. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  4. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  5. Curie temperatures of zinc-blende half-metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübler, J.

    2003-06-01

    Using density-functional theory in the local-density approximation and spin-fluctuation theory, the Curie temperatures of the zinc-blende half-metallic ferromagnets VAs, CrAs, MnAs and the Heusler compound NiMnSb have been estimated, the lower bounds obtained being ab initio. The orders of magnitude are the same as the Curie temperature of the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb with Tc=701 K. Of the three compounds VAs, CrAs, and MnAs, the highest Tc is calculated for CrAs, for which the Fermi energy is in the middle of the minority-spin electron gap; its Curie temperature might be as high as 1000 K. The Curie temperature drops sharply when the Fermi energy moves into the minority-electron conduction band as in the case of MnAs.

  6. Room temperature optical and magnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone capped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chakrabarti, Keka R.; Sanyal, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2009-09-15

    Defect induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped nanocrystalline ZnO samples have been studied. Crystal phase and the lattice parameter of the synthesized nanocrystalline samples have been determined from X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron micrographs (HR-TEM). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum for the bare ZnO sample shows a strong band at {approx} 379 nm and another band at {approx} 525 nm. The PL spectra also revealed that the number of oxygen vacancies in the uncapped sample is more than the PVP capped sample. Both sample exhibit ferromagnetic property at room temperature when annealed at 500 deg. C for 3 h, due to the formation of adequate oxygen vacancy related defects. The saturation magnetization for the annealed PVP capped sample is found to be larger compared to that for the uncapped sample.

  7. Structural phase transition, narrow band gap, and room-temperature ferromagnetism in [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1−x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3−δ}]{sub x} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wenliang; Yang, Pingxiong Chu, Junhao; Deng, Hongmei

    2014-09-15

    Structural phase transition, narrow band gap (E{sub g}), and room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) have been observed in the [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1−x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3−δ}]{sub x} (KBNNO) ceramics. All the samples have single phase perovskite structure, but exhibit a gradual transition behaviour from the orthorhombic to a cubic structure with the increase of x. Raman spectroscopy analysis not only corroborates this doping-induced change in normal structure but also shows the local crystal symmetry for x ≥ 0.1 compositions to deviate from the idealized cubic perovskite structure. A possible mechanism for the observed specific changes in lattice structure is discussed. Moreover, it is noted that KBNNO with compositions x = 0.1–0.3 have quite narrow E{sub g} of below 1.5 eV, much smaller than the 3.2 eV band gap of parent KNbO{sub 3} (KNO), which is due to the increasing Ni 3d electronic states within the gap of KNO. Furthermore, the KBNNO materials present RTFM near a tetragonal to cubic phase boundary. With increasing x from 0 to 0.3, the magnetism of the samples develops from diamagnetism to ferromagnetism and paramagnetism, originating from the ferromagnetic–antiferromagnetic competition. These results are helpful in the deeper understanding of phase transitions, band gap tunability, and magnetism variations in perovskite oxides and show the potential role, such materials can play, in perovskite solar cells and multiferroic applications.

  8. Nanostructure and magnetic properties of the MnZnO system, a room temperature magnetic semiconductor?

    PubMed

    Costa-Krämer, J L; Briones, F; Fernández, J F; Caballero, A C; Villegas, M; Díaz, M; García, M A; Hernando, A

    2005-02-01

    The magnetic properties of the system MnZnO prepared by conventional ceramic procedures using ZnO and MnO(2) starting powders are studied and related to the nanostructure. Thermal treatment at 500 °C produces a ferromagnetic phase, although this temperature is not high enough to promote proper sintering; thus the thermally treated compact shows brittle characteristics of unreacted and poorly densified ceramic samples. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray analysis reveal the appearance of a new phase, most probably related to the diffusion of Zn into MnO(2) oxide nanocrystals. The magnetic properties deviate considerably from what would be expected of an unreacted mixture of ZnO (diamagnetic) and MnO(2) particles (paramagnetic above 100 K and anti-ferromagnetic below that temperature), exhibiting a ferromagnetic like behaviour from 5 to 300 K and beyond mixed with a paramagnetic component. The ferromagnetic phase seems to be originated by diffusion at the nanoscale of Zn into MnO(2) grains. The Curie temperature of the ferromagnetic phase, once the paramagnetic component has been subtracted from the hysteresis loops, is measured to be 450 K. EPR resonance experiments from 100 to 600 K confirm a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic like transition above room temperature for these materials.

  9. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  10. Ferromagnetic vortex core switching at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Nowak, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    An approach for the investigation of vortex core switching is presented. Thermal effects up to the Curie point are included in a micromagnetic framework based on the recently developed Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. In this approach it is easier to avoid numerical discretization artifacts, commonly present when a Bloch point is mediating the switching process. Switching in thin circular permalloy disks caused by the application of a slowly increasing magnetic field oriented orthogonally to the disk is considered. An energy barrier which can be overcome by thermal fluctuations is taken into account, leading to a strong influence of the temperature on the switching field. In particular, the switching field goes to zero at a significantly smaller temperature than the Curie temperature. The deduced nucleation volume is smaller than the typical grain size in permalloy.

  11. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  12. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics.

  13. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  14. Competing ferromagnetism in high-temperature copper oxide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Angela; Ghosal, Amit; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    The extreme variability of observables across the phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors has remained a profound mystery, with no convincing explanation for the superconducting dome. Although much attention has been paid to the underdoped regime of the hole-doped cuprates because of its proximity to a complex Mott insulating phase, little attention has been paid to the overdoped regime. Experiments are beginning to reveal that the phenomenology of the overdoped regime is just as puzzling. For example, the electrons appear to form a Landau Fermi liquid, but this interpretation is problematic; any trace of Mott phenomena, as signified by incommensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuations, is absent, and the uniform spin susceptibility shows a ferromagnetic upturn. Here, we show and justify that many of these puzzles can be resolved if we assume that competing ferromagnetic fluctuations are simultaneously present with superconductivity, and the termination of the superconducting dome in the overdoped regime marks a quantum critical point beyond which there should be a genuine ferromagnetic phase at zero temperature. We propose experiments and make predictions to test our theory and suggest that an effort must be mounted to elucidate the nature of the overdoped regime, if the problem of high-temperature superconductivity is to be solved. Our approach places competing order as the root of the complexity of the cuprate phase diagram. PMID:17404239

  15. Room-temperature magnetism on the zigzag edges of phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Xu, Shenglong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Tianxing; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-01

    Searching for room-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors has evolved into a broad field of material science and spintronics for decades, nevertheless, these novel states remain rare. Phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus with a puckered honeycomb lattice structure possessing a finite band gap and high carrier mobility, has been synthesized recently. Here we show, by means of two different large-scale quantum Monte Carlo methods, that relatively weak interactions can lead to remarkable edge magnetism in the phosphorene nanoribbons. The ground state constrained path quantum Monte Carlo simulations reveal strong ferromagnetic correlations along the zigzag edges, and the finite temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations show a high Curie temperature up to room temperature.

  16. Curie temperature of ultrathin ferromagnetic layer with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the Curie temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layers. It has been known that the Curie temperature of the ferromagnet depends on spin wave excitation energies, and they are affected by DMI. Therefore, the ferromagnetic transition temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layer must be sensitive on the DMI. We find that the Curie temperature depends on the DMI by using the double time Green's function method. Since the DMI is arisen by the inversion symmetry breaking structure, the DMI is always important in the inversion symmetry breaking ultrathin ferromagnetic layers.

  17. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  18. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  19. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  20. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  1. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  2. Critical temperature of a chain of long range interacting ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, L. A.; Troncoso, P.; Curilef, S.

    2008-11-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of systems with long range interactions is anomalous, because there are some problems about defining the thermodynamic limit. A way to solve the problem is to use scaled thermodynamic quantities. In this work, we use a nonextensive scaling into Hamiltonian and characterize transitions between two different magnetic ordering phases. The critical temperature is estimated by Binder method. Ferromagnetic long range interactions are included in a special Hamiltonian through a power law that decays at large interparticle distance r as r-α for α >= 0. In addition, we improve the known nonextensive scaling and obtain the critical temperature for several values of α.

  3. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials. PMID:27503610

  4. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  5. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  6. High-Curie-temperature ferromagnetism in self-organized Ge1-xMnx nanocolumns.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Matthieu; Barski, André; Devillers, Thibaut; Poydenot, Valier; Dujardin, Romain; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Rothman, Johan; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Marty, Alain; Cibert, Joël; Mattana, Richard; Tatarenko, Serge

    2006-08-01

    The emerging field of spintronics would be dramatically boosted if room-temperature ferromagnetism could be added to semiconductor nanostructures that are compatible with silicon technology. Here, we report a high-TC (>400K) ferromagnetic phase of (Ge,Mn) epitaxial layer. The manganese content is 6%, and careful structural and chemical analyses show that the Mn distribution is strongly inhomogeneous: we observe eutectoid growth of well-defined Mn-rich nanocolumns surrounded by a Mn-poor matrix. The average diameter of these nanocolumns is 3nm and their spacing is 10nm. Their composition is close to Ge(2)Mn, which corresponds to an unknown germanium-rich phase, and they have a uniaxially elongated diamond structure. Their Curie temperature is higher than 400K. Magnetotransport reveals a pronounced anomalous Hall effect up to room temperature. A giant positive magnetoresistance is measured from 7,000% at 30K to 200% at 300K and 9T, with no evidence of saturation.

  7. Room Temperature Electrical Detection of Spin Polarized Currents in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Geurs, Johannes; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Charpentier, Sophie; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new class of quantum materials that exhibit a current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking of massless Dirac Fermions in their surface states. This helical spin polarization in three-dimensional (3D) TIs has been observed using photoemission spectroscopy up to room temperatures. Recently, spin polarized surface currents in 3D TIs were detected electrically by potentiometric measurements using ferromagnetic detector contacts. However, these electric measurements are so far limited to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report the room temperature electrical detection of the spin polarization on the surface of Bi2Se3 by employing spin sensitive ferromagnetic tunnel contacts. The current-induced spin polarization on the Bi2Se3 surface is probed by measuring the magnetoresistance while switching the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic detector. A spin resistance of up to 70 mΩ is measured at room temperature, which increases linearly with current bias, reverses sign with current direction, and decreases with higher TI thickness. The magnitude of the spin signal, its sign, and control experiments, using different measurement geometries and interface conditions, rule out other known physical effects. These findings provide further information about the electrical detection of current-induced spin polarizations in 3D TIs at ambient temperatures and could lead to innovative spin-based technologies.

  8. Individual room temperature control: A peaceful solution to thermostat wars

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, C.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining thermal comfort in individual rooms using an individual room temperature control concept to provide greater occupant comfort and potentially reduce energy consumption. The topics of the article include occupant temperature control methods, multi-room zone control, HVAC system operation, computer simulation, and the results of using individual room temperature control.

  9. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  10. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, Juan David; Arnache Olmos, Oscar; Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ramos, Rafael; Anadon, Alberto; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  11. High Temperature Ferromagnetism in a GdAg2 Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Ormaza, M; Fernández, L; Ilyn, M; Magaña, A; Xu, B; Verstraete, M J; Gastaldo, M; Valbuena, M A; Gargiani, P; Mugarza, A; Ayuela, A; Vitali, L; Blanco-Rey, M; Schiller, F; Ortega, J E

    2016-07-13

    Materials that exhibit ferromagnetism, interfacial stability, and tunability are highly desired for the realization of emerging magnetoelectronic phenomena in heterostructures. Here we present the GdAg2 monolayer alloy, which possesses all such qualities. By combining X-ray absorption, Kerr effect, and angle-resolved photoemission with ab initio calculations, we have investigated the ferromagnetic nature of this class of Gd-based alloys. The Curie temperature can increase from 19 K in GdAu2 to a remarkably high 85 K in GdAg2. We find that the exchange coupling between Gd atoms is barely affected by their full coordination with noble metal atoms, and instead, magnetic coupling is effectively mediated by noble metal-Gd hybrid s,p-d bands. The direct comparison between isostructural GdAu2 and GdAg2 monolayers explains how the higher degree of surface confinement and electron occupation of such hybrid s,p-d bands promote the high Curie temperature in the latter. Finally, the chemical composition and structural robustness of the GdAg2 alloy has been demonstrated by interfacing them with organic semiconductors or magnetic nanodots. These results encourage systematic investigations of rare-earth/noble metal surface alloys and interfaces, in order to exploit them in magnetoelectronic applications. PMID:27247988

  12. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  13. Designing room-temperature multiferroic materials in a single-phase solid-solution film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. J.; Song, C.; Cui, B.; Peng, J. J.; Li, F.; Xiao, L. R.; Pan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The search for multiferroic materials with simultaneous ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in a single phase at room temperature continues to be fuelled from the perspective of developing multifunctional devices. Here we design a single-phase multiferroic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-BaTiO3 film, which possesses epitaxial single-crystal and solid-solution structure, high magnetic Curie temperature (~640 K) as well as switchable ferroelectric polarization. Moreover, a notable strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature in the way of modulating the magnetism with an external applied voltage is also observed. The synthetic solid-solution multiferroic film may open an extraordinary avenue for exploring a series of room-temperature multiferroic materials.

  14. Bioinduced Room-Temperature Methanol Reforming.

    PubMed

    Heim, Leo E; Thiel, Daniel; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2015-08-24

    Imitating nature's approach in nucleophile-activated formaldehyde dehydrogenation, air-stable ruthenium complexes proved to be exquisite catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formaldehyde hydrate as well as for the transfer hydrogenation to unsaturated organic substrates at loadings as low as 0.5 mol %. Concatenation of the chemical hydrogen-fixation route with an oxidase-mediated activation of methanol gives an artificial methylotrophic in vitro metabolism providing methanol-derived reduction equivalents for synthetic hydrogenation purposes. Moreover, for the first time methanol reforming at room temperature was achieved on the basis of this bioinduced dehydrogenation path delivering hydrogen gas from aqueous methanol.

  15. Prediction of Near-Room-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect on Honeycomb Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binghai; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, this long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in the magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (~ 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, which are found to be 2D topological insulators, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV, respectively. The ferromagnetic order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and consequently an ferromagnetic insulator with large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions. We thank the helpful discussions with C. Felser, S. Kanugo, C.-X. Liu, Z. Wang, Y. Xu, K. Wu, and Y. Zhou.

  16. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  17. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  18. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  19. Weak ferromagnetism and temperature dependent dielectric properties of Zn{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O diluted magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Raju; Moslehuddin, A.S.M.; Mahmood, Zahid Hasan; Hossain, A.K.M. Akther

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Single phase wurtzite structure was confirmed from XRD analysis. • Weak ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature. • Pure semiconducting properties confirmed from temperature dependent conductivity. • Smaller dielectric properties at higher frequency. • Possible potential application in high frequency spintronic devices. - Abstract: In this study the room temperature ferromagnetic behaviour and dielectric properties of ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) have been investigated using nominal chemical composition Zn{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed formation of single phase hexagonal wurtzite structure. An increase in grain size with increasing sintering temperature was observed from scanning electron microscopy. Field dependent DC magnetization values indicated dominant paramagnetic ordering along with a slight ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Frequency dependent complex initial permeability showed some positive values around 12 at room temperature. In dielectric measurement, an increasing trend of complex permittivity, loss tangent and ac conductivity with increasing temperature were observed. The temperature dependent dispersion curves of dielectric properties revealed clear relaxation at higher temperature. Frequency dependent ac conductivity was found to increase with frequency whereas complex permittivity and loss tangent showed an opposite trend.

  20. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-01

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains.

  1. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  2. Room-temperature spin-orbit torque in NiMnSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Anderson, L.; Tshitoyan, V.; Ferguson, A. J.; Gerhard, F.; Gould, C.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Gayles, J.; Železný, J.; Šmejkal, L.; Yuan, Z.; Sinova, J.; Freimuth, F.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that crystallize in diamond-related lattices, with Si and GaAs as their prime examples, are at the foundation of modern electronics. Simultaneously, inversion asymmetries in their crystal structure and relativistic spin-orbit coupling led to discoveries of non-equilibrium spin-polarization phenomena that are now extensively explored as an electrical means for manipulating magnetic moments in a variety of spintronic structures. Current research of these relativistic spin-orbit torques focuses primarily on magnetic transition-metal multilayers. The low-temperature diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ga, Mn)As, in which spin-orbit torques were initially discovered, has so far remained the only example showing the phenomenon among bulk non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets. Here we present a general framework, based on the complete set of crystallographic point groups, for identifying the potential presence and symmetry of spin-orbit torques in non-centrosymmetric crystals. Among the candidate room-temperature ferromagnets we chose to use NiMnSb, which is a member of the broad family of magnetic Heusler compounds. By performing all-electrical ferromagnetic resonance measurements in single-crystal epilayers of NiMnSb we detect room-temperature spin-orbit torques generated by effective fields of the expected symmetry and of a magnitude consistent with our ab initio calculations.

  3. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  4. Magnetostructural coupling near room temperature in Ni46-xFexCu4Mn34Ga16 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingmin; He, Yangkun; Jiang, Chengbao

    2013-01-01

    We report the magnetostructural coupling near room temperature in Ni46-xFexCu4Mn34Ga16 (0 ≤ x ≤ 10) alloys. The martensitic transformation temperature was detected over the whole composition range and was decreased by the substitution of Fe for Ni. The martensitic and austenitic Curie temperatures, TCM and TCA, were observed for 0 ≤ x ≤ 6 and 4 ≤ x ≤ 10, respectively. With the increasing Fe content, TCA was slightly increased and TCM was more rapidly increased. The paramagnetic state of the martensite phase collapsed for x > 6 with the presence of the ferromagnetic austenite phase. The magnetostructural coupling transition from paramagnetic martensite to ferromagnetic austenite was obtained within the temperature range of 300-350 K which was near room temperature.

  5. Direct evidence for significant spin-polarization of EuS in Co/EuS multilayers at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, S. D.; Poulopoulos, P.; Lewitz, B.; Straub, A.; Goschew, A.; Kapaklis, V.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Fumagalli, P.

    2013-01-01

    The new era of spintronics promises the development of nanodevices, where the electron spin will be used to store information and charge currents will be replaced by spin currents. For this, ferromagnetic semiconductors at room temperature are needed. We report on significant room-temperature spin polarization of EuS in Co/EuS multilayers recorded by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The films were found to contain a mixture of divalent and trivalent europium, but only Eu++ is responsible for the ferromagnetic behavior of EuS. The magnetic XMCD signal of Eu at room temperature could unambiguously be assigned to magnetic ordering of EuS and was found to be only one order of magnitude smaller than that at 2.5 K. The room temperature magnetic moment of EuS is as large as the one of bulk ferromagnetic Ni. Our findings pave the path for fabrication of room–temperature spintronic devices using spin polarized EuS layers. PMID:23434820

  6. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution.

    PubMed

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F](+) assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F](+) dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  7. Room-temperature nanowire terahertz photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Lorenzo; Coquillant, Dominique; Viti, Leonardo; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Knap, Wojciech; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) represent an ideal building block for implementing rectifying diodes or plasma­ wave detectors that could operate well into the THz, thanks to the typical attofarad-order capacitance. Despite the strong effort in developing these nanostructures for a new generation of complementary metal-oxide semi­ conductors (CMOS), memory and photonic devices, their potential as radiation sensors into the Terahertz is just starting to be explored. We report on the development of NW-based field effect transistors operating as high sensitivity THz detectors in the 0.3 - 2.8 THz range. By feeding the radiation field of either an electronic THz source or a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at the gate-source electrodes by means of a wide band dipole antenna, we measured a photovoltage signal corresponding to responsivity values up to 100 V IW, with impressive noise equivalent power levels < 6 x 10-11W/Hz at room temperature and a > 300kHz modulation bandwidth. The potential scalability to even higher frequencies and the technological feasibility of realizing multi-pixel arrays coupled with QCL sources make the proposed technology highly competitive for a future generation of THz detection systems.

  8. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  9. Room-temperature magnetic properties of SiC based nanowires synthesized via microwave heating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Wang, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Two kinds of ferromagnetic SiC based nanowires with and without Ni catalyst were successfully synthesized by employing microwave heating method. The comprehensive characterizations and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) have been applied to investigate the micro-structures and magnetic properties of as-grown nanowires. For the nanowires synthesized without using Ni catalyst, the diameters and lengths are in the range of 20-60 nm and dozens of micrometers, respectively. Particularly, the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the nanowires consist of SiC core and SiOx shell. The SiC/SiOx coaxial nanowires exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 0.2 emu/g. As to the nanowires obtained using Ni catalyst, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicate that the Ni catalyzed nanowires have a nano-particle attached on the tip and a uniform diameter of approximately 50 nm. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used to explain the formation of the Ni catalyzed nanowires. The detection result of VSM indicates that the Ni catalyzed nanowires possess the paramagnetism and the ferromagnetism, simultaneously. The enhancement of the ferromagnetism, compared with the SiC/SiOx coaxial nanowires, could be attributed to the Ni2Si and NiSi phases.

  10. Multiferroicity in polar phase LiNbO3 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Saravana Kumar, K.; Aparnadevi, N.; Praveen Shanker, N.; Venkateswaran, C.

    2015-10-01

    LiNbO3, prepared by ball milling assisted ceramic method, exhibits weak ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals the rhombohedral phase of LiNbO3 with hexagonal unit cell symmetry. The weak ferromagnetic behavior, obtained using VSM, has been explained using Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction caused by the ferroelectric distortion in its magnetic order. The P-E loop measurement shows lossy natured ferroelectric loop. Electrical and dielectric properties analyzed using impedance spectroscopy show two thermally activated conduction processes, derived from the Arrhenius plot. A gradual increase in the dielectric constant below 493 K and a rapid increase above 493 K reveals the contribution of polarization components and Lithium ion hopping.

  11. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  12. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  13. Nonlinear interaction of a ferromagnet with a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Kashurnikov, V. A. Maksimova, A. N.; Rudnev, I. A. Sotnikova, A. P.

    2013-03-15

    The interaction of an Abrikosov vertex with a ferromagnetic substrate is taken into account in the model of a layered high-temperature superconductor (HTSC). The magnetization reversal loops are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for various values of the magnetic moment of the substrate and at various temperatures. The nonlinearity of the interaction of the superconductor with the ferromagnet is demonstrated. The magnetization of HTSC films on magnetic and nonmagnetic substrates is measured. It is found that the ferromagnetism of the substrate strongly affects the shape and magnitude of the magnetization of the HTSC-substrate composite. Experimental data are found to correlate with the results of calculations.

  14. Designing switchable polarization and magnetization at room temperature in an oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P.; Pitcher, M. J.; Alaria, J.; Niu, H.; Borisov, P.; Stamenov, P.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials exhibit long-range order of atomic-scale electric or magnetic dipoles that can be switched by applying an appropriate electric or magnetic field, respectively. Both switching phenomena form the basis of non-volatile random access memory, but in the ferroelectric case, this involves destructive electrical reading and in the magnetic case, a high writing energy is required. In principle, low-power and high-density information storage that combines fast electrical writing and magnetic reading can be realized with magnetoelectric multiferroic materials. These materials not only simultaneously display ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, but also enable magnetic moments to be induced by an external electric field, or electric polarization by a magnetic field. However, synthesizing bulk materials with both long-range orders at room temperature in a single crystalline structure is challenging because conventional ferroelectricity requires closed-shell d0 or s2 cations, whereas ferromagnetic order requires open-shell dn configurations with unpaired electrons. These opposing requirements pose considerable difficulties for atomic-scale design strategies such as magnetic ion substitution into ferroelectrics. One material that exhibits both ferroelectric and magnetic order is BiFeO3, but its cycloidal magnetic structure precludes bulk magnetization and linear magnetoelectric coupling. A solid solution of a ferroelectric and a spin-glass perovskite combines switchable polarization with glassy magnetization, although it lacks long-range magnetic order. Crystal engineering of a layered perovskite has recently resulted in room-temperature polar ferromagnets, but the electrical polarization has not been switchable. Here we combine ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism at room temperature in a bulk perovskite oxide, by constructing a percolating network of magnetic ions with strong superexchange interactions within a structural scaffold

  15. Designing switchable polarization and magnetization at room temperature in an oxide.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Pitcher, M J; Alaria, J; Niu, H; Borisov, P; Stamenov, P; Claridge, J B; Rosseinsky, M J

    2015-09-17

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials exhibit long-range order of atomic-scale electric or magnetic dipoles that can be switched by applying an appropriate electric or magnetic field, respectively. Both switching phenomena form the basis of non-volatile random access memory, but in the ferroelectric case, this involves destructive electrical reading and in the magnetic case, a high writing energy is required. In principle, low-power and high-density information storage that combines fast electrical writing and magnetic reading can be realized with magnetoelectric multiferroic materials. These materials not only simultaneously display ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, but also enable magnetic moments to be induced by an external electric field, or electric polarization by a magnetic field. However, synthesizing bulk materials with both long-range orders at room temperature in a single crystalline structure is challenging because conventional ferroelectricity requires closed-shell d(0) or s(2) cations, whereas ferromagnetic order requires open-shell d(n) configurations with unpaired electrons. These opposing requirements pose considerable difficulties for atomic-scale design strategies such as magnetic ion substitution into ferroelectrics. One material that exhibits both ferroelectric and magnetic order is BiFeO3, but its cycloidal magnetic structure precludes bulk magnetization and linear magnetoelectric coupling. A solid solution of a ferroelectric and a spin-glass perovskite combines switchable polarization with glassy magnetization, although it lacks long-range magnetic order. Crystal engineering of a layered perovskite has recently resulted in room-temperature polar ferromagnets, but the electrical polarization has not been switchable. Here we combine ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism at room temperature in a bulk perovskite oxide, by constructing a percolating network of magnetic ions with strong superexchange interactions within a structural scaffold

  16. Temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers in multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Perumal, Alagarsamy

    2016-11-01

    We report systematic investigations on temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers and resulting magnetic properties of multilayer structured [FeTaC (~67 nm)/Ta(x nm)]2/FeTaC(~67 nm)] thin films, which are fabricated directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate. As-deposited amorphous films are post annealed at different annealing temperatures (TA=200, 300 and 400 °C). Structural analyzes reveal that the films annealed at TA≤200 °C exhibit amorphous nature, while the films annealed above 200 °C show nucleation of nanocrystals at TA=300 °C and well-defined α-Fe nanocrystals with size of about 9 nm in amorphous matrix for 400 °C annealed films. Room temperature and temperature dependent magnetic hysteresis (M-H) loops reveal that magnetization reversal behaviors and magnetic properties are strongly depending on spacer layer thickness (x), TA and temperature. A large reduction in coercivity (HC) was observed for the films annealed at 200 °C and correlated to relaxation of stress quenched in during the film deposition. On the other hand, the films annealed at 300 °C exhibit unusual variation of HC(T), i.e., a broad minimum in HC(T) vs T curve. This is caused by change in magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic layers having different microstructure. In addition, the broad minimum in the HC(T) curve shifts from 150 K for x=1 film to 80 K for x=4 film. High-temperature thermomagnetization data show a strong (significant) variation of Curie temperature (TC) with TA (x). The multilayer films annealed at 200 °C exhibit low value of TC with a minimum of 350 K for x=4 film. But, the films annealed at 400 °C show largest TC with a maximum of 869 K for x=1 film. The observed results are discussed on the basis of variations in magnetic couplings between FeTaC layers, which are majorly driven by temperature, spacer layer thickness, annealing temperature and nature of interfaces.

  17. Experimental Demonstration of xor Operation in Graphene Magnetologic Gates at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hua; Dery, Hanan; Amamou, Walid; Zhu, Tiancong; Lin, Zhisheng; Shi, Jing; Žutić, Igor; Krivorotov, Ilya; Sham, L. J.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-04-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a magnetologic gate built on graphene at room temperature. This magnetologic gate consists of three ferromagnetic electrodes contacting a single-layer graphene spin channel and relies on spin injection and spin transport in the graphene. We utilize electrical bias tuning of spin injection to balance the inputs and achieve "exclusive or" (xor) logic operation. Furthermore, a simulation of the device performance shows that substantial improvement towards spintronic applications can be achieved by optimizing the device parameters such as the device dimensions. This advance holds promise as a basic building block for spin-based information processing.

  18. Monolithic integration of room-temperature multifunctional BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial heterostructures on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Fina, Ignasi; Domingo, Neus; Herranz, Gervasi; Skumryev, Vassil; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional (ferromagnetic and ferroelectric) response at room temperature that is elusive in single phase multiferroic materials can be achieved in a proper combination of ferroelectric perovskites and ferrimagnetic spinel oxides in horizontal heterostructures. In this work, lead-free CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 bilayers are integrated with Si(001) using LaNiO3/CeO2/YSZ as a tri-layer buffer. They present structural and functional properties close to those achieved on perovskite substrates: the bilayers are fully epitaxial with extremely flat surface, and exhibit robust ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature. PMID:27550543

  19. Monolithic integration of room-temperature multifunctional BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial heterostructures on Si(001)

    PubMed Central

    Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Fina, Ignasi; Domingo, Neus; Herranz, Gervasi; Skumryev, Vassil; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional (ferromagnetic and ferroelectric) response at room temperature that is elusive in single phase multiferroic materials can be achieved in a proper combination of ferroelectric perovskites and ferrimagnetic spinel oxides in horizontal heterostructures. In this work, lead-free CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 bilayers are integrated with Si(001) using LaNiO3/CeO2/YSZ as a tri-layer buffer. They present structural and functional properties close to those achieved on perovskite substrates: the bilayers are fully epitaxial with extremely flat surface, and exhibit robust ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature. PMID:27550543

  20. Monolithic integration of room-temperature multifunctional BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial heterostructures on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Fina, Ignasi; Domingo, Neus; Herranz, Gervasi; Skumryev, Vassil; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2016-08-01

    The multifunctional (ferromagnetic and ferroelectric) response at room temperature that is elusive in single phase multiferroic materials can be achieved in a proper combination of ferroelectric perovskites and ferrimagnetic spinel oxides in horizontal heterostructures. In this work, lead-free CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 bilayers are integrated with Si(001) using LaNiO3/CeO2/YSZ as a tri-layer buffer. They present structural and functional properties close to those achieved on perovskite substrates: the bilayers are fully epitaxial with extremely flat surface, and exhibit robust ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature.

  1. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  2. Ferromagnetic carbon materials prepared from polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tetsuji; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Yoshii, Shunsuke; Nojima, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    We report a ferromagnetic carbon material that is attracted by a permanent magnet. The ferromagnetic carbon material was prepared by pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile at 1273 K for 1 h. Chemical analysis combined with an energy-dispersive x-ray analysis revealed that the carbon material did not contain any transition metals. The metal-free ferromagnetic carbon material exhibited a saturation magnetization of 1.22 emu/g at room temperature.

  3. High temperature ferromagnetism in Ni doped ZnO nanoparticles: Milling time dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Bappaditya Sarkar, D.; Giri, P. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism (RT FM) in the Zn{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O (x = 0, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by a ball milling technique. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the single crystalline ZnO wurtzite structure with presence of small intensity secondary phase related peak which disappear with increasing milling time for Ni doped samples. HRTEM lattice images show that the doped NPs are single crystalline with a dspacing of 2.44 Å. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis confirms the presence of Ni ions in the ZnO matrix. Magnetic measurement (RT) exhibits the hysteresis loop with saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 1.6–2.56 (emu/g) and coercive field (H{sub c}) of 296–322 Oe. M-T measurement shows a Curie temperature of the order of 325°C for 3% Ni doped sample. Micro -Raman studies show doping/disorder induced additional modes at ∼510, 547, 572 cm{sup −1} in addition to 437 cm{sup −1} peak of pure ZnO. UV-Vis absorption spectra illustrate band gap shift due to doping. Alteration of M{sub s} value with the variation of doping concentration and milling time has been studied and discussed.

  4. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  5. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  6. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  7. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  8. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  9. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  10. Thermal Effect in Opal Below Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Martin J.; Shoemaker, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Opal, once believed to be amorphous silica, was shown by Levin and Ott (1932, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 54, 828-829) to give an x-ray powder pattern of the high-temperature form of cristobalite. The early explanation of this anomalous existence of a phase below its high-low transition temperature is now known to be untenable. One of us suggested that the tiny sizes of the component cristobalite crystals might explain the anomaly; if so, the transition might be expected below ambient temperatures. The record of a du Pont 900 Thermoanalyzer indeed revealed heat effects in opal below ambient temperatures, with an exotherm having a maximum at about -40° on cooling and an endotherm that began about -50° on heating. This was not a latent-heat effect due to the high-low transition of cristobalite, however, for the low-cristobalite pattern persisted to below -50°. Opal normally contains 4-9% water, which is tenaciously held; water loss is nearly linear with temperatures up to about 422°, when water loss is abruptly complete. Water-free opal does not display the thermal effect, but the same opal rehydrated does display it. Water is housed in minute voids, judged to be a few hundred Ångströms across, between minute particles of cristobalite. This water behaves differently from water in bulk, for its begins to melt at about -50°. PMID:16592025

  11. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  12. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  13. Structural investigations on Co{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}TeO{sub 6}; (0 < x ≤ 2); High temperature ferromagnetism and enhanced low temperature anti-ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harishchandra; Sinha, A. K. E-mail: hng@rrcat.gov.in; Ghosh, Haranath E-mail: hng@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, M. N.; Rajput, Parasmani; Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-08-21

    In the quest of materials with high temperature ferromagnetism and low temperature anti-ferromagnetism, we prepare Co{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}TeO{sub 6}; (0 < x ≤ 2) solid solutions. Room temperature structural investigations on these solid solutions as a function of Mn concentration using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure measurements in corroboration with magnetism are presented. Phase diagram obtained from Rietveld Refinement on SXRD data as a function of Mn concentration indicates doping disproportionate mixing of both monoclinic (C2/c) and rhombohedral (R 3{sup ¯}) structure for x < 0.5, while only R 3{sup ¯} structure for x ≥ 0.5. Further, it shows increase in both lattice parameters as well as average transition metal-oxygen (Co/Mn-O) bond lengths for x ≥ 0.5. Co and Mn K-edge XANES spectra reveal that both Co and Mn are in mixed oxidation state, Co{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 3+}. Relative ratios of Co{sup 3+}/Co{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} obtained using Linear combination fit decrease with increasing x (for x ≥ 0.5). These structural and spectroscopic evidences are used to provide possible interpretation of the observed paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition at around 185 K followed by an enhanced antiferromagnetic transition ∼45 K for x = 0.5.

  14. High temperature magnetic order in Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Górska, M.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Lewińska, S.; Szymczak, R.; Dynowska, E.; Podgórni, A.; Dobrowolski, W.; Ralević, U.; Gajić, R.; Romčević, N.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Marenkin, S. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present studies of structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors with the average Mn-content, \\bar{x} , changing from 0.027 up to 0.138. The magnetic force microscope imaging done at room temperature shows the presence of a strong signal coming from MnSb clusters. Magnetic properties show the paramagnet-ferromagnet transition with the Curie temperature, T C, equal to about 522 K and the cluster-glass behavior with the transition temperature, T CG, equal to about 465 K, both related to MnSb clusters. The magnetotransport studies show that all investigated samples are p-type semiconductors with high hole concentration, p, changing from 1021 to 1022 cm-3. A large increase in the resistivity as a function of the magnetic field is observed at T  <  10 K and small magnetic fields, |B|<100 mT, for all the studied samples with a maximum amplitude of the magnetoresistance about 460% at T  =  1.4 K. The large increase in the resistivity is most probably caused by the appearance of the superconducting state in the samples at T  <  4.3 K.

  15. Room temperature dual ferroic behaviour of ball mill synthesized NdFeO3 orthoferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparnadevi, N.; Saravana Kumar, K.; Manikandan, M.; Paul Joseph, D.; Venkateswaran, C.

    2016-07-01

    Phase pure NdFeO3 has been achieved using high energy ball milling of oxide precursors with subsequent sintering. It is established that structural arrangement of NdFeO3 regulates the multifunctional feature of the material. Rietveld refinement of the room temperature X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the Fe-O-Fe bond angle significantly favors the super exchange interaction, which is predominantly antiferromagnetic in nature. Magnetization measurement illustrates antiferromagnetic behaviour with a weak ferromagnetic component caused by the canted nature of the Fe3+ spins at room temperature. Absorption bands in the visible ambit, apparent from the UV-Vis diffuse reflectance studies, is found due to the crystal ligand field of octahedral oxygen environment of Fe3+ ions. The direct band gap is estimated to be 2.39 eV from the diffuse reflectance spectrum. The lossy natured ferroelectric loop having a maximum polarization of 0.23 μC/cm2 at room temperature is found to be driven by the non-collinear magnetic structure with reverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya effect. Magnetic field has influence on the dielectric constant as evident from the impedance spectroscopy, indicating the strong coupling between ferroelectric and the magnetic structure of NdFeO3.

  16. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  17. A novel ferromagnetic thermo-stent for plaque stabilization that self-regulates the temperature.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Matsumura, Kouji; Hagisawa, Kousuke; Ishihara, Masayuki; Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kurita, Akira; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the vascular wall with a thermally self-regulating, cylindrical stent made of a low Curie temperature ferromagnetic alloy. Physiologic saline was circulated in the silicone model vessel implanted with the stent. The stent-temperature remained nearly constant for variable saline flows, saline temperatures, and magnetic flux densities. Stent implants of this type in human blood vessels could potentially enable thermotherapy and temperature determination without catheterization.

  18. Exchange bias up to room temperature in antiferromagnetic hexagonal Mn3Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J. F.; Nayak, A. K.; Kreiner, G.; Schnelle, W.; Felser, C.

    2014-07-01

    Mn3.04Ge0.96 has a hexagonal crystal structure, which can be stabilized by high-temperature annealing, and shows antiferromagnetic order with a small ferromagnetic component of less than 0.1μB and a coercivity of 0.45 T. In the ordered phase, magnetization curves M(H) exhibit an exchange bias of 62 mT at T = 2 K after field cooling, which is observable up to room temperature. The exchange anisotropy is suggested to originate from the exchange interaction between the host of triangular-antiferromagnetic Mn3Ge units and embedded ferrimagnetic-like clusters. Such clusters develop when excess Mn atoms occupy empty Ge sites in the original triangular-antiferromagnetic structure of Mn3Ge.

  19. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  20. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-12

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering.

  1. Near-room temperature relaxor multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Dilsom A.; Kumar, A.; Ortega, N.; Katiyar, R. S.; Scott, J. F.

    2010-11-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of highly oriented Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)0.60(Fe0.5Ta0.5)0.40O3 thin films. Dielectric spectra showed a maximum (Tm) around 350 K for 1 kHz that shifted to higher temperatures (by ˜30 K) with an increase in frequency up to 1 MHz. High dielectric dispersion below and above Tm, low dielectric loss (2%-5%), high dielectric constant (˜1380@1 kHz), ferroelectric polarization, and weak magnetic moment are observed. Real and imaginary dielectric data were fitted with a nonlinear Vogel-Fulcher equation, implying a relaxor nature. The ac conductivity shows frequency-dependent conductivity, low loss, and frequency-dependent kinks near Tm.

  2. Exchange interactions, spin waves, and Curie temperature in zincblende half-metallic sp-electron ferromagnets: the case of CaZ (Z = N, P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Laref, A; Saşioglu, E; Galanakis, I

    2011-07-27

    Using first-principle calculations in conjunction with the frozen-magnon technique we have calculated the exchange interactions and spin-wave dispersions in the series of the zincblende half-metallic II-V (CaZ, Z = N, P, As, Sb) ferromagnets. The calculated exchange constants are used to estimate the Curie temperature within the random phase approximation. The large Stoner gap in these alloys gives rise to well-defined undamped spin waves throughout the Brillouin zone. Moreover we show that the spin-wave stiffness constants for the considered systems are among the largest available for local moment ferromagnets. The predicted Curie temperature of half-metallic CaN is noticeably higher than the room temperature with respect to the other compounds, and thus we propose CaN as a promising candidate for future applications in spintronic devices.

  3. Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a μSR and DFT study

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Thomas; Audehm, Patrick; Chen, Yu–Chun; Schütz, Gisela; Straumal, Boris B.; Protasova, Svetlana G.; Mazilkin, Andrey A.; Straumal, Petr B.; Prokscha, Thomas; Luetkens, Hubertus; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Baretzky, Brigitte; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Danilov, Denis; Goering, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Diamagnetic oxides can, under certain conditions, become ferromagnetic at room temperature and therefore are promising candidates for future material in spintronic devices. Contrary to early predictions, doping ZnO with uniformly distributed magnetic ions is not essential to obtain ferromagnetic samples. Instead, the nanostructure seems to play the key role, as room temperature ferromagnetism was also found in nanograined, undoped ZnO. However, the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in primarily non–magnetic oxides like ZnO is still unexplained and a controversial subject within the scientific community. Using low energy muon spin relaxation in combination with SQUID and TEM techniques, we demonstrate that the magnetic volume fraction is strongly related to the sample volume fraction occupied by grain boundaries. With molecular dynamics and density functional theory we find ferromagnetic coupled electron states in ZnO grain boundaries. Our results provide evidence and a microscopic model for room temperature ferromagnetism in oxides. PMID:25747456

  4. Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a μSR and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Thomas; Audehm, Patrick; Chen, Yu-Chun; Schütz, Gisela; Straumal, Boris B; Protasova, Svetlana G; Mazilkin, Andrey A; Straumal, Petr B; Prokscha, Thomas; Luetkens, Hubertus; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Baretzky, Brigitte; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Danilov, Denis; Goering, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Diamagnetic oxides can, under certain conditions, become ferromagnetic at room temperature and therefore are promising candidates for future material in spintronic devices. Contrary to early predictions, doping ZnO with uniformly distributed magnetic ions is not essential to obtain ferromagnetic samples. Instead, the nanostructure seems to play the key role, as room temperature ferromagnetism was also found in nanograined, undoped ZnO. However, the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in primarily non-magnetic oxides like ZnO is still unexplained and a controversial subject within the scientific community. Using low energy muon spin relaxation in combination with SQUID and TEM techniques, we demonstrate that the magnetic volume fraction is strongly related to the sample volume fraction occupied by grain boundaries. With molecular dynamics and density functional theory we find ferromagnetic coupled electron states in ZnO grain boundaries. Our results provide evidence and a microscopic model for room temperature ferromagnetism in oxides. PMID:25747456

  5. Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a μSR and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Thomas; Audehm, Patrick; Chen, Yu–Chun; Schütz, Gisela; Straumal, Boris B.; Protasova, Svetlana G.; Mazilkin, Andrey A.; Straumal, Petr B.; Prokscha, Thomas; Luetkens, Hubertus; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Baretzky, Brigitte; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Danilov, Denis; Goering, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Diamagnetic oxides can, under certain conditions, become ferromagnetic at room temperature and therefore are promising candidates for future material in spintronic devices. Contrary to early predictions, doping ZnO with uniformly distributed magnetic ions is not essential to obtain ferromagnetic samples. Instead, the nanostructure seems to play the key role, as room temperature ferromagnetism was also found in nanograined, undoped ZnO. However, the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in primarily non-magnetic oxides like ZnO is still unexplained and a controversial subject within the scientific community. Using low energy muon spin relaxation in combination with SQUID and TEM techniques, we demonstrate that the magnetic volume fraction is strongly related to the sample volume fraction occupied by grain boundaries. With molecular dynamics and density functional theory we find ferromagnetic coupled electron states in ZnO grain boundaries. Our results provide evidence and a microscopic model for room temperature ferromagnetism in oxides.

  6. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications. PMID:25042767

  7. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed.

  8. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  9. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  10. Magnetic properties measurement and discussion of an amorphous power transformer core at room and liquid nitrogen temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronto, A. G.; Maurício, A.; Pina, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In energy generation, transmission and distribution systems, power transformers are one of the most common and important components. Consequently, the performance of these transformers is crucial to global efficiency of the systems. To optimize transformers efficiency, the selection of an adequate ferromagnetic material is very important. For example, the use of amorphous ferromagnetic materials in transformer cores, replacing crystalline electrical steels, decreases total magnetic losses of the device. Other possible solution to increase energy systems efficiency, is the installation of high temperature superconducting power transformers (HTS transformers), normally cooled by liquid nitrogen at 77 K. In order to contribute to HTS transformer efficiency improvement, a 562.5 VA transformer with an amorphous ferromagnetic core was designed and built. For this core, the most important magnetic properties are measured at room and cryogenic temperature, and then compared with those of a typical crystalline grain-oriented electrical steel. Amorphous material magnetic losses (static and dynamic) at room and 77K are also presented and discussed.

  11. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  12. Transition-metal embedded carbon nitride monolayers: high-temperature ferromagnetism and half-metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Kumar, Sourabh; Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices.High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  13. Three-dimensional spin mapping of antiferromagnetic nanopyramids having spatially alternating surface anisotropy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R

    2012-11-14

    Antiferromagnets play a key role in modern spintronic devices owing to their ability to modify the switching behavior of adjacent ferromagnets via the exchange bias effect. Consequently, detailed measurements of the spin structure at antiferromagnetic interfaces and surfaces are highly desirable, not only for advancing technologies but also for enabling new insights into the underlying physics. Here using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at room-temperature, we reveal in three-dimensions an orthogonal spin structure on antiferromagnetic compound nanopyramids. Contrary to expected uniaxial anisotropy based on bulk properties, the atomic terraces are found to have alternating in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies. The observed layer-wise alternation in anisotropy could have strong influences on future nanoscale spintronic applications.

  14. Robust room temperature spin injection through Fe|CrAs|GaAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu P., X.; Zwierzycki, M.; Xia, K.; Kelly P., J.; Turek, I.; Wang E., G.

    2003-03-01

    Electronic spin injection from a metallic ferromagnet into a semiconductor was realized only very recently and with less than 10% efficiency. Even though some theoretical study showed that it is possible to achieve almost 100% spin injection through the Fe|GaAs junction in the ballistic limit. However, the symmetry sensitivity of this injection mechanism makes it very difficult to be realized. To study the spin injection effect of a Fe|CrAs (n)|GaAs structure we calculated a scattering matrix based on first-principles density functional theory. Our results show that the high efficiency of spin injection in a Fe|CrAs(n)|GaAs structure can be realized at room temperature with only a few layers of CrAs. The spin injection efficiency is affected little by the interfacial disorder. The spin-dependent resistance of Fe|CrAs|GaAs junction is also studied.

  15. Protocols for dry DNA storage and shipment at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Masha L

    2013-01-01

    The globalization of DNA barcoding will require core analytical facilities to develop cost-effective, efficient protocols for the shipment and archival storage of DNA extracts and PCR products. We evaluated three dry-state DNA stabilization systems: commercial Biomatrica® DNAstable® plates, home-made trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) plates on 96-well panels of insect DNA stored at 56 °C and at room temperature. Controls included unprotected samples that were stored dry at room temperature and at 56 °C, and diluted samples held at 4 °C and at −20 °C. PCR and selective sequencing were performed over a 4-year interval to test the condition of DNA extracts. Biomatrica® provided better protection of DNA at 56 °C and at room temperature than trehalose and PVA, especially for diluted samples. PVA was the second best protectant after Biomatrica® at room temperature, whereas trehalose was the second best protectant at 56 °C. In spite of lower PCR success, the DNA stored at −20 °C yielded longer sequence reads and stronger signal, indicating that temperature is a crucial factor for DNA quality which has to be considered especially for long-term storage. Although it is premature to advocate a transition to DNA storage at room temperature, dry storage provides an additional layer of security for frozen samples, protecting them from degradation in the event of freezer failure. All three forms of DNA preservation enable shipment of dry DNA and PCR products between barcoding facilities. PMID:23789643

  16. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  17. Coherent population trapping in a crystalline solid at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman

    2005-11-01

    Observation of coherent population trapping (CPT) at ground-state Zeeman sublevels of Cr3+ ion in ruby at room temperature is reported. A mechanism of CPT, not owing to optical pumping, is revealed in a situation when the optical pulse duration is shorter than the population decay time from the excited optical state.

  18. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  19. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  20. Assembling non-ferromagnetic materials to ferromagnetic architectures using metal-semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Liu, Chunting; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a facile and versatile solution route was used to fabricate room-temperature ferromagnetic fish bone-like, pteridophyte-like, poplar flower-like, cotton-like Cu@Cu2O architectures and golfball-like Cu@ZnO architecture. The ferromagnetic origins in these architectures were found to be around metal-semiconductor interfaces and defects, and the root cause for their ferromagnetism lay in charge transfer processes from metal Cu to semiconductors Cu2O and ZnO. Owing to different metallization at their interfaces, these architectures exhibited different ferromagnetic behaviors, including coercivity, saturation magnetization as well as magnetic interactions.

  1. Assembling non-ferromagnetic materials to ferromagnetic architectures using metal-semiconductor interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Liu, Chunting; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a facile and versatile solution route was used to fabricate room-temperature ferromagnetic fish bone-like, pteridophyte-like, poplar flower-like, cotton-like Cu@Cu2O architectures and golfball-like Cu@ZnO architecture. The ferromagnetic origins in these architectures were found to be around metal-semiconductor interfaces and defects, and the root cause for their ferromagnetism lay in charge transfer processes from metal Cu to semiconductors Cu2O and ZnO. Owing to different metallization at their interfaces, these architectures exhibited different ferromagnetic behaviors, including coercivity, saturation magnetization as well as magnetic interactions. PMID:27680286

  2. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  3. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  4. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  5. Transition-metal embedded carbon nitride monolayers: high-temperature ferromagnetism and half-metallicity.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Kumar, Sourabh; Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-08-01

    High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ∼450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices. PMID:27321785

  6. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  7. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3–BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3–BiMnO3–PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses. PMID:27677353

  8. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature. PMID:26675052

  9. Magnetic properties of MoS2: Existence of ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongay, Sefaattin; Varnoosfaderani, Sima S.; Appleton, Bill R.; Wu, Junqiao; Hebard, Arthur F.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of MoS2 measured from room temperature down to 10 K and magnetic fields up to 5 T. We find that single crystals of MoS2 display ferromagnetism superimposed onto large temperature-dependent diamagnetism and have observed that ferromagnetism persists from 10 K up to room temperature. We attribute the existence of ferromagnetism partly to the presence of zigzag edges in the magnetic ground state at the grain boundaries. Since the magnetic measurements are relatively insensitive to the interlayer coupling, these results are expected to be valid in the single layer limit.

  10. Room temperature scanning Hall probe microscopy using GaAs/AlGaAs and Bi micro-hall probes.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, A; Masuda, H; Oral, A; Bending, S J; Yamada, A; Konagai, M

    2002-05-01

    A room temperature scanning Hall probe microscope system utilizing GaAs/AlGaAs and bismuth micro-Hall probes was used for magnetic imaging of ferromagnetic domain structures on the surfaces of crystalline thin film garnets and permanent magnets. The Bi micro-Hall probes had dimensions ranging between 0.25 and 2.8 microm2 and were fabricated using a combination of optical lithography and focused ion beam milling. The use of bismuth was found to overcome surface depletion effects associated with semiconducting micro-Hall probes. Our experiments demonstrated that Bi is a practical choice of material for fabricating sub-micron sized Hall sensors.

  11. Effects of room temperature aging on two cryogenic temperature sensor models used in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors used in aerospace applications are typically procured far in advance of the mission launch date. Depending upon the program, the temperature sensors may be stored at room temperature for extended periods as installation and groundbased testing can take years before the actual flight. The effects of long term storage at room temperature are sometimes approximated by the use of accelerated aging at temperatures well above room temperature, but this practice can yield invalid results as the sensing material and/or electrical contacting method can be increasingly unstable with higher temperature exposure. To date, little data are available on the effects of extended room temperature aging on sensors commonly used in aerospace applications. This research examines two such temperature sensors models - the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. model CernoxTM and DT-670-SD temperature sensors. Sample groups of each model type have been maintained for ten years or longer with room temperature storage between calibrations. Over an eighteen year period, the CernoxTM temperature sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±20 mK for T<30 K and better than ±0.1% of temperature for T>30 K. Over a ten year period the model DT-670-SD sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±140 mK for T<25 K and better than ±75 mK for T>25 K.

  12. Induced spin-polarization of EuS at room temperature in Ni/EuS multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Poulopoulos, P.; Goschew, A.; Straub, A.; Fumagalli, P.; Kapaklis, V.; Wolff, M.; Delimitis, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Pappas, S. D.

    2014-03-17

    Ni/EuS multilayers with excellent multilayer sequencing are deposited via e-beam evaporation on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers at 4 × 10{sup −9} millibars. The samples have very small surface and interface roughness and show sharp interfaces. Ni layers are nanocrystalline 4–8 nm thick and EuS layers are 2–4 nm thick and are either amorphous or nanocrystalline. Unlike for Co/EuS multilayers, all Eu ions are in divalent (ferromagnetic) state. We show a direct antiferromagnetic coupling between EuS and Ni layers. At room temperature, the EuS layers are spin-polarized due to the proximity of Ni. Therefore, Ni/EuS is a candidate for room-temperature spintronics applications.

  13. Low-temperature ferromagnetic properties in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fengxia E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn; Yu, Gen; Han, Chong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Duanming; Xia, Zhengcai E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn

    2014-01-06

    β-Ag{sub 2}Se is a topologically nontrivial insulator. The magnetic properties of Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles with Co concentrations up to 40% were investigated. The cusp of zero-field-cooling magnetization curves and the low-temperature hysteresis loops were observed. With increasing concentration of Co{sup 2+} ions mainly substituting Ag{sub I} sites in the Ag{sub 2}Se structure, the resistivity, Curie temperature T{sub c}, and magnetization increased. At 10 T, a sharp drop of resistance near T{sub c} was detected due to Co dopants. The ferromagnetic behavior in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se might result from the intra-layer ferromagnetic coupling and surface spin. This magnetic semiconductor is a promising candidate in electronics and spintronics.

  14. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  15. Room-temperature reactions for self-cleaning molecular nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Keith H; Wang, Bin; Cliffel, David E; Wright, David W; Haglund, Richard F; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2013-02-13

    New sensing techniques for detecting molecules, especially self-cleaning sensors, are in demand. Here we describe a room-temperature process in which a nanostructured substrate catalyzes the reaction of a target molecule with atmospheric oxygen and the reaction energy is absorbed by the substrate, where it can in principle be detected. Specifically, we report first-principles calculations describing a reaction between 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and atmospheric O(2) catalyzed by Fe-porphyrin at room temperature, incorporating an oxygen into the methyl group of DNT and releasing 1.9 eV per reaction. The atomic oxygen left on the Fe site can be removed by reacting with another DNT molecule, restoring the Fe catalyst.

  16. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  17. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  18. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  19. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  20. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  1. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  2. Aggregation-based growth of silver nanowires at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lanlan; Wang, Li; Song, Yonghai; Guo, Cunlan; Sun, Yujing; Peng, Chongyang; Liu, Zhelin; Li, Zhuang

    2008-02-01

    We describe an aggregation-based growth mechanism for formation of silver nanowires at room temperature. It is found that the pH of solution and the concentration of L-cysteine capping molecules have an important effect on the formation and growth of nanowires. Characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectroscopy recorded as time clearly shows that the silver nanowires are grown at the expense of nanoparticles.

  3. Room Temperature, Metal-Free Arylation of Aliphatic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Raju; Lindstedt, Erik; Jalalian, Nazli; Olofsson, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Diaryliodonium salts are demonstrated as efficient arylating agents of aliphatic alcohols under metal-free conditions. The reaction proceeds at room temperature within 90 min to give alkyl aryl ethers in good to excellent yields. Aryl groups with electron-withdrawing substituents are transferred most efficiently, and unsymmetric iodonium salts give chemoselective arylations. The methodology has been applied to the formal synthesis of butoxycaine. PMID:24808991

  4. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  5. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  6. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  7. Noninvasive liver iron measurements with a room-temperature susceptometer

    PubMed Central

    Avrin, W F; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements on the liver can quantify iron overload accurately and noninvasively. However, established susceptometer designs, using Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) that work in liquid helium, have been too expensive for widespread use. This paper presents a less expensive liver susceptometer that works at room temperature. This system uses oscillating magnetic fields, which are produced and detected by copper coils. The coil design cancels the signal from the applied field, eliminating noise from fluctuations of the source-coil current and sensor gain. The coil unit moves toward and away from the patient at 1 Hz, cancelling drifts due to thermal expansion of the coils. Measurements on a water phantom indicated instrumental errors less than 30 μg of iron per gram of wet liver tissue, which is small compared with other errors due to the response of the patient’s body. Liver iron measurements on eight thalassemia patients yielded a correlation coefficient r=0.98 between the room-temperature susceptometer and an existing SQUID. These results indicate that the fundamental accuracy limits of the room-temperature susceptometer are similar to those of the SQUID. PMID:17395991

  8. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10‑3 S cm‑1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  9. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  10. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  11. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  12. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  13. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  14. Observation of ferromagnetism in Mn doped KNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Venkateswaran, C.

    2015-06-01

    Pure and Mn doped KNbO3 have been prepared by ball milling assisted ceramic method. Mn ion had been doped at Nb site to induce ferromagnetism at room temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveal the formation of orthorhombic phase. High resolution scanning electron micrograph (HR-SEM) of both pure and Mn doped samples show a mixture of spherical and plate like particles. Room temperature magnetic behavior of both the samples were analyzed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). 5% Mn doped KNbO3 exhibits ferromagnetic behavior. Observed ferromagnetic feature has been explained by interactions between bound magnetic polarons which are created by Mn4+ ions.

  15. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  16. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  17. Room-temperature spin thermoelectrics in metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölle, Sebastian; Gorini, Cosimo; Eckern, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Considering metallic films at room temperature, we present the first theoretical study of the spin Nernst and thermal Edelstein effects that takes into account dynamical spin-orbit coupling, i.e., direct spin-orbit coupling with the vibrating lattice (phonons) and impurities. This gives rise to a novel process, namely, a dynamical side-jump mechanism, and to dynamical Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation, never before considered in this context. Both are the high-temperature counterparts of the well-known T =0 side-jump and Elliott-Yafet, central to the current understanding of the spin Hall, spin Nernst and Edelstein (current-induced spin polarization) effects at low T . We consider the experimentally relevant regime T >TD , with TD the Debye temperature, as the latter is lower than room temperature in transition metals such as Pt, Au and Ta typically employed in spin injection/extraction experiments. We show that the interplay between intrinsic (Bychkov-Rashba type) and extrinsic (dynamical) spin-orbit coupling yields a nonlinear T dependence of the spin Nernst and spin Hall conductivities.

  18. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Julia A; Brooks, Charles M; Holtz, Megan E; Moyer, Jarrett A; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F; Heron, John T; Clarkson, James D; Disseler, Steven M; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A; Ratcliff, William D; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A; Schlom, Darrell G

    2016-01-01

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3-the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling-we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially-from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering. PMID:27652564

  19. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Julia A.; Brooks, Charles M.; Holtz, Megan E.; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F.; Heron, John T.; Clarkson, James D.; Disseler, Steven M.; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A.; Ratcliff, William D.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J.; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3—the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling—we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially—from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering.

  20. High-temperature ferromagnetism of Si1-xMnx (x≈0.52-0.55) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylkov, V. V.; Bugaev, A. S.; Novodvorskii, O. A.; Tugushev, V. V.; Kulatov, E. T.; Zenkevich, A. V.; Semisalova, A. S.; Nikolaev, S. N.; Vedeneev, A. S.; Shorokhova, A. V.; Aver‧yanov, D. V.; Chernoglazov, K. Yu.; Gan‧shina, E. A.; Granovsky, A. B.; Wang, Y.; Panchenko, V. Ya.; Zhou, S.

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports on the comprehensive study of properties of nonstoichiometric Si1-xMnx alloys slightly enriched in Mn (x≈0.51-0.55) as compared to the stoichiometric monosilicide MnSi. Mosaic type Si1-xMnx films 55-70 nm in thickness were produced by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method onto the single crystalline Al2O3 substrates at 340 °C. The Curie temperature TC in nonstoichiometric Si1-xMnx (x≈0.52-0.55) films exceeds room temperature, while in their stoichiometric counterpart, MnSi, the TC value does not exceed ≈30 K. The consistent data on anomalous Hall effect and transverse Kerr effect prove the global character of ferromagnetic (FM) order caused by magnetic defect formation rather than the presence of FM clusters. At Mn content x≤0.55, the magnetization data testify to a good homogeneity in the distribution of magnetic defects without their segregation: variations of the saturation magnetization Ms do not exceed 6% in the temperature range T=10-100 K and are well described by the Bloch law. It is also revealed that textured high-quality Si1-xMnx films with x≈0.52 and TC~300 K could be formed by PLD method in the "shadow" geometry (at lower energy of deposited atoms).

  1. Temperature dependent ferromagnetic relaxation and gyromagnetic ratio in Ni80Fe20 / Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mohammadi, Jamileh; Mewes, Claudia; Mewes, Tim; Eggers, Tatiana; Miller, Casey; MINT Center Team; Rochester Institute of Technology Team

    2015-03-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the magnetization dynamics of NiFe thin films (5nm & 10nm) capped with a 3nm Gd layer using broadband ferromagnetic resonance. We observe that the effective Gilbert damping parameter determined from the broadband measurements increases as the temperature approaches the Curie-temperature of the Gd layer. Part of the enhancement can be explained by an increase of the spin-pumping contribution to the relaxation as the temperature approaches the Curie temperature of Gd. We also measure a strong increase of the gyromagnetic ratio with decreasing temperature which resembles the increase of the gyromagnetic ratio in rare earth containing transition metals near the compensation point. This increase in the gyromagnetic ratio is expected to lead to an increased Gilbert type damping due to spin-orbit interaction, that likely also contributes to the increase in damping. NSF-CAREER Award No. 0952929 and NSF-ECCS-1231929.

  2. Room-temperature and near-room-temperature molecule-based magnets.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Mark D; Crawford, T Daniel; Yee, Gordon T

    2008-07-01

    Additional members of the family of high- T c molecule-based magnets, V[acceptor] 2. yCH 2Cl 2 have been discovered in which the acceptor is a fluorophenyltricyanoethylene. Varying the number and position of the fluorine substitutions around the phenyl ring results in materials with significantly different magnetic ordering temperatures ( T c's) ranging from 160 to 300 K. Density functional theory calculations were performed on the neutral and anionic forms of the acceptors that reveal modest correlation between T c and three calculated quantities: the gas-phase electron affinity, the dihedral angle between the phenyl ring and the olefin, and the Mulliken spin densities on the nitrogen atoms. The electrochemistry of the acceptors has also been examined.

  3. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  4. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  5. Room temperature GaAsSb single nanowire infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyuan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Fu, Lan; Peng, Kun; Wang, Fan; Fu, Xiao; Caroff, Philippe; White, Thomas P; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-11-01

    Antimonide-based ternary III-V nanowires (NWs) allow for a tunable bandgap over a wide range, which is highly interesting for optoelectronics applications, and in particular for infrared photodetection. Here we demonstrate room temperature operation of GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW infrared photodetectors grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. These GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs have uniform axial composition and show p-type conductivity with a peak field-effect mobility of ∼12 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Under light illumination, single GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW photodetectors exhibited typical photoconductor behavior with an increased photocurrent observed with the increase of temperature owing to thermal activation of carrier trap states. A broadband infrared photoresponse with a long wavelength cutoff at ∼1.66 μm was obtained at room temperature. At a low operating bias voltage of 0.15 V a responsivity of 2.37 (1.44) A/W with corresponding detectivity of 1.08 × 10(9) (6.55 × 10(8)) cm√Hz/W were achieved at the wavelength of 1.3 (1.55) μm, indicating that ternary GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs are promising photodetector candidates for small footprint integrated optical telecommunication systems. PMID:26451616

  6. Icelike water monolayer adsorbed on mica at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P.B.; Xu, L.; Shen, Y.R.; Salmeron, M.

    1998-10-01

    The structure of a water film formed on mica at room temperature, in equilibrium with water vapor at various relative humidities (RH), was studied using sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM). Analysis of the O-D stretch modes in the SFG spectra of D{sub 2}O on mica indicates that as RH increases, the submonolayer water structure evolves into a more ordered hydrogen-bonding network. At full monolayer coverage ({approximately} 90% RH), the SFG spectrum suggests an icelike film with no dangling O-D groups, in agreement with a recent molecular dynamics simulation.

  7. Ferromagnetism in Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, T.; Liberati, M.; Aubriet, H.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Bali, R.; Becker, C.; Ruch, D.; MacManus-Driscoll, J.L.; Arenholz, E.; Blamire, M.G.

    2009-04-21

    The origin of ferromagnetism in Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films is discussed. While the as-grown samples are not ferromagnetic at room temperature or at 10 K, ferromagnetism at room temperature appears after annealing the films in reducing conditions and disappears after annealing in oxidizing conditions. Magnetic measurements, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments indicate that within the resolution of the instruments the activation of the ferromagnetism is not due to the presence of pure Co.

  8. Oxygen-vacancy-induced room-temperature magnetization in lamellar V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Cezar, A. B.; Graff, I. L. Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the local atomic and electronic structures as well as oxygen-vacancy-induced magnetic properties of electrodeposited V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films. Unlike stoichiometric V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which is a diamagnetic lamellar semiconductor, our oxygen-defective V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films are ferromagnetic at room-temperature and their saturation magnetization decreases with air exposure time. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the aging effect on these films, revealing that freshly-made samples exhibit only local crystalline order, whereas the aged ones undoubtedly show an enhancement of crystallinity and coordination symmetry. The mean number of oxygen atoms around V tends to increase, indicating a decrease of oxygen vacancies with time. Concurrently with the decrease of oxygen vacancies, a loss of saturation magnetization is also observed. Hence, it can be concluded that the ferromagnetism of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films originates from a vacancy-induced mechanism, confirming the universality of this class of ferromagnetism.

  9. Study of dielectric, magnetic, ferroelectric and magnetoelectric properties in the PbMn(x)Ti(1-x)O(3) system at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, K L

    2007-06-20

    We report magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature between ferroelectric and magnetic order parameters in Mn-doped PbTiO(3) compounds prepared by a solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction showed that PbMn(x)Ti(1-x)O(3) (x = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5) compounds were single phase. The Mn substitution reduced the lattice distortion, i.e., the c/a ratio, and hence the ferroelectric Curie temperature (T(C)) decreased with increasing Mn content. High-temperature magnetization measurements showed that the ferromagnetic Curie temperature (T(M)) decreases with increasing Mn in PbMn(x)Ti(1-x)O(3). An anomaly in the dielectric constant (ε) was observed in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic transition temperature. These samples exhibited magnetism and ferroelectricity simultaneously at room temperature, which was evidenced from the coexistence of saturated magnetization and polarization hysteresis loops. An enhancement in saturation polarization after poling the samples in the magnetic field was evidence of magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature. An enhancement of 11-13% in polarization was observed after poling the samples in a magnetic field at 1.2 T. PMID:21694032

  10. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  11. CuInP₂S₆ Room Temperature Layered Ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Belianinov, A; He, Q; Dziaugys, A; Maksymovych, P; Eliseev, E; Borisevich, A; Morozovska, A; Banys, J; Vysochanskii, Y; Kalinin, S V

    2015-06-10

    We explore ferroelectric properties of cleaved 2-D flakes of copper indium thiophosphate, CuInP2S6 (CITP), and probe size effects along with limits of ferroelectric phase stability, by ambient and ultra high vacuum scanning probe microscopy. CITP belongs to the only material family known to display ferroelectric polarization in a van der Waals, layered crystal at room temperature and above. Our measurements directly reveal stable, ferroelectric polarization as evidenced by domain structures, switchable polarization, and hysteresis loops. We found that at room temperature the domain structure of flakes thicker than 100 nm is similar to the cleaved bulk surfaces, whereas below 50 nm polarization disappears. We ascribe this behavior to a well-known instability of polarization due to depolarization field. Furthermore, polarization switching at high bias is also associated with ionic mobility, as evidenced both by macroscopic measurements and by formation of surface damage under the tip at a bias of 4 V-likely due to copper reduction. Mobile Cu ions may therefore also contribute to internal screening mechanisms. The existence of stable polarization in a van-der-Waals crystal naturally points toward new strategies for ultimate scaling of polar materials, quasi-2D, and single-layer materials with advanced and nonlinear dielectric properties that are presently not found in any members of the growing "graphene family".

  12. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  13. Wetting behavior of dialkylimidazolium chloroaluminate, a room temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, J.

    1985-08-01

    Eberhart (1979) has found that the wetting behavior of a battery electrolyte can have a dramatic effect on the internal resistance of the battery as well as its cycle life. Good wetting of battery separators by electrolyte is essential for the easy passage of ions through the separator pores, while porous, gas diffusion electrodes require a lesser degree of wetting. For several years, a room temperature molten salt system has been under study. This system is composed of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (C6N2H11Cl or MeEtImCl) plus aluminum chloride. The application of this novel liquid solution as a battery electrolyte appears to be promising. Available data suggest that likely candidates include cells with a chlorine positive electrode reactant and a magnesium, aluminum, or zinc negative electrode material. The present investigation is concerned with an assessment of the wetting behavior in the considered system, taking into account a study of the contact angles of various room temperature molten salts on candidate battery separator and porous electrode materials. 10 references.

  14. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  15. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  16. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm. PMID:21152492

  17. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm.

  18. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-06-09

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  19. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  20. Synthesis of manganese spinel nanoparticles at room temperature by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannelli, F.; Autret-Lambert, C.; Mathieu, C.; Chartier, T.; Delorme, F.; Seron, A

    2012-08-15

    This paper is focused on a new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by alkalisation by sodium hydroxide on a manganeous solution at room temperature. The precipitates obtained at different pH values have been characterized by XRD and TEM. Since the first addition of sodium hydroxide, a white Mn(OH){sub 2} precipitate appears. At pH=7, {gamma}-MnOOH phase is predominant with needle like shaped particles. At pH=10, hausmanite nanoparticles, which exhibits well defined cubic shape in the range 50-120 nm are obtained. This new precipitation route is a fast and easy environmentally friendly process to obtain well crystallized hausmanite nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles after a precipitation at pH=10. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis has been performed by precipitation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is between 50 and 120 nm.

  1. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.

  2. Directional molecular sliding at room temperature on a silicon runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouju, Xavier; Chérioux, Frédéric; Coget, Sébastien; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Palmino, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations.The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational details, additional STM images and movies showing DETB molecules sliding on the SmSi(111)-(7 × 1) reconstruction obtained from semi-empirical calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01685d

  3. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuanyuan; Lu, Haidong; Yin, Yuewei; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Ahmadi, Zahra; Costa, Paulo S.; DiChiara, Anthony D.; Cheng, Xuemei; Gruverman, Alexei; Enders, Axel; Xu, Xiaoshan

    2016-09-01

    Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50-100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

  4. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  5. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  6. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D.; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions.

  7. Enabling NIR imaging at room temperature using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Calvez, S.; Bourvon, H.; Kanaan, H.; Meunier-Della Gatta, S.; Philippot, C.; Reiss, P.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging in visible light at room temperature is now a well-mastered technology, whereas imaging in the near infrared (NIR) remains a challenge. NIR imaging has many applications like sensing, night vision and biological diagnostics. Unfortunately, silicon detectors are inefficient above 1000 nm, and other IR technologies still need low working temperatures and are thus expensive. Colloidal quantum dots can overcome these limitations thanks to their absorption wavelength tunability depending on their chemical composition and size. After a brief review of this research field, we will present the preparation of hybrid photodetectors using NIR absorbing PbS quantum dots in combination with poly(3-hexylthiopene) and PCBM. We discuss different solution based deposition processes for device fabrication (spincoating, dip-coating, doctor blading, inkjet printing). Preliminary device tests result in a detectivity of 4.7.109 Jones at 1300 nm.

  8. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  9. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  10. Hysteretic magnetic pinning and reversible resistance switching in high-temperature superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visani, C.; Metaxas, P. J.; Collaudin, A.; Calvet, B.; Bernard, R.; Briatico, J.; Deranlot, C.; Bouzehouane, K.; Villegas, J. E.

    2011-08-01

    We study a high-critical temperature superconducting (YBa2Cu3O7-δ)/ferromagnetic (Co/Pt multilayer) hybrid that exhibits resistance switching driven by the magnetic history: depending on the direction of the external field, a pronounced decrease or increase of the mixed-state resistance is observed as magnetization reversal occurs within the Co/Pt multilayer. We demonstrate that stray magnetic fields cause these effects via (i) creation of vortices/antivortices and (ii) magnetostatic pinning of vortices that are induced by the external field.

  11. Longitudinal spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Sukhov, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2014-07-01

    Based on the solution of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation discretized for a ferromagnetic chain subject to a uniform temperature gradient, we present a detailed numerical study of the spin dynamics with a particular focus on finite-size effects. We calculate and analyze the net longitudinal spin current for various temperature gradients, chain lengths, and external static magnetic fields. In addition, we model an interface formed by a nonuniformly magnetized finite-size ferromagnetic insulator and a normal metal and inspect the effects of enhanced Gilbert damping on the formation of the space-dependent spin current within the chain. One aim of this study is the inspection of the spin-Seebeck effect beyond the linear response regime. We find that within our model the microscopic mechanism of the spin-Seebeck current is the magnon accumulation effect quantified in terms of the exchange spin torque. According to our results, this effect drives the spin-Seebeck current even in the absence of a deviation between the magnon and phonon temperature profiles. The influence of the dipole-dipole interaction and domain formation on the spin current is exposed and discussed. Our theoretical findings are in line with the recently observed experimental results by Agrawal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107204 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.107204].

  12. [Studies on the health standard for room temperature in cold regions].

    PubMed

    Meng, Z L

    1990-03-01

    The microclimate of 205 rooms of single storey houses in four new rural residential districts in coastal and inland Shandong was monitored and studied the blood circulation of the finger, skin temperature, sweating function and other physiological indexes among 2,401 peasants. We interrogated their personal sensation to cold and warmth. The count was done by the application of thermal equilibrium index (TEI), predicted 4-hour Sweat Rate (P4SR) and the uncomfortable index. The standard room temperature is recommended as follows. In rural area in winter the appropriate room temperature is 14-16 degrees C, the comfortable room temperature is 16-20 degrees C, the lowest room temperature must not be below 14 degrees C. In summer the appropriate room temperature is 25-28 degrees C, the comfortable room temperature is 26-27 degrees C, the highest temperature must not be above 28 degrees C. PMID:2364801

  13. Room-temperature ultrasensitive mass spectrometer via dynamical decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Yin, Zhang-qi

    2014-10-01

    We propose an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer based on a coupled quantum-bit-oscillator system. Under dynamical decoupling control of the quantum bit (qubit), the qubit coherence exhibits a comb structure in the time domain. The time-comb structure enables high-precision measurements of oscillator frequency, which can be used as an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. We show that, in the ideal case, the sensitivity η of the proposed mass spectrometer has better performance at higher temperature and scales with the temperature T as η ˜T-1 /2 . While taking into account qubit and oscillator decay, the optimal sensitivity reaches a universal value independent of environmental temperature T . The measurement sensitivity η also shows an improved dependence on the control-pulse number N as η ˜N-3 /2 , in comparison with the N-1 /2 scaling in previous magnetometry studies. With the present technology on solid-state spin qubit and high-quality optomechanical system, our proposal is feasible to realize an ultrasensitive room-temperature mass spectrometer.

  14. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors.

  15. Contracting cardiomyocytes in hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Fujita, Kyoko; Higashi, Ayako; Sakiyama, Keiko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatible room-temperature ionic liquid was applied on beating cardiomyocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lifetime of beating cardiomyocytes was depended on anion functional group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A longer lifetime was recorded for no functional group on alkyl chain on their anion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino group on alkyl chain and fluorine in anion induced fatal condition changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reported liquid electrolyte interface to stimulate cardiomyocytes. -- Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are drawing attention as a new class of nonaqueous solvents to replace organic and aqueous solvents for chemical processes in the liquid phase at room temperature. The RTILs are notable for their characteristics of nonvolatility, extremely low vapor pressure, electric conductivity, and incombustibility. These distinguished properties of RTILs have brought attention to them in applications with biological cells and tissue in vacuum environment for scanning electron microscopy, and in microfluidic devices for micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS). Habitable RTILs could increase capability of nonaqueous micro-TAS for living cells. Some RTILs seemed to have the capability to replace water in biological applications. However, these RTILs had been applied to just supplemental additives for biocompatible test, to fixed cells as a substitute for an aqueous solution, and to simple molecules. None of RTILs in which directly soaks a living cell culture. Therefore, we demonstrated the design of RTILs for a living cell culture and a liquid electrolyte to stimulate contracting cardiomyocytes using the RTILs. We assessed the effect of RTILs on the cardiomyocytes using the beating lifetime to compare the applicability of RTILs for biological applications. Frequent spontaneous contractions of cardiomyocytes were confirmed in amino acid anion RTILs [P{sub 8,8,8,8}][Leu] and [P{sub 8

  16. Tuning structural instability toward enhanced magnetocaloric effect around room temperature in MnCo(1-x)Zn(x)Ge.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, D; Suzuki, T; Tokura, Y; Taguchi, Y

    2014-01-01

    Magnetocaloric effect is the phenomenon that temperature change of a magnetic material is induced by application of a magnetic field. This effect can be applied to environmentally-benign magnetic refrigeration technology. Here we show a key role of magnetic-field-induced structural instability in enhancing the magnetocaloric effect for MnCo(1-x)Zn(x)Ge alloys (x = 0-0.05). The increase in x rapidly reduces the martensitic transition temperature while keeping the ferromagnetic transition around room temperature. Fine tuning of x around x = 0.03 leads to the concomitant structural and ferromagnetic transition in a cooling process, giving rise to enhanced magnetocaloric effect as well as magnetic-field-induced structural transition. Analyses of the structural phase diagrams in the T-H plane in terms of Landau free-energy phenomenology accounts for the characteristic x-dependence of the observed magnetocaloric effect, pointing to the importance of the magnetostructural coupling for the design of high-performance magnetocalorics. PMID:25519919

  17. Tuning structural instability toward enhanced magnetocaloric effect around room temperature in MnCo1−xZnxGe

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Suzuki, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetocaloric effect is the phenomenon that temperature change of a magnetic material is induced by application of a magnetic field. This effect can be applied to environmentally-benign magnetic refrigeration technology. Here we show a key role of magnetic-field-induced structural instability in enhancing the magnetocaloric effect for MnCo1−xZnxGe alloys (x = 0–0.05). The increase in x rapidly reduces the martensitic transition temperature while keeping the ferromagnetic transition around room temperature. Fine tuning of x around x = 0.03 leads to the concomitant structural and ferromagnetic transition in a cooling process, giving rise to enhanced magnetocaloric effect as well as magnetic-field-induced structural transition. Analyses of the structural phase diagrams in the T-H plane in terms of Landau free-energy phenomenology accounts for the characteristic x-dependence of the observed magnetocaloric effect, pointing to the importance of the magnetostructural coupling for the design of high-performance magnetocalorics. PMID:25519919

  18. Tuning structural instability toward enhanced magnetocaloric effect around room temperature in MnCo1-xZnxGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Suzuki, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetocaloric effect is the phenomenon that temperature change of a magnetic material is induced by application of a magnetic field. This effect can be applied to environmentally-benign magnetic refrigeration technology. Here we show a key role of magnetic-field-induced structural instability in enhancing the magnetocaloric effect for MnCo1-xZnxGe alloys (x = 0-0.05). The increase in x rapidly reduces the martensitic transition temperature while keeping the ferromagnetic transition around room temperature. Fine tuning of x around x = 0.03 leads to the concomitant structural and ferromagnetic transition in a cooling process, giving rise to enhanced magnetocaloric effect as well as magnetic-field-induced structural transition. Analyses of the structural phase diagrams in the T-H plane in terms of Landau free-energy phenomenology accounts for the characteristic x-dependence of the observed magnetocaloric effect, pointing to the importance of the magnetostructural coupling for the design of high-performance magnetocalorics.

  19. Outcome of impact disruption of iron meteorites at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, T.; Nakamura, A.; Takabe, A.; Okamoto, T.; Sangen, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Liu, X.; Mashimo, T.

    2014-07-01

    The iron meteorites and some M-class asteroids are generally understood to originate in the cores of differentiated planetesimals or in the local melt pools of primitive bodies. On these primitive bodies and planetesimals, a wide range of collisional events at different mass scales, temperatures, and impact velocities would have occurred. Iron materials have a brittle-ductile transition at a certain temperature, which depends on metallurgical factors such as grain size and purity, and on conditions such as strain-rate and confining pressure [1]. An evolutional scenario of iron meteorite parent bodies was proposed in which they formed in the terrestrial planet region, after which they were scattered into the main belt by collisions, Yarkovsky thermal forces, and resonances [2]. In this case, they may have experienced collisional evolution in the vicinity of the Earth before they were scattered into the main belt. The size distribution of iron bodies in the main belt may therefore have depended on the disruption threshold of iron bodies at temperature above the brittle-ductile transition. This paper presents the results of impact-disruption experiments of iron meteorite and steel specimens mm-cm in size as projectiles or targets conducted at room temperature using three light-gas guns and one powder gun. Our iron specimens were almost all smaller in size than their counterparts (as targets or projectiles, respectively). The fragment size distribution of iron material was different from that of rocks. In iron fragmentation, a higher percentage of the mass is concentrated in larger fragments, i.e., the mass fraction of fine fragments is much less than that of rocks shown in the Figure (left). This is probably due to the ductile nature of the iron materials at room temperature. Furthermore, the Figure (right) shows that the largest fragment mass fraction f is dependent not only on the energy density but also on the size of the specimens. In order to obtain a generalized

  20. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  1. Creep of Mg-PSZ at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, T.R. . Dept. of Physics); Gross, A.K. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Griffiths, J.R. . Div. of Manufacturing Technology); Kisi, E.H. . Faculty of Science and Technology)

    1994-03-01

    Transient [beta], or Andrade, creep occurs when magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia is loaded in tension at room temperature. The equation relating the longitudinal or tensile creep strain [var epsilon][sub l][sup c] to the tensile stress, [sigma], and to the time, t, has been determined to be [var epsilon][sub l][sup c] = A[sigma][sup m]t[sup n] in which the constants A, m, and n depend on the phase content of the zirconia. Observations are reported of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic and tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transformations which occur during creep: there is also a progressive development of microcracking. It is shown that a combination of these phenomena can account for the observed creep behavior.

  2. Room temperature water splitting at the surface of magnetite.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gareth S; Novotný, Zbyněk; Jacobson, Peter; Schmid, Michael; Diebold, Ulrike

    2011-08-17

    An array of surface science measurements has revealed novel water adsorption behavior at the Fe(3)O(4)(001) surface. Following room temperature exposure to water, a low coverage of hydrogen atoms is observed, with no associated water hydroxyl group. Mild annealing of the hydrogenated surface leads to desorption of water via abstraction of surface oxygen atoms, leading to a reduction of the surface. These results point to an irreversible splitting of the water molecule. The observed phenomena are discussed in the context of recent DFT calculations (Mulakaluri, N.; Pentcheva, R.; Scheffler, M. J. Phys. Chem. C 2010, 114, 11148), which show that the Jahn-Teller distorted surface isolates adsorbed H in a geometry that could kinetically hinder recombinative desorption. In contrast, the adsorption geometry facilitates interaction between water hydroxyl species, which are concluded to leave the surface following a reactive desorption process, possibly via the creation of O(2).

  3. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop. PMID:25551062

  4. Extraordinary room-temperature photoluminescence in triangular WS2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Humberto R; Perea-López, Nestor; Elías, Ana Laura; Berkdemir, Ayse; Wang, Bei; Lv, Ruitao; López-Urías, Florentino; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio

    2013-08-14

    Individual monolayers of metal dichalcogenides are atomically thin two-dimensional crystals with attractive physical properties different from those of their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the direct synthesis of WS2 monolayers with triangular morphologies and strong room-temperature photoluminescence (PL). The Raman response as well as the luminescence as a function of the number of S-W-S layers is also reported. The PL weakens with increasing number of layers due to a transition from direct band gap in a monolayer to indirect gap in multilayers. The edges of WS2 monolayers exhibit PL signals with extraordinary intensity, around 25 times stronger than that at the platelet's center. The structure and chemical composition of the platelet edges appear to be critical for PL enhancement.

  5. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  6. Electrically Injected Photon-Pair Source at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitier, Fabien; Orieux, Adeline; Autebert, Claire; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Manquest, Christophe; Sirtori, Carlo; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Ducci, Sara

    2014-05-01

    One of the main challenges for future quantum information technologies is the miniaturization and integration of high performance components in a single chip. In this context, electrically driven sources of nonclassical states of light have a clear advantage over optically driven ones. Here we demonstrate the first electrically driven semiconductor source of photon pairs working at room temperature and telecom wavelengths. The device is based on type-II intracavity spontaneous parametric down-conversion in an AlGaAs laser diode and generates pairs at 1.57 μm. Time-correlation measurements of the emitted pairs give an internal generation efficiency of 7×10-11 pairs/injected electron. The capability of our platform to support the generation, manipulation, and detection of photons opens the way to the demonstration of massively parallel systems for complex quantum operations.

  7. Icelike Water Monolayer Adsorbed on Mica at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P.B.; Xu, L.; Shen, Y.R.; Salmeron, M.

    1998-12-01

    The structure of a water film formed on mica at room temperature, in equilibrium with water vapor at various relative humidities (RH), was studied using sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM). Analysis of the O-D stretch modes in the SFG spectra of D{sub 2}O on mica indicates that as RH increases, the submonolayer water structure evolves into a more ordered hydrogen-bonding network. At full monolayer coverage ({approximately} 90{percent} RH) , the SFG spectrum suggests an icelike film with no dangling O-D groups, in agreement with a recent molecular dynamics simulation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  9. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  10. Emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity at reduced dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Lu, H; Gu, Y; Choi, S-Y; Li, S-D; Ryu, S; Paudel, T R; Song, K; Mikheev, E; Lee, S; Stemmer, S; Tenne, D A; Oh, S H; Tsymbal, E Y; Wu, X; Chen, L-Q; Gruverman, A; Eom, C B

    2015-09-18

    The enhancement of the functional properties of materials at reduced dimensions is crucial for continuous advancements in nanoelectronic applications. Here, we report that the scale reduction leads to the emergence of an important functional property, ferroelectricity, challenging the long-standing notion that ferroelectricity is inevitably suppressed at the scale of a few nanometers. A combination of theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, and structural analyses provides evidence of room-temperature ferroelectricity in strain-free epitaxial nanometer-thick films of otherwise nonferroelectric strontium titanate (SrTiO3). We show that electrically induced alignment of naturally existing polar nanoregions is responsible for the appearance of a stable net ferroelectric polarization in these films. This finding can be useful for the development of low-dimensional material systems with enhanced functional properties relevant to emerging nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26383947

  11. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  12. Complete S matrix in a microwave cavity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, Jérôme; Legrand, Olivier; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    We experimentally study the widths of resonances in a two-dimensional microwave cavity at room temperature. By developing a model for the coupling antennas, we are able to discriminate their contribution from those of Ohmic losses to the broadening of resonances. Concerning Ohmic losses, we experimentally put to evidence two mechanisms: damping along propagation and absorption at the contour, the latter being responsible for variations of widths from mode to mode due to its dependence on the spatial distribution of the field at the contour. A theory, based on an S -matrix formalism, is given for these variations. It is successfully validated through measurements of several hundreds of resonances in a rectangular cavity.

  13. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shixuan

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice. (L.D. Pan et al., Nano Lett. 2015, 15, 6464. In collaboration with Lida Pan, Yande Que, Hui Chen, Dongfei Wang, Jun Li, Chengmin Shen, Wende Xiao, Hongjun Gao in CAS, and S. Pantellides in Vanderbilt University.)

  14. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lida; Que, Yande; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dongfei; Li, Jun; Shen, Chengmin; Xiao, Wende; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2015-10-14

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice.

  15. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  16. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ganhua; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Chen, Junhong

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 °C) or one-step heating (200 °C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO2 and NH3 gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO2/NH3). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  17. Spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in Mn2NiGa at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Rawat, R; Muthu, S Esakki; D'Souza, S W; Suard, E; Senyshyn, A; Banik, S; Rajput, P; Bhardwaj, S; Awasthi, A M; Ranjan, Rajeev; Arumugam, S; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Barman, S R

    2012-12-14

    Spin valves have revolutionized the field of magnetic recording and memory devices. Spin valves are generally realized in thin film heterostructures, where two ferromagnetic (FM) layers are separated by a nonmagnetic conducting layer. Here, we demonstrate spin-valve-like magnetoresistance at room temperature in a bulk ferrimagnetic material that exhibits a magnetic shape memory effect. The origin of this unexpected behavior in Mn(2)NiGa has been investigated by neutron diffraction, magnetization, and ab initio theoretical calculations. The refinement of the neutron diffraction pattern shows the presence of antisite disorder where about 13% of the Ga sites are occupied by Mn atoms. On the basis of the magnetic structure obtained from neutron diffraction and theoretical calculations, we establish that these antisite defects cause the formation of FM nanoclusters with parallel alignment of Mn spin moments in a Mn(2)NiGa bulk lattice that has antiparallel Mn spin moments. The direction of the Mn moments in the soft FM cluster reverses with the external magnetic field. This causes a rotation or tilt in the antiparallel Mn moments at the cluster-lattice interface resulting in the observed asymmetry in magnetoresistance. PMID:23368355

  18. Nearly ferromagnetic Fermi-liquid behaviour in YFe2Zn20 and high-temperature ferromagnetism of GdFe2Zn20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Canfield, P. C.

    2007-05-01

    One of the historic goals of alchemy was to turn base elements into precious ones. Although the practice of alchemy has been superseded by chemistry and solid-state physics, the desire to dramatically change or tune the properties of a compound, preferably through small changes in stoichiometry or composition, remains. This desire becomes even more compelling for compounds that can be tuned to extremes in behaviour. Here, we report that the RT2Zn20 (R=rare earth and T=transition metal) family of compounds manifests exactly this type of versatility, even though they are more than 85% Zn. By tuning T, we find that YFe2Zn20 is closer to ferromagnetism than elemental Pd, the classic example of a nearly ferromagnetic Fermi liquid. By submerging Gd in this highly polarizable Fermi liquid, we tune the system to a remarkably high-temperature ferromagnetic (TC=86K) state for a compound with less than 5% Gd. Although this is not quite turning lead into gold, it is essentially tuning Zn to become a variety of model compounds.

  19. Origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity in soft ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Moubah, R.; Ahlberg, M.; Zamani, A.; Olsson, A.; Hjörvarsson, B.; Jönsson, P. E.; Shi, S.; Sun, Z.; Carlson, S.; Hallén, A.

    2014-08-07

    We report on the origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity observed in some soft ferromagnets by studying the magnetic and electronic properties of FeZr films doped using ion implantation by H, He, B, C, and N. The anomalous increase of the coercivity with temperature was observed only in the C- and B-doped samples. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the anomalous behavior of the coercivity coincides with the occurrence of an electron charge transfer for those implanted samples. The origin of the anomaly is discussed in terms of (i) magnetic softness, (ii) nature of the Fe-C and -B covalent bonds, and (iii) large charge transfer.

  20. Weak ferromagnetism in `non-magnetic' austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crangle, John; Fogarty, A.; Taylor, M. J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetization and susceptability of the non-magnetic stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 316 have been measured at low temperatures using a SQUID magnetometer. A small but stable ferromagnetic component is always present. Field cooling shows the effects of exchange anisotropy. Another stainless steel AISI 321 is non-magnetic at room temperature but it transforms irreversibly to a partially ferromagnetic state when it is cooled below 280 K.

  1. High temperature magnetic order in Zn1‑x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Górska, M.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Lewińska, S.; Szymczak, R.; Dynowska, E.; Podgórni, A.; Dobrowolski, W.; Ralević, U.; Gajić, R.; Romčević, N.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Marenkin, S. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present studies of structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Zn1‑x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors with the average Mn-content, \\bar{x} , changing from 0.027 up to 0.138. The magnetic force microscope imaging done at room temperature shows the presence of a strong signal coming from MnSb clusters. Magnetic properties show the paramagnet-ferromagnet transition with the Curie temperature, T C, equal to about 522 K and the cluster-glass behavior with the transition temperature, T CG, equal to about 465 K, both related to MnSb clusters. The magnetotransport studies show that all investigated samples are p-type semiconductors with high hole concentration, p, changing from 1021 to 1022 cm‑3. A large increase in the resistivity as a function of the magnetic field is observed at T  <  10 K and small magnetic fields, |B|<100 mT, for all the studied samples with a maximum amplitude of the magnetoresistance about 460% at T  =  1.4 K. The large increase in the resistivity is most probably caused by the appearance of the superconducting state in the samples at T  <  4.3 K.

  2. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  3. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  4. Engineering Room-temperature Superconductors Via ab-initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, Mamikon; Melkonyan, Gurgen; Gulian, Armen

    The BCS, or bosonic model of superconductivity, as Little and Ginzburg have first argued, can bring in superconductivity at room temperatures in the case of high-enough frequency of bosonic mode. It was further elucidated by Kirzhnitset al., that the condition for existence of high-temperature superconductivity is closely related to negative values of the real part of the dielectric function at finite values of the reciprocal lattice vectors. In view of these findings, the task is to calculate the dielectric function for real materials. Then the poles of this function will indicate the existence of bosonic excitations which can serve as a "glue" for Cooper pairing, and if the frequency is high enough, and the dielectric matrix is simultaneously negative, this material is a good candidate for very high-Tc superconductivity. Thus, our approach is to elaborate a methodology of ab-initio calculation of the dielectric function of various materials, and then point out appropriate candidates. We used the powerful codes (TDDF with the DP package in conjunction with ABINIT) for computing dielectric responses at finite values of the wave vectors in the reciprocal lattice space. Though our report is concerned with the particular problem of superconductivity, the application range of the data processing methodology is much wider. The ability to compute the dielectric function of existing and still non-existing (though being predicted!) materials will have many more repercussions not only in fundamental sciences but also in technology and industry.

  5. A computed room temperature line list for phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    An accurate and comprehensive room temperature rotation-vibration transition line list for phosphine (31PH3) is computed using a newly refined potential energy surface and a previously constructed ab initio electric dipole moment surface. Energy levels, Einstein A coefficients and transition intensities are computed using these surfaces and a variational approach to the nuclear motion problem as implemented in the program TROVE. A ro-vibrational spectrum is computed, covering the wavenumber range 0-8000 cm-1. The resulting line list, which is appropriate for temperatures up to 300 K, consists of a total of 137 million transitions between 5.6 million energy levels. Several of the band centres are shifted to better match experimental transition frequencies. The line list is compared to the most recent HITRAN database and other laboratorial sources. Transition wavelengths and intensities are generally found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data, with particularly close agreement for the rotational spectrum. An analysis of the comparison between the theoretical data created and the existing experimental data is performed, and suggestions for future improvements and assignments to the HITRAN database are made.

  6. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  7. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised—silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  8. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  9. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  10. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is ‘dark’ with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  11. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ∼100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised--silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  12. Magnon energy renormalization and low-temperature thermodynamics of O(3) Heisenberg ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Radošević, Slobodan M. Pantić, Milan R.; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica V.; Kapor, Darko V.

    2013-12-15

    We present the perturbation theory for lattice magnon fields of the D-dimensional O(3) Heisenberg ferromagnet. The effective Hamiltonian for the lattice magnon fields is obtained starting from the effective Lagrangian, with two dominant contributions that describe magnon–magnon interactions identified as a usual gradient term for the unit vector field and a part originating in the Wess–Zumino–Witten term of the effective Lagrangian. Feynman diagrams for lattice scalar fields with derivative couplings are introduced, on the basis of which we investigate the influence of magnon–magnon interactions on magnon self-energy and ferromagnet free energy. We also comment appearance of spurious terms in low-temperature series for the free energy by examining magnon–magnon interactions and internal symmetry of the effective Hamiltonian (Lagrangian). -- Highlights: •Lattice magnon Hamiltonian constructed from the effective Lagrangian. •New Feynman diagrams with colored propagators and vertices for lattice scalar fields. •Influence of magnon–magnon interactions from the WZW term on magnon energies and free energy of O(3) HFM.

  13. Weak ferromagnetic behavior of BiFeO{sub 3} at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungkyu; Kim, Chul Sung

    2013-05-07

    Polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3}, having a spherical shape with a diameter of about 78 {mu}m, has been synthesized by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The observed Raman and x-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the sample show the spectra of typical single-phased BiFeO{sub 3}, and the x-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement further confirmed that the synthesized sample is single phase. The value of isomer shift from Moessbauer analysis indicates the Fe{sup 3+} ionic state without Fe{sup 2+} ionic state as observed from XPS measurement. The experimentally measured M-H curves show antiferromagnetic behavior at 295 K and weak ferromagnetic behavior at 4.2 K. The appearance of two different magnetic behaviors is due to the fact that the antiferromagnetic coupling becomes weak because of the presence of two distorted octahedral sites. Since the effect of the lattice distortion strongly depends on the thermal agitation effect, the weak ferromagnetic behavior can be observed only at 4.2 K. The detailed Moessbauer spectra analysis result confirms the existence of two distortion octahedral sites, which is in an agreement with XRD results.

  14. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-01

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  15. Room temperature semiconductor detectors for hard x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ann M.; Stahle, Carl M.; Lisse, Casey M.; Babu, Sachi; Gehrels, Neil A.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Shu, Peter K.

    1994-09-01

    Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and mercuric iodide (HgI2) semiconductor hard X-ray detectors are currently being evaluated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use in future balloon and satellite applications. PoRTIA, a small engineering prototype hard X-ray (20 - 150 keV) balloon instrument will contain both a CdZnTe and a HgI2 detector, each 6.5 cm2 x .15 - .2 cm and sharing the same 5 degree(s) field-of-view. PoRTIA will be launched from Alice Springs, Australia in the Spring of 1995 as a piggyback instrument aboard the GRIS balloon payload. PoRTIA will provide valuable information about detector efficiency, durability and material dependent detector background components at balloon altitudes as it observes the Crab Nebula. In addition, a CdZnTe research and development program has been initiated to develop the capability to produce improved CdZnTe detectors for astrophysics applications. The work at Goddard continues in an effort to develop CdZnTe detectors with improvements in electronics, contacts and packaging methods.

  16. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  17. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  18. Proactive aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of room-temperature ionic liquids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulacki, K.J.; Chaloner, D.T.; Larson, J.H.; Costello, D.M.; Evans-White, M. A.; Docherty, K.M.; Bernot, R.J.; Brueseke, M.A.; Kulpa, C.F.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments are being contaminated with a myriad of anthropogenic chemicals, a problem likely to continue due to both unintentional and intentional releases. To protect valuable natural resources, novel chemicals should be shown to be environmentally safe prior to use and potential release into the environment. Such proactive assessment is currently being applied to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs). Because most ILs are water-soluble, their effects are likely to manifest in aquatic ecosystems. Information on the impacts of ILs on numerous aquatic organisms, focused primarily on acute LC50 and EC50 endpoints, is now available, and trends in toxicity are emerging. Cation structure tends to influence IL toxicity more so than anion structure, and within a cation class, the length of alkyl chain substituents is positively correlated with toxicity. While the effects of ILs on several aquatic organisms have been studied, the challenge for aquatic toxicology is now to predict the effects of ILs in complex natural environments that often include diverse mixtures of organisms, abiotic conditions, and additional stressors. To make robust predictions about ILs will require coupling of ecologically realistic laboratory and field experiments with standard toxicity bioassays and models. Such assessments would likely discourage the development of especially toxic ILs while shifting focus to those that are more environmentally benign. Understanding the broader ecological effects of emerging chemicals, incorporating that information into predictive models, and conveying the conclusions to those who develop, regulate, and use those chemicals, should help avoid future environmental degradation. ?? 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  19. Mesophases in nearly 2D room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Cesaratto, M; Del Pópolo, M G; Ballone, P

    2009-11-26

    Computer simulations of (i) a [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] film of nanometric thickness squeezed at kbar pressure by a piecewise parabolic confining potential reveal a mesoscopic in-plane density and composition modulation reminiscent of mesophases seen in 3D samples of the same room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Near 2D confinement, enforced by a high normal load, as well as relatively long aliphatic chains are strictly required for the mesophase formation, as confirmed by computations for two related systems made of (ii) the same [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] adsorbed at a neutral solid surface and (iii) a shorter-chain RTIL ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) trapped in the potential well of part i. No in-plane modulation is seen for ii and iii. In case ii, the optimal arrangement of charge and neutral tails is achieved by layering parallel to the surface, while, in case iii, weaker dispersion and packing interactions are unable to bring aliphatic tails together into mesoscopic islands, against overwhelming entropy and Coulomb forces. The onset of in-plane mesophases could greatly affect the properties of long-chain RTILs used as lubricants. PMID:19886615

  20. High-power room-temperature-operated CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kouki; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi; Kumagai, Mikio; Takashima, Yoich; Naito, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hasuike, Toru

    2000-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to achieve high-power, efficient operation of a room-temperature CO laser and to collect data for designing the CO laser system for nuclear reactor decommissioning. The influence of the H2O concentration in the laser gas on the output performance was investigated, and it was found that the H2O concentration should be kept as low as possible (less than 260 ppm) to obtain stable, high-power outputs. To improve output performance, the rf frequency was increased from 13.56 MHz to 27.12 MHz. The output power for the 27.12 MHz excitation was increased by 10 to 20% compared with that for the 13.56 MHz excitation. The laser output was scaled by extending the discharge tube inner diameter from 19 mm to 30 mm. By optimizing the air gap length and the curvature radius of the outer metallic electrode, the operating gas conditions, and the reflectivity of the output coupler, a maximum output of 830 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 12.2% with adding neither Kr nor Xe. The addition of Kr was more effective for increasing the output than the addition of Xe. A maximum output of 910 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 14.8% with Kr addition, and a maximum output of 810 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 16.2% with Xe addition.

  1. Realization of Ground State Artificial Skyrmion Lattices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Fischer, Peter; Liu, Kai

    Artificial skyrmion lattices stable at ambient conditions offer a convenient and powerful platform to explore skyrmion physics and topological phenomena and motivates their inclusion in next-generation data and logic devices. In this work we present direct experimental evidence of artificial skyrmion lattices with a stable ground state at room temperature. Our approach is to pattern vortex-state Co nanodots (560 nm diameter) in hexagonal arrays on top of a Co/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; the skyrmion state is prepared using a specific magnetic field sequence. Ion irradiation has been employed to suppress PMA in the underlayer and allow imprinting of the vortex structure from the nanodots to form skyrmion lattices, as revealed by polarized neutron reflectometry. Circularity control is realized through Co dot shape asymmetry, and confirmed by microscopy and FORC magnetometry. The vortex polarity is set during the field sequence and confirmed by magnetometry. Spin-transport studies further demonstrate a sensitivity to the skyrmion spin texture.Work supported by NSF (DMR-1008791, ECCS-1232275 and DMR-1543582)

  2. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  3. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  4. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  5. Controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yingpu; Lu, Gongxuan

    2008-07-01

    Large quantities of pentagonal gold nanotubes have been synthesized by reducing chloroauric acid with silver nanowires in an aqueous solution of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at room temperature. These gold nanotubes possess perfect structures, smooth surfaces, highly crystalline walls, and similar cross-sections to that of the silver template. In this process, the CTAB participation was found to be crucial for shape-controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes. In the absence of CTAB, loose and hollow gold structures were routinely generated, while bundled gold nanotubes with rough surfaces were obtained by replacing the CTAB with poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The possible formation mechanism of pentagonal gold nanotubes has also been discussed on the basis of various growth stages studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images. In addition, the catalytic properties of these hollow nanostructures for hydrogen generation reaction from HCHO solution have also been investigated. They showed higher activity than that of spherical gold nanoparticles. PMID:21828702

  6. Water-driven structure transformation in nanoparticles at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengzhong; Gilbert, Benjamin; Huang, Feng; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-08-28

    The thermodynamic behaviour of small particles differs from that of the bulk material by the free energy term gammaA--the product of the surface (or interfacial) free energy and the surface (or interfacial) area. When the surfaces of polymorphs of the same material possess different interfacial free energies, a change in phase stability can occur with decreasing particle size. Here we describe a nanoparticle system that undergoes structural changes in response to changes in the surface environment rather than particle size. ZnS nanoparticles (average diameter 3 nm) were synthesized in methanol and found to exhibit a reversible structural transformation accompanying methanol desorption, indicating that the particles readily adopt minimum energy structural configurations. The binding of water to the as-formed particles at room temperature leads to a dramatic structural modification, significantly reducing distortions of the surface and interior to generate a structure close to that of sphalerite (tetrahedrally coordinated cubic ZnS). These findings suggest a route for post-synthesis control of nanoparticle structure and the potential use of the nanoparticle structural state as an environmental sensor. Furthermore, the results imply that the structure and reactivity of nanoparticles at planetary surfaces, in interplanetary dust and in the biosphere, will depend on both particle size and the nature of the surrounding molecules. PMID:12944961

  7. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  8. Ferromagnetism in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ren-Wei; Wang, Hua-Jie; Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Fei; Liu, Xue-Chao Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal. An initial increase in proton dose leads to pronounced ferromagnetism, accompanying with obvious increase in vacancy concentration. Further increase in irradiation dose lowers the saturation magnetization with the decrease in total vacancy defects due to the defects recombination. It is found that divacancies are the mainly defects in proton irradiated 4H-SiC and responsible for the observed ferromagnetism.

  9. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold kit therefor

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.; Hupf, Homer B.; Wanek, Philip M.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free .sup.125 I.sup.- is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  10. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test... B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test day... Temperatures shall be controlled to ± 1 °C....

  11. Room-temperature magnetic order on zigzag edges of narrow graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Jin, Xiaozhan; Hagymási, Imre; Vancsó, Péter; Osváth, Zoltán; Nemes-Incze, Péter; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P; Tapasztó, Levente

    2014-10-30

    The possibility that non-magnetic materials such as carbon could exhibit a novel type of s-p electron magnetism has attracted much attention over the years, not least because such magnetic order is predicted to be stable at high temperatures. It has been demonstrated that atomic-scale structural defects of graphene can host unpaired spins, but it remains unclear under what conditions long-range magnetic order can emerge from such defect-bound magnetic moments. Here we propose that, in contrast to random defect distributions, atomic-scale engineering of graphene edges with specific crystallographic orientation--comprising edge atoms from only one sub-lattice of the bipartite graphene lattice--can give rise to a robust magnetic order. We use a nanofabrication technique based on scanning tunnelling microscopy to define graphene nanoribbons with nanometre precision and well-defined crystallographic edge orientations. Although so-called 'armchair' ribbons display quantum confinement gaps, ribbons with the 'zigzag' edge structure that are narrower than 7 nanometres exhibit an electronic bandgap of about 0.2-0.3 electronvolts, which can be identified as a signature of interaction-induced spin ordering along their edges. Moreover, upon increasing the ribbon width, a semiconductor-to-metal transition is revealed, indicating the switching of the magnetic coupling between opposite ribbon edges from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic configuration. We found that the magnetic order on graphene edges of controlled zigzag orientation can be stable even at room temperature, raising hopes of graphene-based spintronic devices operating under ambient conditions.

  12. Observation of direct magneto-dielectric behaviour in Lu3Fe5O12-δ above room-temperature.

    PubMed

    Manimuthu, P; Vidya, R; Ravindran, P; Fjellvåg, H; Venkateswaran, C

    2015-07-21

    The coupling of dielectric and magnetic order is highly nontrivial and seldom observed in rare-earth iron garnets. Careful investigations on polycrystalline Lu3Fe5O12-δ, prepared by the solid state route, establish a direct correlation between the magnetic and dielectric order parameters. A dielectric anomaly at the magnetic ordering temperature supports this correlation. The dielectric permittivity at various magnetic fields is measured using an indigenously developed connector setup. Lu3Fe5O12-δ exhibits a magneto-dielectric coupling of ∼6% at room temperature, which is significant in the case of a single-phase magneto-dielectric material at low fields. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction pattern, bond valence sum method, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate two different oxidation states of Fe. Complete structural optimizations performed using the density functional theory establish a ferrimagnetic ground state and provide structural parameters in agreement with experimental values. Electronic structure analysis shows that Lu3Fe5O12 exhibits insulating behavior both in ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic configurations. The capability of Lu3Fe5O12-δ to exhibit room temperature magneto-dielectric response is a key factor in designing and fabricating various electronic devices and sensors.

  13. Room temperature magnetic and dielectric properties of cobalt doped CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Chunhong; Song, Yuanqiang; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    CaCu3Ti4-xCoxO12 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) ceramics were prepared by a conventional solid state reaction, and the effects of cobalt doping on the room temperature magnetic and dielectric properties were investigated. Both X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Cu and Co rich phase at grain boundaries of Co-doped ceramics. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of Co-doped samples showed a striking change from regular polyhedral particle type in pure CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) to sheet-like grains with certain growth orientation. Undoped CaCu3Ti4O12 is well known for its colossal dielectric constant in a broad temperature and frequency range. The dielectric constant value was slightly changed by 5 at. % and 10 at. % Co doping, whereas the second relaxation process was clearly separated in low frequency region at room temperature. A multirelaxation mechanism was proposed to be the origin of the colossal dielectric constant. In addition, the permeability spectra measurements indicated Co-doped CCTO with good magnetic properties, showing the initial permeability (μ') as high as 5.5 and low magnetic loss (μ″ < 0.2) below 3 MHz. And the interesting ferromagnetic superexchange coupling in Co-doped CaCu3Ti4O12 was discussed.

  14. Room-Temperature Creation and Spin-Orbit Torque Manipulation of Skyrmions in Thin Films with Engineered Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoqiang; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenyuan; Kim, Se Kwon; Fan, Yabin; Wong, Kin L; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic skyrmions, which are topologically protected spin textures, are promising candidates for ultralow-energy and ultrahigh-density magnetic data storage and computing applications. To date, most experiments on skyrmions have been carried out at low temperatures. The choice of available materials is limited, and there is a lack of electrical means to control skyrmions in devices. In this work, we demonstrate a new method for creating a stable skyrmion bubble phase in the CoFeB-MgO material system at room temperature, by engineering the interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the ferromagnetic layer. Importantly, we also demonstrate that artificially engineered symmetry breaking gives rise to a force acting on the skyrmions, in addition to the current-induced spin-orbit torque, which can be used to drive their motion. This room-temperature creation and manipulation of skyrmions offers new possibilities to engineer skyrmionic devices. The results bring skyrmionic memory and logic concepts closer to realization in industrially relevant and manufacturable thin film material systems.

  15. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  16. Room temperature syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two new heterometallic polymers based on 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shu-Hua Zhao, Ru-Xiao; Li, Gui; Zhang, Hai-Yang; Huang, Qiu-Ping; Liang, Fu-Pei

    2014-12-15

    Two new heterometallic coordination polymers [ZnNa(ehbd){sub 2}(N{sub 3})]{sub n} (1) and [Cu{sub 3}Na{sub 2}(ehbd){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sub n} (2) (Hehbd is 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde) have been synthesized under room temperature and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV, TG and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca, showing a one-dimensional (1-D) chain. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group Pī, constructing a heterometallic 2D layer structure. Luminescent properties and magnetic properties have been studied for 1 and 2, respectively and the fluorescence quantum yield of 1 is 0.077. - Highlights: • Two novel complexes 1 and 2 have been synthesized. • Complex 1 represents a novel qualitative change of luminescence property. • Complex 2 displays ferromagnetic interaction through symmetric μ{sub 1,1}–N{sub 3} bridges. • Complex 2 displays anti-ferromagnetic interaction through asymmetric μ{sub 1,1}–N{sub 3} bridges.

  17. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A.; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A.; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  18. Towards Room Temperature Silicon Memory Using Single Electron Effects.^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    1996-03-01

    In a semiconductor device, transport, where single electron effects prevail, is usually characterized by sub-μ A currents, large time-constants, and non-linearities that are not suitably harnessed by conventional methods of implementing logic. However, many of the attributes of single electron effects are quite appropriate for memories and we summarize one promising implementation involving low interface state density nano-crystals of silicon that are electrostatically coupled to a conducting channel whose conduction is modulated by a control gate.(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 52nd Annual Device Research Conference IVA-4 (1994))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 53rd Annual Device Research Conference, 50 (1995))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of International Electron Devices Meeting (1995)) Single electron effects manifest themselves in the nano-crystals of silicon (5--7 nm in dimensions) where Coulombic energies of ≈ 60 meV are presently achieved, sufficient for 77 K demonstrations. Large threshold voltage shifts (> 0.2--0.25 V) are achieved by using large enough density of such nano-crystals where single/multiple electron storage occurs and appear as plateaus in threshold voltage - gate voltage characteristics. The charging of the nano-crystals occurs from an inversion layer and discharging occurs to a depletion region. Scaling of nano-crystals size is expected to shift this operational behavior to room temperature, and very low power behavior should be expected from scaled structures utilizing only a single nano-crystal. ^*Performed in collaboration with F. Rana, K. Chan, J. Welser, and H. Hanafi

  19. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce.

  20. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  1. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  2. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Cr-doped ZnS Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Murali, G.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.; Reddy, B. K.

    2011-10-01

    Cr-doped ZnS nanoparticles with Cr concentration of 2 atm.% were successfully synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method using 2-mercapto ethanol as the capping agent. The structural, optical characteristics and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were studied. Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements showed the existence of Cr ion in the Cr doped ZnS. No mixed phase was observed from X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and all the peaks were indexed to the cubic phase of ZnS. The diameter is in the range of 5-10 nm, it was confirmed by TEM studies. The photoluminescence spectra of all the samples exhibited a broad emission band located around 435 nm. The luminescence intensity decreased by doping Cr. The magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles for Cr doped ZnS was investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). We determined the magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization (MS), coercivity (HC) and retentivity (MR) with Cr concentration from M-H loop.

  3. Band-gap narrowing in Mn-doped GaAs probed by room-temperature photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prucnal, S.; Gao, K.; Skorupa, I.; Rebohle, L.; Vines, L.; Schmidt, H.; Khalid, M.; Wang, Y.; Weschke, E.; Skorupa, W.; Grenzer, J.; Hübner, R.; Helm, M.; Zhou, S.

    2015-12-01

    The electronic band structure of the (Ga,Mn)As system has been one of the most intriguing problems in solid state physics over the past two decades. Determination of the band structure evolution with increasing Mn concentration is a key issue to understand the origin of ferromagnetism. Here, we present room-temperature photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements of G a100 %-xM nxAs alloy. The upshift of the valence band is proven by the redshift of the room temperature near band-gap emission from the G a100 %-xM nxAs alloy with increasing Mn content. It is shown that even a doping by 0.02% of Mn affects the valence-band edge, and it merges with the impurity band for a Mn concentration as low as 0.6%. Both x-ray diffraction pattern and high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images confirmed full recrystallization of the implanted layer and GaMnAs alloy formation.

  4. Self-regulating hyperthermia induced using thermosensitive ferromagnetic material with a low Curie temperature.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hajime; Mitobe, Kazutaka; Ito, Aki; Sugawara, Yu; Maruyama, Kiyotomi; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Motoyama, Satoru; Yoshimura, Noboru; Ogawa, Jun-ichi

    2008-04-01

    Hyperthermia has been used for many years to treat a variety of malignant tumors. The Curie temperature (Tc) is a transition point at which magnetic materials lose their magnetic properties, causing a cessation of current and thus heat production. The Tc enables automatic temperature control throughout a tumor as a result of the self-regulating nature of the thermosensitive material. We have developed a method of magnetically-induced hyperthermia using thermosensitive ferromagnetic particles (FMPs) with low Tc (43 degrees C), enough to mediate automatic temperature control. B16 melanoma cells were subcutaneously injected into the backs of C57BL/6 mice, after which tumors were allowed to grow to 5 mm in diameter. FMPs were then injected into the tumors, and the mice were divided into three groups: group I (no hyperthermia, control); group II (one hyperthermia treatment); and group III (hyperthermia twice a week for 4 weeks). When exposed to a magnetic field, the FMPs showed a sharp rise in heat production, reaching the Tc in tissue within 7 min, after which the tissue temperature stabilized at approximately the Tc. In groups I and II, all mice died within 30-45 days. In group III, however, 6 of 10 mice remained alive 120 days after beginning treatment. Our findings suggest that repeated treatment with magnetically-induced self-regulating hyperthermia, mediated by FMPs with a low Tc, is an effective means of suppressing melanoma growth. A key advantage of this hyperthermia system is that it is minimally invasive, requiring only a single injection for repeated treatments with automatic temperature control. PMID:18294293

  5. Giant enhancement of magnetocaloric effect at room temperature by the formation of nanoparticle of La0.48Ca0.52MnO3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is the change in temperature or entropy of a material due to the application of external magnetic field. The temperature dependence of MCE shows maximum value near the ferromagnetic transition of the material. Material with large MCE near room temperature will make revolutionary change in cooling technology and will have large impact in human society. We have transformed antiferromagnetic bulk manganite material La0.48Ca0.52MnO3 to ferromagnetic material by the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale. MCE, as well as the Relative cooling power (RCP) of the material at room temperature (RT) systematically increase with the reduction of the particle sizes. The RCP value for the 45 nm particle size sample at RT is about 400% larger compared with the bulk counterpart. Our detail study on the nano form of the compound highlights an effective way to enhance the MCE. It opens up a vast possibility of achieving giant enhancement of MCE of several already known materials just by the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale.

  6. Room temperature magnetoresistance in CoFeB/SrTiO{sub 3}/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hassen, E. M. J.; Viala, B.; Cyrille, M. C.; Cartier, M.; Redon, O.; Lima, P.; Belhadji, B.; Yang, H. X.; Chshiev, M.; Velev, J.

    2012-04-01

    Room temperature transport properties are reported in polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3}-based magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering. The junctions comprise CoFeB electrodes and the SrTiO{sub 3} barrier with thickness varied between 0.9 and 1.9 nm. Resistance area product values between 3 {Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} and 22 k{Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} have been measured with a tunnel magnetoresistance ratio ranging from 3.1 to 13% at room temperature. At low barrier thickness (1.2 nm), ferromagnetic coupling between electrodes is observed, indicating the presence of defects in the structure. A post-oxidation step was found to improve transport properties at lower barrier thickness.

  7. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C.; Jacquemart, D.; Buldyreva, J.; Lacome, N.; Perrin, A.

    2012-07-01

    Methyl chloride is of interest for atmospheric applications, since this molecule is directly involved in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. In a previous work [Bray et al. JQSRT 2011;112:2446], lines positions and intensities of self-perturbed 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl have been studied into details for the 3.4 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurement and calculation of N2-broadening coefficients of the 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues. High-resolution Fourier Transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures at room-temperature have been recorded between 2800 and 3200 cm-1 at LADIR (using a classical source) and between 47 and 59 cm-1 at SOLEIL (using the synchrotron source on the AILES beamline). 612 mid-infrared transitions of the ν1 band and 86 far-infrared transitions of the pure rotational band have been analyzed using a multispectrum fitting procedure. Average accuracy on the deduced N2-broadening coefficients has been estimated to 5% and 10% in the mid- and far-infrared spectral regions, respectively. The J- and K-rotational dependences of these coefficients have been observed in the mid-infrared region and then a simulation has been performed using an empirical model for 0≤J≤50, K≤9. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line widths for 0≤J≤50 and K≤10 of the ν1 band and for 55≤J≤67 and K≤15 of the pure rotational band have been computed using a semi-classical approach involving exact trajectories and a real symmetric-top geometry of the active molecule. Finally, a global comparison with the experimental and theoretical data existing in the literature has been performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been appeared while no clear evidence for any vibrational or isotopic dependences have been pointed out.

  8. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  10. Spin rectification induced by spin Hall magnetoresistance at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Jiang, S. W.; Luan, Z. Z.; Zhou, L. F.; Ding, H. F.; Zhou, Y.; Tao, X. D.; Wu, D.

    2016-09-01

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the dc voltage generation in the heterostructure of Pt and yttrium iron garnet under the ferromagnetic resonance. Besides a symmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage, an antisymmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage is observed in field scan, which can solely originate from the spin rectification effect due to the spin Hall magnetoresistance. The angular dependence of the dc voltage is theoretically analyzed by taking into account both the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects. We find that the experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical model, further identifying the spin Hall magnetoresistance origin of the spin rectification effect. Moreover, the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects are quantitatively separated by their different angular dependence at particular experimental geometry.

  11. Ferromagnetism in cobalt-doped titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Alexandre Francois

    Semiconductor spintronics is a promising new field of study in the ongoing quest to make electronic devices faster, cheaper, and more efficient. While current spintronics utilizes the spin property of electrons to achieve greater functionality, the integration of spintronics into conventional semiconductor electronics will lead to advances in opto-electronics, quantum computing, and other emerging fields of technology. This integration relies on effective generation, injection, transport, and detection of spin polarized electron currents. To these ends, the successful synthesis of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors is mandatory. In this work, we study the properties of cobalt-doped titanium dioxide, a room temperature dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor discovered in 2001. We characterize the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) of Co-doped TiO2 thin films, including the substrate-induced stabilization of the anatase structure of TiO2. We also confirm the substitutional nature of cobalt on titanium sites by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The ferromagnetic interaction mechanism remains controversial. Yet, we provide experimental evidence for the polaron mediated ferromagnetic coupling mechanism recently suggested to mediate ferromagnetic interactions in this, and other magnetically doped oxides, in the dilute regime (approximately 0 to 3%). Our evidence is related to a previously unobserved and unreported XAS spectral feature. Finally, we demonstrate the surprising absence of an X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) signature at the cobalt L edge.

  12. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  14. Cooling field and temperature dependent exchange bias in spin glass/ferromagnet bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rui, W. B.; Hu, Y.; Du, A.; You, B.; Xiao, M. W.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, S. M.; Du, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental and theoretical studies of cooling field (HFC) and temperature (T) dependent exchange bias (EB) in FexAu1 − x/Fe19Ni81 spin glass (SG)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers. When x varies from 8% to 14% in the FexAu1 − x SG alloys, with increasing T, a sign-changeable exchange bias field (HE) together with a unimodal distribution of coercivity (HC) are observed. Significantly, increasing in the magnitude of HFC reduces (increases) the value of HE in the negative (positive) region, resulting in the entire HE ∼ T curve to move leftwards and upwards. In the meanwhile, HFC variation has weak effects on HC. By Monte Carlo simulation using a SG/FM vector model, we are able to reproduce such HE dependences on T and HFC for the SG/FM system. Thus this work reveals that the SG/FM bilayer system containing intimately coupled interface, instead of a single SG layer, is responsible for the novel EB properties. PMID:26348277

  15. Low-temperature specific heat and magnetic properties of the filled skutterudite ferromagnet NdRu4As12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, A.; Henkie, Z.; Cichorek, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present the low-temperature specific heat and magnetic properties of the filled skutterudite compound NdRu4As12 that exhibits a ferromagnetic transition at TC ≃ 2.3 K . Magnetic entropy considerations point at a quartet ground state of the Nd3+ ions. Deep in the ferromagnetic state, the heat capacity shows a Schottky anomaly that we ascribe to the Zeeman splitting in the presence of a molecular field. Comparison of the specific heats of NdRu4As12 and its Os-based homologue near their Curie temperatures supports our earlier observation suggesting an unusual lowering of the Th cubic point symmetry in the latter filled skutterudite.

  16. Nano-structured TiO2 film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2009-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO2 thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers. PMID:19672322

  17. Room temperature magnetism and metal to semiconducting transition in dilute Fe doped Sb1-xSex semiconducting alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Naveen; Sarkar, Mitesh; Chawda, Mukesh; Ganesan, V.; Bodas, Dhananjay

    2015-02-01

    The magnetism was observed in very dilute Fe doped alloy thin film Fe0.008Sb1-xSex, for x = 0.01 to 0.10. These thin films were grown on silicon substrate using thermal evaporation technique. Structural, electrical, optical, charge carrier concentration measurement, surface morphology and magnetic properties were observed using glancing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), four probe resistivity, photoluminescence, Hall measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) techniques, respectively. No peaks of iron were seen in GIXRD. The resistivity results show that activation energy increases with increase in selenium (Se) concentration. The Arrhenius plot reveals metallic behavior below room temperature. The low temperature conduction is explained by variable range-hopping mechanism, which fits very well in the temperature range 150-300 K. The decrease in density of states has been observed with increasing selenium concentration (x = 0.01 to 0.10). There is a metal-to-semiconductor phase transition observed above room temperature. This transition temperature is Se concentration dependent. The particle size distribution ˜47-61 nm is evaluated using AFM images. These thin films exhibit ferromagnetic interactions at room temperature.

  18. Substrate Temperature Effects on Room Temperature Sensing Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jonnala Rakesh; Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Shankar, Prabakaran; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using chemical spray pyrolysis technique at different substrate temperatures such as 523, 623 and 723 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of polycrystalline films with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and revealed the change in preferential orientation of the crystal planes. Scanning electron micrographs showed the formation of uniformly distributed spherical shaped grains at low deposition temperature and pebbles like structure at the higher temperature. Transmittance of 85% was observed for the film deposited at 723 K. The band gap of the films was found to be increased from 3.15 to 3.23 eV with a rise in deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films was found to be improved with an increase in substrate temperature. Surface of ZnO thin films deposited at 523 K, 623 K and 723 K were found to be hydrophobic with the contact angles of 92°, 105° and 128° respectively. The room temperature gas sensing characteristics of all the films were studied and found that the film deposited at 623 K showed a better response towards ammonia vapour. PMID:27398478

  19. Deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Electron fractographic and thin foil electron metallographic techniques were used to evaluate the deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at temperatures ranging from 24 to 816/sup 0/C. Operative dislocation mechanisms and fracture surface morphologies were related to the overall tensile response of this nickel-base superalloy. At room temperature, failure occurred primarily by an intergranular dimple rupture mechanism associated with microvoid coalescence along grain boundary denuded regions. A fairly high density of dislocations throughout the matrix resulted in relatively high ductility levels even though failure occurred by an intergranular mechanism. Under intermediate temperature conditions (316 to 427/sup 0/C), increased transgranular fracture coupled with extensive dislocation activity within the Inconel X-750 matrix caused a slight increase in ductility. At progressively higher temperatures, 538 to 704/sup 0/C, all dislocation activity was channeled through narrow slip bands which subsequently initiated localized separation and resulted in a very faceted fracture surface appearance. The absence of a homogeneous dislocation substructure in this temperature regime resulted in a severe degradation in ductility levels. At the highest test temperature (816/sup 0/C), a uniform dislocation network throughout the Inconel X-750 matrix coupled with intense dislocation activity in the grain boundary denuded zone resulted in a marked improvement in ductility. Furthermore, the extensive dislocation activity along grain boundary regions ultimately resulted in an intergranular fracture morphology.

  20. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-02-03

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6 nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 Ω at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  1. Pentacene on Ni(111): room-temperature molecular packing and temperature-activated conversion to graphene.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L E; De Marchi, F; MacLeod, J M; Lipton-Duffin, J; Gatti, R; Ma, D; Perepichka, D F; Rosei, F

    2015-02-21

    We investigate, using scanning tunnelling microscopy, the adsorption of pentacene on Ni(111) at room temperature and the behaviour of these monolayer films with annealing up to 700 °C. We observe the conversion of pentacene into graphene, which begins from as low as 220 °C with the coalescence of pentacene molecules into large planar aggregates. Then, by annealing at 350 °C for 20 minutes, these aggregates expand into irregular domains of graphene tens of nanometers in size. On surfaces where graphene and nickel carbide coexist, pentacene shows preferential adsorption on the nickel carbide phase. The same pentacene to graphene transformation was also achieved on Cu(111), but at a higher activation temperature, producing large graphene domains that exhibit a range of moiré superlattice periodicities.

  2. Excess Ni-doping induced enhanced room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni-Mn-Sn based shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-09-15

    Present work reports on the observation of large magnetoresistance (∼−30% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (∼12 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} for 0–50 kOe) near room temperature (∼290 K) on the Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56}. The sample can be thought of being derived from the parent Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.6} alloy, where excess Ni was doped at the expense of Sn. Such Ni doping enhances the martensitic transition temperature and for the Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56} it is found to be optimum (288 K). The doped alloy shows enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduced saturation magnetization as compared to the undoped counterpart at low temperature. A probable increment of antiferromagnetic correlation between Mn-atoms on Ni substitution can be accounted for the enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduction in saturation moment.

  3. Room temperature multiferroic properties of (Fe{sub x}, Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Cheolbok; Fang, Sheng-Po; Yoon, Yong-Kyu

    2014-09-08

    This letter reports the structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and magnetic properties of Fe substituted SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in room temperature. The structural data obtained from x-ray diffraction indicates that (Fe{sub x},Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3}, the so called FST, transforms from pseudocubic to tetragonal structures with increase of the Fe content in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, featuring the ferroelectricity, while vibrating sample magnetometer measurements show magnetic hysteresis loops for the samples with low iron contents indicating their ferromagnetism. The characterized ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism confirms strong multiferroitism of the single phase FST thin films in room temperature. Also, an FST thin film metal-insulator-metal multiferroic capacitor has been fabricated and characterized in microwave frequencies between 10 MHz and 5 GHz. A capacitor based on Fe{sub 0.1}Sr{sub 0.9}TiO{sub 3} with a thickness of 260 nm shows a high electric tunability of 18.6% at 10 V and a maximum magnetodielectric value of 1.37% at 0.4 mT with a loss tangent of 0.021 at 1 GHz. This high tuning and low loss makes this material as a good candidate for frequency agile microwave devices such as tunable filters, phase shifters, and antennas.

  4. Ferromagnetism in Single Crystal MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi Varnoosfaderani, Sima; Tongay, Sefaattin; Appleton, Bill; Wu, Junqiao; Hebard, Arthur

    2013-03-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of MoS2 flakes measured from room temperature down to 10 K and magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is one of the most stable layered transition metal dichalcogenides, which has a finite band gap and is regarded as a complementary (quasi-) 2D material to graphene. We find that single crystals of MoS2 display ferromagnetism superimposed onto a large temperature-dependent diamagnetism and observe that ferromagnetism persists from 10 K up to room temperature. We attribute the existence of ferromagnetism partly to the presence of zigzag edges in the magnetic ground state at the grain boundaries. Since the magnetic measurements are relatively insensitive to the interlayer coupling, these results are expected to be also valid in the single layer limit. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation

  5. An active homopolar magnetic bearing with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in liquid nitrogen. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 200 lb (890 N) radial load capacity (measured non-rotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that in Cu in liquid nitrogen. Design compromises permitted use of circular coils with rectangular cross section. Conductor improvements will eventually permit coil shape optimization, higher current density and higher bearing load capacity. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, required negligible power to carry its direct current. The control coils were wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag. These dissipated negligible power for direct current (i.e. for steady radial load components). When an alternating current (AC) was added, the AC component dissipated power which increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. In fact at frequencies above about 2 hz, the effective resistance of the control coil conductor actually exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. This is at least qualitatively understandable in the context of a Bean-type model of flux and current penetration into a Type II superconductor. Fortunately the dynamic currents required for bearing stability are of small amplitude. These results show that while twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation, twisted multifilaments will be required to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads, such as those due to unbalance.

  6. Comparison of the ferromagnetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model and the AF spin-1 longitudinal Ising model at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, M. T.; Corrêa Silva, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    We derive the exact Helmholtz free energy (HFE) of the standard and staggered one-dimensional Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) model in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. We discuss in detail the thermodynamic behavior of the ferromagnetic version of the model, which exhibits magnetic field-dependent plateaux in the z-component of its magnetization at low temperatures. We also study the behavior of its specific heat and entropy, both per site, at finite temperature. The degeneracy of the ground state, at T=0, along the lines that separate distinct phases in the phase diagram of the ferromagnetic BEG model is calculated, extending the study of the phase diagram of the spin-1 antiferromagnetic (AF) Ising model in S.M. de Souza and M.T. Thomaz, J. Magn. and Magn. Mater. 354 (2014) 205 [5]. We explore the implications of the equality of phase diagrams, at T=0, of the ferromagnetic BEG model with K/|J| = - 2 and of the spin-1 AF Ising model for D/|J| > 1/2.

  7. Rapid and controllable covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rubí, Yadienka; Guan, Jingwen; Lin, Shuqiong; Scriver, Christine; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Simard, Benoit

    2007-12-28

    We report a rapid and efficient procedure to functionalize SWNT where free radicals generated at room temperature by a redox reaction between reduced SWNT and diacyl peroxide derivatives were covalently attached to the SWNT wall. PMID:18060123

  8. Evaluation of DNA/RNAshells for room temperature nucleic acids storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopan; Li, Qiyuan; Wang, Xian; Zhou, Xiaolin; He, Xuheng; Liao, Qiuyan; Zhu, Fengqin; Cheng, Le; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Traditional nucleic acids preservation methods rely on maintaining samples in cold environments, which are costly to operate and time sensitive. Recent work validated that using room temperature for the storage of nucleic acids is possible if the samples are completely protected from water and oxygen. Here, we conducted accelerated aging and real-time degradation studies to evaluate the new technology DNAshell and RNAshell, which preserves DNA and RNA at room temperature, including the DNA and RNA yield, purity, and integrity. DNA and RNA solutions are dried in the presence of stabilizers in stainless steel minicapsules, then redissolved after different time points of heating and storing at room temperature. Results show that DNAshell and RNAshell ensure the safe storage of nucleic acids at room temperature for long periods of time, and that the quality of these nucleic acids is suitable for common downstream analysis.

  9. Robust room temperature valley polarization in monolayer and bilayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Pramoda K; Lin, Fan-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Huang, Jer-Shing; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-21

    We report robust room temperature valley polarization in chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown monolayer and bilayer WS2via polarization-resolved photoluminescence measurements using excitation below the bandgap. We show that excitation with energy slightly below the bandgap of the multi-valleyed transition metal chalcogenides can effectively suppress the random redistribution of excited electrons and, thereby, greatly enhance the efficiency of valley polarization at room temperature. Compared to mechanically exfoliated WS2, our CVD grown WS2 films also show enhancement in the coupling of spin, layer and valley degree of freedom and, therefore, provide improved valley polarization. At room temperature, using below-bandgap excitation and CVD grown monolayer and bilayer WS2, we have reached a record-high valley polarization of 35% and 80%, respectively, exceeding the previously reported values of 10% and 65% for mechanically exfoliated WS2 layers using resonant excitation. This observation provides a new direction to enhance valley control at room temperature.

  10. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK AND TEMPLATE-FREE SYNTHESIS OF LEUCOEMARLDINE POLYANILINE NANOFIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe a simple strategy for the bulk and template-free synthesis of reduced leucoemarldine polyaniline nanofibers size ranging from as low as 10 nm to 50 nm without the use of any reducing agents at room temperature.

  11. Saccharides as Prospective Immobilizers of Nucleic Acids for Room-Temperature Structural EPR Studies.

    PubMed

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Tormyshev, Victor M; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedin, Matvey V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for structural studies of biomolecules and their complexes. This method, whose applicability has been recently extended to room temperatures, requires immobilization of the studied biosystem to prevent averaging of dipolar couplings; at the same time, the modification of native conformations by immobilization must be avoided. In this work, we provide first demonstration of room-temperature EPR distance measurements in nucleic acids using saccharides trehalose, sucrose, and glucose as immobilizing media. We propose an approach that keeps structural conformation and unity of immobilized double-stranded DNA. Remarkably, room-temperature electron spin dephasing time of triarylmethyl-labeled DNA in trehalose is noticeably longer compared to previously used immobilizers, thus providing a broader range of available distances. Therefore, saccharides, and especially trehalose, can be efficiently used as immobilizers of nucleic acids, mimicking native conditions and allowing wide range of structural EPR studies at room temperatures. PMID:27320083

  12. Red photoluminescence of living systems at the room temperature : measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, I. S.; Rud, V. Yu; Shpunt, V. Ch; Rud, Yu V.; Glinushkin, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Presents results of a study of the red luminescence of living plants at room temperature. The analysis of obtained results allows to conclude that the photoluminescence spectra for green leaves in all cases represent the two closely spaced bands.

  13. A room-temperature adenosine-based molecular beacon for highly sensitive detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hsiu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2012-06-25

    This study developed a simple, sensitive, and selective molecular beacon for detecting nucleic acids at room temperature based on coralyne induced conformational change of a MB through A(2)-coralyne-A(2) coordination.

  14. Linear Chains of Magnetic Ions Stacked with Variable Distance: Ferromagnetic Ordering with a Curie Temperature above 20 K.

    PubMed

    Friedländer, Stefan; Liu, Jinxuan; Addicoat, Matt; Petkov, Petko; Vankova, Nina; Rüger, Robert; Kuc, Agnieszka; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Wencai; Lukose, Binit; Wang, Zhengbang; Weidler, Peter G; Pöppl, Andreas; Ziese, Michael; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the SURMOF-2 series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Contrary to bulk MOF-2 crystals, where Cu(2+) ions form paddlewheels and are antiferromagnetically coupled, in this case the Cu(2+) ions are connected via carboxylate groups in a zipper-like fashion. This unusual coupling of the spin 1/2 ions within the resulting one-dimensional chains is found to stabilize a low-temperature, ferromagnetic (FM) phase. In contrast to other ordered 1D systems, no strong magnetic fields are needed to induce the ferromagnetism. The magnetic coupling constants describing the interaction between the individual metal ions have been determined in SQUID experiments. They are fully consistent with the results of ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations. The theoretical results allow the unusual magnetic behavior of this exotic, yet easy-to-fabricate, material to be described in a detailed fashion. PMID:27599895

  15. Linear Chains of Magnetic Ions Stacked with Variable Distance: Ferromagnetic Ordering with a Curie Temperature above 20 K.

    PubMed

    Friedländer, Stefan; Liu, Jinxuan; Addicoat, Matt; Petkov, Petko; Vankova, Nina; Rüger, Robert; Kuc, Agnieszka; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Wencai; Lukose, Binit; Wang, Zhengbang; Weidler, Peter G; Pöppl, Andreas; Ziese, Michael; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the SURMOF-2 series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Contrary to bulk MOF-2 crystals, where Cu(2+) ions form paddlewheels and are antiferromagnetically coupled, in this case the Cu(2+) ions are connected via carboxylate groups in a zipper-like fashion. This unusual coupling of the spin 1/2 ions within the resulting one-dimensional chains is found to stabilize a low-temperature, ferromagnetic (FM) phase. In contrast to other ordered 1D systems, no strong magnetic fields are needed to induce the ferromagnetism. The magnetic coupling constants describing the interaction between the individual metal ions have been determined in SQUID experiments. They are fully consistent with the results of ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations. The theoretical results allow the unusual magnetic behavior of this exotic, yet easy-to-fabricate, material to be described in a detailed fashion.

  16. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  17. Room temperature exchange bias in SmFeO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang (王晓雄), Xiaoxiong; Cheng (程相义), Xiangyi; Gao (高尚), Shang; Song (宋俊达), Junda; Ruan (阮可青), Keqing; Li (李晓光), Xiaoguang

    2016-02-01

    Exchange bias phenomenon is generally ascribed to the unidirectional magnetic shift along the field axes at interface of two magnetic materials. Room temperature exchange bias is found in SmFeO3 single crystal. The behavior after different cooling procedure is regular, and the training behavior is attributed to the athermal training and its pinning origin is attributed to the antiferromagnetic clusters. Its being single phase and occurring at room temperature make it an appropriate candidate for application.

  18. Copper-Catalyzed N-Arylation of 2-Pyridones Employing Diaryliodonium Salts at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seo-Hee; Sung, Dan-Bi; Park, Cho-Hee; Kim, Won-Suk

    2016-09-01

    A new and mild synthetic approach for the N-arylation of 2-pyridones with diaryliodonium salts has been developed. Most reactions proceed readily at room temperature in the presence of 10 mol % of copper chloride. As a result, a wide range of N-arylpyridine-2-ones were synthesized in yields of 23% to 99%. With this method, an antifibrotic drug, Pirfenidone, was successfully synthesized in 99% yield within 30 min at room temperature. PMID:27484240

  19. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  20. Room-temperature single-photon sources based on nanocrystal fluorescence in photonic/plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, S. G.; Winkler, J. M.; Bissell, L. J.; Mihaylova, D.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Shi, Z.; Goldberg, D.; Menon, V. M.; Boyd, R. W.; Chen, G.; Prasad, P.

    2014-10-01

    Results are presented here towards robust room-temperature SPSs based on fluorescence in nanocrystals: colloidal quantum dots, color-center diamonds and doped with trivalent rare-earth ions (TR3+). We used cholesteric chiral photonic bandgap and Bragg-reflector microcavities for single emitter fluorescence enhancement. We also developed plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas and 2D-Si-photonic bandgap microcavities. The paper also provides short outlines of other technologies for room-temperature single-photon sources.

  1. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits. PMID:26541203

  2. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits.

  3. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  4. Magnetic refrigeration: an eco-friendly technology for the refrigeration at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, C.; Greco, A.; Maiorino, A.; Masselli, C.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging, environment-friendly technology based on a magnetic solid that acts as a refrigerant by magneto-caloric effect (MCE). In the case of ferromagnetic materials MCE is a warming as the magnetic moments of the atom are aligned by the application of a magnetic field, and the corresponding cooling upon removal of the magnetic field. There are two types of magnetic phase changes that may occur at the Curie point: first order magnetic transition (FOMT) and second order magnetic transition (SOMT). The reference cycle for magnetic refrigeration is AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative cycle) where the magnetic material matrix works both as a refrigerating medium and as a heat regenerating medium, while the fluid flowing in the porous matrix works as a heat transfer medium. Regeneration can be accomplished by blowing a heat transfer fluid in a reciprocating fashion through the regenerator made of magnetocaloric material that is alternately magnetized and demagnetized. In this paper, attention is directed towards the near room-temperature range. We compare the energetic performance of a commercial R134a refrigeration plant to that of a magnetic refrigerator working with an AMR cycle. Attention is devoted to the evaluation of the environmental impact in terms of a greenhouse effect. The comparison is performed in term of TEWI index (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) that takes into account both direct and indirect contributions to global warming. In this paper the AMR cycle works with different magnetic refrigerants: pure gadolinium, second order phase magnetic transition (Pr0.45Sr0.35MnO3) and first order phase magnetic transition alloys (Gd5Si2Ge2, LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52, LaFe1105Co0.94Si110 and MnFeP0.45As0.55). The comparison, carried out by means of a mathematical model, clearly shows that GdSi2Ge2 and LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52 has a TEWI index always lower than that of a vapor compression plant. Furthermore, the TEWI of the AMR

  5. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  6. Ferromagnetism in Semiconductor C-Ni Films at Different Annealing Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, Vali; Elahi, Smohammad

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the microstructure and magnetic properties of carbon-nickel (C-Ni) composite films annealed at different temperatures (300-1000∘C) were investigated. The films were grown by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on quartz substrates at room temperature. The nickel concentration in the films are affected by changing of the value of evaporation nickel atoms and measured by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Values of coercive field were measured under both increasing and decreasing applied magnetic field. It is shown that the coercive field of films strongly dependent on the annealing temperature and at 500∘C films has maximum value of 93.67Oe. The difference in the coercive fields increased for films annealed from 300 to 500∘C and then decreased from 500 to 1000∘C. The ID/IG ratio of Raman spectra would indicate the presence of higher sp2 bonded carbon in the films annealed at 800∘C.

  7. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni-Mn-Sn melt spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziarz, W.; Czaja, P.; Szczerba, M. J.; Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C.; Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T.; Cesari, E.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni48Mn39.5Sn12.5-xAlx (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔTMT=49 K; ΔTRMT=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite TCM decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite TCA remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune TCA and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L21 type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32¯) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31¯) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the TCM has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications.

  8. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  9. Atomically Thin B doped g-C3N4 Nanosheets: High-Temperature Ferromagnetism and calculated Half-Metallicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Daqiang; Liu, Yonggang; Liu, Peitao; Si, Mingsu; Xue, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3), which can be seen as C-doped graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4), was reported to display ferromagnetic ground state and intrinsic half-metallicity (Du et al., PRL,108,197207,2012), it has attracted numerous research interest to tune the electronic structure and magnetic properties of g-C3N4 due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, we reported the experimentally achieving of high temperature ferromagnetism in metal-free ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets by introducing of B atoms. Further, first-principles calculation results revealed that the current flow in such a system was fully spin-polarized and the magnetic moment was mainly attributed to the p orbital of N atoms in B doped g-C3N4 monolayer, giving the theoretic evidence of the ferromagnetism and half-metallicity. Our finding provided a new perspective for B doped g-C3N4 spintronic devices in future. PMID:27762348

  10. First-principles study of ferromagnetism in Pd-doped and Pd- Cu-codoped BN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Dai, J. F.; Li, W. X.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we aimed at probing the ferromagnetism properties of Pd and Pd-Cu- codoped supercell BN based on the first-principles methods. The formation energy, lattice constants, energy band structures, spin density of state, energy difference between ferromagnetism (FM) and autiferromagnetism (AFM) orderings were calculated. Formation energy calculations showed that Pd atom tended to replace B atom in the supercell. Pd-doped BN exhibited a half-metallic ferromagnetic. And the ferromagnetism arised form the strong hybridization between the Pd4d and N2p state. Pd-Cu-codoped BN also displayed a half-metallic ferromagnetic. The incorporation of Pd and Pd-Cu induced some impurity energy differences between FM and AFM orderings. It also showed that FM state was the ground state, and room temperature ferromagnetism may be expected. These results pointed out the possibility of fabricating BN based on dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) by doping with Pd and Pd-Cu.

  11. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Suresh, K. G.

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300 K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} was observed near 300 K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300 K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300 K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62 K at 280 K.

  12. Room-temperature observations of the weak localization in low-mobility graphene films

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junhao; Wang, Shanyue; Qian, Di; Song, Fengqi E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Baigeng E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Han, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Xuefeng

    2013-12-07

    We report room-temperature observations of the quantum conductance corrections caused by the weak localization in graphene films synthesized using solid-state-source chemical vapor deposition. Both Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements showed strong disorder in the samples with a low mobility of ∼430 cm{sup 2}/V s. The emergence of weak localization at room temperature arises from the competition between the valley-dependent scattering and the thermal dephasing in such low-quality samples, although quantum effects normally appear in the samples that have an ideal structure at cryogenic temperatures. The large disorder in our low-mobility samples unexpectedly preserved the quantum mechanical weak localization.

  13. Room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films modulated by cation concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Junxing; Liang, Yan; Li, Wentao; Wang, Weihua; Jin, Kuijuan; Gu, Lin; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-24

    The room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} is promising for oxide electronic devices controlled by multiple fields. An effective way to control the ferroelectricity is highly demanded. Here, we show that the off-centered antisite-like defects in SrTiO{sub 3} films epitaxially grown on Si (001) play the determinative role in the emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity. The density of these defects changes with the film cation concentration sensitively, resulting in a varied coercive field of the ferroelectric behavior. Consequently, the room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films can be effectively modulated by tuning the temperature of metal sources during the molecular beam epitaxy growth. Such an easy and reliable modulation of the ferroelectricity enables the flexible engineering of multifunctional oxide electronic devices.

  14. Fundamental Properties of TBAF Clathrate for Usage as a Latent Heat Storage at a Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takanari; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takao, Shingo; Yabe, Akira

    For promotion of further energy conservation, development of a coolant with a higher heat capacity regulated around a room temperature is strongly required. As a candidate of such a new coolant, we employ the clathrate hydrate, i.e., a mixture of Tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) and water. This clathrate hydrate is composed of the micro crystals with an order of 100 μm in dimension. It retains fluidity and melting point at a room temperature of about 25 °C. Moreover, the melting point is able to be controlled between 25 °C and 0 °C by changing the concentration of TBAF. The temperature can be regulated by its latent heat at the melting point. Characteristics such as the latent heat and the crystal structure of the clathrate have been experimentally obtained to confirm the feasibility for its usage as the latent heat storage around a room temperature.

  15. Proposal of a general scheme to obtain room-temperature spin polarization in asymmetric antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Wu, Xiaojun; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-09-01

    Exploring magnetic semiconductors is one of the most important questions for spintronic applications. Although various solutions, such as dilute magnetic semiconductors, have been proposed, a practical spintronic device working at room temperature has not been realized. The key to address this issue is to find magnetic materials with both room-temperature magnetic ordering and large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level. Here, we predict a new concept of asymmetric antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (AAFMSs) with both features. The high temperature magnetic ordering originates from the AFM coupling between different transition metal ions with strong super-exchange interaction, whereas the large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level owes to d orbital mismatch among these ions. Through first-principles calculations, a family of double perovskites A2Cr M O6 (A =Ca ,Sr ,Ba , and M =Ru ,Os ) are predicted to be AAFMSs. This paper provides a way for developing spintronic devices working at room temperature.

  16. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  17. Observation of a large spin-dependent transport length in organic spin valves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianmin; Mizukami, Shigemi; Kubota, Takahide; Ma, Qinli; Oogane, Mikihiko; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Ando, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2013-01-01

    The integration of organic semiconductors and magnetism has been a fascinating topic for fundamental scientific research and future applications in electronics, because organic semiconductors are expected to possess a large spin-dependent transport length based on weak spin-orbit coupling and weak hyperfine interaction. However, to date, this length has typically been limited to several nanometres at room temperature, and a large length has only been observed at low temperatures. Here we report on a novel organic spin valve device using C(60) as the spacer layer. A magnetoresistance ratio of over 5% was observed at room temperature, which is one of the highest magnetoresistance ratios ever reported. Most importantly, a large spin-dependent transport length of approximately 110 nm was experimentally observed for the C(60) layer at room temperature. These results provide insights for further understanding spin transport in organic semiconductors and may strongly advance the development of spin-based organic devices. PMID:23340432

  18. Subtle variation in ambient room temperature influences the expression of social cognition.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Swartz, Tyler J; Rowell, Lauren N

    2013-10-01

    Social signaling models predict that subtle variation in climatic temperature induces systematic changes in expressed cognition. An experiment showed that perceived room temperature was associated with variability in self-descriptions, social reactions of others, and desiring differing types of social networks. The findings reflect the tendency to inflate capacity demonstrations in warmer climates as a result of the social networking opportunities they enable.

  19. Mn,Cd-metallothionein-2: a room temperature magnetic protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lee, Shang-Fan; Sun, Kein-Wen; Ho, Chien-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Hung; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2006-02-24

    Naturally occurring metallothionein (MT) is a metal binding protein, which binds to seven Zn2+ through 20 conserved cysteines and forms two metal binding clusters with a Zinc-Blende structure. We demonstrate that the MT, when substituting the Zn2+ ions by Mn2+ and Cd2+, exhibits magnetic hysteresis loop observable by SQUID from 10 to 330 K. The magnetic moment may have originated from the bridging effect of the sulfur atoms between the metal ions that leads to the alignment of the electron spins of the Mn2+ ions inside the clusters. The protein backbone may restrain the net spin moment of Mn2+ ions from thermal fluctuation. The modified magnetic-metallothionein is a novel approach to creating molecular magnets with operating temperatures up to 330 K. PMID:16403435

  20. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  1. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  2. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Revin, D. G. Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  3. Geopolymer - room-temperature ceramic matrix for composites

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J.; Davidovics, M.

    1988-08-01

    The semiamorphous three-dimensional networks of polymeric Na, K, Li, and Mg aluminosilicates of both poly(sialate) and poly(sialate-siloxo) type, collectively known as geopolymers, harden at 20-120 C and are similar to thermoset resins, but are stable at up to 1200-1400 C without shrinkage. A wide variety of alkaline-resistant inorganic reinforcements, notably SiC fibers, have been combined with geopolymer matrices to yield nonburning, nonsmoking high-temperature composites. An SiC fiber-reinforced K-poly(sialate-siloxo) matrix, shaped and hardened at 70 C for 1.5 hr, develops flexural mean strengths of the order of 380 MPa that are retained after firing at up to 900 C. 16 references.

  4. Large tunnel magnetoresistance at room temperature with a Co{sub 2}FeAl full-Heusler alloy electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Sugimoto, S.; Tezuka, N.; Inomata, K.

    2005-06-06

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler alloy electrode are fabricated by the deposition of the film using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system followed by photolithography and Ar ion etching. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of 47% at room temperature (RT) are obtained in a stack of Co{sub 2}FeAl/Al-O{sub x}/Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si substrate despite the A2 type atomic site disorder for Co{sub 2}FeAl. There is no increase of TMR in MTJs with the B2 type Co{sub 2}FeAl, which is prepared by the deposition on a heated substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles in Co{sub 2}FeAl single layer films reveal that Al atoms in Co{sub 2}FeAl are oxidized preferentially at the surfaces. On the other hand, at the interfaces in Co{sub 2}FeAl/Al-O{sub x}/Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} MTJs, the ferromagnetic layers are hardly oxidized during plasma oxidation for a formation of Al oxide barriers.

  5. Effects of reduced nocturnal temperature on pig performance and energy consumption in swine nursery rooms.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L J; Brumm, M C; Moeller, S J; Pohl, S; Shannon, M C; Thaler, R C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of a reduced nocturnal temperature (RNT) regimen on performance of weaned pigs and energy consumption during the nursery phase of production. The age of weaned pigs assigned to experiments ranged from 16 to 22 d. In Exp. 1, 3 stations conducted 2 trials under a common protocol that provided data from 6 control rooms (CON; 820 pigs) and 6 RNT rooms (818 pigs). Two mirror-image nursery rooms were used at each station. Temperature in the CON room was set to 30°C for the first 7 d, then reduced by 2°C per week through the remainder of the experiment. Room temperature settings were held constant throughout the day and night. The temperature setting in the RNT room was the same as CON during the first 7 d, but beginning on the night of d 7, the room temperature setting was reduced 6°C from the daytime temperature from 1900 to 0700 h. The use of heating fuel and electricity were measured weekly in each room. Overall, ADG (0.43 kg), ADFI (0.62 kg), and G:F (0.69) were identical for CON and RNT rooms. Consumption of heating fuel [9,658 vs. 7,958 British thermal units (Btu)·pig(-1)·d(-1)] and electricity (0.138 vs. 0.125 kilowatt-hour (kWh)·pig(-1)·d(-1)] were not statistically different for CON and RNT rooms, respectively. In Exp. 2, 4 stations conducted at least 2 trials that provided data from 9 CON rooms (2,122 pigs) and 10 RNT rooms (2,176 pigs). Experimental treatments and protocols were the same as Exp. 1, except that the RNT regimen was imposed on the night of d 5 and the targeted nighttime temperature reduction was 8.3°C. Neither final pig BW (21.8 vs. 21.5 kg; SE = 0.64), ADG (0.45 vs. 0.44 kg; SE = 0.016), ADFI (0.61 vs. 0.60 kg; SE = 0.019), nor G:F (0.75 vs. 0.75; SE = 0.012) were different for pigs housed in CON or RNT rooms, respectively. Consumption of heating fuel and electricity was consistently reduced in RNT rooms for all 4 stations. Consumption of heating fuel (10,019 vs. 7,061 Btu

  6. Microstructure of Rapidly Quenched Bismuth Iron Oxide Systems with Ferromagnetic Character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Soga, Naohiro; Mori, Hirotaro

    1991-12-01

    Mössbauer measurements and high-resolution electron microscopy have been carried out on rapidly quenched 10CaO\\cdot30Bi2O3·60Fe2O3 and Bi3Fe5O12 which exhibit ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The intensity of the peaks due to internal fields in Mössbauer spectra are very weak at room temperature and increases with a decrease of temperature, indicating that the specimens are superparamagnetic. The electron micrograph clearly shows that the specimens contain microcrystals of 5 to 10 nm. The ferromagnetic character of the present oxides is brought about by the ferrimagnetic microcrystals precipitated.

  7. A moment model for phonon transport at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Struchtrup, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Heat transfer in solids is modeled by deriving the macroscopic equations for phonon transport from the phonon-Boltzmann equation. In these equations, the Callaway model with frequency-dependent relaxation time is considered to describe the Resistive and Normal processes in the phonon interactions. Also, the Brillouin zone is considered to be a sphere, and its diameter depends on the temperature of the system. A simple model to describe phonon interaction with crystal boundary is employed to obtain macroscopic boundary conditions, where the reflection kernel is the superposition of diffusive reflection, specular reflection and isotropic scattering. Macroscopic moments are defined using a polynomial of the frequency and wave vector of phonons. As an example, a system of moment equations, consisting of three directional and seven frequency moments, i.e., 63 moments in total, is used to study one-dimensional heat transfer, as well as Poiseuille flow of phonons. Our results show the importance of frequency dependency in relaxation times and macroscopic moments to predict rarefaction effects. Good agreement with data reported in the literature is obtained.

  8. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-Ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the `frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr.cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region.

  9. Room temperature aluminum antimonide radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Aberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Coombs, III, Arthur W; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2015-03-03

    In one embodiment, a method for producing a high-purity single crystal of aluminum antimonide (AlSb) includes providing a growing environment with which to grow a crystal, growing a single crystal of AlSb in the growing environment which comprises hydrogen (H.sub.2) gas to reduce oxide formation and subsequent incorporation of oxygen impurities in the crystal, and adding a controlled amount of at least one impurity to the growing environment to effectively incorporate at least one dopant into the crystal. In another embodiment, a high energy radiation detector includes a single high-purity crystal of AlSb, a supporting structure for the crystal, and logic for interpreting signals obtained from the crystal which is operable as a radiation detector at a temperature of about 25.degree. C. In one embodiment, a high-purity single crystal of AlSb includes AlSb and at least one dopant selected from a group consisting of selenium (Se), tellurium (Te), and tin (Sn).

  10. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the ‘frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  11. Performance evaluation of ZnO–CuO hetero junction solid state room temperature ethanol sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ming-Ru; Suyambrakasam, Gobalakrishnan; Wu, Ren-Jang; Chavali, Murthy

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Sensor response (resistance) curves of time were changed from 150 ppm to 250 ppm alcohol concentration of ZnO–CuO 1:1. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The sensing material ZnO–CuO is a high potential alcohol sensor which provides a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature. Highlights: ► The main advantages of the ethanol sensor are as followings. ► Novel materials ZnO–CuO ethanol sensor. ► The optimized ZnO–CuO hetero contact system. ► A good sensor response and room working temperature (save energy). -- Abstract: A semiconductor ethanol sensor was developed using ZnO–CuO and its performance was evaluated at room temperature. Hetero-junction sensor was made of ZnO–CuO nanoparticles for sensing alcohol at room temperature. Nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method and optimized with different weight ratios. Sensor characteristics were linear for the concentration range of 150–250 ppm. Composite materials of ZnO–CuO were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). ZnO–CuO (1:1) material showed maximum sensor response (S = R{sub air}/R{sub alcohol}) of 3.32 ± 0.1 toward 200 ppm of alcohol vapor at room temperature. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The linearity R{sup 2} of the sensor response was 0.9026. The sensing materials ZnO–CuO (1:1) provide a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature.

  12. Investigation of the temperature-dependence of ferromagnetic resonance and spin waves in Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5}

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, Li Ming; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Deorani, Praveen; Yang, Hyunsoo; Tung Yu, Chris Nga; Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2014-06-09

    Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} (CFAS) is a Heusler compound that is of interest for spintronics applications, due to its high spin polarization and relatively low Gilbert damping constant. In this study, the behavior of ferromagnetic resonance as a function of temperature was investigated in CFAS, yielding a decreasing trend of damping constant as the temperature was increased from 13 to 300 K. Furthermore, we studied spin waves in CFAS using both frequency domain and time domain techniques, obtaining group velocities and attenuation lengths as high as 26 km/s and 23.3 μm, respectively, at room temperature.

  13. Ferromagnetism in Tb doped ZnO nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, W. Q.; Ge, C. N.; Venkataiah, G.; Su, H. L.; Hsu, H. S.; Huang, J. C. A.; Liu, X. C.; Zhang, F. M.; Du, Y. W.

    2012-06-01

    Nanocrystalline Tb-doped ZnO films have been prepared by ion-beam sputtering technique. Magnetic characterization showed that the films are ferromagnetic with Curie temperature (TC) higher than room temperature. By further treated with a rapid thermal annealing process, both the grain size and the carrier concentration of the films increase, while the saturation magnetization of the films decreases. This magnetic behavior can be hardly explained by either bound magnetic polaron model or free carrier mediation model, thus suggests that the grain boundaries play a key role for the origin of ferromagnetism in these films.

  14. Giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses in insulating nanogranular films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    The electric and magnetic properties of matter are of great interest for materials science and their use in electronic applications. Large dielectric and magnetoelectric responses of materials at room temperature are a great advantage for electromagnetic device applications. Here we present a study of FeCo-MgF nanogranular films exhibiting giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses at room temperature; with dielectric constant ε′=490 and magnetoelectric response Δε′/ε′0=3%. In these films, Fe-Co alloy-based nanometer-sized magnetic granules are dispersed in a Mg-fluoride-based insulator matrix. Insulating nanogranular films are a new class of multifunctional materials. The giant responses are caused by spin-dependent charge oscillation between magnetic granules via quantum-mechanical tunnelling. A possible application of such insulating nanogranular materials with giant response is in the construction of a tunable device, in which impedance components such as capacitance and inductance are tunable at room temperature. PMID:25048805

  15. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  16. Ultrafast room temperature single-photon source from nanowire-quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bounouar, S; Elouneg-Jamroz, M; Hertog, M den; Morchutt, C; Bellet-Amalric, E; André, R; Bougerol, C; Genuist, Y; Poizat, J-Ph; Tatarenko, S; Kheng, K

    2012-06-13

    Epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots are particularly promising as realistic single-photon sources for their compatibility with manufacturing techniques and possibility to be implemented in compact devices. Here, we demonstrate for the first time single-photon emission up to room temperature from an epitaxial quantum dot inserted in a nanowire, namely a CdSe slice in a ZnSe nanowire. The exciton and biexciton lines can still be resolved at room temperature and the biexciton turns out to be the most appropriate transition for single-photon emission due to a large nonradiative decay of the bright exciton to dark exciton states. With an intrinsically short radiative decay time (≈300 ps) this system is the fastest room temperature single-photon emitter, allowing potentially gigahertz repetition rates.

  17. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  18. Quality of red blood cells isolated from umbilical cord blood stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  19. Magnetic switching of ferroelectric domains at room temperature in multiferroic PZTFT

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D.M.; Schilling, A.; Kumar, Ashok; Sanchez, D.; Ortega, N.; Arredondo, M.; Katiyar, R.S.; Gregg, J.M.; Scott, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-phase magnetoelectric multiferroics are ferroelectric materials that display some form of magnetism. In addition, magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters are not independent of one another. Thus, the application of either an electric or magnetic field simultaneously alters both the electrical dipole configuration and the magnetic state of the material. The technological possibilities that could arise from magnetoelectric multiferroics are considerable and a range of functional devices has already been envisioned. Realising these devices, however, requires coupling effects to be significant and to occur at room temperature. Although such characteristics can be created in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites, to date they have only been weakly evident in single-phase multiferroics. Here in a newly discovered room temperature multiferroic, we demonstrate significant room temperature coupling by monitoring changes in ferroelectric domain patterns induced by magnetic fields. An order of magnitude estimate of the effective coupling coefficient suggests a value of ~1 × 10−7 sm−1. PMID:23443562

  20. Stage for texture measurements above room temperature in a Philips X'Pert Pro MPD diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrero, Cesar E.; Castellani, Daniel; Bolmaro, Raul E.; Malarria, Jorge A.

    2009-11-15

    A special stage for texture measurements above room temperature was designed with the proper size and weight to be fitted onto the Eulerean cradle of the Philips X'Pert Pro MPD diffractometer. With such device, flat samples of 2x2 cm{sup 2} area can be analyzed at a nearly constant temperature with variations below {+-}4 deg. C in the range between ambient temperature and 200 deg. C.

  1. Assessment of DNA Encapsulation, a New Room-Temperature DNA Storage Method

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells®). Samples were stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells® are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells® for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  2. Tunable Ferromagnetic Transition Temperature and Vertical Hysteretic Shift in SrRuO3 Films Integrated on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    SrRuO3 thin films have been epitaxially integrated on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible Si(001) substrates via pulsed laser deposition using a unique buffer layer (SrTiO3/TiN) approach. When the oxygen pressure during deposition was controlled, a dramatic suppression in the ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC) of up to 53 K was observed, caused by the growth-induced ruthenium vacancies rather than the oxygen vacancies. The ruthenium vacancies can also effectively tune the vertical magnetization shift (Mshift) in hysteresis loops, and thus we achieved a giant Mshift of 240%. Transport and magnetic measurements reveal that these appreciable physical phenomena are closely related to the ruthenium defect-induced local disorder and complex effects due to the strongly hybridized p-d orbitals as well as the induced lattice distortion. These observations indicate the importance of ruthenium defects in controlling the vertical magnetization shift and ferromagnetic transition temperature in this transitional metal oxide. PMID:27203399

  3. Magnetic anisotropy peculiarities of high-temperature ferromagnetic MnxSi1-x (x ≈ 0.5) alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drovosekov, A. B.; Kreines, N. M.; Savitsky, A. O.; Kapelnitsky, S. V.; Rylkov, V. V.; Tugushev, V. V.; Prutskov, G. V.; Novodvorskii, O. A.; Cherebilo, E. A.; Kulatov, E. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, S.

    2016-08-01

    Thin films of Mn x Si1-x alloys with different Mn concentration x≈0.44\\text{--}0.63 grown by the pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) method onto the Al2O3 (0001) substrate were investigated in the temperature range 4-300 K using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements in the wide range of frequencies (f = 7\\text{--}60 \\text{GHz}) and magnetic fields (H = 0\\text{--}30 \\text{kOe}) . For samples with x≈0.52\\text{--}0.55 , FMR data show clear evidence of ferromagnetism (FM) with high Curie temperatures TC ˜ 300 \\text{K} . These samples demonstrate the complex and unusual character of magnetic anisotropy described in the frame of phenomenological model as a combination of the essential second-order easy-plane anisotropy contribution and the additional fourth-order anisotropy contribution with the easy direction normal to the film plane. We explain the obtained results by a polycrystalline (mosaic) structure of the films caused by the film-substrate lattice mismatch.

  4. Room-temperature wafer scale bonding using smoothed Au seal ring surfaces for hermetic sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Yuichi; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated room-temperature bonding characteristics of electroplated Au surfaces smoothed by the lift-off and imprint methods. As a result, we found that smoothed surfaces enable strong bonding; on the other hand, electroplated rough surfaces result in very weak bonding. In transmission electron microscopy observations, no delamination was observed at the bonding interface bonded at room temperature using a smooth surface prepared by the lift-off method. Moreover, the hermeticity of the bonding interface prepared using smoothed surfaces was evaluated using diaphragm structures. As a result, we confirmed that good hermetic sealing was achieved using the electroplated Au surface smoothed by the lift-off method.

  5. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing.

  6. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes sensor for organic liquid detection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as room temperature chemical sensor for the detection of organic liquids such as ethanol, propanol, methanol and toluene. MWCNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. The interdigitated electrodes were fabricated by conventional photolithography technique. The sensor was fabricated by drop depositing MWCNT suspension onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensing properties of MWCNTs sensor was studied for organic liquids detection. The resistance of sensor was found to increase upon exposure to these liquids. Sensor shows good reversibility and fast response at room temperature. Charge transfer between the organic liquid and sensing element is the dominant sensing mechanism.

  7. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  8. Some problems on rf breakdown in room temperature accelerator structure, a possible criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    The discussion is confined to high gradient, room-temperature accelerators which have clean well-finished cavity surfaces and good vacuum conditions. Breakdown-initiating mechanisms due to ''cold'' field electron emission occurring at isolated sites on broad-area cavity surfaces, where the field is enhanced, are described. The influences of an alternating field and transition time tunneling are taken into account. The thermal instability resulting in vacuum voltage breakdown is hypothesized to derive a new criterion for room-temperature accelerator structure. 18 refs., 5 figs. (DWL)

  9. A 2.5-2.7 THz Room Temperature Electronic Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Mehdi, Imran; Lin, Robert; Siles, Jose Vicente; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Bertrand, Thomas; Ward, John

    2011-01-01

    We report on a room temperature 2.5 to 2.7 THz electronic source based on frequency multipliers. The source utilizes a cascade of three frequency multipliers with W-band power amplifiers driving the first stage multiplier. Multiple-chip multipliers are utilized for the two initial stages to improve the power handling capability and a sub-micron anode is utilized for the final stage tripler. Room temperature measurements indicate that the source can put out a peak power of about 14 microwatts with more than 4 microwatts in the 2.5 to 2.7 THz range.

  10. Photoexcited Individual Nanowires: Key Elements in Room Temperature Detection of Oxidizing Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Prades, J. D.; Jimenez-Diaz, R.; Manzanares, M.; Andreu, T.; Cirera, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J. R.

    2009-05-23

    Illuminating metal oxide semiconductors with ultra-violet light is a feasible alternative to activate chemical reactions at their surface and thus, using them as gas sensors without the necessity of heating them. Here, the response at room temperature of individual single-crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanowires towards NO{sub 2} is studied in detail. The results reveal that similar responses to those obtained with thermally activated sensors can be achieved by choosing the optimal illumination conditions. This finding paves the way to the development of conductometric gas sensors operated at room temperature. The power consumption in these devices is in range with conventional micromachined sensors.

  11. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

  12. Exploiting fast detectors to enter a new dimension in room-temperature crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robin L. Paterson, Neil; Axford, Danny; Aishima, Jun; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2014-05-01

    A departure from a linear or an exponential decay in the diffracting power of macromolecular crystals is observed and accounted for through consideration of a multi-state sequential model. A departure from a linear or an exponential intensity decay in the diffracting power of protein crystals as a function of absorbed dose is reported. The observation of a lag phase raises the possibility of collecting significantly more data from crystals held at room temperature before an intolerable intensity decay is reached. A simple model accounting for the form of the intensity decay is reintroduced and is applied for the first time to high frame-rate room-temperature data collection.

  13. High room temperature optical polarization due to spin-valley coupling in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. S.; Friedman, A. L.; Jonker, B. T.

    2016-05-01

    We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral exciton or the negatively charged trion. While the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization at room temperature, we observe a room temperature optical polarization in excess of 40% for the trion. Using an applied gate voltage, we can modulate the electron density, and subsequently the polarization of the trion emission continuously from 20-40%. Both the polarization and the emission energy monotonically track the gate voltage with the emission energy increasing by 45 meV. We discuss the role electron capture by the exciton has on suppressing the intervalley scattering process.

  14. Efficient, resonantly pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Ter-Gabrielyan, N; Fromzel, V; Ryba-Romanowski, W; Lukasiewicz, T; Dubinskii, M

    2012-04-01

    We report an efficient room-temperature operation of a resonantly pumped Er3+:GdVO4 laser at 1598.5 nm. The maximum continuous wave (CW) output power of 3.5 W with slope efficiency of 56% was achieved with resonant pumping by an Er-fiber laser at 1538.6 nm. With pumping by a commercial laser diode bar stack, a quasi-CW (QCW) output of 7.7 W and maximum slope efficiency of ~53% versus absorbed pump power were obtained. This is believed to be the first resonantly (in-band) pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

  15. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Miyokawa, Norihiko; Ide, Keisuke; Toda, Yoshitake; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  16. Metal-Based Room-Temperature Operating Single Electron Devices Using Scanning Probe Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Gotoh, Yoshitaka; TatsuroMaeda, TatsuroMaeda; Dagata, John; Harris, JamesS.

    1999-01-01

    Coulomb oscillation was clearly observed at room temperature in the singleelectron transistor fabricated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nano-oxidationprocess. In order to obtain a clear Coulomb oscillation at room temperature, newand improved fabrication processes and measurement systems such as a pulse-modeAFM nano-oxidation process and a triaxial active feedback measurement system areintroduced. The Coulomb oscillation peaks appear with the period of 1.9 V at thedrain bias conditions of 0.25 V and 0.3 V. The current modulation rate ranges from20% to 30%.

  17. Single Event Effects on Space Radiation Hardened 64K SRAMS at Room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, O.; Schwartz, H.; McCarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser threshold linear Energy transfer for single event upsetscan be estimaed, even at room temperature, for space radiation hardened 64K SRAMs. The memories where independently developed to quality for the Qualified Manufacturer's List by IBM and Honeywell. The memory was so hard that high energy heavy ions generated by the Van de Graff could not determine the SEU threshold at room temperature. Use of pulsed Laser tests would meake it possible to forgo very expensive testing at ultra-high energy accelerators.

  18. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  19. Possible half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc blende CrSb and CrAs (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, M.

    2003-05-01

    Theoretical study based on a first-principles band structure calculation is carried out for new room-temperature ferromagnets, zinc blende CrSb and CrAs. It is found from the total-energy calculation that the ferromagnetic state is energetically favorable for both materials. By using the value of the difference in total energy between ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic states, the Curie temperatures of these ferromagnets are estimated as 1600-1800 K within mean-field approximation of the Heisenberg model. The magnetic moment is evaluated to be 3 Bohr magnetons per formula unit for both materials, which agrees well with the saturation moments estimated experimentally. Furthermore, these ferromagnets are half metallic, and the spin polarization at the Fermi level is almost unaffected even if spin-orbit interaction is taken into account.

  20. Extraordinary Hall effect and universal scaling in Fe{sub x}(ZnO){sub 1–x} granular thin films at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hao-Bo; Liu, Mengyin; He, Jie; Lu, Feng; Wang, Weichao; Cheng, Yahui Liu, Hui; Song, Shutao; Zhang, Yan; Du, Xiwen; Li, Zhiqing; Zheng, Rongkun

    2015-01-05

    On the benefit of the concept of the so-called diluted magnetic oxides, Fe{sub x}(ZnO){sub 1–x} (x = 0.50–0.85) granular thin films with different thickness through 2D and 3D percolation region were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition. All samples are ferromagnetic at room-temperature due to the ferromagnetic nature of the Fe-doped ZnO matrix, which is quite different from the superparamagnetic behavior in the insulator-matrix based granular films. Along with decreasing thickness, the Hall coefficient R{sub S} is largely enhanced. The maximum R{sub S} reaches 4.27 × 10{sup −7} m{sup 3}/C in ∼2.8 nm Fe{sub 0.6}(ZnO){sub 0.4} granular film, which is nearly 9 times larger than the R{sub S} (4.64 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 3}/C) of the ∼50 nm Fe{sub 0.6}(ZnO){sub 0.4} sample. Meanwhile, the R{sub S} could maintain in a wide temperature region from 10 K to 300 K and the Hall sensitivity reaches ∼130 V/AT at room-temperature. The scaling exponential of n = 1.7 ± 0.1 in σ{sub xy}∼σ{sub xx}{sup n} is observed, fitting well with the recent developed universal scaling theory characterized by n = 1.6 in the dirty limit.