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Sample records for room temperature ferromagnetism

  1. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  2. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y W; Lu, Y H; Yi, J B; Feng, Y P; Herng, T S; Liu, X; Gao, D Q; Xue, D S; Xue, J M; Ouyang, J Y; Ding, J

    2012-03-06

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  3. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in alumina films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. L.; Zhen, C. M.; Wang, X. Q.; Ma, L.; Li, X. L.; Hou, D. L.

    2011-08-01

    We have prepared alumina thin films on Si substrates using a radio frequency (RF) sputtering method, and have observed room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in the thin films. When the thin films were annealed in vacuum, the saturation magnetization (Ms) increased, while annealing the sample in the air contributed to a decrease in the value of Ms. The Ms of the thin film also decreased as the thickness increased. We confirm that the unpaired electron spins responsible for ferromagnetism (FM) in Al 2O 3-δ thin films have their origin in the oxygen vacancies, especially at the interface of the Al 2O 3-δ thin film and the Si substrate.

  5. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Polymer and the Correlated Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinsong; Yang, Bin; Shield, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) has been observed in organic semiconductor devices where resistance can change in a relatively small external magnetic field at room temperature. Since a weak magnetic field is involved, the hyperfine interaction (HFI) is employed to explain OMAR in the reported literatures. None of these issues consider the magnetic properties of the organic semiconductors themselves. However, the we recently discovered that polymer semiconductors, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT, can have room temperature (RT) ferromagnetic properties in their crystalline phase and when mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Here, we will report the possible correlation between the ferromagnetic property of the P3HT:PCBM and anomalous OMAR phenomenon including the anisotropic and hysteretic OMAR behavior. The magnetic property of the polymer including the anisotropic and photo induced change of magnetism will be also discussed to explore the possible mechanism of the room temperature ferromagnetism.~ This work is partially supported by the NSF MRSEC program at University.

  6. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Z. Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  7. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xudong; Liu, Liangliang; Wang, Zhu; Wu, Yichu

    2014-01-21

    The effect of hydrogen doping on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles was investigated. Hydrogen was incorporated by annealing under 5% H{sub 2} in Ar ambient at 700 °C. Room-temperature ferromagnetism was induced in hydrogenated ZnO nanoparticles, and the observed ferromagnetism could be switched between “on” and “off” states through hydrogen annealing and oxygen annealing process, respectively. It was found that Zn vacancy and OH bonding complex (V{sub Zn} + OH) was crucial to the observed ferromagnetism by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy analysis. Based on first-principles calculations, V{sub Zn} + OH was favorable to be presented due to the low formation energy. Meanwhile, this configuration could lead to a magnetic moment of 0.57 μ{sub B}. The Raman and photoluminescence measurements excluded the possibility of oxygen vacancy as the origin of the ferromagnetism.

  9. Above room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-ion implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, M.; Awo-Affouda, C.; Stollenwerk, A.; Huang, M. B.; Ramos, F. G.; Agnello, G.; Labella, V. P.

    2005-01-01

    Above room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is achieved in Si through Mn ion implantation. Three-hundred-keV Mn+ ions were implanted to 0.1% and 0.8% peak atomic concentrations, yielding a saturation magnetization of 0.3emu/g at 300K for the highest concentration as measured using a SQUID magnetometer. The saturation magnetization increased by ˜2× after annealing at 800°C for 5min . The Curie temperature for all samples was found to be greater than 400K . A significant difference in the temperature-dependent remnant magnetization between the implanted p-type and n-type Si is observed, giving strong evidence that a Si-based diluted magnetic semiconductor can be achieved.

  10. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  11. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Zn,Cr)Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hidekazu

    2006-03-01

    Ferromagnetic diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) are the key material to developing semiconductor spintronic devices. One of the most characteristics physical phenomena in DMS is a strong interaction between sp-carriers and localized d-spins (sp-d exchange interaction) [1]. Confirmation of this interaction is essential to prove a synthesis of real DMS, and can be done directly by the magneto-optical studies such as a magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurement [2]. Here, we report room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism with the sp-d exchange interaction in Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) [3]. Zn1-xCrxTe films with x.3ex<=x 0.20 were grown on GaAs (001) substrates by a molecular beam epitaxy method. No sign of a secondary phase was detected in any films by the reflection high-energy electron and X-ray diffractions. MCD spectra were measured in a transmission mode. Magnetization (M) measurements were carried out using a SQUID. The M-H curves of Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) showed a ferromagnetic behavior up to about RT. Curie temperature TC was estimated to be 300±10 K by the Arrott plot analysis. A strong enhancement of the MCD signal at the optical transition energies of critical points of host ZnTe was observed in Zn1-xCrxTe, indicating a strong sp-d exchange interaction. The MCD spectra of Zn1-xCrxTe at any magnetic field could be superposed upon a single spectrum, indicating that the observed MCD signals come from a single material, that is, Zn1-xCrxTe. The magnetic field dependence of MCD intensity showed the ferromagnetic feature, which coincides with the M-H curves measured using a SQUID. Furthermore, the MCD data showed the same TC as that obtained from magnetization data. These results indicate that Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) is an intrinsic DMS with RT ferromagnetism. References [1] J. K. Furdyna, J. Appl. Phys. 64, R29 (1988). [2] K. Ando, in Magneto-Optics, Springer Series in Solid-State Science, edited by S. Sugano and N. Kojima (Springer, Berlin, 2000), Vol.128, p. 211. [3

  12. Theory of room temperature ferromagnetism in Cr modified DNA nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruğ Duru, Izzet; Değer, Caner; Eldem, Vahap; Kalayci, Taner; Aktaş, Şahin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties of Cr3+ (J  <  0) ion-modified DNA (M-DNA) nanowire (1000 base) at room temperature under a uniform magnetic field (˜100 Oe) for different doping concentrations. A Monte Carlo simulation method-based Metropolis algorithm is used to figure out the thermodynamic quantities of nanowire formed by Cr M-DNA followed by analysing the dependency of the ferromagnetic behaviour of the M-DNA to dopant concentration. It is understood that ion density/base and ion density/helical of Cr3+ ions can be a tuning parameter, herewith the dopant ratio has an actual importance on the magnetic characterization of M-DNA nanowire (3%-20%). We propose the source of magnetism as an exchange interaction between Cr and DNA helical atoms indicated in the Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in pure ZnO nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bie, Xiaofei; Wang, Chunzhong; Ehrenberg, H.; Wei, Yingjin; Chen, Gang; Meng, Xing; Zou, Guangtian; Du, Fei

    2010-08-01

    ZnO nanoflowers are synthesized by hydrothermal method. The morphology of ZnO is captured by SEM, TEM and HRTEM, which is composed of closely packed nanorods of about 100 nm in diameter and 1 μm in length. The ZFC/FC curves show superparamagnetic features. The abnormal increase in magnetization curves below 14 K comes from the isolated vacancy clusters with no interaction. The magnetic hysteresis at 300 K displays saturation state and confirms room-temperature ferromagnetism. While the magnetic hysteresis at 5 K shows nonsaturation state due to the enhanced effects of vacancy clusters. The O 1s XPS results can be fitted to three Gaussian peaks. The existence of medium-binding energy located at 531.16 eV confirms the deficiency of O ions at the surface of ZnO nanoflowers.

  14. Room-Temperature Spin Filtering in Metallic Ferromagnet-Multilayer Graphene-Ferromagnet Junctions.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Enrique D; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Culbertson, James C; Jernigan, Glenn G; Bussman, Konrad; Jonker, Berend T

    2016-11-22

    We report room-temperature negative magnetoresistance in ferromagnet-graphene-ferromagnet (FM|Gr|FM) junctions with minority spin polarization exceeding 80%, consistent with predictions of strong minority spin filtering. We fabricated arrays of such junctions via chemical vapor deposition of multilayer graphene on lattice-matched single-crystal NiFe(111) films and standard photolithographic patterning and etching techniques. The junctions exhibit metallic transport behavior, low resistance, and the negative magnetoresistance characteristic of a minority spin filter interface throughout the temperature range 10 to 300 K. We develop a device model to incorporate the predicted spin filtering by explicitly treating a metallic minority spin channel with spin current conversion and a tunnel barrier majority spin channel and extract spin polarization of at least 80% in the graphene layer in our structures. The junctions also show antiferromagnetic coupling, consistent with several recent predictions. The methods and findings are relevant to fast-readout low-power magnetic random access memory technology, spin logic devices, and low-power magnetic field sensors.

  15. Thermopower and resistivity in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, A. D.; Sultan, Rubina; Bassett, D.; Wei, D.; Zink, B. L.

    2011-03-01

    We present measurements of thermopower (Seebeck coefficient) and electrical resistivity of a wide selection of polycrystalline ferromagnetic films with thicknesses ranging from 60-167 nm. For comparison, a copper film of similar thickness was measured with the same techniques. Both the thermal and electrical measurements, made as a function of temperature from 77-325 K, are made using a micromachined thermal isolation platform consisting of a suspended, patterned silicon-nitride membrane. We observe a strong correlation between the resistivity of the films and the thermopower. Films with higher resistivity and residual resistivity ratios, indicating a higher concentration of static defects such as impurities or grain boundaries, with rare exception show thermopower of the same sign, but with absolute magnitude reduced from the thermopower of the corresponding bulk material. In addition, iron films exhibit the pronounced low-temperature peak in thermopower associated with magnon drag, with a magnitude similar to that seen in bulk iron alloys. These results provide important groundwork for ongoing studies of related thermoelectric effects in nanomagnetic systems, such as the spin Seebeck effect.

  16. First principle prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism above room temperature in half-heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Van An Dinh; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2010-01-04

    A first principle study of half-metallicity and ferromagnetism in half-heusler alloys NiMnZ (Z = Si, P, Ge, As, and Sb) is given. The half-metallicity and ferromagnetism are predicted via the calculation of electronic structure, and Curie temperature. The stability of the orthorhombic and tetragonal structures and C1{sub b} at various values of lattice parameters is also studied by means of the pseudo-potential method. All alloys exhibit the half-metallicity and ferromagnetism above room temperature.

  17. Ferromagnetism at room temperature in Cr-doped anodic titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yulong E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Li, Jie; Yu, Guoliang; Zhong, Zhiyong; Bai, Feiming; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Shihong; Zhong, Peng

    2014-05-07

    This study reports the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) synthesized via the electrochemical method followed by a novel Cr-doping process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the TiO{sub 2} NTs were highly ordered with length up to 26 μm, outer diameter about 110 nm, and inner diameter about 100 nm. X-ray diffraction results indicated there were no magnetic contaminations of metallic Cr clusters or any other phases except anatase TiO{sub 2}. The Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} NTs were further annealed in oxygen, air and argon, and room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed in all Cr-doped samples. Moreover, saturation magnetizations and coercivities of the Cr-doped under various annealing atmosphere were further analyzed, and results indicate that oxygen content played a critical role in the room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  18. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    2011-08-12

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

  19. Joint effect of ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic cations for adjusting room temperature ferromagnetism of highly luminescent CuNiInS quaternary nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Lv, Changgui; Zhang, Ruohu; Cui, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    In this work, highly luminescent quaternary CuNiInS nanocrystals (NCs) are put forward as a good prototype for investigating defect-induced room temperature ferromagnetism. A ferromagnetic Ni cation can preserve the strong luminescence of NCs without introducing intermediate energy levels in the center of the forbidden band. The strong luminescence of NCs is used as an indicator for monitoring the concentration of vacancy defects inside them, facilitating the investigation of the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in CuNiInS NCs. Our results reveal that the patching of Cu vacancies ({{{{V}}}{{Cu}}}-) with Ni will result in bound magnetic polarons composed of both {{{{V}}}{{Cu}}}- and a substitution of Cu by Ni ({{{{Ni}}}{{Cu}}}+), giving rise to the room temperature ferromagnetism of CuNiInS NCs. Either the ferromagnetic Ni or the non-ferromagnetic Cu cation can tune the magnetism of CuNiInS NCs because of the change of bound magnetic polaron concentration at the altered concentration ratio of {{{{V}}}{{Cu}}}- and {{{{Ni}}}{{Cu}}}+.

  20. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism and band gap tuning in nonmagnetic Mg doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Qi, Yan; Song, Zhilin; Qi, Shifei; Zhou, Guowei; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    Mg doped ZnO films with hexagonal wurtzite structure were deposited on c-cut sapphire Al2O3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Both room temperature ferromagnetism and band gap of the films simultaneously tuned by the concentration of oxygen vacancies were performed. Our results further reveal that the singly occupied oxygen vacancies should be responsible for the room temperature ferromagnetism and band gap narrowing. Singly occupied oxygen vacancies having the localized magnetic moments form bound magnetic polarons, which results in a long-range ferromagnetic ordering due to Mg doping. Moreover, band gap narrowing of the films is probably due to the formation of impurity band in the vicinity of valence band, originating from singly occupied oxygen vacancies. These results may build a bridge to understand the relationship between the magnetic and optical properties in oxide semiconductor, and are promising to integrate multiple functions in one system.

  1. Reversible switching of room temperature ferromagnetism in CeO2-Co nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacanell, J.; Paulin, M. A.; Ferrari, V.; Garbarino, G.; Leyva, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the reversible ferromagnetic (FM) behavior of pure and Co doped CeO2 nanopowders. The as-sintered samples displayed an increasing paramagnetic contribution upon Co doping. Room temperature FM is obtained simply by performing thermal treatments in vacuum at temperatures as low as 500 °C and it can be switched off by performing thermal treatments in oxidizing conditions. The FM contribution is enhanced as we increase the time of the thermal treatment in vacuum. Those systematic experiments establish a direct relation between ferromagnetism and oxygen vacancies and open a path for developing materials with tailored properties.

  2. Substrate effect on the room-temperature ferromagnetism in un-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Peng; Wang, Weipeng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong

    2012-07-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism was achieved in un-doped ZnO films on silicon and quartz substrates. Photoluminescence measurement and positron annihilation analysis suggested that the ferromagnetism was originated from singly occupied oxygen vacancies (roughly estimated as ˜0.55 μB/vacancy), created in ZnO films by annealing in argon. The saturated magnetization of ZnO films was enhanced from ˜0.44 emu/g (on quartz) to ˜1.18 emu/g (on silicon) after annealing at 600 °C, as silicon acted as oxygen getter and created more oxygen vacancies in ZnO films. This study clarified the origin of ferromagnetism in un-doped ZnO and provides an idea to enhance the ferromagnetism.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-08-14

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism and structural properties of nano BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamanickam, N.; Rajashabala, S.; Ramachandran, K.

    2015-06-01

    Perovskite barium titanate (BTO) is a ferroelectric material and here an attempt is made to observe ferromagnetism, for multiferroics. BTO nanostructures (NS) were prepared by coprecipitation method. Perovskite structured tetragonal phase was observed by XRD and Rietveld method. The absorption spectrum of UV-Vis exhibited a band gap of 3.23 eV, blue shifted from bulk. The flower like structure for morphology was observed in SEM. Ferromagnetic behavior is observed by VSM measurement at room temperature (RT) and the possible reasons are discussed.

  6. Synthesis and properties of Ag-doped ZnO films with room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Chang, Ze-Jiang; Liu, Jing-Jin; Ren, Ya-Xuan; Sun, Hui-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    A series of Ag-doped ZnO films were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. XRD and SEM results showed that the doping amount of Ag had a great influence on the films' morphology and ferromagnetism, and their magnetism can be improved by doping an appropriate amount of Ag. The theoretical analysis suggested that the magnetism resulted mainly from the film grain boundary surfaces. Further research revealed that these films had strong timeliness. Such a result indicated that the room temperature ferromagnetism of Ag-doped ZnO films did not stem from the cation vacancies but from the oxygen vacancies on the boundary surfaces.

  7. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlir, Vojtech; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-03

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  8. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods: Microwave-assisted synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Singh, Shashi B.; Das, Raja; Poddar, Pankaj; Kulkarni, Sulabha K.

    2011-02-15

    One-dimensional (1D) undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods of average length {approx}1 {mu}m and diameter {approx}50 nm have been obtained using a microwave-assisted synthesis. The magnetization (M) and coercivity (H{sub c}) value obtained for undoped ZnO nanorods at room temperature is {approx}5x10{sup -3} emu/g and {approx}150 Oe, respectively. The Fe doped ZnO samples show significant changes in M -H loop with increasing doping concentration. Both undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods exhibit a Curie transition temperature (T{sub c}) above 390 K. Electron spin resonance and Moessbauer spectra indicate the presence of ferric ions. The origin of ferromagnetism in undoped ZnO nanorods is attributed to localized electron spin moments resulting from surface defects/vacancies, where as in Fe doped samples is explained by F center exchange mechanism. -- Graphical abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetism has been reported in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods of average length {approx}1 {mu}m and diameter {approx}50 nm. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} Microwave-assisted synthesis of undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods. {yields} Observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Fe doped ZnO nanorods. {yields} Transition temperature (T{sub c}) obtained in undoped and doped samples is above 390 K. {yields} In undoped ZnO origin of ferromagnetism is explained in terms of defects/vacancies. {yields} Ferromagnetism in Fe doped ZnO is explained by F-center exchange mechanism.

  10. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; Esquinazi, P.; Arenholz, E.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-05-01

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the average magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite. Also, our findings show that the magnetic properties of graphite surfaces, thin films or two dimensional graphene samples can be reliably studied using soft x-ray dichroism. Fundamental new insight into the magnetic properties of carbon based systems can thus be obtained.

  11. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-implanted 6H-SiC single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. W.; Yan, Y. L.; Lv, Z. C.; Yang, S. W.; Li, X. G.; Liu, J. D.; Ye, B. J.; Peng, C. X.; Diao, C. L.; Zhang, W. F.

    2013-04-01

    200 keV Cu+ ions were implanted into 6H-SiC single crystal at room temperature with fluence of 8 × 1015 cm-2. No ferromagnetism (FM)-related secondary phase was found by the results of high-resolution x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy results indicated that the main defect type was silicon vacancy and the concentration of it increased after Cu implantation. The room-temperature ferromagnetism was detected by superconducting quantum interference device. First-principles calculations revealed that the magnetic moments mainly come from the 2p orbitals of C atoms and 3d orbitals of Cu dopant. The origin of the FM has been discussed in detail.

  12. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite.

  13. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles of the series Ni1-xMnxO (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) are successfully synthesized using a low temperature hydrothermal method. Samples up to 6% Mn-doping are single phase in nature as observed from powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data shows that all the single phase samples crystallize in the NaCl like fcc structure with space group Fm-3m. Unit cell volume decreases with increasing Mn-doping. Pure NiO nanoparticles show weak ferromagnetism, may be due to nanosize nature. Introduction of Mn within NiO lattice improves the magnetic properties significantly. Room temperature ferromagnetism is found in all the doped samples whereas the magnetization is highest for 2% Mn-doping and then decreases with further doping. The ZFC and FC branches in the temperature dependent magnetization separate well above 350 K indicating transition temperature well above room temperature for 2% Mn-doped NiO Nanoparticle. The ferromagnetic Curie temperature is found to be 653 K for the same sample as measured by temperature dependent magnetization study using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in high vacuum.

  14. Proximity induced room temperature ferromagnetism in graphene probed with spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenantsmeyer, Johannes Christian; Kaverzin, Alexey A.; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; van Wees, Bart J.

    2017-03-01

    We present a direct measurement of the exchange interaction in room temperature ferromagnetic graphene. We study the spin transport in exfoliated graphene on an yttrium-iron-garnet substrate where the observed spin precession clearly indicates the presence and strength of an exchange field that is an unambiguous evidence of induced ferromagnetism. We describe the results with a modified Bloch diffusion equation and extract an average exchange field of the order of 0.2 T. Further, we demonstrate that a proximity induced 2D ferromagnet can efficiently modulate a spin current by controlling the direction of the exchange field. These findings can create a building block for magnetic-gate tuneable spin transport in one-atom-thick spintronic devices.

  15. Light Control of Ferromagnetism in ZnO Films on Pt Substrate at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jihao; Qin, Hongwei; Hao, Yanming; Cheng, Bin; Liu, Weikang; Liu, Liang; Ren, Shaoqing; Zhou, Guangjun; Ji, Ziwu; Hu, Jifan

    2017-01-01

    The control of ferromagnetism by light at room temperature is essential for the development of some optical-magnetic coupling devices, data storage and quantum computation techniques. In the present work, we demonstrate that the ferromagnetism of a semiconducting ZnO film on Pt substrate can be controlled by nonpolarized ultraviolet or violet light. The illumination of light with sufficiently high frequency photons could excite photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the semiconducting ZnO film. The amount of oxygen vacancies in the ZnO film and the appearance of built-in electric field due to the heterostructured ZnO/Pt may play important roles in the light-induced changes in the ferromagnetism of the ZnO film. PMID:28393834

  16. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped In2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsaprom, Kwanruthai; Sonsupap, Somchai; Maensiri, Santi; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles of Fe-doped In2O3 [(In1- x Fe x )2O3, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10] are prepared by a simple polymerized complex method using indium (III) nitrate hydrate, iron (III) nitrate nonahydrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone as the starting materials. The XRD, Raman and electron diffraction analysis results indicated that the calcined samples have the cubic structure of In2O3. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy including X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy is used in order to address both qualitative and quantitative of doped Fe valence states. The undoped sample exhibits a diamagnetic behavior, whereas all the Fe-doped samples are ferromagnetic having the magnetizations of ~0.0019-0.2959 emu/g at 10 kOe. Our results indicate that room-temperature ferromagnetism of Fe-doped In2O3 system is intrinsic and is not a result of any ferromagnetic impurity phases.

  17. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in lightly Cr-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, L. B.; Zhao, X. R.; Liu, J. M.; Wang, T.; Rao, G. H.

    2010-06-01

    Zn1- x Cr x O (0≤ x≤0.15) nanoparticles were synthesized by an auto-combustion method and characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering techniques. The solubility limit for Cr in ZnO was determined as x≈0.03. Room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) was observed in lightly Cr-doped ZnO nanoparticles with x=0.01 and 0.02. Raman scattering spectra of the lightly Cr-doped and Co-doped ZnO were studied and compared. The enhancement of both the magnetization and the intensity of Raman scattering peak associated with donor defects (Zni and/or VO) and carriers indicates that light Cr doping in ZnO could be an effective way to achieve pronounced RT-FM and the ferromagnetism is closely related to the dopant-donor hybridization besides the ferromagnetic Cr-O-Cr superexchange interactions.

  18. A room-temperature magnetic semiconductor from a ferromagnetic metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjian; Zhang, Hongxia; Shi, Jin-An; Wang, Zhongchang; Song, Cheng; Wang, Xiangrong; Lu, Siyuan; Zhou, Xiangjun; Gu, Lin; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Chen, Mingwei; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2016-12-01

    Emerging for future spintronic/electronic applications, magnetic semiconductors have stimulated intense interest due to their promises for new functionalities and device concepts. So far, the so-called diluted magnetic semiconductors attract many attentions, yet it remains challenging to increase their Curie temperatures above room temperature, particularly those based on III-V semiconductors. In contrast to the concept of doping magnetic elements into conventional semiconductors to make diluted magnetic semiconductors, here we propose to oxidize originally ferromagnetic metals/alloys to form new species of magnetic semiconductors. We introduce oxygen into a ferromagnetic metallic glass to form a Co28.6Fe12.4Ta4.3B8.7O46 magnetic semiconductor with a Curie temperature above 600 K. The demonstration of p-n heterojunctions and electric field control of the room-temperature ferromagnetism in this material reflects its p-type semiconducting character, with a mobility of 0.1 cm2 V-1 s-1. Our findings may pave a new way to realize high Curie temperature magnetic semiconductors with unusual multifunctionalities.

  19. A room-temperature magnetic semiconductor from a ferromagnetic metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjian; Zhang, Hongxia; Shi, Jin-an; Wang, Zhongchang; Song, Cheng; Wang, Xiangrong; Lu, Siyuan; Zhou, Xiangjun; Gu, Lin; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Chen, Mingwei; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2016-01-01

    Emerging for future spintronic/electronic applications, magnetic semiconductors have stimulated intense interest due to their promises for new functionalities and device concepts. So far, the so-called diluted magnetic semiconductors attract many attentions, yet it remains challenging to increase their Curie temperatures above room temperature, particularly those based on III–V semiconductors. In contrast to the concept of doping magnetic elements into conventional semiconductors to make diluted magnetic semiconductors, here we propose to oxidize originally ferromagnetic metals/alloys to form new species of magnetic semiconductors. We introduce oxygen into a ferromagnetic metallic glass to form a Co28.6Fe12.4Ta4.3B8.7O46 magnetic semiconductor with a Curie temperature above 600 K. The demonstration of p–n heterojunctions and electric field control of the room-temperature ferromagnetism in this material reflects its p-type semiconducting character, with a mobility of 0.1 cm2 V−1 s−1. Our findings may pave a new way to realize high Curie temperature magnetic semiconductors with unusual multifunctionalities. PMID:27929059

  20. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in doped face-centered cubic fe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bingqing; Shima, Mutsuhiro; Pati, Ranjit; Nayak, Saroj K; Singh, David J; Ma, Renzhi; Li, Yubao; Bando, Yoshio; Nasu, Saburo; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2006-06-01

    The magnetism of Fe and its alloys has been at the center of scientific and technological interest for decades. Along with the ferromagnetic nature of body-centered cubic Fe, the magnetic properties of face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe have attracted much attention. It is well known that fcc Fe is thermodynamically unstable at ambient conditions and not ferromagnetic. Contrary to what is known, we report that elongated nanoparticles of fcc Fe, grown within graphitic nanotubes, remain structurally stable and appear ferromagnetic at room temperature. The magnetic moment (2+/-0.5 microB) in these nanoparticles and the hyperfine fields for two different components of 57Fe (33 and 21 T), measured by Mössbauer spectroscopy, are explained by carbon interstitials in the expanded fcc Fe lattice, that is, FeC(x) where x approximately 0.10, which result in the formation of a dominant Fe4C stoichiometry. First-principles calculations suggest that the ferromagnetism observed in the fcc Fe is related to both lattice expansion and charge transfer between iron and carbon. The understanding of strain- and dopant-induced ferromagnetism in the fcc Fe could lead to the development of new fcc Fe-based alloys for magnetic applications.

  1. Room temperature ferromagnetism of tin oxide nanocrystal based on synthesis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthiraj, K.; Hema, M.; Balachandrakumar, K.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental conditions used in the preparation of nanocrystalline oxide materials play an important role in the room temperature ferromagnetism of the product. In the present work, a comparison was made between sol-gel, microwave assisted sol-gel and hydrothermal methods for preparing tin oxide nanocrystal. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the formation of tetragonal rutile phase structure for all the samples. The crystallite size was estimated from the HRTEM images and it is around 6-12 nm. Using optical absorbance measurement, the band gap energy value of the samples has been calculated. It reveals the existence of quantum confinement effect in all the prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms that the luminescence process originates from the structural defects such as oxygen vacancies present in the samples. Room temperature hysteresis loop was clearly observed in M-H curve of all the samples. But the sol-gel derived sample shows the higher values of saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanence (Mr) than other two samples. This study reveals that the sol-gel method is superior to the other two methods for producing room temperature ferromagnetism in tin oxide nanocrystal.

  2. Reconsidering the possibility of room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Akash; Bouzerar, Georges

    2013-12-01

    The possibility to induce long-range ferromagnetic order by doping oxides with transition metal ions has become a very exciting challenge in the last decade. Theoretically, it has been claimed that Mn-doped ZrO2 could be a very promising spintronic candidate and that high critical temperatures could be already achieved even for a low Mn concentration. Some experiments have reported room temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) whilst some others only paramagnetism. When observed, the nature of RT-FM appears to be controversial and not clearly understood. In this study, we propose to clarify and shed light on some of theses existing issues. A detailed study of the critical temperatures and low-energy magnetic excitations in Mn-doped ZrO2 is performed. We show that the Curie temperatures were largely overestimated previously, due to the inadequate treatment of both thermal and transverse fluctuations, and disorder. It appears that the Mn-Mn couplings cannot explain the observed RT-FM. We argue, that this can be attributed to the interaction between large moments induced in the vicinity of the manganese. This is similar to the non-magnetic defect-induced ferromagnetism reported in oxides, semiconductors and graphene/graphite.

  3. Enhancement of room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si by He implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jihong; Guo, Liping; Liu, Congxiao; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Jin, Shuoxue; Yang, Zheng

    2012-09-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted p-Si was enhanced dramatically by implantation of He. A 75 nm end-of-range region was found in the sample, with large scale and inhomogeneous damaging but preserved Si lattice periodicity. The end-of-range region shows an intrinsic magnetization of ˜100 emu/cm3. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that the spin polarization of Si dangling bonds rather than Mn impurity was the major source for the enhanced magnetism.

  4. Manganese mono-boride, an inexpensive room temperature ferromagnetic hard material

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuailing; Bao, Kuo; Tao, Qiang; Zhu, Pinwen; Ma, Teng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yazhou; Cui, Tian

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized orthorhombic FeB-type MnB (space group: Pnma) with high pressure and high temperature method. MnB is a promising soft magnetic material, which is ferromagnetic with Curie temperature as high as 546.3 K, and high magnetization value up to 155.5 emu/g, and comparatively low coercive field. The strong room temperature ferromagnetic properties stem from the positive exchange-correlation between manganese atoms and the large number of unpaired Mn 3d electrons. The asymptotic Vickers hardness (AVH) is 15.7 GPa which is far higher than that of traditional ferromagnetic materials. The high hardness is ascribed to the zigzag boron chains running through manganese lattice, as unraveled by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result and first principle calculations. This exploration opens a new class of materials with the integration of superior mechanical properties, lower cost, electrical conductivity, and fantastic soft magnetic properties which will be significant for scientific research and industrial application as advanced structural and functional materials. PMID:28262805

  5. Manganese mono-boride, an inexpensive room temperature ferromagnetic hard material.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuailing; Bao, Kuo; Tao, Qiang; Zhu, Pinwen; Ma, Teng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yazhou; Cui, Tian

    2017-03-06

    We synthesized orthorhombic FeB-type MnB (space group: Pnma) with high pressure and high temperature method. MnB is a promising soft magnetic material, which is ferromagnetic with Curie temperature as high as 546.3 K, and high magnetization value up to 155.5 emu/g, and comparatively low coercive field. The strong room temperature ferromagnetic properties stem from the positive exchange-correlation between manganese atoms and the large number of unpaired Mn 3d electrons. The asymptotic Vickers hardness (AVH) is 15.7 GPa which is far higher than that of traditional ferromagnetic materials. The high hardness is ascribed to the zigzag boron chains running through manganese lattice, as unraveled by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result and first principle calculations. This exploration opens a new class of materials with the integration of superior mechanical properties, lower cost, electrical conductivity, and fantastic soft magnetic properties which will be significant for scientific research and industrial application as advanced structural and functional materials.

  6. Manganese mono-boride, an inexpensive room temperature ferromagnetic hard material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuailing; Bao, Kuo; Tao, Qiang; Zhu, Pinwen; Ma, Teng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yazhou; Cui, Tian

    2017-03-01

    We synthesized orthorhombic FeB-type MnB (space group: Pnma) with high pressure and high temperature method. MnB is a promising soft magnetic material, which is ferromagnetic with Curie temperature as high as 546.3 K, and high magnetization value up to 155.5 emu/g, and comparatively low coercive field. The strong room temperature ferromagnetic properties stem from the positive exchange-correlation between manganese atoms and the large number of unpaired Mn 3d electrons. The asymptotic Vickers hardness (AVH) is 15.7 GPa which is far higher than that of traditional ferromagnetic materials. The high hardness is ascribed to the zigzag boron chains running through manganese lattice, as unraveled by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result and first principle calculations. This exploration opens a new class of materials with the integration of superior mechanical properties, lower cost, electrical conductivity, and fantastic soft magnetic properties which will be significant for scientific research and industrial application as advanced structural and functional materials.

  7. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    DOE PAGES

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlir, Vojtech; Gatti, Matteo; ...

    2016-03-03

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry breaking induced at themore » Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.« less

  8. Possible Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Self-Assembled Ensembles of Paramagnetic and Diamagnetic Molecular Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Dhara, Barun; Tarafder, Kartick; Jha, Plawan K; Panja, Soumendra N; Nair, Sunil; Oppeneer, Peter M; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-12-15

    Owing to long spin-relaxation time and chemically customizable physical properties, molecule-based semiconductor materials like metal-phthalocyanines offer promising alternatives to conventional dilute magnetic semiconductors/oxides (DMSs/DMOs) to achieve room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism. However, air-stable molecule-based materials exhibiting both semiconductivity and magnetic-order at RT have so far remained elusive. We present here the concept of supramolecular arrangement to accomplish possibly RT ferromagnetism. Specifically, we observe a clear hysteresis-loop (Hc ≈ 120 Oe) at 300 K in the magnetization versus field (M-H) plot of the self-assembled ensembles of diamagnetic Zn-phthalocyanine having peripheral F atoms (ZnFPc; S = 0) and paramagnetic Fe-phthalocyanine having peripehral H atoms (FePc; S = 1). Tauc plot of the self-assembled FePc···ZnFPc ensembles showed an optical band gap of ∼1.05 eV and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) studies suggest semiconducting characteristics in the material. Using DFT+U quantum-chemical calculations, we reveal the origin of such unusual ferromagnetic exchange-interaction in the supramolecular FePc···ZnFPc system.

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-incorporated TiO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Panwar, N; Kashyap, Subhash C; Pandya, D K

    2011-03-01

    Observation of room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in nano-crystalline Co-incorporated titanium dioxide [Ti(1-x)Co(x)O2(x = 0.05)] thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis technique is reported. While only the anatase phase was detected in as-deposited 5 at.% Co-incorporated TiO2 film, a small amount of rutile phase developed following its vacuum annealing. Besides, no X-ray diffraction peak corresponding to cobalt metal could be detected in any of the two films. SQUID magnetometry of both pristine and Co-doped thin films at room temperature elucidated distinct ferromagnetic behavior in 5 at.% Co-incorporated as-deposited film with saturation moment M(s) approximately 5.6 emu/cm3 which got enhanced up to 11.8 emu/cm3 on subsequent vacuum annealing. From the zero field cooled magnetization measurement we confirmed the absence of Co-metal clusters. The electrical resistivity was found to be greater than 108 omega-cm for the films. Based on the magnetic and electrical measurements the origin of RTFM has been attributed to the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model.

  10. Room temperature ferromagnetic ordering in indium substituted nano-nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Sangeeta; Katyal, S. C.; Gupta, A.; Reddy, V. R.; Singh, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nano-nickel-zinc-indium ferrite (NZIFO)(Ni0.58Zn0.42InxFe2-xO4) with varied quantities of indium (x =0,0.1,0.2) have been synthesized via reverse micelle technique. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size, structure, and morphology of the nanoferrites. The addition of indium in nickel-zinc ferrite (NZFO) has been shown to play a crucial role in enhancing the magnetic properties. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra revealed that the nano-NZFO ferrite exhibit collective magnetic excitations, while indium doped NZFO samples have the ferromagnetic phase. The dependence of Mössbauer parameters, viz. isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, linewidth, and hyperfine magnetic field, on In3+ concentration has been studied. Mössbauer study on these nanosystems shows that the cation distribution not only depends on the particle size but also on the preparation route. Mössbauer results are also supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic couplings which makes nano-NZIFO ferrite suitable for magnetic storage data.

  11. Strain induced room temperature ferromagnetism in epitaxial magnesium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Zhenghe; Kim, Ki Wook; Nori, Sudhakar; Lee, Yi-Fang; Narayan, Jagdish; Kumar, D.; Wu, Fan; Prater, J. T.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the epitaxial growth and room-temperature ferromagnetic properties of MgO thin films deposited on hexagonal c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The epitaxial nature of the films has been confirmed by both θ-2θ and φ-scans of X-ray diffraction pattern. Even though bulk MgO is a nonmagnetic insulator, we have found that the MgO films exhibit ferromagnetism and hysteresis loops yielding a maximum saturation magnetization up to 17 emu/cc and large coercivity, H{sub c} = 1200 Oe. We have also found that the saturation magnetization gets enhanced and that the crystallization degraded with decreased growth temperature, suggesting that the origin of our magnetic coupling could be point defects manifested by the strain in the films. X-ray (θ-2θ) diffraction peak shift and strain analysis clearly support the presence of strain in films resulting from the presence of point defects. Based on careful investigations using secondary ion mass spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies, we have ruled out the possibility of the presence of any external magnetic impurities. We discuss the critical role of microstructural characteristics and associated strain on the physical properties of the MgO films and establish a correlation between defects and magnetic properties.

  12. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co defused CdTe nanocrystalline thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Kaleemulla, S.; Begam, M. Rigana

    2014-04-24

    Nanocrystalline Co defused CdTe thin films were prepared using electron beam evaporation technique by depositing CdTe/Co/CdTe stacked layers with different Co thickness onto glass substrate at 373 K followed by annealing at 573K for 2 hrs. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties of of all the Co defused CdTe thin films has been investigated. XRD pattern of all the films exhibited zinc blende structure with <111> preferential orientation without changing the crystal structure of the films. The grain size of the films increased from 31.5 nm to 48.1 nm with the increase of Co layer thickness from 25nm to 100nm. The morphological studies showed that uniform texture of the films and the presence of Co was confirmed by EDAX. Room temperature magnetization curves indicated an improved ferromagnetic behavior in the films with increase of the Co thickness.

  13. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaspal Vashihth, A.; Gill, Pritampal Singh; Verma, N. K.

    2015-06-24

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O (x = 0, 0,10) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the synthesized nanoparticles possess wurtzite phase having hexagonal structure. Morphological analysis was carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) which depicts the spherical morphology of ZnO nanoparticles. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed the presence of Mg in ZnO nanoparticles. Electron spin resonance (ESR) signal was found to be decreasing with increasing of Mg-doping concentration. The room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in undoped and Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles. The increase of Mg-doping concentration resulted in decrease of saturation magnetization value which could be attributed to decrease of oxygen vacancies present in host nanoparticles.

  14. Electronic structure and room temperature ferromagnetism of C doped TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablat, Abduleziz; Wu, Rong; Mamat, Mamatrishat; Ghupur, Yasin; Aimidula, Aimierding; Bake, Muhammad Ali; Gholam, Turghunjan; Wang, Jiaou; Qian, Haijie; Wu, Rui; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-10-01

    C-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a simple hydrothermal synthesis method. After this preparation, a portion of the samples were annealed separately in air on the one hand, and in argon on the other, and another portion remained untreated. The results of X-ray diffraction show that the untreated samples primarily display anatase and rutile structures. However, after annealing, the samples displayed the rutile structure only. The Ti K-edge and L-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure analyses clearly show that C atoms were successfully incorporated into the TiO2 host lattice. All doped samples exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. The saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercive fields (Hc) tend to decrease after the samples are annealed in argon and in air. The maximum Ms of the untreated samples was approximately 0.038 emu/g.

  15. d carrier induced intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism in Nb:TiO2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Han, Y. L.; He, L.; Dou, R. F.; Xiong, C. M.; Nie, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    High crystalline anatase TiO2 and Nb:TiO2 thin films were fabricated on LaAlO3 (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Room temperature ferromagnetism was obtained in Nb:TiO2 but absent in pure TiO2. The Kondo effect and anomalous Hall effect observed in metallic Nb:TiO2 strongly confirmed the existence of exchange interaction between intrinsic local magnetic moments and carriers. High energy resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the Nb:TiO2 thin film revealed clear signals of Ti3+ and Nb4+ ions, which had one unpaired d electron responsible for the local magnetic moments. This result consisted quite well with the spin polarized first principle calculation.

  16. Above room-temperature ferromagnetism of Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. T.; Wadekar, P. V.; Kao, H. S.; Chen, T. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Tu, L. W.; Huang, H. C.; Ho, N. J.

    2014-02-10

    One-dimensional nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductors were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Delta-doping technique was adopted to dope GaN nanorods with Mn. The structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The GaMnN nanorods with a single crystalline structure and with Ga sites substituted by Mn atoms were verified by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, respectively. Secondary phases were not observed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the magnetic hysteresis curves show that the Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods are ferromagnetic above room temperature. The magnetization with magnetic field perpendicular to GaN c-axis saturates easier than the one with field parallel to GaN c-axis.

  17. Room-temperature decay and light reactivation of high-Tc ferromagnetism in an oxide-diluted magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dengyu; Wan, Jianguo; Xu, Guoliang; Lv, Liya; Wu, Yujie; Min, Han; Liu, Junming; Wang, Guanghou

    2006-10-04

    We present a novel route for manipulation of the ferromagnetic order in Co-doped TiO2 using UV laser irradiation. The ferromagnetic order of the nanocrystal films decays with aging in air at room temperature, which can be reactivated and enhanced by UV irradiation, whereas the coercive force reduces with irradiation time. Photoinduced trapped electrons were suggested to induce the ferromagnetic order. We believe that light manipulation is a general method for tuning the magnetic properties of oxide-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, which can find practical applications in future integrated magneto-optical nanoelectronics.

  18. Enhancement of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of rf sputtered Ni-CeO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Ni-doped CeO2 thin films were prepared under Ar+ atmosphere on glass substrates using rf magnetron sputtering. To assess the properties of the prepared thin films, the influence of various amounts of Ni dopant on structural, morphological, optical, vibrational, compositional and magnetic properties of the CeO2 films were studied by using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), photoluminescence (PL), micro-Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD patterns for all the samples revealed the expected CeO2 cubic fluorite-type structure and Ni ions were uniformly distributed in the samples. AFM images of the prepared samples indicate high dense, columnar structure with uniform distribution of CeO2. Room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and micro-Raman spectroscopic studies revealed an increase of oxygen vacancies with higher concentration of Ni in CeO2. XPS results confirm the presence of Ni2p, O1s and Ce and depict that cerium is present as both Ce4+ and Ce3+ oxidation states in Ce1-xNixO2 (x = 15%) thin film. Field dependent magnetization measurements revealed a paramagnetic behavior for pure CeO2, while a ferromagnetic behavior appeared when Ni is doped in CeO2 films. Doping dependent magnetization measurements suggest that the observed ferromagnetism is due to the presence of metallic Ni clusters with nanometric size and broad size distribution.

  19. Intrinsic and extrinsic origins of room temperature ferromagnetism in Ni-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. J.; Zhu, X. Y.; Song, C.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2009-02-01

    The structural, electrical and magnetic properties of Ni-doped ZnO films with different Ni concentrations (x = 0-0.11, x: Ni concentration) and thicknesses (d = 15-330 nm, d: film thickness) prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering have been systematically investigated. The structural characterizations indicate that Ni ions in the 2+ valence state, uniformly distributed in the film, almost substitute for the Zn ions when x <= 0.07, whereas when x increases up to 0.11, a second phase Ni is formed. Room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism (FM) has been observed for all the Ni-doped ZnO wurtzite films. The saturated magnetization varies drastically with the Ni concentration and the film thickness. A large magnetic moment of 2.80 μB/Ni is obtained in the 15 nm thick Zn0.96Ni0.04O film at RT. The results show that the FM observed is intrinsic for Ni-doped ZnO films and can be explained in terms of the bound magnetic polaron mechanism based on the presence of defects. In addition, the Ni precipitates owing to the excessive doping of Ni in ZnO, as an extrinsic origin, also contribute to the ferromagnetic properties in highly doped samples.

  20. Abnormal room temperature ferromagnetism in CuO/ZnO nanocomposites via hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Wei; Li, Ying; Wang, Jianchun; Wu, Ping

    2017-03-01

    CuO/ZnO nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method with different phase ratios. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy results show that the obtained products of nanosheets are composed of small primary particles with an average size of about 20 nm. With the increasing proportion of CuO phase, nanosheets have significant collapse and the amount of small sheets increases obviously. The abnormal room temperature ferromagnetism was discovered at the interface between diamagnetic ZnO and antiferromagnetic CuO, which can be tuned by changing the phase ratios. Optical spectra indicate that the interaction between ZnO and CuO modifies the electronic structure of nanocomposites. XPS results verify the valence change of Cu ions and the presence of oxygen vacancies, which are ultimately responsible for the observed ferromagnetism. The indirect double-exchange model was employed to explain the origin of magnetism. Our study suggests that magnetically functional interfaces exhibit very appealing properties for novel devices.

  1. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, H. S. Chien, P. C.; Chang, Y. Y.; Sun, S. J.; Lee, C. H.

    2014-08-04

    This study provides conclusive evidence of room temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) composites from the spin polarized semiconductor band. These composites are constructed from discontinuous [Co(3 nm)/a-C(d{sub c} nm)]{sub 5} multilayers with d{sub c} = 3 nm and d{sub c} = 6 nm. Only remnant circular dichroism (CD) was observed from the d{sub c} = 3 nm sample but not when d{sub c} = 6 nm. In addition, the remnant CD peaks at 5.5 eV, which is comparable with the absorption peak associated with the C σ-σ* gap transition. We suggest that the possible mechanism for this coupling can be considered as a magnetic proximity effect in which a ferromagnetic moment in the C medium is induced by Co/C interfaces.

  2. Origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in SnO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Bai, Guohua; Jiang, Yinzhu; Du, Youwei; Wu, Chen; Yan, Mi

    2017-03-01

    SnO2 films exhibiting room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) have been prepared on Si (001) by pulsed laser deposition. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the films experiences a decreasing trend followed by increasing with the growth temperature increased from RT to 400 ℃. The growth temperature affects both the concentration and the location of the oxygen vacancies as the origin of the RTFM. With lower growth temperatures (<300 ℃), more oxygen vacancies exist in the inner film for the samples with less crystallinity, resulting in enhanced magnetism. Higher deposition temperature leads to less oxygen vacancies in the inner film but more oxygen defects at the film surface, which is also beneficial to achieve greater magnetism. Various oxygen pressures during growth and post-annealing have also been used to confirm the role of oxygen vacancies. The study demonstrates that the surface oxygen defects and the positively charged monovalent O vacancies (VO+) in the inner film are the origin of the magnetism in SnO2 films.

  3. Search for Origin of Room Temperature Ferromagnetism Properties in Ni-Doped ZnO Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Rana, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Rajput, Parasmani; Jha, Shambhu Nath; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Shirage, Parasharam M

    2017-03-01

    The origin of room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism (FM) in Zn1-xNixO (0< x < 0.125) samples are systematically investigated through physical, optical, and magnetic properties of nanostructure, prepared by simple low-temperature wet chemical method. Reitveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern displays an increase in lattice parameters with strain relaxation and contraction in Zn/O occupancy ratio by means of Ni-doping. Similarly, scanning electron microscope demonstrates modification in the morphology from nanorods to nanoflakes with Ni doping, suggests incorporation of Ni ions in ZnO. More interestingly, XANES (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy) measurements confirm that Ni is being incorporated in ZnO as Ni(2+). EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) analysis reveals that structural disorders near the Zn sites in the ZnO samples upsurges with increasing Ni concentration. Raman spectroscopy exhibits additional defect driven vibrational mode (at 275 cm(-1)), appeared only in Ni-doped samples and the shift with broadening in 580 cm(-1) peak, which manifests the presence of the oxygen vacancy (VO) related defects. Moreover, in photoluminescence (PL) spectra, we have observed a peak at 524 nm, indicating the presence of singly ionized VO(+), which may be activating bound magnetic polarons (BMPs) in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Magnetization measurements indicate weak ferromagnetism at RT, which rises with increasing Ni concentration. It is therefore proposed that the effect of the Ni ions as well as the inherent exchange interactions arising from VO(+) assist to produce BMPs, which are accountable for the RT-FM in Zn1-xNixO (0< x < 0.125) system.

  4. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In-Cr ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkera, Harish Sharma; Singh, Inderdeep; Kaur, Davinder

    2017-02-01

    The influence of Cr substitution for In on the martensitic phase transformation and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been investigated in Ni-Mn-Cr-In ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) thin films fabricated by magnetron sputtering. Temperature dependent magnetization (M-T) measurements demonstrated that the martensitic transformation temperatures (TM) monotonously increase with the increase of Cr content due to change in valence electron concentration (e/a) and cell volume. From the study of isothermal magnetization curves (M-H), magnetocaloric effect around the martensitic transformation has been investigated in these FSMA thin films. The magnetic entropy change ∆SM of 7.0 mJ/cm3-K was observed in Ni51.1Mn34.9In9.5Cr4.5 film at 302 K in an applied field of 2 T. Further, the refrigerant capacity (RC) was also calculated for all the films in an applied field of 2 T. These findings indicate that the Cr doped Ni-Mn-In FSMA thin films are potential candidates for room temperature micro-length-scale magnetic refrigeration applications.

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in nanocrystalline Ni-doped ZnO synthesized by co-precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hilo, M.; Dakhel, A. A.; Ali-Mohamed, A. Y.

    2009-07-01

    Ni-doped ZnO powder was synthesized by thermal co-decomposition of a mixture of bis(acetylacetonato) zinc(II)hydrate and bis(dimethylglyoximato)nickel(II) complexes. The samples were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and FT-IR spectroscopy. The atomic ratio Ni/Zn of the samples was determined by the EDXRF method to be 1%, 4.3%, 7.4% and 22.5 wt%. The XRD studies show the formation of nanocrystalline (14-18 nm) of Ni-doped ZnO along with nanoparticles of NiO. By magnetic measurements, it was observed that powder contains 1%Ni, 4.3%Ni, 7.4%Ni exhibits superparamagnetic behaviour while the sample of 22.5%Ni prepared in closed atmospheric environment shows clear ferromagnetic (FM) loop at room temperature due to the formation of solid solution Zn 1-xNi xO.

  6. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn doped ZnO: Co nanoparticles by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhanivelu, V.; Selvadurai, A. Paul Blessington; Zhao, Yongsheng; Thiyagarajan, R.; Murugaraj, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this present work, the Mn2+ and Co2+ ions doping and co-doping effect on the structural, vibrational, morphological, optical and magnetic behaviors of ZnO based dilute magnetic semiconductors are reported. The Zn0.95Co0.05O (ZC), Zn0.95Mn0.05O (ZM) and Zn0.90Co0.05Mn0.05O (ZCM) samples were prepared by co-precipitation method. From the XRD analysis, it was observed that on the doping of Mn2+ ion in ZnO matrix, decreases their crystalline nature as well as the crystallite size significantly. The Raman spectra, Photoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the presence of defects in prepared samples. The UV-DRS spectroscopic exhibits the incorporation of dopant ions and their effect on the band gap subsequently. The magnetization measurements suggest the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in the prepared samples. The observed RTFM phenomenon was discussed based on the defects and grain confinement.

  7. Structural, optical and room-temperature ferromagnetic properties of Fe-doped CuO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed Basith, N.; Judith Vijaya, J.; John Kennedy, L.; Bououdina, M.

    2013-09-01

    Pure CuO and Fe-doped CuO nanostructures with different weight ratios (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 at wt% of Fe) were synthesized via the microwave combustion method. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD patterns refined by the Rietveld method indicated the formation of single-phase monoclinic structure and also confirmed that Fe ions successfully incorporated into CuO crystal lattice by occupying Cu ionic sites. Interestingly, the morphology was found to change considerably from nanoflowers to nano-rod and disk-shaped then to nanoparticles with the variation of Fe content. The optical band gap calculated using DRS was found to be 2.8 eV for pure CuO and increases up to 3.4 eV with increasing ‘Fe’ content. Photoluminescence measurements also confirm these results. The magnetic measurements indicated that the obtained nanostructures are found to be room temperature ferromagnetism (RTF) with an optimum value of saturation magnetization at 2.0 wt% of Fe-doped CuO, i.e. 1.2960×10-3 emu/g.

  8. Ferromagnetism at room temperature with a large magnetic moment in anatase V-doped TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nguyen Hoa; Sakai, Joe; Hassini, Awatef

    2004-04-01

    V-doped TiO2 thin films were grown by laser ablation on LaAlO3 substrates. In the chosen range of the growth conditions, all V:TiO2 films have an anatase structure and exhibit semiconducting and ferromagnetic behaviors at room temperature. V:TiO2 films have a giant magnetic moment and they seem to be far better ferromagnetic than Co/Fe/Ni-doped TiO2 films. This study has proved that a few percent of V substituting for Ti in TiO2 can result in a potential diluted magnetic semiconductor.

  9. Extrinsic origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped ZnO annealed in Zn vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guoqing; Xuan, Haicheng

    2011-08-01

    Co-doped ZnO and CoO were prepared at 950 °C by the solid-state reaction method, then were annealed in N2 flow at 950 °C, and finally annealed in Zn vapor at 600 °C or 800 °C. The samples before annealing in Zn vapor have no ferromagnetism, but after annealing in Zn vapor, Co-doped ZnO and CoO both exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism. Through x-ray diffraction and element composition measurements, it was found that the ferromagnetism of Co-doped ZnO annealed in Zn vapor is extrinsic and comes from cubic Co5Zn21 and/or cubic CoZn.

  10. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism of FeCo-Codoped ZnO Nanorods Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Liu, J.; West, A.; Yan, Y.; Yu, M.; Zhou, W.

    2008-11-01

    FeCo-codoped ZnO nanorods with room temperature ferromagnetic ordering have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Detailed nanostructures were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoprobe X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The ZnO nanorods were grown along c-axis of a single crystalline wurtzite structure and no second phase was observed by high resolution TEM. EDS analysis along the nanowires indicated that Co and Fe were successfully doped into the ZnO lattice with concentrations about 0.6-1.0 at.%. Magnetic measurement demonstrates a ferromagnetic ordering with Curie temperature higher than 300 K presents in the ZnO nanorods.

  11. Electrodeposition and room temperature ferromagnetic anisotropy of Co and Ni-doped ZnO nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.B.; Gibson, U.J.

    2005-09-26

    Cobalt and nickel doped ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized by an electrochemical process at a temperature of 90 deg. C. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction show that the dopants are incorporated into the wurtzite-structure ZnO. Anisotropic ferromagnetism with an easy direction of magnetization either perpendicular or parallel to the wire axis, depending on the wire geometry and density, was observed in 1.7% Co and 2.2% Ni-doped ZnO nanowires at room temperature. The anisotropic magnetism was explained in terms of a competition between self-demagnetization and magnetostatic coupling among the nanowires.

  12. Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Litzius, Kai; Krüger, Benjamin; Im, Mi-Young; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Mann, Maxwell; Krone, Andrea; Reeve, Robert M.; Weigand, Markus; Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Fischer, Peter; Kläui, Mathias; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit fascinating physical behaviours and large potential in highly energy-efficient spintronic device applications. The main obstacles so far are that skyrmions have been observed in only a few exotic materials and at low temperatures, and fast current-driven motion of individual skyrmions has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the observation of stable magnetic skyrmions at room temperature in ultrathin transition metal ferromagnets with magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy. We demonstrate the ability to generate stable skyrmion lattices and drive trains of individual skyrmions by short current pulses along a magnetic racetrack at speeds exceeding 100 m s-1 as required for applications. Our findings provide experimental evidence of recent predictions and open the door to room-temperature skyrmion spintronics in robust thin-film heterostructures.

  13. Structural and room temperature ferromagnetic properties of Ni doped ZnO nanoparticles via low-temperature hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Changzhen; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Xiuling; Liu, Jie

    2016-12-01

    A series of Zn1-xNixO (x=0, 1%, 3%, 5%) nanoparticles have been synthesized via a low-temperature hydrothermal method. Influence of Ni doping concentration on the structure, morphology, optical properties and magnetism of the samples was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometer and vibrating sample magnetometer instruments. The results show that the undoped and doped ZnO nanoparticles are both hexagonal wurtzite structures. The surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The images of SEM reveal that the structure of pure ZnO and Ni doped samples are nanoparticles which intended to form flakes with thickness of few nanometers, being overlain with each one to develop the network with some pores and voids. Based on the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy analysis, it indicates that the band gap energy decreases with the increasing concentration of Ni. Furthermore, The Ni doped ZnO samples didn't exhibit higher ultraviolet-light-driven photocatalytic activity compared to the undoped ZnO sample. Vibrating sample magnetometer was used for the magnetic property investigations, and the result indicates that room temperature ferromagnetism property of 3% Ni doped sample is attributed to oxygen vacancy and interaction between doped ions.

  14. Phase-transfer induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in 1T@2H-MoSe2 nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Baorui; Wang, Tongtong; Xiao, Wen; Zhang, Rongfang; Liu, Peitao; Ding, Jun; Gao, Daqiang; Xue, Desheng

    2017-01-01

    Manipulating electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional transitional-metal dichalcogenides has raised a lot of attention recently. Herein we report the synthesis and ferromagnetic properties of phase-transfer induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in 1 T@2H-MoSe2 nanosheets. Experimental results indicate the saturated magnetization of the 1 T@2H-MoSe2 compound increases first and then decreases as the increasing of 1 T-MoSe2 phase, where 65.58% 1 T-MoSe2 phase incorporation in 2H-MoSe2 could enhance the saturated magnetization from 0.32 memu/g to 8.36 memu/g. Besides, obvious magnetoresistance behaviors are observed in these samples, revealing their potential applications in future spintronics. PMID:28349939

  15. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co and Nb co-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, M.; Mori, K.; Hyodo, K.; Morimoto, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Ichiyanagi, Y.

    2015-02-27

    Co- and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles encapsulated with amorphous SiO{sub 2} were synthesized by our novel preparation method. An anatase TiO{sub 2} single-phase structure was confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The particle size could be controlled to be about 5 nm. The composition of these nanoparticles was investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra showed that the Ti{sup 4+} and Co{sup 2+} states were dominant in our prepared samples. A reduction in the coordination number was also confirmed. The dependence of the electrical conductivity on the frequency was measured by an LCR meter, and the carrier concentration was determined. The magnetization curves for the nanoparticles indicated ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. We concluded that the ferromagnetism originated in oxygen vacancies around the transition metal ions.

  16. Room temperature p-type conductivity and coexistence of ferroelectric order in ferromagnetic Li doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, Saif Ullah E-mail: ullahphy@gmail.com; Hasanain, S. K.; Anjum, D. H.; Awan, M. S.; Shah, Saqlain A.

    2014-10-28

    Memory and switching devices acquired new materials which exhibit ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order simultaneously. We reported multiferroic behavior in Zn{sub 1−y}Li{sub y}O(0.00≤y≤0.10) nanoparticles. The analysis of transmission electron micrographs confirmed the hexagonal morphology and wurtzite crystalline structure. We investigated p-type conductivity in doped samples and measured hole carriers in range 2.4 × 10{sup 17}/cc to 7.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc for different Li contents. We found that hole carriers are responsible for long range order ferromagnetic coupling in Li doped samples. Room temperature ferroelectric hysteresis loops were observed in 8% and 10% Li doped samples. We demonstrated ferroelectric coercivity (remnant polarization) 2.5 kV/cm (0.11 μC/cm{sup 2}) and 2.8 kV/cm (0.15 μC/cm{sup 2}) for y = 0.08 and y = 0.10 samples. We propose that the mechanism of Li induced ferroelectricity in ZnO is due to indirect dipole interaction via hole carriers. We investigated that if the sample has hole carriers ≥5.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc, they can mediate the ferroelectricity. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic measurements showed that higher electric polarization and larger magnetic moment is attained when the hole concentration is larger and vice versa. Our results confirmed the hole dependent coexistence of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric behavior at room temperature, which provide potential applications for switchable and memory devices.

  17. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Eu-doped ZnO nanoparticulate powders prepared by combustion reaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Pessoni, H. V. S.; Soares, M. P.

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticulate powders of Eu-doped ZnO with 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 at% Eu were synthesized by combustion reaction method using zinc nitrate, europium nitrate and urea as fuel without subsequent heat treatments. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) of all samples showed broad peaks consistent with the ZnO wurtzite structure. The absence of extra reflections in the diffraction patterns ensures the phase purity, except for x=0.03 that exhibits small reflection corresponding to Eu2O3 phase. The average crystallite size determined from the most prominent (1 0 1) peak of the diffraction using Scherrer's equation was in good agreement with those determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); being ~26 nm. The magnetic properties measurements were performed using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in magnetic fields up to 2.0 kOe at room temperature. The hysteresis loops, typical of magnetic behaviors, indicating that the presence of an ordered magnetic structure can exist in the Eu-doped ZnO wurtzite structure at room temperature. The room temperature ferromagnetism behavior increases with the Eu3+ doping concentration. All samples exhibited the same Curie temperature (TC) around ~726 K, except for x=0.01; TC~643 K. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed defects/strain in the lattice and grain boundaries of Eu-doped ZnO nanoparticulate powders. The origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in Eu-doped ZnO nanoparticulate powders was discussed in terms of these defects, which increase with the Eu3+ doping concentration.

  18. Ferromagnetism at room temperature in La{endash}Ba{endash}Ca{endash}Mn{endash}O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Nguyen Hoa; Sakai, Joe; Imai, Syozo

    2001-06-01

    The effects of substitution of Ca by Ba in La{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) with x{lt}0.5 were investigated systematically in order to clarify the role of the size of the A cations. As for the La{sub 1{minus}x}(Ba{endash}Ca){sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LBCMO) films of ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) region (x=0.2; 0.3; and 0.4), by doping Ba, the ferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub C}) and the insulator-to-metal (IM) transition temperature (T{sub IM}) were improved about 30{endash}60 K, compared with those of LCMO thin films with the same ratio of Mn{sup 3+}:Mn{sup 4+}. Especially, La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.1}Ca{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} thin films have an anomalously high T{sub C} (about room temperature) and a T{sub IM} of 275 K under zero field. In the ferromagnetic insulating (FMI) region (x=0.15; 0.1), the Ba doping enables the IM transition and remarkably heightens the T{sub C} as well. The phase diagram shows that in the slightly doped region (x{lt}0.5), Ba doping has made the FMM phase significantly expanded. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Defect-mediated room temperature ferromagnetism in vanadium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Han; Nori, Sudhakar; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish

    2009-09-01

    High quality epitaxial undoped vanadium oxide (VO2) thin films on c-plane sapphire (0001) substrate have been grown using pulsed laser deposition technique. The as-grown films exhibited excellent structural and transport properties without requiring further annealing treatments for these oxygen-deficient oxide films. The epitaxial growth has been achieved via domain matching epitaxy, where matching of integral multiples of planes occurs across the film-substrate interface. The magnetic properties of vanadium oxide (VO2) films investigated at different temperatures in the range of 10-360 K showed significant magnetic hysteresis as well as saturation of the magnetic moment. The origin of ferromagnetic properties with an estimated Curie temperature above 500 K is discussed in the absence of magnetic impurities in VO2 thin films as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Origin of ferromagnetism and oxygen-vacancy ordering induced cross-controlled magnetoelectric effects at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. K.; Zou, T.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Q. H.; Sun, Y.; Gu, L.; Hirata, A.; Chen, M. W.; Yao, Y.; Jin, C. Q.; Yu, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    In dilute magnetic oxide hexagonal Ba(Ti0.9Fe0.1)O2.81 bulk ceramic, we report on combined ferromagnetism and improper ferroelectricity as well as cross-controlled magnetoelectric effects at room temperature. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging technique in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) demonstrates an oxygen vacancy ordering in the hexagonal closest-packed Ba1-O1 layers and severe distortion of the octahedra and pyramids. Strong dependencies of the susceptibility on temperature and magnetic field as well as the frequency dependence of magnetization under an ac electric field reveal that the intrinsic ferromagnetism of the highly insulating system dynamically evolves from a paramagnetic ground state, and dynamic exchanges of trapped electrons in the ordered polarons are attributed to the ferromagnetic interaction. Accordingly, aided by the motion of oxygen vacancies, responses of the trapped electrons to the ac magnetic field result in the reversal of magnetically induced voltages between high and low states. Our results not only expand our understanding on the magnetoelectric coupling mechanism, but also provide a grand opportunity toward designing novel multiferroic materials through introducing ordered point defects into a centrosymmetric matrix.

  1. Room temperature insulating ferromagnetism induced by charge transfer in ultrathin (110) La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Zhiyong; Wu, Biao; Zhang, Fei; Zhou, Guowei; Zang, Julu; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    The achievement of high temperature ferromagnetism in perovskite manganites has proved both fundamentally and technologically important for spintronics devices. However, high operating temperatures have not been achieved due to the depression of the Curie temperature and the rapid spin filtering efficiency loss, which are the main obstacles for practical applications. Here, we report unexpected room temperature insulating ferromagnetism in ultrathin (110) oriented La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) films. The relationships between room temperature ferromagnetism, charge transfer, and orbital occupancy are investigated, with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray linear dichroism (XLD) measurements. Our results suggest that the room temperature insulating ferromagnetism is originated from super-exchange interaction between Mn2+ and Mn3+. The formation of Mn2+ ions is related to the charge transfer induced by oxygen vacancies. Moreover, a preferential orbital occupancy of eg(3z2-r2) in Mn3+ ions is crucial to the in-plane super-exchange coupling in ultrathin (110) LSMO films, resulting in insulating ferromagnetic behavior. This work may lead to the development of barrier materials in spin filter tunnel junctions and understanding of ferromagnetic coupling in insulating perovskite films.

  2. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  3. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    DOE PAGES

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a highmore » temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.« less

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in Nd-doped In2O3 dilute magnetic semiconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhanpeng; Zhang, Junran; Niu, Wei; Zhang, Minhao; Song, Li; Zhu, Hairong; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Nd-doped In2O3 nanowires were fabricated by an Au-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition method. Nd atoms were successfully doped into the In2O3 host lattice structure, as revealed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Nd-doped In2O3 nanowires, which was attributed to the long-range-mediated magnetization among Nd3+-vacancy complexes through percolation-bound magnetic polarons. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274003), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China.

  5. Room-temperature electronically-controlled ferromagnetism at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Bark, Chung-Wung; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2014-09-01

    Reports of emergent conductivity, superconductivity and magnetism have helped to fuel intense interest in the rich physics and technological potential of complex-oxide interfaces. Here we employ magnetic force microscopy to search for room-temperature magnetism in the well-studied LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system. Using electrical top gating to control the electron density at the oxide interface, we directly observe the emergence of an in-plane ferromagnetic phase as electrons are depleted from the interface. Itinerant electrons that are reintroduced into the interface align antiferromagnetically with the magnetization at first screening and then destabilizing it as the conductive regime is approached. Repeated cycling of the gate voltage results in new, uncorrelated magnetic patterns. This newfound control over emergent magnetism at the interface between two non-magnetic oxides portends a number of important technological applications.

  6. Room-temperature electronically-controlled ferromagnetism at the LaAlO₃/SrTiO₃ interface.

    PubMed

    Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Bark, Chung-Wung; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2014-09-25

    Reports of emergent conductivity, superconductivity and magnetism have helped to fuel intense interest in the rich physics and technological potential of complex-oxide interfaces. Here we employ magnetic force microscopy to search for room-temperature magnetism in the well-studied LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system. Using electrical top gating to control the electron density at the oxide interface, we directly observe the emergence of an in-plane ferromagnetic phase as electrons are depleted from the interface. Itinerant electrons that are reintroduced into the interface align antiferromagnetically with the magnetization at first screening and then destabilizing it as the conductive regime is approached. Repeated cycling of the gate voltage results in new, uncorrelated magnetic patterns. This newfound control over emergent magnetism at the interface between two non-magnetic oxides portends a number of important technological applications.

  7. Room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N. Sai; Kaleemulla, S. Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.; Begam, M. Rigana; Amarendra, G.

    2015-06-24

    Undoped and Ni (5 at.%) doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were deposited on glass substrate using electron beam evaporation technique and Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were annealed at 450 oC. A systematic study was carried out on the structural, chemical and magnetic properties of the as deposited and annealed thin films. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that all the films were cubic in structure and exhibied ferromagnetism at room temperature. The undoped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films exhibited a saturation magnetization of 24.01 emu/cm3. Ni doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films annealed at 450 oC showed a saturation magnetization of 53.81 emu/cm3.

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si achieved by controlling atomic structure, Cr concentration, and carrier densities: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xin-Yuan; Yang, Zhong-Qin; Zhu, Yan; Li, Yun

    2015-04-28

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigated how to achieve a strong ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si by controlling the atomic structure and Cr concentration as well as carrier densities. We found that the configuration in which the Cr atom occupies the tetrahedral interstitial site can exist stably and the Cr atom has a large magnetic moment. Using this doping configuration, room-temperature ferromagnetism can be achieved in both n-type and p-type Si by tuning Cr concentration and carrier densities. The results indicate that the carrier density plays a crucial role in realizing strong ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  9. Giant electric field modulation of double exchange ferromagnetism at room temperature in the perovskite manganite/titanate p-n junction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Zhang, Jun; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-01-14

    We report on the electrical modulation of double exchange ferromagnetism at room temperature in hole-doped manganites of a metal oxide p-n junction. In this (La0.9Ba0.1)MnO(3)/Nb doped SrTiO3 p-n junction, the temperature dependence of the junction resistance shows a metal-insulator transition whose temperature, corresponding to that of ferromagnetic transition, is hugely modulated from 290 to 340 K by a bias voltage increasing from +1.0 to +1.8 V. The magnetoresistance can also be modulated electrically.

  10. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composites at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO3. The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3 is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO3/paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance.

  11. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  12. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-06-10

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  13. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  14. Defect mediated room temperature ferromagnetism and resistance minima study in epitaxial ZnGa0.002Al0.02O transparent conducting oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, Namik K.; Nori, Sudhakar; Kumar, D.; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    We report on the micro-structural, transport, optical and magnetic properties in ZnGa0.002Al0.02O (AGZO) films grown by pulsed laser deposition under different growth conditions. AGZO films grown at substrate temperatures of 600 °C show metal-like behavior with a resistivity minima at lower temperatures, whereas films grown at 300 °C and ambient oxygen partial pressure of 1 mTorr show metallic nature with resistivity values on the order of 100 µΩ · cm at room temperature. The most interesting features are the concomitant occurrence of high temperature resistivity minima and room temperature ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetic moment of 1000 A m-1 and with coercivity in the range 100-240 Oe. The temperature dependent resistivity data has been interpreted in the light of quantum corrections to conductivity in disordered systems, suggesting that the e-e interactions is the dominant mechanism in the weak-localization (WL) limit in the case of films showing resisitivity minima. The simultaneous ferromagnetic ordering coupled with the enhancements in electrical conductivity in AGZO system should have their origin in native point defects in the form of oxygen and zinc vacancies and interstitials and their complexes. We propose that formation of oxygen vacancy-zinc interstitial defect complex (V O-I Zn) is responsible for the enhancement in n-type conductivity, and zinc vacancies (V Zn) for the observed room temperature ferromagnetism.

  15. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence behavior of Cu-doped ZnO co-doped with Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, M.; Muthukumaran, S.

    2015-05-01

    Cu, Mn co-doped ZnO nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the sol-gel technique. XRD pattern described that Mn-doping did not affect the hexagonal wurtzite structure of the samples and no secondary phases were found. The reduced crystallite size at Mn=2% is due to the suppression of grain surface growth by foreign impurity. The enhancement of crystal size after Mn=2% is due to the expansion of lattice volume produced by the distortion around the dopant ion. The better dielectric constant and conductivity noticed at Mn=2% are explained by charge carrier density and crystallite size. The suppression of broad UV band by Mn-doping is discussed based on the generation of non-radiative recombination centers. Hysteresis loop showed the clear room temperature ferromagnetism in all the samples and the magnetization increased with Mn-doping. Better electrical and magnetic behavior of Zn0.94Cu0.04Mn0.02O sample is suggested for effective opto-magnetic devices.

  16. Effect of Cu doping on room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of Mn doped LiNbO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Dechong; Fu, Yuting; Sun, Ning; Li, Chunjing; Li, Yanghua; An, Yukai; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-11-01

    Cu and Mn co-doped LiNbO3 films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by rf-magnetron sputtering. XRD shows a randomly oriented polycrystalline R3C structure of LiNbO3 was formed in the films annealed at 1000 °C for 1 h in air. XPS and XAFS determine that Mn2+ substitutes on the Li site with a Li vacancy and Cu2+ substitutes on the Nb site with an oxygen vacancy in the LiNbO3 lattice. SQUID measurements indicate that all the films exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism, attributed to a strong d-d electron interaction between Mn and Nb and the bound magnetic polarons resulting from the oxygen vacancies. The saturated magnetization increases but the atom magnetic moment decreases with increasing Cu content in the films. The drop of the atom magnetic moment may arise from the antiferromagnetic coupling among adjacent Cu ions and an antiparallel configuration between Cu2+ ions and their trapped electrons.

  17. Thermal ionization induced metal-semiconductor transition and room temperature ferromagnetism in trivalent doped ZnO codoped with lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagamasundari, A.; Chandrasekar, S.; Pugaze, R.; Kannan, R.; Rajagopan, S.

    2014-03-07

    Thermal ionization induced metallic to semiconductor (MST) transition occurring at 460 K for Zn{sub 0.97}Al{sub 0.03}O, 463 K for Zn{sub 0.94}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}O, and 503 K for Zn{sub 0.91}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}Mn{sub 0.03}O has been found in the sol-gel synthesized (using hexamethylenetetramine), trivalent doped (Al, Mn) ZnO codoped with lithium. Increase in the thermally ionized carrier concentration due to Al doping is responsible for near band edge (NBE) peak shift causing Fermi level to move into conduction band making it metallic consistent with resistivity results. Free carrier (thermally activated) neutralization with ionized donor is responsible for semiconducting nature, which is supported from the free carrier screening produced energy shift in the NBE of photoluminescence peak. Furthermore, independently band gap shrinkage is also obtained from UV-Visible studies confirming localization induced MST. An anti-correlation is found between defect density (DLE) and room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) indicating intrinsic defects are not directly responsible for RTFM.

  18. Role of donor defects in stabilizing room temperature ferromagnetism in (Mn, Co) co-doped ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Naeem, M; Hasanain, S K

    2012-06-20

    We report the effects of co-doping ZnO with Co and Mn in an n-type environment on ferromagnetism (FM). Two sets of samples, Zn(0.95-x)Co(0.04)Mn(x)O (0.000 ≤ x ≤ 0.02) and Zn(0.95-y)Co(y)Mn(0.04)O (0.000 ≤ y ≤ 0.02), were synthesized by the chemical route with oxygen vacancies introduced via annealing in a forming gas (reducing the atmosphere). In addition to the magnetization, the particles were characterized by x-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near-edge emission spectroscopy. The Co and Mn ions were determined to be in the + 2 state in a tetrahedral symmetry, with no evidence of metallic Co or Mn. We find that while a purely Mn-doped sample exhibits weak FM at room temperature, the general effect of Mn as a co-dopant with Co, in an n-type environment, is to decrease the moment strongly. All of our results can be systematically explained within the context of defect mediated FM in these wide bandgap semiconductors, where the coincidence of the spin-split-impurity (defect) band states and the 3d states leads to the development of a net moment alongside the formation of spin polarons.

  19. Room-Temperature Electronically-Controlled Ferromagnetism at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Bark, Chung-Wung; Ryu, Sangwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2014-03-01

    Reports of emergent conductivity, superconductivity, and magnetism at oxide interfaces have helped to fuel intense interest in their rich physics and technological potential. We employ magnetic force microscopy to search for room-temperature magnetism in the well-studied LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system.[2] Using electrical top gating to deplete electrons from the oxide interface, we directly observe an in-plane ferromagnetic phase with sharply defined domain walls. Itinerant electrons, introduced by a top gate, align antiferromagnetically with the magnetization, at first screening and then destabilizing it as the conductive state is reached. Subsequent depletion of electrons results in a new, uncorrelated magnetic pattern. This newfound control over emergent magnetism at the interface between two non-magnetic oxides portends a number of important technological applications. We gratefully acknowledge support for this work from ARO MURI W911NF-08-1-0317 (JL), AFOSR MURI FA9550-10-1-0524 (CBE, JL) FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE), and grants from the National Science Foundation DMR-1104191 (JL), DMR-1124131 (CBE, JL), DMR-1234096(CBE).

  20. Preparation of Fe-doped TiO2 nanotube arrays and their room-temperature ferromagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianli; Liu, Chao; Shen, Weidong; Cao, Chunlan; Song, Sihong

    2014-08-01

    Fe-doped titania nanotube arrays (NTs) were fabricated by electrochemical anodization on a Ti foil using Fe(NO3)3 · 2H2O as iron source. Their morphology, structure and optical properties were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The UV-visible reflection spectrum of the Fe-doped TiO2 NTs showed a red shift in wavelength of absorption and greater reflectivity compared with the undoped sample due to the Fe ion incorportion in TiO2 lattices. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Fe-doped TiO2 NTs shows two strong new peaks centered at 388 nm and 694 nm, besides the UV emission peak owing to the electronic transition mediated by the defect levels such as oxygen vacancies in the band gap. The magnetic property of the Fe-doped TiO2 NTs exhibits a room temperature ferromagnetic characteristic with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 0.146 x 10(-2) emu/cm3 and a coercive field of 60 Oe. And the cause of the magnetic properties has been discussed in detail.

  1. Synthesis aspects, structural, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and room temperature ferromagnetism of zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakila, K.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of complex compound of zinc iodide with thiocarbamide by slow evaporation method. The single crystal XRD study reveals that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group and powder XRD analysis shows that the perfect crystalline nature of the crystal. The presence of functional group and element were confirmed from FT-IR and EDAX analysis. Optical absorbance of the grown crystal was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical constants were calculated from the optical absorbance data such as refractive index (n), extinction coefficient (K) and reflectance (R). The optical band gap (Eg) of thiocarbamide zinc iodide crystal is 4.22 eV. The magnetic properties of grown crystal have been determined by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM). Room temperature magnetization revealed a ferromagnetic behaviour for the grown crystal. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by well diffusion method and MIC method against the standard bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and against fungus like Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus sps and Penicillium sps. Thermal behaviour of the crystal has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA).

  2. Post-annealing effect on the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yu-Min Kuang, Chein-Hsiun; Han, Tai-Chun; Yu, Chin-Chung; Li, Sih-Sian

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we investigated the structural and magnetic properties of both as-deposited and post-annealed Cu-doped ZnO thin films for better understanding the possible mechanisms of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) in ZnO-based diluted magnetic oxides. All of the films have a c-axis-oriented wurtzite structure and display RT-FM. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the incorporated Cu ions in as-deposited films are in 1+ valence state merely, while an additional 2+ valence state occurs in post-annealed films. The presence of Cu{sup 2+} state in post-annealed film accompanies a higher magnetization value than that of as-deposited film and, in particular, the magnetization curves at 10 K and 300 K of the post-annealed film separate distinctly. Since Cu{sup 1+} ion has a filled 3d band, the RT-FM in as-deposited Cu-doped ZnO thin films may stem solely from intrinsic defects, while that in post-annealed films is enhanced due to the presence of CuO crystallites.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Ist group elements codoped ZnO:Fe nanoparticles by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhanivelu, V.; Paul Blessington Selvadurai, A.; Kannan, R.; Murugaraj, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the structural, vibrational and magnetic behavior of Ist group elements (Li+, Na+ and K+) codoping effect in ZnO:Fe nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by co-precipitation method. The single crystalline phase of the prepared NPs was identified as Wurtizite structure and the Raman spectra expressed the local structural change and the presence of complex lattice defects such as Zinc interstitial (Zni) and Oxygen vacanvy (V+o) defects in the NPs. The presence of functional groups was confirmed by FT-IR spectral analysis. The optical absorption properties of the prepared NPs were characterised by UV-Drs spectroscopy. The valance state of Zinc ions and the role of Oxygen related defects were analysed from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral line illustrated the presence of complex defects such as Zinc interstitial (Zni) and oxygen vacancy (V+o) defects in the sample. The observed room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in the prepared sample was induced by lattice defects. The observed results are discussed and reported.

  4. Thermal ionization induced metal-semiconductor transition and room temperature ferromagnetism in trivalent doped ZnO codoped with lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivagamasundari, A.; Chandrasekar, S.; Pugaze, R.; Rajagopan, S.; Kannan, R.

    2014-03-01

    Thermal ionization induced metallic to semiconductor (MST) transition occurring at 460 K for Zn0.97Al0.03O, 463 K for Zn0.94Al0.03Li0.03O, and 503 K for Zn0.91Al0.03Li0.03Mn0.03O has been found in the sol-gel synthesized (using hexamethylenetetramine), trivalent doped (Al, Mn) ZnO codoped with lithium. Increase in the thermally ionized carrier concentration due to Al doping is responsible for near band edge (NBE) peak shift causing Fermi level to move into conduction band making it metallic consistent with resistivity results. Free carrier (thermally activated) neutralization with ionized donor is responsible for semiconducting nature, which is supported from the free carrier screening produced energy shift in the NBE of photoluminescence peak. Furthermore, independently band gap shrinkage is also obtained from UV-Visible studies confirming localization induced MST. An anti-correlation is found between defect density (DLE) and room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) indicating intrinsic defects are not directly responsible for RTFM.

  5. Origin of Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Cr-Doped Lead-Free Ferroelectric Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, L. T. H.; Doan, N. B.; Dung, N. Q.; Cuong, L. V.; Bac, L. H.; Duc, N. A.; Bao, P. Q.; Dung, D. D.

    2017-01-01

    The development of multiferroic materials based on lead-free ferroelectric material provides an opportunity to fabricate next-generation electronic devices. In this work, Cr-doped lead-free ferroelectric Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 materials were synthesized by using the sol-gel method. The optical band gap was reduced from 3.12 eV to 2.12 eV for undoped and 9 mol.% Cr-doped Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 with the substitution of Cr at the Ti-site. Cr-doped Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 materials exhibited weak ferromagnetism at room temperature. Saturation magnetization was approximately 0.08 μ B/Cr at 5 K. Our work will facilitate the further understanding of the role of transition metal ferromagnetism in lead-free ferroelectric materials at room temperature.

  6. Room temperature ferromagnetism in conducting α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Akaiwa, K.; Kaneko, K.; Fujita, S.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.

    2015-02-09

    We have studied electronic transport and magnetic properties of α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy films. Temperature dependence of resistivity of the films showed semiconducting behavior of conductivity. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed. Relatively high coercive fields indicated that observed ferromagnetism in α-(In{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} films were not arisen from magnetic metallic iron nano-precipitates. Remanence measurement revealed the Curie temperature of 520 K and 620 K for α-(In{sub 0.52}Fe{sub 0.48}){sub 2}O{sub 3} and α-(In{sub 0.23}Fe{sub 0.77}){sub 2}O{sub 3} films, corresponding to a weakening of superexchange interactions in these alloys (with less magnetic iron cations) with respect to canted antiferromagnet α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Nevertheless, Curie temperatures remain much higher than 300 K, and semiconducting behavior with low activation energy in resistivity for middle composition alloy, exhibiting combined multi-functionality of room ferromagnetism and semiconducting properties, in corundum alloys such as α-(Ga{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} or α-Fe{sub 2−x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}.

  7. Room-temperature extraction of spin lifetimes in metallic thin films via determination of the spin-pumping contribution to damping in ferromagnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Carl; Schoen, Martin; Shaw, Justin; Nembach, Hans; Silva, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Recent room-temperature measurements yield spin diffusion lengths for Pt and Pd that are smaller than the bulk electron mean free path at room temperature. One proposed explanation is the thickness-dependence of conductivity that results in shorter momentum lifetimes at small Pt/Pd thicknesses. We measured spin transport properties in Pd and Pt thin films at room temperature via fitting of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) damping vs. NM thickness with the spin pumping model for ferromagnet (FM)/normal metal (NM) multilayers. We use a broadband, perpendicular FMR system to obtain high-precision values for the damping. The fits are based upon spin diffusion equations that include both momentum and spin scattering processes. By measuring thickness-dependent conductivity of the same films, we correlate the charge and spin transport parameters, permitting us to test multiple models for spin scattering. We explicitly show that the spin scattering time τsf must be shorter than the momentum scattering time tau over some range of NM thicknesses to adequately fit the data. Invocation of a simple monotonic proportionality between τsf and τ fails to fit the data. However, an inverse proportionality τ ~ 1 /τsf can fit the data, and τ <τsf for sufficiently thin NM layer.

  8. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism of Cu-Doped ZnO Films Probed by Soft X-Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Herng, T.S.; Ku, W.; Qi, D.-C.; Berlijn, T.; Yi, J.B.; Yang, K.S.; Dai, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Santoso, I.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Gao, X.Y.; Wee, A.T.S.; Ding, J.; Rusydi, A.

    2010-11-08

    We report direct evidence of room-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in O-deficient ZnO:Cu films by using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption. Our measurements have revealed unambiguously two distinct features of Cu atoms associated with (i) magnetically ordered Cu ions present only in the oxygen-deficient samples and (ii) magnetically disordered regular Cu{sup 2+} ions present in all the samples. We find that a sufficient amount of both oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) and Cu impurities is essential to the observed ferromagnetism, and a non-negligible portion of Cu impurities is uninvolved in the magnetic order. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose a microscopic 'indirect double-exchange' model, in which alignments of localized large moments of Cu in the vicinity of the V{sub O} are mediated by the large-sized vacancy orbitals.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Room-Temperature Anisotropic Ferromagnetism in Fe-Doped In2O3 Heteroepitaxial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Peng-Fei; Chen, Yan-Xue; Tang, Min-Jian; Yan, Shi-Shen; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo; Jiao, Jun

    2009-11-01

    Fe-doped In2O3 films are grown epitaxially on YSZ (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, the atomic force microscopy, and the x-ray diffraction patterns show that the films have a well defined cubic structure epitaxially oriented in the (100) direction. Room temperature ferromagnetism is observed by an alternating gradient magnetometer. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a remnant magnetization ratio of 0.83 and a coercivity of 2.5kOe is revealed. Both the structural and the magnetic measurements suggest that this ferromagnetism is an intrinsic property deriving from the spin-orbit coupling between the diluted Fe atoms.

  10. Room-temperature ferromagnetism and optical properties in Mg-doped TiO{sub 2}: A density functional theory investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanyu; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Ping

    2014-03-28

    The magnetic and optical properties of Mg-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} have been theoretically investigated using the LDA+U method. The total induced moments are about 2 μ{sub B}, which mainly localize on the nearest apical oxygen atoms. Moreover, the hole-induced interactions indicate that the magnetic moments prefer to the ferromagnetic coupling with the antiferromagnetic state lying 1160 meV higher in energy. This implies that the ferromagnetic state can be stable against thermal fluctuations up to room temperature. Additionally, the Mg doping is able to enhance the absorption efficiency of solar spectrum, especially in the near-infrared light region, which origins from the isolated O 2p states above the valence-band maximum rather than the effect of band-gap narrowing.

  11. Driving Curie temperature towards room temperature in the half-metallic ferromagnet K2Cr8O16 by soft redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pirrotta, I; Fernández-Sanjulián, J; Moran, E; Alario-Franco, M A; Gonzalo, E; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F

    2012-02-14

    The half-metallic ferromagnet K(2)Cr(8)O(16) with the hollandite structure has been chemically modified using soft chemistry methods to increase the average oxidation state of chromium. The synthesis of the parent material has been performed under high pressure/high temperature conditions. Following this, different redox reactions have been carried out on K(2)Cr(8)O(16). Oxidation to obtain potassium-de-inserted derivatives, K(2-x)Cr(8)O(16) (0 ≤x≤ 1), has been investigated with electrochemical methods, while the synthesis of sizeable amounts was achieved chemically by using nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate as a highly oxidizing agent. The maximum amount of extracted K ions corresponds to x = 0.8. Upon oxidation the hollandite structure is maintained and the products keep high crystallinity. The de-insertion of potassium changes the Cr(3+)/Cr(4+) ratio, and therefore the magnetic properties. Interestingly, the Curie temperature increases from ca. 175 K to 250 K, getting therefore closer to room temperature.

  12. Free-standing and single-crystalline Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism and excellent magnetic response.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiu; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Tang, Jianshi; Lin, Ching-Chun; Hou, Te-Chien; Jiang, Xiaowei; Wang, Kang L; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2012-06-26

    High-aspect-ratio Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method in one step. This is the first report of ternary silicide nanowires using magnetic Mn ions to partially replace metal sites in the host matrix. Here we report the excellent magnetic characteristics of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, which exhibit strong ferromagnetism at room temperature and high magnetoresistance (MR) variation. As-synthesized Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires show a hyperbranched morphology and a spin-disorder behavior. The strong spin interaction in Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, induced by the substitution of Fe sublattices for magnetic Mn ions, was revealed in the hysteresis loops. The magnetization versus magnetic field (M-H) curves of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires are much less sensitive to the temperature variation from 10 to 300 K than those of FeSi nanowires. Remarkably, the excellent MR performance, -41.6% at 25 K with a magnetic field of 9 T, was demonstrated in an individual Fe(0.88)Mn(0.12)Si nanowire.

  13. Observation of strong magnetoelectric coupling and ferromagnetism at room temperature in Fe substituted ferroelectric BaZr0.05Ti0.95O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Mukesh; Barrionuevo Diestra, Danilo G.; Katiyar, Ram; Shah, Jyoti; Kotnala, R. K.; Chatterjee, Ratnamala

    2017-01-01

    Single phase polycrystalline thin films (˜100 nm) of BaZr0.05(FexTi1-3x/4)0.95O3, with x = 0 (BZT) and 0.015 (BZFT15), were grown on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrate using pulsed laser deposition technique. Room temperature ferromagnetism with a remanent magnetization (Mr) ˜ 1.1 × 10-1 emu/cm3 and a coercive field (Hc) ˜ 0.1 kOe was observed in BZFT15 film. The ferroelectric domain switching in both BZT and BZFT15 films is confirmed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). The magnetoelectric coupling coefficient (α) measured at room temperature in the BZFT15 film in in-plane magnetized-out of plane polarized configuration (L-T mode) was found to be ˜165 mV/cm Oe. It is argued that the observed ferromagnetism in BZFT15 films arises from the oxygen vacancy (Ov) mediated (Fe3+-Ov-Fe3+) exchange.

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic semiconductors prepared by sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Dinia, A.; Schmerber, G.; Meny, C.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.; Beaurepaire, E.

    2005-06-15

    We have used magnetron cosputtering to grow Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic dilute semiconductors. The growth has been performed on SiO{sub 2}/Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. The Co concentration has been varied between 0.1 and 0.25 and the substrate temperature between room temperature and 600 deg. C. X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that for the films grown on Si substrates the structural quality of the film is improved by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. The films are textured with c axis of the wurtzite structure along the growth direction. However, for the films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate quasi-epitaxial films have been obtained for 600 deg. C substrate temperature. Magnetization measurements have shown that the ferromagnetism is directly correlated to the structural quality and appears by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. Moreover, for the highly textured film a clear magnetic perpendicular anisotropy has been evidenced with the easy magnetization axis along the growth direction. To evidence the intrinsic nature of the ferromagnetism in the films, transmission optical measurements have been used. They show three absorption bands that are characteristics of d-d transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Co{sup 2+}. This has been supported by nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic thermal variation.

  15. Ferromagnetism at room temperature of c- and m-plane GaN : Gd films grown on different substrates by reactive molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranchal, R.; Yadav, B. S.; Trampert, A.

    2013-02-01

    We report the magnetic properties of c- and m-plane GaN : Gd films grown on different substrate materials. Additionally, we have investigated the magnetic behaviour of the bare substrates in order to analyse their possible contribution on the properties of this material system. For the growth of c-phase GaN : Gd we have used 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) and GaN/Al2O3 templates. Whereas templates only exhibit a diamagnetic behaviour, the SiC substrates show clear signatures of ferromagnetism at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ions mass spectrometry have revealed traces of Fe in the SiC substrates. This Fe contamination seems to be related to the ferromagnetic ordering observed in these substrates. LiAlO2(0 0 1) is a good choice for growth of m-plane diluted nitrides due to its diamagnetic behaviour. The hysteresis loops of c- and m-phase GaN : Gd deposited on template and LiAlO2, respectively, show coercivity and magnetic saturation. These characteristics together with the magnetization curves are indications of an intrinsic ferromagnetic behaviour in the GaN : Gd.

  16. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700–1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering.

  17. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700–1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering. PMID:27527493

  18. Band-edge exciton transitions in (Ga 1- xMn x)N diluted magnetic semiconductor films with above room temperature ferromagnetic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. C.; Kang, T. W.; Kim, T. W.; Cho, Y. H.

    2006-06-01

    (Ga 1- xMn x)N thin films grown on GaN buffer layers by using molecular beam epitaxy were investigated with the goal of producing diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) with band-edge exciton transitions for applications in optomagnetic devices. The magnetization curve as a function of the magnetic field at 5 K indicated that ferromagnetism existed in the (Ga 1- xMn x)N thin films, and the magnetization curve as a function of the temperature showed that the ferromagnetic transition temperature of the (Ga 1- xMn x)N thin film was above room temperature. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra showed that band-edge exciton transitions in (Ga 1- xMn x)N thin films appeared. These results indicate that the (Ga 1- xMn x)N DMSs with a magnetic single phase hold promise for potential applications in spin optoelectronic devices in the blue region of the spectrum.

  19. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in electrodeposited Co-doped ZnO nanostructured thin films by controlling the oxygen vacancy defects

    SciTech Connect

    Simimol, A.; Anappara, Aji A.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2015-06-07

    We report the growth of un-doped and cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures fabricated on FTO coated glass substrates using electrodeposition method. A detailed study on the effects of dopant concentration on morphology, structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the ZnO nanostructures has been carried out systematically by varying the Co concentration (c.{sub Co}) from 0.01 to 1 mM. For c.{sub Co }≤ 0.2 mM, h-wurtzite phase with no secondary phases of Co were present in the ZnO nanostructures. For c.{sub Co} ≤ 0.2 mM, the photoluminescence spectra exhibited a decrease in the intensity of ultraviolet emission as well as band-gap narrowing with an increase in dopant concentration. All the doped samples displayed a broad emission in the visible range and its intensity increased with an increase in Co concentration. It was found that the defect centers such as oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials were the source of the visible emission. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed, Co was primarily in the divalent state, replacing the Zn ion inside the tetrahedral crystal site of ZnO without forming any cluster or secondary phases of Co. The un-doped ZnO nanorods exhibited diamagnetic behavior and it remained up to a c.{sub Co} of 0.05 mM, while for c.{sub Co }> 0.05 mM, the ZnO nanostructures exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. The coercivity increased to 695 G for 0.2 mM Co-doped sample and then it decreased for c.{sub Co }> 0.2 mM. Our results illustrate that up to a threshold concentration of 0.2 mM, the strong ferromagnetism is due to the oxygen vacancy defects centers, which exist in the Co-doped ZnO nanostructures. The origin of strong ferromagnetism at room temperature in Co-doped ZnO nanostructures is attributed to the s-d exchange interaction between the localized spin moments resulting from the oxygen vacancies and d electrons of Co{sup 2+} ions. Our findings provide a new insight for tuning the

  20. Oxygen vacancy enhanced the room temperature ferromagnetism in Ni-doped TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, D. L.; Meng, H. J.; Jia, L. Y.; Ye, X. J.; Zhou, H. J.; Li, X. L.

    2007-04-01

    Ni-doped TiO2 anatase thin films were fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering on SiO2 substrates. The doping and annealing effects on structure and magnetism for the films have been systematically investigated. The results show that ferromagnetism originated from the doped matrix and enhancement (suppression) of ferromagnetism is strongly correlated with the increase (decrease) of oxygen vacancies in TiO2.

  1. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    SciTech Connect

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a high temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.

  2. Microstructures and room temperature ferromagnetism of ordered porous ZrO2 thin films sputter deposited onto porous anodic alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ru-shuai; Qi, Li-qian; Liu, Li-hu; Xu, Qin; Guo, Ge-Xin; Sun, Hui-yuan

    2017-04-01

    Ordered porous ZrO2 films with pore diameters in the 5-45 nm range have been prepared on porous anodic alumina substrates using DC-reactive magnetron sputtering of pure Zr targets. A saturation magnetization (MS) value as high as 119 emu/cm3 was obtained for the ZrO2 film with pores of 45 nm in diameter when the external field was perpendicular to the film surface. The significant out-of-plane saturation magnetization is associated with the porous structure of the film. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the origin of the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is closely related to the ordered porous structure and the single charged oxygen vacancies of the films. These findings suggest that porous ZrO2 films are promising to be applied to the spin electronic devices.

  3. X-ray spectroscopic study of the charge state and local orderingof room-temperature ferromagnetic Mn oped ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.; Gupta, Amita; Sharma, Parmanand; Rao, K.V.; Marcus,M.A.; Dong, C.L.; Guillen, J.M.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Mattesini, M.; Glans,P.A.; Smith, K.E.; Chang, C.L.; Ahuja, R.

    2007-08-07

    The charge state and local ordering of Mn doped into a pulsed laser deposited single-phase thin film of ZnO are investigated by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the O K-, Mn K- and L-edges, and X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K- and Mn L-edge. This film is found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. EXAFS measurement shows that Mn{sup 2+} replaces Zn site in tetrahedral symmetry, and there is no evidence for either metallic Mn or MnO in the film. Upon Mn doping, the top of O 2p valence band extends into the bandgap indicating additional charge carries being created.

  4. Visible photoluminescence and room temperature ferromagnetism in high In-content InGaN:Yb nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, K.; Palai, R.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W. M.; Guinel, M. J.-F.; Huhtinen, H.; Mundle, R.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2015-09-28

    We report the growth of high indium content InGaN:Yb nanorods grown on c-plane sapphire (0001) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns recorded during and after the growth revealed crystalline nature of the nanorods. The nanorods were examined using electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The photoluminescence studies of the nanorods showed the visible emissions. The In composition was calculated from x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the photoluminescence spectroscopy. The In-concentration was obtained from photoluminescence using modified Vegard's law and found to be around 37% for InGaN and 38% for Yb (5 ± 1%)-doped InGaN with a bowing parameter b = 1.01 eV. The Yb-doped InGaN showed significant enhancement in photoluminescence properties compared to the undoped InGaN. The Yb-doped InGaN nanorods demonstrated the shifting of the photoluminescence band at room temperature, reducing luminescence amplitude temperature dependent fluctuation, and significant narrowing of excitonic emission band as compared to the undoped InGaN. The magnetic properties measured by superconducting quantum interference devices reveals room temperature ferromagnetism, which can be explained by the double exchange mechanism and magnetostriction.

  5. Effect of Ar ion irradiation on the room temperature ferromagnetism of undoped and Cu-doped rutile TiO2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan-Nan; Li, Gong-Ping; Lin, Qiao-Lu; Liu, Huan; Bao, Liang-Man

    2016-11-01

    Remarkable room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed both in undoped and Cu-doped rutile TiO2 single crystals (SCs). To tune their magnetism, Ar ion irradiation was quantitatively performed on the two crystals in which the saturation magnetizations for the samples were enhanced distinctively. The post-irradiation led to a spongelike layer in the near surface of the Cu-doped TiO2. Meanwhile, a new CuO-like species present in the sample was found to be dissolved after the post-irradiation. Analyzing the magnetization data unambiguously reveals that the experimentally observed ferromagnetism is related to the intrinsic defects rather than the exotic Cu ions, while these ions are directly involved in boosting the absorption in the visible region. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11575074), the Open Project of State Key laboratory of Crystal Material, Shandong University, China (Grant No. KF1311), the Open Project of Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, China (Grant No. LZUMMM2012003), the Open Project of Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, China (Grant No. 201204), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. lzujbky-2015-240).

  6. Comments on "Synthesis aspects, structural, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and room temperature ferromagnetism of zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand" by K. Shakila and S. Kalainathan, Spectrochim. Acta 135 A (2015) 1059-1065

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Nadkarni, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    Shakila and Kalainathan report on the synthetic and structural aspects of a zinc iodide complex with Schiff based ligand, which exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism. In this comment, many points of criticism, concerning the characterization of this so called zinc iodide complex of Schiff based ligand are highlighted to prove that the title paper is completely erroneous.

  7. ScRe 2O 6: A new ternary oxide with metallic Re-Re-bonds and a ferromagnetic component above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, D.; Ehrenberg, H.; Miehe, G.; Trots, D.; Hess, C.; Schneider, R.; Fuess, H.

    2008-01-01

    AbstactA new phase in the system Sc-Re-O, ScRe 2O 6, was synthesized for the first time in sealed silica tubes and its crystal structure was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. ScRe 2O 6 (space group P2 1/ a, a=5.6176(9) Å, b=4.7970(9) Å, c=7.5143(16) Å, β=97.49(2)°, Z=2) crystallizes in a new rutile-type structure, derived from three formula units by splitting the cation site in ratio 1:2. Re 2O 10 clusters can be considered as structural units, in which the rhenium ions form pairs by metallic bonds with a Re-Re distance of 2.523(3) Å. No phase transition was observed in the temperature range of 295-930 K. The compound has a metallic character of conductivity in the temperature range of at least 4-950 K and displays a ferromagnetic ordering above room temperature ("unconventional Re-magnetism").

  8. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; ...

    2015-06-15

    We repormore » t elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1+δSb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.« less

  9. Oxygen vacancy induced phase formation and room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Co-doped TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P.; Mishra, N. C.; Choudhary, R. J.; Banerjee, A.; Shripathi, T.; Lalla, N. P.; Annapoorni, S.; Rath, Chandana

    2012-08-01

    TiO2 and Co-doped TiO2 (CTO) thin films deposited at various oxygen partial pressures by pulsed laser deposition exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) independent of their phase. Films deposited at 0.1 mTorr oxygen partial pressure show a complete rutile phase confirmed from glancing angle x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. At the highest oxygen partial pressure, i.e. 300 mTorr, although the TiO2 film shows a complete anatase phase, a small peak corresponding to the rutile phase along with the anatase phase is identified in the case of CTO film. An increase in O to Ti/(Ti+Co) ratio with increase in oxygen partial pressure is observed from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is revealed from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that oxygen vacancies are found to be higher in the CTO film than TiO2, while the valency of cobalt remains in the +2 state. Therefore, the CTO film deposited at 300 mTorr does not show a complete anatase phase unlike the TiO2 film deposited at the same partial pressure. We conclude that RTFM in both films is not due to impurities/contaminants, as confirmed from XPS depth profiling and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), but due to oxygen vacancies. The magnitude of moment, however, depends not only on the phase of TiO2 but also on the crystallinity of the films.

  10. Achieving High-Temperature Ferromagnetic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat

    Topological insulators (TIs) are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic and spintronic devices, including TI-based quantum computation. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a TI system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to a realization of several predicted novel physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the TI surface at specific locations without introducing spin scattering centers could open up new possibilities for devices. Here, we demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) to a TI (Bi2Se3); this interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the FMI (EuS) is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The induced magnetism at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and spin-momentum locking feature of the TI surface is found to greatly enhance the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of the TI/FMI bilayer system. Due to the short range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a TI, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered TI could allow for an efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies. Work supported by MIT MRSEC through the MRSEC Program of NSF under award number DMR-0819762, NSF Grant DMR-1207469, the ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301, and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF grant DMR-1231319.

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetic properties of epitaxial (111) Y0.225Sr0.775CoO3-δ thin film grown on single crystalline (111) MgO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Yeog Son, Jong

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxial (111) Y0.225Sr0.775CoO3-δ (YSCO) thin films were deposited on single crystalline (111) MgO substrates by a pulsed laser deposition method. The YSCO thin film exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism with a remanent magnetization of 1.5×10-5 emu. The magnetic force microscopy (MFM) study revealed that the YSCO thin film had a mosaic MFM domain structure. The comparison of domain wall energy for the YSCO and PZT indicates that the large domain wall energy induce the large domain size, though the large magnetization value reduce the magnetic domain size in the case of Co. According to the optical conductivity analysis by spectroscopic ellipsometry, it is inferred that the transition from the intermediate spin state to the high spin state of the YSCO thin film is attributed to the ferromagnetism of the Co4+ ion.

  12. Systematic study of room-temperature ferromagnetism and the optical response of Zn1-x TM x S/Se (TM  =  Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) ferromagnets: first-principle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Q.; Hassan, M.; Noor, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    The structural, magnetic and optical characteristics of Zn1-x TM x S/Se (TM  =  Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and x  =  6.25%) have been investigated through the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of density functional theory. The optimized structures have been used to calculate the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic ground-state energies. The stability of the ferromagnetic phase has been confirmed from the formation and the cohesive energies. The Heisenberg model is used to elucidate the Curie temperature (T c) of these alloys. From the band structures and density of states plots, it has been observed that TM-doped ZnS/Se alloys appear to be semiconductors and exhibit ferromagnetism. In addition, the observed ferromagnetism has also been explained in terms of direct exchange energy Δ x (d), exchange splitting energy Δ x (pd), crystal-field energy (E crys), exchange constants (N 0 α and N 0 β) and magnetic moments that shows potential spintronic applications. The optical behaviors of these alloys have been explained in terms of real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant ɛ(ω), refractive index n(ω), extinction coefficient K(ω), reflectivity R(ω) and absorption coefficient σ(ω), in the energy range 0-25 eV. The calculated static limits of the band gaps and real part of the dielectric constants satisfy the Penn model. The critical limits of the imaginary part of the dielectric constants and absorption coefficients indicate that these alloys can be operated in the visible and the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum; therefore, make them important for optoelectronic applications.

  13. Degradation of the remanent ferromagnetic state under the action of ferroelectric relaxation processes in Co/(1-x)PMN-xPT/Co hybrids: Possible implications on cryogenic and room-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Zeibekis, M.; Vertsioti, G.; Zhang, S. J.

    2014-08-01

    Low-dimensional hybrid structures of heterogeneous constituents usually exhibit abnormal properties, a fact that makes such hybrids attractive for various cryogenic and room-temperature applications. Here, we studied Co/(1 - x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3/Co (Co/PMN-xPT/Co) with x = 0.29 and 0.30, specifically focusing on the evolution of the remanent ferromagnetic state, mrem of the Co outer layers in the whole temperature range from 300 K down to 10 K, upon application of an external electric field, Eex. We observed that mrem was vulnerable to degradation through the occurrence of electric field-induced magnetic instabilities (EMIs) that appeared only when Eex ≠ 0 kV/cm and were facilitated as Eex increases. However, EMIs completely ceased below a characteristic temperature Tces = 170 K even for the maximum |Eex| = 5 kV/cm applied in this work. A direct comparison of the magnetization data of the Co/PMN-xPT/Co hybrids reported here with the electromechanical properties of the parent PMN-xPT crystals plausibly indicates that EMIs are motivated by the coupling of the ferromagnetic domains of the Co outer layers with the ferroelectric domains of the PMN-xPT crystal. These results highlight the drawback of EMIs in relevant hybrids and delimit the temperature regime for the reliable operation of the Co/PMN-xPT/Co ones studied here.

  14. Taking Ferromagnetic Resonance to Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebl, Hans; Zollitsch, Christoph; Hocke, Fredrik; Weiler, Mathias; Radlmeier, Martin; Neumaier, Karl; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2011-03-01

    Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) is a sensitive tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization damping in thin magnetic films. Broadband FMR based on coplanar waveguide technology hereby is particularly attractive as it allows for the investigation of plain films as well as of single magnetic nanostructures. We here present broadband FMR data of 50~nm thick nickel and cobalt thin films, recorded at temperatures range from 4.2~K down to 50~mK. The excellent sensitivity of our setup allows for the detection of FMR with an incident microwave power of 100~fW at the base temperature of the dilution refrigerator. Our FMR measurements in Co and Ni reveal no distinct temperature dependence of the anisotropy and damping parameters in the temperature regime below 4.2~K, which appears consistent with the trend observed in measurements from room temperature down to 4.2~K. Our proof-of-principle experiments open the path for broadband FMR studies of magnetic anisotropy and magnetization damping at millikelvin temperatures a regime so far very scarcely explored. This project is financially supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB 631 and the Cluster of Excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM).

  15. Isotope shift of the ferromagnetic transition temperature in itinerant ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi; Odagiri, Kosuke

    2017-02-01

    We present a theory of the isotope effect of the Curie temperature Tc in itinerant ferromagnets. The isotope effect in ferromagnets occurs via the electron-phonon vertex correction and the effective attractive interaction mediated by the electron-phonon interaction. The decrease of the Debye frequency increases the relative strength of the Coulomb interaction, which results in a positive isotope shift of Tc when the mass M of an atom increases. Following this picture, we evaluate the isotope effect of Tc by using the Stoner theory and a spin-fluctuation theory. When Tc is large enough as large as or more than 100 K, the isotope effect on Tc can be measurable. Recently, precise measurements on the oxygen isotope effect on Tc have been performed for itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3 with Tc ∼ 160 K. A clear isotope effect has been observed with the positive shift of Tc ∼ 1 K by isotope substitution (16O →18O). This experimental result is consistent with our theory.

  16. system at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoyuan; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xiuhua; Xiao, Yongyin; Ma, Mingyu; Zhu, Wenjie; Wei, Feng

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the moderately and lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) were fabricated by the `one-pot procedure' metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method in the HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature. The effects of H2O2 concentration on the nanostructure of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated. The experimental results indicate that porous structure can be introduced by the addition of H2O2 and the pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of H2O2. The H2O2 species replaces Ag+ as the oxidant and the Ag nanoparticles work as catalyst during the etching. And the concentration of H2O2 influences the nucleation and motility of Ag particles, which leads to formation of different porous structure within the nanowires. A mechanism based on the lateral etching which is catalyzed by Ag particles under the motivation by H2O2 reduction is proposed to explain the PSiNWs formation.

  17. Room temperature polyesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.S.; Stupp, S.I. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new room temperature polymerization method has been developed for the synthesis of high molecular weight polyesters directly from carboxylic acids and phenols. The solution polymerization reaction proceeds under mild conditions, near neutral pH, and also avoids the use of preactivated acid derivatives for esterification. The reaction is useful in the preparation of isoregic ordered chains with translational polar symmetry and also in the polymerization of functionalized or chiral monomers. The conditions required for polymerization in the carbodiimide-based reaction included catalysis by the 1:1 molecular complex formed by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and p-toluenesulfonic acid. These conditions were established through studies on a model system involving esterification of p-toluic acid and p-cresol. Self-condensation of several hydroxy acid monomers by this reaction has produced routinely good yields of polyesters with molecular weights greater than 15,000. It is believed that the high extents of reaction required for significant degrees of polymerization result from suppression of the side reaction leading to N-acylurea. The utility of this reaction in the formation of polar chains from sensitive monomers is demonstrated hereby the polycondensation of a chiral hydroxy acid.

  18. Role of vanadium ions, oxygen vacancies, and interstitial zinc in room temperature ferromagnetism on ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present the role of vanadium ions (V+5 and V+3), oxygen vacancies (VO), and interstitial zinc (Zni) to the contribution of specific magnetization for a mixture of ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles (NPs). Samples were obtained by mechanical milling of dry powders and ethanol-assisted milling for 1 h with a fixed atomic ratio V/Zn?=?5% at. For comparison, pure ZnO samples were also prepared. All samples exhibit a room temperature magnetization ranging from 1.18?×?10−3 to 3.5?×?10−3 emu/gr. Pure ZnO powders (1.34?×?10−3 emu/gr) milled with ethanol exhibit slight increase in magnetization attributed to formation of Zni, while dry milled ZnO powders exhibit a decrease of magnetization due to a reduction of VO concentration. For the ZnO-V2O5 system, dry milled and thermally treated samples under reducing atmosphere exhibit a large paramagnetic component associated to the formation of V2O3 and secondary phases containing V+3 ions; at the same time, an increase of VO is observed with an abrupt fall of magnetization to σ?~?0.7?×?10−3 emu/gr due to segregation of V oxides and formation of secondary phases. As mechanical milling is an aggressive synthesis method, high disorder is induced at the surface of the ZnO NPs, including VO and Zni depending on the chemical environment. Thermal treatment restores partially structural order at the surface of the NPs, thus reducing the amount of Zni at the same time that V2O5 NPs segregate reducing the direct contact with the surface of ZnO NPs. Additional samples were milled for longer time up to 24 h to study the effect of milling on the magnetization; 1-h milled samples have the highest magnetizations. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Identification of VO and Zni was carried out with Raman spectra, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to verify that V did not diffuse into ZnO NPs as well to quantify O/Zn ratios. PMID:24708614

  19. Role of vanadium ions, oxygen vacancies, and interstitial zinc in room temperature ferromagnetism on ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Olive-Méndez, Sion F; Santillán-Rodríguez, Carlos R; González-Valenzuela, Ricardo A; Espinosa-Magaña, Francisco; Matutes-Aquino, José A

    2014-04-07

    In this work, we present the role of vanadium ions (V+5 and V+3), oxygen vacancies (VO), and interstitial zinc (Zni) to the contribution of specific magnetization for a mixture of ZnO-V2O5 nanoparticles (NPs). Samples were obtained by mechanical milling of dry powders and ethanol-assisted milling for 1 h with a fixed atomic ratio V/Zn?=?5% at. For comparison, pure ZnO samples were also prepared. All samples exhibit a room temperature magnetization ranging from 1.18?×?10-3 to 3.5?×?10-3 emu/gr. Pure ZnO powders (1.34?×?10-3 emu/gr) milled with ethanol exhibit slight increase in magnetization attributed to formation of Zni, while dry milled ZnO powders exhibit a decrease of magnetization due to a reduction of VO concentration. For the ZnO-V2O5 system, dry milled and thermally treated samples under reducing atmosphere exhibit a large paramagnetic component associated to the formation of V2O3 and secondary phases containing V+3 ions; at the same time, an increase of VO is observed with an abrupt fall of magnetization to σ?~?0.7?×?10-3 emu/gr due to segregation of V oxides and formation of secondary phases. As mechanical milling is an aggressive synthesis method, high disorder is induced at the surface of the ZnO NPs, including VO and Zni depending on the chemical environment. Thermal treatment restores partially structural order at the surface of the NPs, thus reducing the amount of Zni at the same time that V2O5 NPs segregate reducing the direct contact with the surface of ZnO NPs. Additional samples were milled for longer time up to 24 h to study the effect of milling on the magnetization; 1-h milled samples have the highest magnetizations. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Identification of VO and Zni was carried out with Raman spectra, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to verify that V did not diffuse into ZnO NPs as well to quantify O/Zn ratios.

  20. Finding the Curie Temperature for Ferromagnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizowski, Czeslaw; Budzik, Sylwia; Cebulski, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    The laboratory exercise described in this paper is based on a well-known qualitative demonstration of Curie temperature. A long ferromagnetic wire, in the form of a spiral, is attracted to a strong permanent magnet placed near its midpoint (see Fig. 1). The temperature of the wire is increased by passing a current through it. When the temperature…

  1. Understanding the magnetic interaction between intrinsic defects and impurity ions in room-temperature ferromagnetic Mg1-x Fe x O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Wang, Yung Jui; Li, Xin; Glans, Per-Anders; Fang, Mei; Riazanova, Anastasia V.; Belova, Lyubov M.; Rao, K. V.; Luo, Yi; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Guo, Jinghua

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the nature and characteristics of the intrinsic defects and impurities in the dielectric barrier separating the ferromagnetic electrodes in a magnetic tunneling junction is of great importance for understanding the often observed ‘barrier-breakdown’ therein. In this connection, we present herein systematic experimental (SQUID and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy) and computational studies on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mg1-x Fe x O thin films. Our studies reveal: (i) defect aggregates comprised of basic and trimer units (Fe impurity coupled to 1 or 2 Mg vacancies) and (ii) existence of two competing magnetic orders, defect- and dopant-induced, with spin densities aligning anti-parallel if the trimer is present in the oxide matrix. These findings open up new avenues for designing tunneling barriers with high endurance and tunneling effect upon tuning the concentration/distribution of the two magnetic orders.

  2. Structural and morphological properties of Zn1- x Zr x O with room-temperature ferromagnetism and fabricated by using the co-precipitation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M.; Irfan, R.; Riaz, S.; Naseem, S.; Hussain, S. S.; Murtaza, G.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, ZnO was doped with various concentrations of zirconium ( x Zr = 0 - 5 mole%), by using the co-precipitation method so as to achieve successful formation of a single-phase diluted magnetic semiconductor. X-Ray diffraction results showed that the crystal structure of Zn1- x Zr x O was that of hexagonal wurtzite. The structural properties showed no additional phases at low impurity contents ( x Zr < 3%); however, impurity peaks belonging to ZrO2 appeared at high impurity contents ( x Zr ≥ 3%). The calculated ZnO lattice constants ` a' and ` c' were found to be 3.256 Å and 5.203 Å, respectively, which are in close match to the values found in the literature. For undoped ZnO, the average calculated particle size was 75.35 nm, and calculated bond length was 1.98 Å. The residual strains and the secondary phases of ZrO2 were found to affect the lattice parameters and the bond lengths. The scanning electron microscopy images showed a porous structure with non-uniform surface morphology. However, a few nano-scale dendrite-type structures were also present, indicating the potential applications of Zr-doped ZnO in nano-devices. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) was employed to measure the magnetic properties, and the measurements showed undoped ZnO to be diamagnetic; however, doping with Zr induced a small ferromagnetic character at small magnetic fields. On the otherhand, a paramagnetic behavior was evident at higher magnetic fields. The magnetization at 1T was observed to degrade with increasing Zr content in the ZnO host lattice, which was due to the residual strains and the secondary phases.

  3. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  4. Switchable hardening of a ferromagnet at fixed temperature

    PubMed Central

    Silevitch, D. M.; Aeppli, G.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-01-01

    The intended use of a magnetic material, from information storage to power conversion, depends crucially on its domain structure, traditionally crafted during materials synthesis. By contrast, we show that an external magnetic field, applied transverse to the preferred magnetization of a model disordered uniaxial ferromagnet, is an isothermal regulator of domain pinning. At elevated temperatures, near the transition into the paramagnet, modest transverse fields increase the pinning, stabilize the domain structure, and harden the magnet, until a point where the field induces quantum tunneling of the domain walls and softens the magnet. At low temperatures, tunneling completely dominates the domain dynamics and provides an interpretation of the quantum phase transition in highly disordered magnets as a localization/delocalization transition for domain walls. While the energy scales of the rare earth ferromagnet studied here restrict the effects to cryogenic temperatures, the principles discovered are general and should be applicable to existing classes of highly anisotropic ferromagnets with ordering at room temperature or above. PMID:20133728

  5. Temperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar,; Harold J. , Harris; Kelvin, Christopher [Houston, TX

    2012-07-17

    A heater is described. The heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The ferromagnetic conductor is positioned relative to the electrical conductor such that an electromagnetic field produced by time-varying current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor confines a majority of the flow of the electrical current to the electrical conductor at temperatures below or near a selected temperature.

  6. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  7. Ferromagnetism in metals at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gyorffy, B.L.; Staunton, J.B.; Stocks, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The conventional spin-polarized band theory is well known to give a reasonable description of the magnetic ground states of metals. Here it is generalized to finite temperatures. The resulting theory is the first first-principles theory of the ferromagnetic phase transition in metals. It is a mean-field theory. For iron we find T/sub c/ = 1250 K and chi/sup -1/(q = 0) follows a Curie-Weiss law. We also report on our results for the wave-vector dependent susceptibility chi(q) which is a measure of magnetic short-range order above T/sub c/.

  8. Inherent room temperature ferromagnetism and dopant dependent Raman studies of PbSe, Pb{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}Se, and Pb{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}Se

    SciTech Connect

    Gayner, Chhatrasal; Kar, Kamal K.

    2015-03-14

    Polycrystalline lead selenide (PbSe) doped with copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) was prepared to understand its magnetic behaviour and Raman activity. The processing conditions, influence of dopants (magnetically active and non-active) and their respective compositions on the magnetic properties and Raman active mode were studied. A surprising/anomalous room temperature ferromagnetism (hysteresis loop) is noticed in bulk diamagnetic PbSe, which is found to be natural or inherent characteristic of material, and depends on the crystallite size, dopant, and developed strain due to dopant/defects. The magnetic susceptibility (−1.71 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) and saturated magnetic susceptibility (−2.74 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) are found to be higher than the earlier reported value (diamagnetic: −1.0 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe) in bulk PbSe. With increase of Cu concentration (2% to 10%) in PbSe, the saturated magnetic susceptibility decreases from −1.22 × 10{sup −4} to −0.85 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe. Whereas for Ni dopant, the saturated magnetic susceptibility increases to −2.96 × 10{sup −4} emu/mol Oe at 2% Ni doped PbSe. But it further decreases with dopant concentration. In these doped PbSe, the shifting of longitudinal (LO) phonon mode was also studied by the Raman spectroscopy. The shifting of LO mode is found to be dopant dependent, and the frequency shift of LO mode is associated with the induced strain that created by the dopants and vacancies. This asymmetry in LO phonon mode (peak shift and shape) may be due to the intraband electronic transition of dopants. The variation in magnetic susceptibility and Raman shifts are sensitive to crystallite size, nature of dopant, concentration of dopants, and induced strain due to dopants.

  9. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  10. Ferromagnetic ZnO bicrystal nanobelts fabricated in low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Congkang; Chun, Junghwan; Rho, Keehan; Lee, Hyo Jin; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Kim, Dong-Eon; Chon, Bonghwan; Hong, Sangsu; Joo, Taiha

    2006-08-28

    Zinc oxide bicrystal nanobelts were fabricated via a vapor phase transport of a powder mixture of Zn, BiI{sub 3}, and MnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O at temperatures as low as 300 deg. C. The bicrystal nanobelts, growing along the [011{sup -}3] direction, have the widths of 40-150 nm and lengths of tens of microns. The energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy result verifies that the bicrystal nanobelts contain higher concentration of both Bi and Mn along the grain boundary. The investigation of the growth mechanism proposes that MnBi may induce the formation of bicrystal nanobelts. Photoluminescence spectra show that the ultraviolet emission of the bicrystal nanobelts has a blueshift of 18 meV as compared to Bi-ZnO nanowires at 10 K. The bicrystal nanobelts also exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature.

  11. On the origin of high-temperature ferromagnetism in the low-temperature-processed Mn-Zn-O system.

    PubMed

    Kundaliya, Darshan C; Ogale, S B; Lofland, S E; Dhar, S; Metting, C J; Shinde, S R; Ma, Z; Varughese, B; Ramanujachary, K V; Salamanca-Riba, L; Venkatesan, T

    2004-10-01

    The recent discovery of ferromagnetism above room temperature in low-temperature-processed MnO(2)-ZnO has generated significant interest. Using suitably designed bulk and thin-film studies, we demonstrate that the ferromagnetism in this system originates in a metastable phase rather than by carrier-induced interaction between separated Mn atoms in ZnO. The ferromagnetism persists up to approximately 980 K, and further heating transforms the metastable phase and kills the ferromagnetism. By studying the interface diffusion and reaction between thin-film bilayers of Mn and Zn oxides, we show that a uniform solution of Mn in ZnO does not form under low-temperature processing. Instead, a metastable ferromagnetic phase develops by Zn diffusion into the Mn oxide. Direct low-temperature film growth of Zn-incorporated Mn oxide by pulsed laser deposition shows ferromagnetism at low Zn concentration for an optimum oxygen growth pressure. Our results strongly suggest that the observed ferromagnetic phase is oxygen-vacancy-stabilized Mn(2-x)Zn(x)O(3-delta.).

  12. High temperature magnetism and microstructure of ferromagnetic alloy Si1-x Mn x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronzon, B. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Vasiliev, A. L.; Perov, N. S.; Novodvorsky, O. A.; Parshina, L. S.; Presniakov, M. Yu; Lahderanta, E.

    2017-02-01

    The results of a detailed study of magnetic properties and of the microstructure of SiMn films with a small deviation from stoichiometry are presented. The aim was to reveal the origin of the high temperature ferromagnetic ordering in such compounds. Unlike SiMn single crystals with the Curie temperature ~30 K, considered Si1-x Mn x compounds with x  =  0.5  +Δx and Δx in the range of 0.01-0.02 demonstrate a ferromagnetic state above room temperature. Such a ferromagnetic state can be explained by the existence of highly defective B20 SiMn nanocrystallites. These defects are Si vacancies, which are suggested to possess magnetic moments. The nanocrystallites interact with each other through paramagnons (magnetic fluctuations) inside a weakly magnetic manganese silicide matrix giving rise to a long range ferromagnetic percolation cluster. The studied structures with a higher value of Δx  ≈  0.05 contained three different magnetic phases: (a)—the low temperature ferromagnetic phase related to SiMn; (b)—the above mentioned high temperature phase with Curie temperature in the range of 200-300 K depending on the growth history and (c)—superparamagnetic phase formed by separated noninteracting SiMn nanocrystallites.

  13. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-01-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via –OH functionalization. PMID:28216636

  14. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp(3) functionalized graphene.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-02-20

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp(3) coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp(2)-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp(3) matrix and superexchange interactions via -OH functionalization.

  15. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via -OH functionalization.

  16. Proximity effect and its enhancement by ferromagnetism in high-temperature superconductor-ferromagnet structures.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A F; Efetov, K B

    2009-02-20

    We consider a bilayer consisting of a d-wave layered superconductor and diffusive ferromagnet with a domain wall (DW). The c axis in the superconductor and DW in the ferromagnet are assumed to be perpendicular to the interface. We demonstrate that in such a heterostructure the inhomogeneous exchange field enhances the proximity effect. It is shown that, whereas in the absence of the exchange field the d-wave condensate decays in the normal metal on the mean free path l, the superconductivity penetrates the ferromagnet along the DW over much larger distances. This happens because the presence of the DW results in a generation of an odd-frequency triplet s-wave component of the condensate. The phenomenon discovered here may help to explain a recent experiment on high-temperature superconductor-ferromagnet bilayers.

  17. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Parker, David S.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Williams, T. J.; Taylor, A. E.

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientation that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.

  18. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    DOE PAGES

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; ...

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientationmore » that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.« less

  19. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  20. Nanoengineering of an Si/MnGe quantum dot superlattice for high Curie-temperature ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Nie, Tianxiao; Kou, Xufeng; Tang, Jianshi; Fan, Yabin; Lee, Shengwei; He, Qinglin; Chang, Li-Te; Murata, Koichi; Gen, Yin; Wang, Kang L

    2017-03-02

    The realization and application of spintronic devices would be dramatically advanced if room-temperature ferromagnetism could be integrated into semiconductor nanostructures, especially when compatible with mature silicon technology. Herein, we report the observation of such a system - an Si/MnGe superlattice with quantum dots well aligned in the vertical direction successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Such a unique system could take full advantage of the type-II energy band structure of the Si/Ge heterostructure, which could trap the holes inside MnGe QDs, significantly enhancing the hole-mediated ferromagnetism. Magnetic measurements indeed found that the superlattice structure exhibited a Curie temperature of above 400 K. Furthermore, zero-field cooling and field cooling curves could confirm the absence of ferromagnetic compounds, such as Ge8Mn11 (Tc ∼ 270 K) and Ge3Mn5 (Tc ∼ 296 K) in our system. Magnetotransport measurement revealed a clear magnetoresistance transition from negative to positive and a pronounced anomalous Hall effect. Such a unique Si/MnGe superlattice sets a new stage for strengthening ferromagnetism due to the enhanced hole-mediation by quantum confinement, which can be exploited for realizing the room-temperature Ge-based spin field-effect transistors in the future.

  1. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  2. Room temperature long range ferromagnetic ordering in Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} nano magnetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Sarveena, Chand, Jagdish; Verma, S.; Singh, M.; Kotnala, R. K.; Batoo, K. M.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and magnetic behavior of sol-gel autocombustion synthesized nanocrystalline Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer(VSM). Sample of high purity and high homogeneity was obtained by calcination at low temperature (500°C) resulting in nanoparticles of average diameter ∼15nm as determined by XRD and further confirmed by TEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selective area diffraction (SAED) confirmed the single phase of the sample. Mössbauer results are supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic coupling at room temperature finding material utility in magnetic storage data. The existence of iron in ferric state confirmed by isomer shift is a clear evidence of improved magnetic properties of the present system.

  3. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S.; Assaf, Badih A.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W.; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2016-05-09

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry(1,)2, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices(3-5). Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena(6,7). In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends similar to 2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator(2,8) could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies.

  4. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling.

    PubMed

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S; Assaf, Badih A; Jamer, Michelle E; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-05-26

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends ~2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies.

  5. A high-temperature ferromagnetic topological insulating phase by proximity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat; Lauter, Valeria; Nogueira, Flavio S.; Assaf, Badih A.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Wei, Peng; Satpati, Biswarup; Freeland, John W.; Eremin, Ilya; Heiman, Don; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens up new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic, spintronic and quantum computation devices. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a topological insulator system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to the realization of several predicted physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the surface of the topological insulator at specific locations without introducing spin-scattering centres could open up new possibilities for devices. Here we use spin-polarized neutron reflectivity experiments to demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) to a topological insulator (Bi2Se3) in a bilayer system. This interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the ferromagnetic insulator is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The magnetism induced at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and the spin-momentum locking of the topological insulator surface greatly enhances the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of this bilayer system. The ferromagnetism extends ~2 nm into the Bi2Se3 from the interface. Owing to the short-range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a topological insulator, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered topological insulator could allow efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy-efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies.

  6. Spin-valley caloritronics in silicene near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Gao, Wenwen; Cai, Xinlong; Fan, Ding; Yang, Zhihong; Meng, Lan

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional silicene, with an observable intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, has a great potential to perform fascinating physics and new types of applications in spintronics and valleytronics. By introducing an electromotive force from a temperature difference in ferromagnetic silicene, we discover that a longitudinal spin Seebeck effect can be driven even near room temperature, with spin-up and spin-down currents flowing in opposite directions, originating from the asymmetric electron-hole spin band structures. We further propose a silicene field-effect transistor constructed of two ferromagnetic electrodes and a central dual-gated region, and find that a valley Seebeck effect appears, with currents from two different valleys flowing in opposite directions. The forbidden transport channels are determined by either spin-valley dependent band gaps or spin mismatch. By tuning the electric field in the central region, the transport gaps depending on spin and valley vary correspondingly, and a transition from valley Seebeck effect to spin Seebeck effect is observed. These spin-valley caloritronic results near room temperature are robust against many real perturbations, and thus suggest silicene to be an excellent candidate for future energy-saving technologies and bidirectional information processing in solid-state circuits.

  7. Room-temperature helimagnetism in FeGe thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S L; Stasinopoulos, I; Lancaster, T; Xiao, F; Bauer, A; Rucker, F; Baker, A A; Figueroa, A I; Salman, Z; Pratt, F L; Blundell, S J; Prokscha, T; Suter, A; Waizner, J; Garst, M; Grundler, D; van der Laan, G; Pfleiderer, C; Hesjedal, T

    2017-12-01

    Chiral magnets are promising materials for the realisation of high-density and low-power spintronic memory devices. For these future applications, a key requirement is the synthesis of appropriate materials in the form of thin films ordering well above room temperature. Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the cubic compound FeGe exhibits helimagnetism with a relatively high transition temperature of 278 K in bulk crystals. We demonstrate that this temperature can be enhanced significantly in thin films. Using x-ray scattering and ferromagnetic resonance techniques, we provide unambiguous experimental evidence for long-wavelength helimagnetic order at room temperature and magnetic properties similar to the bulk material. We obtain α intr = 0.0036 ± 0.0003 at 310 K for the intrinsic damping parameter. We probe the dynamics of the system by means of muon-spin rotation, indicating that the ground state is reached via a freezing out of slow dynamics. Our work paves the way towards the fabrication of thin films of chiral magnets that host certain spin whirls, so-called skyrmions, at room temperature and potentially offer integrability into modern electronics.

  8. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  9. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  10. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  11. Strain-Induced Extrinsic High-Temperature Ferromagnetism in the Fe-Doped Hexagonal Barium Titanate

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, A.; Pregelj, M.; Gomilšek, M.; Jagličić, Z.; Pajić, D.; Telling, M.; Arčon, I.; Mikulska, I.; Valant, M.

    2015-01-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors possessing intrinsic static magnetism at high temperatures represent a promising class of multifunctional materials with high application potential in spintronics and magneto-optics. In the hexagonal Fe-doped diluted magnetic oxide, 6H-BaTiO3-δ, room-temperature ferromagnetism has been previously reported. Ferromagnetism is broadly accepted as an intrinsic property of this material, despite its unusual dependence on doping concentration and processing conditions. However, the here reported combination of bulk magnetization and complementary in-depth local-probe electron spin resonance and muon spin relaxation measurements, challenges this conjecture. While a ferromagnetic transition occurs around 700 K, it does so only in additionally annealed samples and is accompanied by an extremely small average value of the ordered magnetic moment. Furthermore, several additional magnetic instabilities are detected at lower temperatures. These coincide with electronic instabilities of the Fe-doped 3C-BaTiO3-δ pseudocubic polymorph. Moreover, the distribution of iron dopants with frozen magnetic moments is found to be non-uniform. Our results demonstrate that the intricate static magnetism of the hexagonal phase is not intrinsic, but rather stems from sparse strain-induced pseudocubic regions. We point out the vital role of internal strain in establishing defect ferromagnetism in systems with competing structural phases. PMID:25572803

  12. Experimental Demonstration of Room-Temperature Spin Transport in n -Type Germanium Epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushenko, S.; Koike, M.; Ando, Y.; Shinjo, T.; Myronov, M.; Shiraishi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of room-temperature spin transport in n -type Ge epilayers grown on a Si(001) substrate. By utilizing spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance, which inherently endows a spin battery function for semiconductors connected with a ferromagnet, a pure spin current is generated in the n -Ge at room temperature. The pure spin current is detected by using the inverse spin-Hall effect of either a Pt or Pd electrode on n -Ge . From a theoretical model that includes a geometrical contribution, the spin diffusion length in n -Ge at room temperature is estimated to be 660 nm. Moreover, the spin relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature, in agreement with a recently proposed theory of donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

  13. Multiferroic Nanopatterned Hybrid Material with Room-Temperature Magnetic Switching of the Electric Polarization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ronggang; Antohe, Vlad-Andrei; Hu, Zhijun; Nysten, Bernard; Piraux, Luc; Jonas, Alain M

    2017-02-01

    A nanopatterned hybrid layer is designed, wherein the electric polarization can be flipped at room temperature by a magnetic field aided by an electrical field. This is achieved by embedding ferromagnetic nanopillars in a continuous organic ferroelectric layer, and amplifying the magnetostriction-generated stress gradients by scaling down the supracrystalline cell of the material.

  14. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-15

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1+δSb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.

  15. Cobalt-doped anatase TiO2: A room temperature dilute magnetic dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, K. A.; Pakhomov, A. B.; Wang, C. M.; Heald, S. M.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2005-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the room temperature ferromagnetism observed in insulating Co doped anatase TiO2 thin films grown by sputter deposition. The Co was uniformly incorporated in the lattice as Co(II) with no evidence of Co metal. A series of annealing treatments were carried out to optimize the ferromagnetic ordering and a saturation moment of 1.1μB/Co atom at 300 K was obtained with UHV annealing at 450 °C. Both as-deposited and annealed films were highly insulating at room temperature. Results show that the ferromagnetism is strongly dependent on the number and distribution of oxygen vacancies in the Co:TiO2 lattice.

  16. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  17. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  18. Towards a new class of heavy ion doped magnetic semiconductors for room temperature applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juwon; Subramaniam, Nagarajan Ganapathi; Agnieszka Kowalik, Iwona; Nisar, Jawad; Lee, Jaechul; Kwon, Younghae; Lee, Jaechoon; Kang, Taewon; Peng, Xiangyang; Arvanitis, Dimitri; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The article presents, using Bi doped ZnO, an example of a heavy ion doped oxide semiconductor, highlighting a novel p-symmetry interaction of the electronic states to stabilize ferromagnetism. The study includes both ab initio theory and experiments, which yield clear evidence for above room temperature ferromagnetism. ZnBixO1−x thin films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique. The room temperature ferromagnetism finds its origin in the holes introduced by the Bi doping and the p-p coupling between Bi and the host atoms. A sizeable magnetic moment is measured by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the O K-edge, probing directly the spin polarization of the O(2p) states. This result is in agreement with the theoretical predictions and inductive magnetometry measurements. Ab initio calculations of the electronic and magnetic structure of ZnBixO1−x at various doping levels allow to trace the origin of the ferromagnetic character of this material. It appears, that the spin-orbit energy of the heavy ion Bi stabilizes the ferromagnetic phase. Thus, ZnBixO1−x doped with a heavy non-ferromagnetic element, such as Bi, is a credible example of a candidate material for a new class of compounds for spintronics applications, based on the spin polarization of the p states. PMID:26592564

  19. Towards a new class of heavy ion doped magnetic semiconductors for room temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juwon; Subramaniam, Nagarajan Ganapathi; Agnieszka Kowalik, Iwona; Nisar, Jawad; Lee, Jaechul; Kwon, Younghae; Lee, Jaechoon; Kang, Taewon; Peng, Xiangyang; Arvanitis, Dimitri; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-11-01

    The article presents, using Bi doped ZnO, an example of a heavy ion doped oxide semiconductor, highlighting a novel p-symmetry interaction of the electronic states to stabilize ferromagnetism. The study includes both ab initio theory and experiments, which yield clear evidence for above room temperature ferromagnetism. ZnBixO1-x thin films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique. The room temperature ferromagnetism finds its origin in the holes introduced by the Bi doping and the p-p coupling between Bi and the host atoms. A sizeable magnetic moment is measured by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the O K-edge, probing directly the spin polarization of the O(2p) states. This result is in agreement with the theoretical predictions and inductive magnetometry measurements. Ab initio calculations of the electronic and magnetic structure of ZnBixO1-x at various doping levels allow to trace the origin of the ferromagnetic character of this material. It appears, that the spin-orbit energy of the heavy ion Bi stabilizes the ferromagnetic phase. Thus, ZnBixO1-x doped with a heavy non-ferromagnetic element, such as Bi, is a credible example of a candidate material for a new class of compounds for spintronics applications, based on the spin polarization of the p states.

  20. Structural phase transition, narrow band gap, and room-temperature ferromagnetism in [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1−x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3−δ}]{sub x} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wenliang; Yang, Pingxiong Chu, Junhao; Deng, Hongmei

    2014-09-15

    Structural phase transition, narrow band gap (E{sub g}), and room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) have been observed in the [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1−x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3−δ}]{sub x} (KBNNO) ceramics. All the samples have single phase perovskite structure, but exhibit a gradual transition behaviour from the orthorhombic to a cubic structure with the increase of x. Raman spectroscopy analysis not only corroborates this doping-induced change in normal structure but also shows the local crystal symmetry for x ≥ 0.1 compositions to deviate from the idealized cubic perovskite structure. A possible mechanism for the observed specific changes in lattice structure is discussed. Moreover, it is noted that KBNNO with compositions x = 0.1–0.3 have quite narrow E{sub g} of below 1.5 eV, much smaller than the 3.2 eV band gap of parent KNbO{sub 3} (KNO), which is due to the increasing Ni 3d electronic states within the gap of KNO. Furthermore, the KBNNO materials present RTFM near a tetragonal to cubic phase boundary. With increasing x from 0 to 0.3, the magnetism of the samples develops from diamagnetism to ferromagnetism and paramagnetism, originating from the ferromagnetic–antiferromagnetic competition. These results are helpful in the deeper understanding of phase transitions, band gap tunability, and magnetism variations in perovskite oxides and show the potential role, such materials can play, in perovskite solar cells and multiferroic applications.

  1. High temperature ferromagnetism with a giant magnetic moment in transparent co-doped SnO(2-delta).

    PubMed

    Ogale, S B; Choudhary, R J; Buban, J P; Lofland, S E; Shinde, S R; Kale, S N; Kulkarni, V N; Higgins, J; Lanci, C; Simpson, J R; Browning, N D; Das Sarma, S; Drew, H D; Greene, R L; Venkatesan, T

    2003-08-15

    The occurrence of room temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in pulsed laser deposited thin films of Sn(1-x)Co(x)O(2-delta) (x<0.3). Interestingly, films of Sn(0.95)Co(0.05)O(2-delta) grown on R-plane sapphire not only exhibit ferromagnetism with a Curie temperature close to 650 K, but also a giant magnetic moment of 7.5+/-0.5 micro(B)/Co, not yet reported in any diluted magnetic semiconductor system. The films are semiconducting and optically highly transparent.

  2. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo(2)Ti(2)Fe(8)O(19), large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them.

  3. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  4. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  5. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  6. Competing ferromagnetism in high-temperature copper oxide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Angela; Ghosal, Amit; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2007-04-10

    The extreme variability of observables across the phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors has remained a profound mystery, with no convincing explanation for the superconducting dome. Although much attention has been paid to the underdoped regime of the hole-doped cuprates because of its proximity to a complex Mott insulating phase, little attention has been paid to the overdoped regime. Experiments are beginning to reveal that the phenomenology of the overdoped regime is just as puzzling. For example, the electrons appear to form a Landau Fermi liquid, but this interpretation is problematic; any trace of Mott phenomena, as signified by incommensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuations, is absent, and the uniform spin susceptibility shows a ferromagnetic upturn. Here, we show and justify that many of these puzzles can be resolved if we assume that competing ferromagnetic fluctuations are simultaneously present with superconductivity, and the termination of the superconducting dome in the overdoped regime marks a quantum critical point beyond which there should be a genuine ferromagnetic phase at zero temperature. We propose experiments and make predictions to test our theory and suggest that an effort must be mounted to elucidate the nature of the overdoped regime, if the problem of high-temperature superconductivity is to be solved. Our approach places competing order as the root of the complexity of the cuprate phase diagram.

  7. Competing ferromagnetism in high-temperature copper oxide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Angela; Ghosal, Amit; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    The extreme variability of observables across the phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors has remained a profound mystery, with no convincing explanation for the superconducting dome. Although much attention has been paid to the underdoped regime of the hole-doped cuprates because of its proximity to a complex Mott insulating phase, little attention has been paid to the overdoped regime. Experiments are beginning to reveal that the phenomenology of the overdoped regime is just as puzzling. For example, the electrons appear to form a Landau Fermi liquid, but this interpretation is problematic; any trace of Mott phenomena, as signified by incommensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuations, is absent, and the uniform spin susceptibility shows a ferromagnetic upturn. Here, we show and justify that many of these puzzles can be resolved if we assume that competing ferromagnetic fluctuations are simultaneously present with superconductivity, and the termination of the superconducting dome in the overdoped regime marks a quantum critical point beyond which there should be a genuine ferromagnetic phase at zero temperature. We propose experiments and make predictions to test our theory and suggest that an effort must be mounted to elucidate the nature of the overdoped regime, if the problem of high-temperature superconductivity is to be solved. Our approach places competing order as the root of the complexity of the cuprate phase diagram. PMID:17404239

  8. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. Prepared for submission to Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) journal, Green Chemistry as a communication.

  9. Curie temperature of ultrathin ferromagnetic layer with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the Curie temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layers. It has been known that the Curie temperature of the ferromagnet depends on spin wave excitation energies, and they are affected by DMI. Therefore, the ferromagnetic transition temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layer must be sensitive on the DMI. We find that the Curie temperature depends on the DMI by using the double time Green's function method. Since the DMI is arisen by the inversion symmetry breaking structure, the DMI is always important in the inversion symmetry breaking ultrathin ferromagnetic layers.

  10. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  11. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  12. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials. PMID:27503610

  13. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  14. Room Temperature Electrical Detection of Spin Polarized Currents in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Geurs, Johannes; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Charpentier, Sophie; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-12-09

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new class of quantum materials that exhibit a current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking of massless Dirac Fermions in their surface states. This helical spin polarization in three-dimensional (3D) TIs has been observed using photoemission spectroscopy up to room temperatures. Recently, spin polarized surface currents in 3D TIs were detected electrically by potentiometric measurements using ferromagnetic detector contacts. However, these electric measurements are so far limited to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report the room temperature electrical detection of the spin polarization on the surface of Bi2Se3 by employing spin sensitive ferromagnetic tunnel contacts. The current-induced spin polarization on the Bi2Se3 surface is probed by measuring the magnetoresistance while switching the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic detector. A spin resistance of up to 70 mΩ is measured at room temperature, which increases linearly with current bias, reverses sign with current direction, and decreases with higher TI thickness. The magnitude of the spin signal, its sign, and control experiments, using different measurement geometries and interface conditions, rule out other known physical effects. These findings provide further information about the electrical detection of current-induced spin polarizations in 3D TIs at ambient temperatures and could lead to innovative spin-based technologies.

  15. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, Juan David; Arnache Olmos, Oscar; Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ramos, Rafael; Anadon, Alberto; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  16. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-03-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior.

  17. Cubic ideal ferromagnets at low temperature and weak magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2017-04-01

    The low-temperature series for the free energy density, pressure, magnetization and susceptibility of cubic ideal ferromagnets in weak external magnetic fields are discussed within the effective Lagrangian framework up to three loops. The structure of the simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattice is taken into account explicitly. The expansion involves integer and half-integer powers of the temperature. The corresponding coefficients depend on the magnetic field and on low-energy effective constants that can be expressed in terms of microscopic quantities. Our formulas may also serve as efficiency or consistency check for other techniques like Green's function methods, where spurious terms in the low-temperature expansion have appeared. We explore the sign and magnitude of the spin-wave interaction in the pressure, magnetization and susceptibility, and emphasize that our effective field theory approach is fully systematic and rigorous.

  18. Physical understanding of negative bias temperature instability below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaoli; Liao, Yiming; Yan, Feng; Zhu, Chenxin; Shi, Yi; Guo, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    The physical mechanism of VT degradations under negative bias temperature stress below room temperature has been studied for SiO2 and plasma nitrided oxide (PNO-based) pMOSFETs. It is found that VT degradations in both devices exhibit strong dependence on the electric field and temperature. The analysis shows that this strong dependence follows multi-phonon field-assisted tunneling theory, which indicates the inelastic hole trapping mechanism in the low temperature negative bias temperature instability (NBTI). On the other hand, by applying a low temperature sweeping technique, the energy distribution of these NBTI-induced hole traps below room temperature is indentified. The energy distribution of hole traps has two obvious peaks, one in the lower and one in the upper half of the silicon band gap. Both peaks gradually develop with increasing the stress time and temperature. We attempt to compare the energy profile for SiO2 and PNO devices to identify the trap precursors in NBTI below room temperature.

  19. High temperature ferromagnetism and optical properties of Co doped ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Bappaditya; Giri, P. K.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the occurrence of high temperature ferromagnetism (FM) in ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) doped with Co-atoms. ZnO NPs of two different initial sizes are doped with 3% and 5% Co using ball milling and FM is studied at room temperature and above. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis confirm the absence of metallic Co clusters or any other phase different from würtzite-type ZnO. UV-visible absorption studies show change in band structure and photoluminescence studies show green emission band at 520 nm indicating incorporation of Co-atoms and presence of oxygen vacancy defects, respectively in ZnO lattice. Micro-Raman studies of doped samples shows defect related additional bands at 547 and 574 cm-1. XRD and Raman spectra provide clear evidence for strain in the doped ZnO NPs. The field dependence of magnetization (M-H curve) measured at room temperature exhibits the clear FM with saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercive field (Hc) of the order of 3-7 emu/g and 260 Oe, respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization (M-T) measurement shows sharp ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition with a high Curie temperature (Tc) of ˜800 K for 3% Co doped ZnO NPs. It is found that doping at 5% and higher concentration does not exhibit a proper magnetic transition. We attempt to fit the observed FM data with the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model involving localized carriers and magnetic cations. However, calculated concentration of the BMPs is well below the typical percolation threshold in ZnO. We believe that observed high temperature FM is primarily mediated by defects in the strained NPs. ZnO NPs of lower initial size show enhanced FM that may be attributed to size dependent doping effect.

  20. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  1. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  2. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  3. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  4. Pressure-Temperature-Field Phase Diagram in the Ferromagnet U3P4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Shingo; Hayashida, Minami; Nishiumi, Naoto; Manabe, Hiroki; Ikeda, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C.; Murata, Keizo; Inada, Yoshihiko; Wiśniewski, Piotr; Aoki, Dai; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori

    2015-02-01

    The pressure-temperature-field phase diagram and quantum fluctuation effect were investigated in the itinerant ferromagnet U3P4 by resistivity, ac susceptibility, and Hall effect measurements under high pressure. The zero-temperature ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition is located at Pc ˜ 4.0 GPa. The tricritical point exists at P* = 3.8 GPa and T* = 32 K, where the ferromagnetic transition changes from second- to first-order. As a quantum fluctuation effect, the low-temperature resistivity at Pc follows T5/3 dependence, which was theoretically described in the case of a three-dimensional ferromagnet. This result indicates that the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition at Pc may be considered as weakly first-order. Another critical behavior, the huge enhancement of ρ0 observed at Pc, cannot be interpreted as the ferromagnetic fluctuation effect. The Hall effect measurements suggest that the magnetic structure in the ordered state changes under high pressure.

  5. Room-temperature solid-state maser.

    PubMed

    Oxborrow, Mark; Breeze, Jonathan D; Alford, Neil M

    2012-08-16

    The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser's birth. The maser's relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic and free-electron masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser's pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing into pentacene's triplet ground state. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser's measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other

  6. Dense nanocrystalline yttrium iron garnet films formed at room temperature by aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Scooter D. Glaser, Evan R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Hite, Jennifer

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We deposit yttrium iron garnet films at room temperature using aerosol deposition. • Films are 96% of theoretical density for yttrium iron garnet. • We report magnetic and structural properties post-deposition and post-annealing. • Low-temperature annealing decreases the FMR linewidth. • We discuss features of the FMR spectra at each anneal temperature. - Abstract: We have employed aerosol deposition to form polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on sapphire at room temperature that are 90–96% dense. We characterize the structural and dynamic magnetic properties of the dense films using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. We find that the as-deposited films are pure single-phase YIG formed of compact polycrystallites ∼20 nm in size. The ferromagnetic resonance mode occurs at 2829 G with a linewidth of 308 G. We perform a series of successive anneals up to 1000 °C on a film to explore heat treatment on the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth. We find the narrowest linewidth of 98 G occurs after a 750 °C anneal.

  7. Weak ferromagnetism and temperature dependent dielectric properties of Zn{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O diluted magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Raju; Moslehuddin, A.S.M.; Mahmood, Zahid Hasan; Hossain, A.K.M. Akther

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Single phase wurtzite structure was confirmed from XRD analysis. • Weak ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature. • Pure semiconducting properties confirmed from temperature dependent conductivity. • Smaller dielectric properties at higher frequency. • Possible potential application in high frequency spintronic devices. - Abstract: In this study the room temperature ferromagnetic behaviour and dielectric properties of ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) have been investigated using nominal chemical composition Zn{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed formation of single phase hexagonal wurtzite structure. An increase in grain size with increasing sintering temperature was observed from scanning electron microscopy. Field dependent DC magnetization values indicated dominant paramagnetic ordering along with a slight ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Frequency dependent complex initial permeability showed some positive values around 12 at room temperature. In dielectric measurement, an increasing trend of complex permittivity, loss tangent and ac conductivity with increasing temperature were observed. The temperature dependent dispersion curves of dielectric properties revealed clear relaxation at higher temperature. Frequency dependent ac conductivity was found to increase with frequency whereas complex permittivity and loss tangent showed an opposite trend.

  8. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-01

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains.

  9. Room-temperature ionic liquid battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; Fuller, J.

    1997-12-01

    The room-temperature molten salts possess a number of unique properties that make them ideal battery electrolytes. In particular, they are nonflammable, nonvolatile, and chemically inert, and they display wide electrochemical windows, high inherent conductivities, and wide thermal operating ranges. Although the ionic liquids have excellent characteristics, the chemical and electrochemical properties of desirable battery electrode materials are not well understood in these electrolytes. The research has focused on rechargeable electrodes and has included work on metallic lithium and sodium anodes in buffered neutral chloroaluminate melts, graphite-intercalation electrodes in neutral chloroaluminate and non-chloroaluminate melts, and silane-imidazole polymeric cathodes in acidic chloroaluminate melts. This paper will provide an overview of the research in these areas.

  10. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  11. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  12. Room-temperature spin-orbit torque in NiMnSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Anderson, L.; Tshitoyan, V.; Ferguson, A. J.; Gerhard, F.; Gould, C.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Gayles, J.; Železný, J.; Šmejkal, L.; Yuan, Z.; Sinova, J.; Freimuth, F.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that crystallize in diamond-related lattices, with Si and GaAs as their prime examples, are at the foundation of modern electronics. Simultaneously, inversion asymmetries in their crystal structure and relativistic spin-orbit coupling led to discoveries of non-equilibrium spin-polarization phenomena that are now extensively explored as an electrical means for manipulating magnetic moments in a variety of spintronic structures. Current research of these relativistic spin-orbit torques focuses primarily on magnetic transition-metal multilayers. The low-temperature diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ga, Mn)As, in which spin-orbit torques were initially discovered, has so far remained the only example showing the phenomenon among bulk non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets. Here we present a general framework, based on the complete set of crystallographic point groups, for identifying the potential presence and symmetry of spin-orbit torques in non-centrosymmetric crystals. Among the candidate room-temperature ferromagnets we chose to use NiMnSb, which is a member of the broad family of magnetic Heusler compounds. By performing all-electrical ferromagnetic resonance measurements in single-crystal epilayers of NiMnSb we detect room-temperature spin-orbit torques generated by effective fields of the expected symmetry and of a magnitude consistent with our ab initio calculations.

  13. Direct evidence for significant spin-polarization of EuS in Co/EuS multilayers at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, S. D.; Poulopoulos, P.; Lewitz, B.; Straub, A.; Goschew, A.; Kapaklis, V.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Fumagalli, P.

    2013-01-01

    The new era of spintronics promises the development of nanodevices, where the electron spin will be used to store information and charge currents will be replaced by spin currents. For this, ferromagnetic semiconductors at room temperature are needed. We report on significant room-temperature spin polarization of EuS in Co/EuS multilayers recorded by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The films were found to contain a mixture of divalent and trivalent europium, but only Eu++ is responsible for the ferromagnetic behavior of EuS. The magnetic XMCD signal of Eu at room temperature could unambiguously be assigned to magnetic ordering of EuS and was found to be only one order of magnitude smaller than that at 2.5 K. The room temperature magnetic moment of EuS is as large as the one of bulk ferromagnetic Ni. Our findings pave the path for fabrication of room–temperature spintronic devices using spin polarized EuS layers. PMID:23434820

  14. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  15. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Curie temperature suppression of ferromagnetic nanosolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. H.; Sun, Chang Q.; Tay, B. K.; Li, S.; Bai, H. L.; Jiang, E. Y.

    2002-06-01

    Based on the recent bond-order-bond-length-bond-strength correlation mechanism (Sun C Q, Chen T P, Tay B K, Li S, Huang H, Zhang Y B, Pan L K, Lau S P and Sun X W 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 3470) and the criterion of thermal-vibration-exchange-interaction energy equilibrium, an atomistic model has been developed for the Curie temperature (TC) suppression of ferromagnetic nanosolids. At TC, the atomic thermal vibration energy (EV) overcomes the atomic cohesive energy (Ecoh), which triggers the order-disorder transition of the spin-spin exchange interaction. Besides, the coordination-number (CN) imperfection at a surface enhances the strength of the bonds of the surface atoms. The CN reduction and bond-strength enhancement modifies the surface atomic Ecoh from that of an atom inside the bulk. As such, the critical EV for an atom at a free surface will be different from the bulk value and, hence, the TC of a nanosolid will change with the portion of surface atoms. Matching between predictions and experimental observations on the TC suppression of Fe, Ni and Co nanofilms evidences the validity of the current premise, in which no assumptions or freely adjustable parameters are involved.

  16. Prediction of near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect on honeycomb materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun; Yan, Binghai

    2014-12-19

    Recently, the long-sough quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in a magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (approximately 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on ab initio band structure calculations, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with a large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, respectively. The ferromagnetic (FM) order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and, consequently, an FM insulator with a large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions.

  17. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  18. Temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers in multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Perumal, Alagarsamy

    2016-11-01

    We report systematic investigations on temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers and resulting magnetic properties of multilayer structured [FeTaC (~67 nm)/Ta(x nm)]2/FeTaC(~67 nm)] thin films, which are fabricated directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate. As-deposited amorphous films are post annealed at different annealing temperatures (TA=200, 300 and 400 °C). Structural analyzes reveal that the films annealed at TA≤200 °C exhibit amorphous nature, while the films annealed above 200 °C show nucleation of nanocrystals at TA=300 °C and well-defined α-Fe nanocrystals with size of about 9 nm in amorphous matrix for 400 °C annealed films. Room temperature and temperature dependent magnetic hysteresis (M-H) loops reveal that magnetization reversal behaviors and magnetic properties are strongly depending on spacer layer thickness (x), TA and temperature. A large reduction in coercivity (HC) was observed for the films annealed at 200 °C and correlated to relaxation of stress quenched in during the film deposition. On the other hand, the films annealed at 300 °C exhibit unusual variation of HC(T), i.e., a broad minimum in HC(T) vs T curve. This is caused by change in magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic layers having different microstructure. In addition, the broad minimum in the HC(T) curve shifts from 150 K for x=1 film to 80 K for x=4 film. High-temperature thermomagnetization data show a strong (significant) variation of Curie temperature (TC) with TA (x). The multilayer films annealed at 200 °C exhibit low value of TC with a minimum of 350 K for x=4 film. But, the films annealed at 400 °C show largest TC with a maximum of 869 K for x=1 film. The observed results are discussed on the basis of variations in magnetic couplings between FeTaC layers, which are majorly driven by temperature, spacer layer thickness, annealing temperature and nature of interfaces.

  19. Nonlinear interaction of a ferromagnet with a high-temperature superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Kashurnikov, V. A. Maksimova, A. N.; Rudnev, I. A. Sotnikova, A. P.

    2013-03-15

    The interaction of an Abrikosov vertex with a ferromagnetic substrate is taken into account in the model of a layered high-temperature superconductor (HTSC). The magnetization reversal loops are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for various values of the magnetic moment of the substrate and at various temperatures. The nonlinearity of the interaction of the superconductor with the ferromagnet is demonstrated. The magnetization of HTSC films on magnetic and nonmagnetic substrates is measured. It is found that the ferromagnetism of the substrate strongly affects the shape and magnitude of the magnetization of the HTSC-substrate composite. Experimental data are found to correlate with the results of calculations.

  20. Spin-pump-induced spin transport in p-type Si at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shikoh, Eiji; Ando, Kazuya; Kubo, Kazuki; Saitoh, Eiji; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2013-03-22

    A spin battery concept is applied for the dynamical generation of pure spin current and spin transport in p-type silicon (p-Si). Ferromagnetic resonance and effective s-d coupling in Ni(80)Fe(20) results in spin accumulation at the Ni(80)Fe(20)/p-Si interface, inducing spin injection and the generation of spin current in the p-Si. The pure spin current is converted to a charge current by the inverse spin Hall effect of Pd evaporated onto the p-Si. This approach demonstrates the generation and transport of pure spin current in p-Si at room temperature.

  1. Spin-Pump-Induced Spin Transport in p-Type Si at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikoh, Eiji; Ando, Kazuya; Kubo, Kazuki; Saitoh, Eiji; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    A spin battery concept is applied for the dynamical generation of pure spin current and spin transport in p-type silicon (p-Si). Ferromagnetic resonance and effective s-d coupling in Ni80Fe20 results in spin accumulation at the Ni80Fe20/p-Si interface, inducing spin injection and the generation of spin current in the p-Si. The pure spin current is converted to a charge current by the inverse spin Hall effect of Pd evaporated onto the p-Si. This approach demonstrates the generation and transport of pure spin current in p-Si at room temperature.

  2. Monolithic integration of room-temperature multifunctional BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial heterostructures on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Fina, Ignasi; Domingo, Neus; Herranz, Gervasi; Skumryev, Vassil; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2016-08-01

    The multifunctional (ferromagnetic and ferroelectric) response at room temperature that is elusive in single phase multiferroic materials can be achieved in a proper combination of ferroelectric perovskites and ferrimagnetic spinel oxides in horizontal heterostructures. In this work, lead-free CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 bilayers are integrated with Si(001) using LaNiO3/CeO2/YSZ as a tri-layer buffer. They present structural and functional properties close to those achieved on perovskite substrates: the bilayers are fully epitaxial with extremely flat surface, and exhibit robust ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature.

  3. Monolithic integration of room-temperature multifunctional BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 epitaxial heterostructures on Si(001)

    PubMed Central

    Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Fina, Ignasi; Domingo, Neus; Herranz, Gervasi; Skumryev, Vassil; Fontcuberta, Josep; Sánchez, Florencio

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional (ferromagnetic and ferroelectric) response at room temperature that is elusive in single phase multiferroic materials can be achieved in a proper combination of ferroelectric perovskites and ferrimagnetic spinel oxides in horizontal heterostructures. In this work, lead-free CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 bilayers are integrated with Si(001) using LaNiO3/CeO2/YSZ as a tri-layer buffer. They present structural and functional properties close to those achieved on perovskite substrates: the bilayers are fully epitaxial with extremely flat surface, and exhibit robust ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at room temperature. PMID:27550543

  4. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  5. A simple method to obtain Fe-doped CeO2 nanocrystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, J. M. A.; Santos, P. E. C.; Cardoso, L. P.; Meneses, C. T.

    2013-02-01

    Ce1-xFexO2 nanocrystals (0room temperature using the coprecipitation method. The samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetization measurements as a function of field. The XRD results and Rietveld refinement analysis show that all particles have a crystalline structure isomorphous to the host structure (CeO2), with average size of 9 nm. This information was also confirmed by TEM images in which it is shown that the particles present spherical-like shape. The magnetic measurements indicated that the Fe-doped samples exhibit a weak ferromagnetism at room temperature, which increases with the increasing of the Fe content.

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Reproducible room temperature giant magnetocaloric effect in Fe-Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manekar, Meghmalhar; Roy, S. B.

    2008-10-01

    We present the results of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) studies in polycrystalline Fe-Rh alloy over a temperature range of 250-345 K across the first order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. By measuring the MCE under various thermomagnetic histories, contrary to the long held belief, we show here explicitly that the giant MCE in Fe-Rh near room temperature does not vanish after the first field cycle. In spite of the fact that the virgin magnetization curve is lost after the first field cycle near room temperature, reproducibility in the MCE under multiple field cycles can be achieved by properly choosing a combination of isothermal and adiabatic field variation cycles in the field-temperature phase space. This reproducible MCE leads to a large effective refrigerant capacity of 324.42 J kg-1, which is larger than that of the well-known magnetocaloric material Gd5Si2Ge2. This information could be important as Fe-Rh has the advantage of having a working temperature of around 300 K, which can be used for room temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  7. High temperature ferromagnetism in Ni doped ZnO nanoparticles: Milling time dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Bappaditya Sarkar, D.; Giri, P. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism (RT FM) in the Zn{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O (x = 0, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by a ball milling technique. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the single crystalline ZnO wurtzite structure with presence of small intensity secondary phase related peak which disappear with increasing milling time for Ni doped samples. HRTEM lattice images show that the doped NPs are single crystalline with a dspacing of 2.44 Å. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis confirms the presence of Ni ions in the ZnO matrix. Magnetic measurement (RT) exhibits the hysteresis loop with saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 1.6–2.56 (emu/g) and coercive field (H{sub c}) of 296–322 Oe. M-T measurement shows a Curie temperature of the order of 325°C for 3% Ni doped sample. Micro -Raman studies show doping/disorder induced additional modes at ∼510, 547, 572 cm{sup −1} in addition to 437 cm{sup −1} peak of pure ZnO. UV-Vis absorption spectra illustrate band gap shift due to doping. Alteration of M{sub s} value with the variation of doping concentration and milling time has been studied and discussed.

  8. Room temperature multiferroic properties of (Fex, Sr1-x)TiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Cheolbok; Fang, Sheng-Po; Yoon, Yong-Kyu

    2014-09-01

    This letter reports the structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and magnetic properties of Fe substituted SrTiO3 thin films in room temperature. The structural data obtained from x-ray diffraction indicates that (Fex,Sr1-x)TiO3, the so called FST, transforms from pseudocubic to tetragonal structures with increase of the Fe content in SrTiO3 thin films, featuring the ferroelectricity, while vibrating sample magnetometer measurements show magnetic hysteresis loops for the samples with low iron contents indicating their ferromagnetism. The characterized ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism confirms strong multiferroitism of the single phase FST thin films in room temperature. Also, an FST thin film metal-insulator-metal multiferroic capacitor has been fabricated and characterized in microwave frequencies between 10 MHz and 5 GHz. A capacitor based on Fe0.1Sr0.9TiO3 with a thickness of 260 nm shows a high electric tunability of 18.6% at 10 V and a maximum magnetodielectric value of 1.37% at 0.4 mT with a loss tangent of 0.021 at 1 GHz. This high tuning and low loss makes this material as a good candidate for frequency agile microwave devices such as tunable filters, phase shifters, and antennas.

  9. Room-temperature creation and spin-orbit torque-induced manipulation of skyrmions in thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenyuan; Im, Se Kwon K.; Fan, Yabin; Wong, Kin L.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    Magnetic skyrmions, which are topologically protected spin texture, are promising candidates for ultra-low energy and ultra-high density magnetic data storage and computing applications1, 2. To date, most experiments on skyrmions have been carried out at low temperatures. The choice of materials available is limited and there is a lack of electrical means to control of skyrmions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a method for creating skyrmion bubbles phase in the ferromagnetic thin film at room temperature. We further demonstrate that the created skyrmion bubbles can be manipulated by electric current. This room-temperature creation and manipulation of skyrmion in thin film is of particular interest for applications, being suitable for room-temperature operation and compatible with existing semiconductor manufacturing tools. 1. Nagaosa, N., Tokura, Y. Nature Nanotechnology 8, 899-911 (2013). 2. Fert, A., et al., Nature Nanotechnology 8, 152-156 (2013).

  10. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  11. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  12. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  13. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. PMID:27991593

  14. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Baig, R B Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Varma, Rajender S

    2016-12-19

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  15. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  16. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  17. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  18. Oxygen-vacancy-induced room-temperature magnetization in lamellar V2O5 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar, A. B.; Graff, I. L.; Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the local atomic and electronic structures as well as oxygen-vacancy-induced magnetic properties of electrodeposited V2O5 films. Unlike stoichiometric V2O5, which is a diamagnetic lamellar semiconductor, our oxygen-defective V2O5 films are ferromagnetic at room-temperature and their saturation magnetization decreases with air exposure time. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the aging effect on these films, revealing that freshly-made samples exhibit only local crystalline order, whereas the aged ones undoubtedly show an enhancement of crystallinity and coordination symmetry. The mean number of oxygen atoms around V tends to increase, indicating a decrease of oxygen vacancies with time. Concurrently with the decrease of oxygen vacancies, a loss of saturation magnetization is also observed. Hence, it can be concluded that the ferromagnetism of the V2O5 films originates from a vacancy-induced mechanism, confirming the universality of this class of ferromagnetism.

  19. Temperature dependence of spin polarization in ferromagnetic metals using lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamor, Estitxu; Isasa, Miren; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix

    2013-11-01

    Spin injection properties of ferromagnetic metals are studied and are compared by using highly reproducible cobalt/copper and permalloy/copper lateral spin valves (LSVs) with transparent contacts, fabricated with a careful control of the interface and the purity of copper. Spin polarization of permalloy and cobalt are obtained as a function of temperature. Analysis of the temperature dependence of both the spin polarization and the conductivity of permalloy confirms that the two-channel model for ferromagnetic metals is valid to define the current spin polarization and shows that a correction factor of ˜2 is needed for the values obtained by LSV experiments. The spin transport properties of copper, which also are studied as a function of temperature, are not affected by the used ferromagnetic material. The low-temperature maximum in the spin-diffusion length of copper is attributed to the presence of diluted magnetic impurities intrinsic from the copper.

  20. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  1. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  2. Room temperature magnetoelectric coupling in Zn1-xCoxO/BaTiO3 bilayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaj, Anuraj; Annal Therese, Helen; Ramaswamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Annamalai, Karthigeyan

    2014-09-01

    We report on room temperature magnetoelectric coupling in Zn1-xCoxO/BaTiO3 (x = 0.02, 0.05, and 0.10) bilayer thinfilm multiferroic system (BLS) grown on SrTiO3 (100) substrate. All the BLSs exhibit room temperature ferroelectric response. The BLS with x = 0.02 is paramagnetic, while the BLS with x = 0.05 and 0.10 is weakly ferromagnetic. Increase in Co concentration of the BLS results in reduction of permittivity and electric polarization along with increase of coercive voltage, coercive field, and magnetic moment. The d33 value change from 23 pm/V to 30 pm/V with increase in external magnetic field from 1500 G to 2500 G for BLS with x = 0.05. This shows that Zn1-xCoxO/BaTiO3 is magnetoelectrically coupled at room temperature.

  3. Enabling room temperature sodium metal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruiguo; Mishra, Kuber; Li, Xiaolin; Qian, Jiangfeng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-12-01

    Rechargeable batteries based upon sodium (Na+) cations are at the core of many new battery chemistries beyond Li-ion batteries. Rather than using carbon or alloy-based anodes, the direct utilization of solid sodium metal as an anode would be highly advantageous, but its use has been highly problematic due to its high reactivity. In this work, however, it is demonstrated that, by tailoring the electrolyte formulation, solid Na metal can be electrochemically plated/stripped at ambient temperature with high efficiency (> 99%) on both copper and inexpensive aluminum current collectors thereby enabling a shift in focus to new battery chemical couples based upon Na metal operating at ambient temperature. These highly concentrated electrolytes has enabled stable cycling of Na metal batteries based on a Na metal anode and Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode at high rates with very high efficiency.

  4. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  5. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-23

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  6. High temperature magnetic order in Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Górska, M.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Lewińska, S.; Szymczak, R.; Dynowska, E.; Podgórni, A.; Dobrowolski, W.; Ralević, U.; Gajić, R.; Romčević, N.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Marenkin, S. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present studies of structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors with the average Mn-content, \\bar{x} , changing from 0.027 up to 0.138. The magnetic force microscope imaging done at room temperature shows the presence of a strong signal coming from MnSb clusters. Magnetic properties show the paramagnet-ferromagnet transition with the Curie temperature, T C, equal to about 522 K and the cluster-glass behavior with the transition temperature, T CG, equal to about 465 K, both related to MnSb clusters. The magnetotransport studies show that all investigated samples are p-type semiconductors with high hole concentration, p, changing from 1021 to 1022 cm-3. A large increase in the resistivity as a function of the magnetic field is observed at T  <  10 K and small magnetic fields, |B|<100 mT, for all the studied samples with a maximum amplitude of the magnetoresistance about 460% at T  =  1.4 K. The large increase in the resistivity is most probably caused by the appearance of the superconducting state in the samples at T  <  4.3 K.

  7. A novel ferromagnetic thermo-stent for plaque stabilization that self-regulates the temperature.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Matsumura, Kouji; Hagisawa, Kousuke; Ishihara, Masayuki; Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kurita, Akira; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the vascular wall with a thermally self-regulating, cylindrical stent made of a low Curie temperature ferromagnetic alloy. Physiologic saline was circulated in the silicone model vessel implanted with the stent. The stent-temperature remained nearly constant for variable saline flows, saline temperatures, and magnetic flux densities. Stent implants of this type in human blood vessels could potentially enable thermotherapy and temperature determination without catheterization.

  8. High temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped MoS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baorui; Guo, Qing; Gao, Daqiang; Shi, Shoupeng; Tao, Kun

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis of 2D metal chalcogenide based on ferromagnetic nanosheets is in high demand for modern electronics and spintronics applications. Herein, Cu-doped MoS2 nanosheets were successfully prepared by a hydrothermal method. Magnetic measurement results indicate that the doping of Cu ions can introduce ferromagnetism into MoS2 nanosheets, where saturate magnetization increases with increased Cu concentration. Further, the hysteresis curves measured at different temperatures demonstrate a high Curie temperature of 930 K for the Cu-doped MoS2 nanosheets. This result opens a new path to exploring spintronics in pristine 2D nanostructures by non-magnetic atom doping.

  9. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-12

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering.

  10. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO3 thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  11. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  12. Large Magnetoelectric Coupling Near Room Temperature in Synthetic Melanostibite Mn2 FeSbO6.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-García, Antonio J; Solana-Madruga, Elena; Ritter, Clemens; Andrada-Chacón, Adrián; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Mompean, Federico J; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Sáez-Puche, Regino; Schmidt, Rainer

    2017-04-10

    Multiferroic materials exhibit two or more ferroic orders and have potential applications as multifunctional materials in the electronics industry. A coupling of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism is hereby particularly promising. We show that the synthetic melanostibite mineral Mn2 FeSbO6 (R3‾ space group) with ilmenite-type structure exhibits cation off-centering that results in alternating modulated displacements, thus allowing antiferroelectricity to occur. Massive magnetoelectric coupling (MEC) and magnetocapacitance effect of up to 4000 % was detected at a record high temperature of 260 K. The multiferroic behavior is based on the imbalance of cationic displacements caused by a magnetostrictive mechanism, which sets up an unprecedented example to pave the way for the development of highly effective MEC devices operational at or near room temperature.

  13. Tunable Curie temperature around room temperature and magnetocaloric effect in ternary Ce-Fe-B amorphous ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhu-bai; Zhang, Le-le; Zhang, Xue-feng; Li, Yong-feng; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Tong-yun; Shen, Bao-gen

    2017-01-01

    Ce13-x Fe81+x B6 (x  =  0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2) amorphous magnets were prepared by melt-spinning method. These magnets are magnetically soft at low temperature, and undergo a second-order phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state near room temperature with a broad temperature span. The phase-transition temperature is tunable by the variation of the Ce/Fe atomic ratio, which is mainly due to the change of the coordination number of Fe atoms in these ternary Ce-Fe-B amorphous magnets. Though the entropy change is low, the refrigeration capacities are in the ranges of 116-150 J kg-1 and 319-420 J kg-1, respectively, for the magnetic field changes of 0-2 T and 0-5 T, which is comparable with those of conventional magnetic materials for room-temperature refrigeration. Given the low cost of Fe and Ce, Ce-Fe-B amorphous magnets are attractive magnetic refrigerant candidates.

  14. Near-room-temperature Chern insulator and Dirac spin-gapless semiconductor: nickel chloride monolayer.

    PubMed

    He, Junjie; Li, Xiao; Lyu, Pengbo; Nachtigall, Petr

    2017-02-09

    A great obstacle for practical applications of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is the lack of suitable QAH materials (Chern insulators) with a large non-trivial band gap, room-temperature magnetic order and high carrier mobility. Based on first-principles calculations it is shown here that a nickel chloride (NiCl3) monolayer has all these characteristics. Thus, the NiCl3 monolayer represents a new class of Dirac materials with Dirac spin-gapless semiconducting properties and high-temperature ferromagnetism (∼400 K). Taking into account the spin-orbit coupling, the NiCl3 monolayer becomes an intrinsic Chern insulator with a large non-trivial band gap of ∼24 meV, corresponding to an operating temperature as high as ∼280 K at which the quantum anomalous Hall effect could be observed. The calculated large non-trivial gap, high Curie temperature and single-spin Dirac states reported herein for the NiCl3 monolayer led us to propose that this material gives a great promise for potential realization of a near-room temperature QAH effect and potential applications in spintronics. Last but not least the calculated Fermi velocities of Dirac fermions of about 4 × 10(5) m s(-1) indicate very high mobility in NiCl3 monolayers.

  15. Exchange interactions, spin waves, and Curie temperature in zincblende half-metallic sp-electron ferromagnets: the case of CaZ (Z = N, P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Laref, A; Saşioglu, E; Galanakis, I

    2011-07-27

    Using first-principle calculations in conjunction with the frozen-magnon technique we have calculated the exchange interactions and spin-wave dispersions in the series of the zincblende half-metallic II-V (CaZ, Z = N, P, As, Sb) ferromagnets. The calculated exchange constants are used to estimate the Curie temperature within the random phase approximation. The large Stoner gap in these alloys gives rise to well-defined undamped spin waves throughout the Brillouin zone. Moreover we show that the spin-wave stiffness constants for the considered systems are among the largest available for local moment ferromagnets. The predicted Curie temperature of half-metallic CaN is noticeably higher than the room temperature with respect to the other compounds, and thus we propose CaN as a promising candidate for future applications in spintronic devices.

  16. Room Temperature Crystallization of Hydroxyapatite in Porous Silicon Structures.

    PubMed

    Santana, M; Estevez, J O; Agarwal, V; Herrera-Becerra, R

    2016-12-01

    Porous silicon (PS) substrates, with different pore sizes and morphology, have been used to crystallize hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-fibers by an easy and economical procedure using a co-precipitation method at room temperature. In situ formation of HA nanoparticles, within the meso- and macroporous silicon structure, resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized hydroxyapatite crystals on/within the porous structure. The X-ray diffraction technique was used to determine the tetragonal structure of the crystals. Analysis/characterization demonstrates that under certain synthesis conditions, growth and crystallization of hydroxyapatite layer on/inside PS can be achieved at room temperature. Such composite structures expand the possibility of designing a new bio-composite material based on the hydroxyapatite and silicon synthesized at room temperature.

  17. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications.

  18. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-03

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed.

  19. Interfacial dominated ferromagnetism in nanograined ZnO: a μSR and DFT study

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Thomas; Audehm, Patrick; Chen, Yu–Chun; Schütz, Gisela; Straumal, Boris B.; Protasova, Svetlana G.; Mazilkin, Andrey A.; Straumal, Petr B.; Prokscha, Thomas; Luetkens, Hubertus; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Baretzky, Brigitte; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Danilov, Denis; Goering, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Diamagnetic oxides can, under certain conditions, become ferromagnetic at room temperature and therefore are promising candidates for future material in spintronic devices. Contrary to early predictions, doping ZnO with uniformly distributed magnetic ions is not essential to obtain ferromagnetic samples. Instead, the nanostructure seems to play the key role, as room temperature ferromagnetism was also found in nanograined, undoped ZnO. However, the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in primarily non–magnetic oxides like ZnO is still unexplained and a controversial subject within the scientific community. Using low energy muon spin relaxation in combination with SQUID and TEM techniques, we demonstrate that the magnetic volume fraction is strongly related to the sample volume fraction occupied by grain boundaries. With molecular dynamics and density functional theory we find ferromagnetic coupled electron states in ZnO grain boundaries. Our results provide evidence and a microscopic model for room temperature ferromagnetism in oxides. PMID:25747456

  20. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  1. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  2. Room Temperature Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Nanocrystalline Tb1.90Ni0.10O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, J.; Dalal, M.; Sarkar, B. J.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-doped terbium oxide (Tb1.90Ni0.10O3) has been synthesized by the co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 700°C for 6 h in vacuum. The crystallographic phase and the substitution of Ni2+ ions in the lattice of Tb2O3 are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of the x-ray diffraction pattern using the software MAUD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is also carried out to study the morphology of the sample. Magnetic measurements are carried out at different temperatures from 5 K to 300 K using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The dependence of the magnetization of Tb1.90Ni0.10O3 as a function of temperature ( M- T) and magnetic field ( M- H) suggests the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature, but antiferromagnetic phase dominates below ˜120 K. The lack of saturation in the M- H curve and good fitting of the M- T curve by the Johnston formula also indicate the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. Interestingly, an antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition is observed below ˜40 K. The result also shows a high value of magnetization at 5 K.

  3. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  4. Transition-metal embedded carbon nitride monolayers: high-temperature ferromagnetism and half-metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Kumar, Sourabh; Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices.High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  5. High temperature ferromagnetism in cubic Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nguyen Hoa; Park, Chul-Kwon; Raghavender, A. T.; Ruyter, Antoine; Chikoidze, Ekaterina; Dumont, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Theory has predicted that high temperature ferromagnetism (FM) should be found in cubic fake-diamonds, Mn-doped ZrO2. Experimentally, it is shown that Mn-doped ZrO2 ceramics are not ferromagnetic, but the nanosized Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films grown on LaAlO3 substrates can be ferromagnets with TC above 400 K. The largest saturated magnetic moment (Ms) is huge as of about 230 emu/cm3 for the Mn0.05Zr0.95O2 films, and it decreases as the Mn content increases. The intrinsic FM is strongly associated with the cubic structure of Mn-doped ZrO2, and the Mn-Mn interactions via oxygen intermediates are important. No electrical conductivity is observed. Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films can be truly considered as excellent candidates for spintronic applications.

  6. Room Temperature Magnetically Ordered Polar Corundum GaFeO3 Displaying Magnetoelectric Coupling.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongjun; Pitcher, Michael J; Corkett, Alex J; Ling, Sanliang; Mandal, Pranab; Zanella, Marco; Dawson, Karl; Stamenov, Plamen; Batuk, Dmitry; Abakumov, Artem M; Bull, Craig L; Smith, Ronald I; Murray, Claire A; Day, Sarah J; Slater, Ben; Cora, Furio; Claridge, John B; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The polar corundum structure type offers a route to new room temperature multiferroic materials, as the partial LiNbO3-type cation ordering that breaks inversion symmetry may be combined with long-range magnetic ordering of high spin d(5) cations above room temperature in the AFeO3 system. We report the synthesis of a polar corundum GaFeO3 by a high-pressure, high-temperature route and demonstrate that its polarity arises from partial LiNbO3-type cation ordering by complementary use of neutron, X-ray, and electron diffraction methods. In situ neutron diffraction shows that the polar corundum forms directly from AlFeO3-type GaFeO3 under the synthesis conditions. The A(3+)/Fe(3+) cations are shown to be more ordered in polar corundum GaFeO3 than in isostructural ScFeO3. This is explained by DFT calculations which indicate that the extent of ordering is dependent on the configurational entropy available to each system at the very different synthesis temperatures required to form their corundum structures. Polar corundum GaFeO3 exhibits weak ferromagnetism at room temperature that arises from its Fe2O3-like magnetic ordering, which persists to a temperature of 408 K. We demonstrate that the polarity and magnetization are coupled in this system with a measured linear magnetoelectric coupling coefficient of 0.057 ps/m. Such coupling is a prerequisite for potential applications of polar corundum materials in multiferroic/magnetoelectric devices.

  7. Modified Spin Wave Analysis of Low Temperature Properties of the Spin-1/2 Frustrated Ferromagnetic Ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Kazuo; Iino, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Low temperature properties of the spin-1/2 frustrated ladder with ferromagnetic rungs and legs, and two different antiferromagnetic next nearest neighbor interactions are investigated using the modified spin wave approximation in the region with ferromagnetic ground states. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic structure factors is calculated. The results are consistent with the numerical exact diagonalization results in the intermediate temperature range. Below this temperature range, the finite size effect is significant in the numerical diagonalization results, while the modified spin wave approximation gives more reliable results. The low temperature properties near the limit of the stability of the ferromagnetic ground state are also discussed.

  8. Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase behavior observed at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uky Vivitasari, Pipit; Azuma, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) consists of source, drain, Coulomb island, and gate to modulate the number of electrons and control the current. For practical applications, it is important to operate a SET at room temperature. One proposal towards the ability to operate at room temperature is to decrease Coulomb island size down to a few nanometres. We investigate a SET using Sn-porphyrin (Sn-por) protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with 1.4 nm in core diameter as a Coulomb island. The fabrication method of nanogap electrodes uses the combination of a top-down technique by electron beam lithography (EBL) and a bottom-up process through electroless gold plating (ELGP) as our group have described before. The electrical measurement was conducted at room temperature (300 K). From current–voltage (I d–V d) characteristics, we obtained clear Coulomb blockade phenomena together with a Coulomb staircase due to a Sn-por protected gold NP as a Coulomb island. Experimental results of I d–V d characteristics agree with a theoretical curve based on using the orthodox model. Clear dI d/dV d peaks are observed in the Coulomb staircase at 9 K which suggest the electron transports through excited energy levels of Au NPs. These results are a big step for obtaining SETs that can operate at room temperature.

  9. Experimental epikeratophakia using tissue lathed at room temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Rostron, C. K.; Sandford-Smith, J. H.; Morton, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents for the first time the results of carrying out epikeratophakia with tissue lathed at room temperature. Using an experimental model of epikeratophakia in the rabbit, we evaluated tissue handling techniques for the preparation of donor lenticules. Details of the technique are described and the in-vivo and histopathological findings reported. Images PMID:3293653

  10. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  11. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  12. Amination of allylic alcohols in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2009-06-04

    The "trick" to carrying out regiocontrolled aminations of allylic alcohols in water as the only medium is use of a nanomicelle's interior as the organic reaction solvent. When HCO(2)Me is present, along with the proper base and source of catalytic Pd, allylic amines are cleanly formed at room temperature.

  13. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  14. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  15. Room-temperature chiral charge pumping in Dirac semimetals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Enze; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Shiheng; Liang, Sihang; Cao, Junzhi; Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Li, Qian; Zhou, Chao; Gu, Teng; Wu, Yizheng; Zou, Jin; Xiu, Faxian

    2017-01-01

    Chiral anomaly, a non-conservation of chiral charge pumped by the topological nontrivial gauge fields, has been predicted to exist in Weyl semimetals. However, until now, the experimental signature of this effect exclusively relies on the observation of negative longitudinal magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Here, we report the field-modulated chiral charge pumping process and valley diffusion in Cd3As2. Apart from the conventional negative magnetoresistance, we observe an unusual nonlocal response with negative field dependence up to room temperature, originating from the diffusion of valley polarization. Furthermore, a large magneto-optic Kerr effect generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields is detected. These new experimental approaches provide a quantitative analysis of the chiral anomaly phenomenon which was inaccessible previously. The ability to manipulate the valley polarization in topological semimetal at room temperature opens up a route towards understanding its fundamental properties and utilizing the chiral fermions. PMID:28067234

  16. Micromachined room-temperature microbolometers for millimeter-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Arifur; de Lange, Gert; Hu, Qing

    1996-04-01

    We have combined silicon micromachining technology with planar circuits to fabricate room-temperature niobium microbolometers for millimeter-wave detection. In this type of detector, a thin niobium film, with a dimension much smaller than the wavelength and fabricated on a 1 μm thick Si3N4 membrane, acts both as a radiation absorber and temperature sensor. Incident radiation is coupled into the microbolometer by a 0.37λ dipole antenna of center frequency 95 GHz with a 3 dB bandwidth of 15%, which is impedance matched with the Nb film. An electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4.5×10-10 W/√Hz has been achieved. This is comparable to the best commercial room-temperature millimeter-wave detectors.

  17. Room-temperature chiral charge pumping in Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Enze; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Shiheng; Liang, Sihang; Cao, Junzhi; Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Li, Qian; Zhou, Chao; Gu, Teng; Wu, Yizheng; Zou, Jin; Xiu, Faxian

    2017-01-01

    Chiral anomaly, a non-conservation of chiral charge pumped by the topological nontrivial gauge fields, has been predicted to exist in Weyl semimetals. However, until now, the experimental signature of this effect exclusively relies on the observation of negative longitudinal magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Here, we report the field-modulated chiral charge pumping process and valley diffusion in Cd3As2. Apart from the conventional negative magnetoresistance, we observe an unusual nonlocal response with negative field dependence up to room temperature, originating from the diffusion of valley polarization. Furthermore, a large magneto-optic Kerr effect generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields is detected. These new experimental approaches provide a quantitative analysis of the chiral anomaly phenomenon which was inaccessible previously. The ability to manipulate the valley polarization in topological semimetal at room temperature opens up a route towards understanding its fundamental properties and utilizing the chiral fermions.

  18. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  19. Assembling non-ferromagnetic materials to ferromagnetic architectures using metal-semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Liu, Chunting; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a facile and versatile solution route was used to fabricate room-temperature ferromagnetic fish bone-like, pteridophyte-like, poplar flower-like, cotton-like Cu@Cu2O architectures and golfball-like Cu@ZnO architecture. The ferromagnetic origins in these architectures were found to be around metal-semiconductor interfaces and defects, and the root cause for their ferromagnetism lay in charge transfer processes from metal Cu to semiconductors Cu2O and ZnO. Owing to different metallization at their interfaces, these architectures exhibited different ferromagnetic behaviors, including coercivity, saturation magnetization as well as magnetic interactions.

  20. Assembling non-ferromagnetic materials to ferromagnetic architectures using metal-semiconductor interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Liu, Chunting; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a facile and versatile solution route was used to fabricate room-temperature ferromagnetic fish bone-like, pteridophyte-like, poplar flower-like, cotton-like Cu@Cu2O architectures and golfball-like Cu@ZnO architecture. The ferromagnetic origins in these architectures were found to be around metal-semiconductor interfaces and defects, and the root cause for their ferromagnetism lay in charge transfer processes from metal Cu to semiconductors Cu2O and ZnO. Owing to different metallization at their interfaces, these architectures exhibited different ferromagnetic behaviors, including coercivity, saturation magnetization as well as magnetic interactions. PMID:27680286

  1. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature.

  2. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3–BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3–BiMnO3–PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses. PMID:27677353

  3. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  4. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-28

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  5. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-03-03

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  6. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  7. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  8. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. F.; Dymek, C. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Three novel primary cells which use room temperature molten salt electrolytes are examined and found to have high open circuit potentials in the 1.75-2.19 V range, by comparison with the Al/AlCl3-MEICl concentration cell; their cathodes were of FeCl3-MEICl, WCl6-MEICl, and Br2/reticulated vitreous carbon together with Pt. Also, secondary electrochemical cell candidates were examined which combined the reversible Al/AlCl3-MEICl electrode with reversible zinc and cadmium molten salt electrodes to yield open circuit potentials of about 0.7 and 1.0 V, respectively. Room temperature molten salts' half-cell reduction potentials are given.

  9. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macro­molecular crystallography. PMID:22751666

  10. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  11. Induced spin-polarization of EuS at room temperature in Ni/EuS multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Poulopoulos, P.; Goschew, A.; Straub, A.; Fumagalli, P.; Kapaklis, V.; Wolff, M.; Delimitis, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Pappas, S. D.

    2014-03-17

    Ni/EuS multilayers with excellent multilayer sequencing are deposited via e-beam evaporation on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers at 4 × 10{sup −9} millibars. The samples have very small surface and interface roughness and show sharp interfaces. Ni layers are nanocrystalline 4–8 nm thick and EuS layers are 2–4 nm thick and are either amorphous or nanocrystalline. Unlike for Co/EuS multilayers, all Eu ions are in divalent (ferromagnetic) state. We show a direct antiferromagnetic coupling between EuS and Ni layers. At room temperature, the EuS layers are spin-polarized due to the proximity of Ni. Therefore, Ni/EuS is a candidate for room-temperature spintronics applications.

  12. Low-temperature ferromagnetic properties in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fengxia E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn; Yu, Gen; Han, Chong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Duanming; Xia, Zhengcai E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn

    2014-01-06

    β-Ag{sub 2}Se is a topologically nontrivial insulator. The magnetic properties of Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles with Co concentrations up to 40% were investigated. The cusp of zero-field-cooling magnetization curves and the low-temperature hysteresis loops were observed. With increasing concentration of Co{sup 2+} ions mainly substituting Ag{sub I} sites in the Ag{sub 2}Se structure, the resistivity, Curie temperature T{sub c}, and magnetization increased. At 10 T, a sharp drop of resistance near T{sub c} was detected due to Co dopants. The ferromagnetic behavior in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se might result from the intra-layer ferromagnetic coupling and surface spin. This magnetic semiconductor is a promising candidate in electronics and spintronics.

  13. Room-temperature direct alkynylation of arenes with copper acetylides.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Cédric; Evano, Gwilherm

    2014-09-05

    C-H bond in azoles and polyhalogenated arenes can be smoothly activated by copper acetylides to give the corresponding alkynylated (hetero)arenes by simple reaction at room temperature in the presence of phenanthroline and lithium tert-butoxide under an oxygen atmosphere. These stable, unreactive, and readily available polymers act as especially efficient and practical reagents for the introduction of an alkyne group to a wide number of arenes under remarkably mild conditions.

  14. Silicon photodiodes with high photoconductive gain at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Carey, J E; Sickler, J W; Pralle, M U; Palsule, C; Vineis, C J

    2012-02-27

    Silicon photodiodes with high photoconductive gain are demonstrated. The photodiodes are fabricated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible process. The typical room temperature responsivity at 940 nm is >20 A/W and the dark current density is ≈ 100 nA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias, yielding a detectivity of ≈ 10(14) Jones. These photodiodes are good candidates for applications that require high detection sensitivity and low bias operation.

  15. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  16. Room Temperature Source of Single Photons of Definite Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Bissel, L.J.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, Jr., C.R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2007-02-12

    A definite polarization in fluorescence from single emitters (dye molecules) at room temperature is demonstrated. A planar-aligned, nematic liquid-crystal host provides definite alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction. Well-defined polarized fluorescence from single-emitters (single photon source) is important for applications in photonic quantum information. Polarized single-photon sources based on single-emitters, for example, are key hardware elements both for absolutely secure quantum communication and quantum computation systems.

  17. Experimental observation of negative capacitance in ferroelectrics at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Daniel J R; Ponon, Nikhil K; Kwa, Kelvin S K; Zou, Bin; Petrov, Peter K; Wang, Tianle; Alford, Neil M; O'Neill, Anthony

    2014-07-09

    Effective negative capacitance has been postulated in ferroelectrics because there is a hysteresis in plots of polarization-electric field. Compelling experimental evidence of effective negative capacitance is presented here at room temperature in engineered devices, where it is stabilized by the presence of a paraelectric material. In future integrated circuits, the incorporation of such negative capacitance into MOSFET gate stacks would reduce the subthreshold slope, enabling low power operation and reduced self-heating.

  18. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  19. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  20. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  1. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robin L. Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-06-15

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A{sub 2A} adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography.

  2. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  3. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10‑3 S cm‑1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  4. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  5. Zero-temperature relaxation of three-dimensional Ising ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejarz, J.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the properties of the Ising-Glauber model on a periodic cubic lattice of linear dimension L after a quench to zero temperature. The resulting evolution is extremely slow, with long periods of wandering on constant energy plateaus, punctuated by occasional energy-decreasing spin-flip events. The characteristic time scale τ for this relaxation grows exponentially with the system size; we provide a heuristic and numerical evidence that τ~exp(L2). For all but the smallest-size systems, the long-time state is almost never static. Instead, the system contains a small number of “blinker” spins that continue to flip forever with no energy cost. Thus, the system wanders ad infinitum on a connected set of equal-energy blinker states. These states are composed of two topologically complex interwoven domains of opposite phases. The average genus gL of the domains scales as Lγ, with γ≈1.7; thus, domains typically have many holes, leading to a “plumber’s nightmare” geometry.

  6. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  7. Room Temperature Chemical Oxidation of Delafossite-Type Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trari, M.; Töpfer, J.; Doumerc, J. P.; Pouchard, M.; Ammar, A.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1994-07-01

    Examination of the delafossite-type structure of CuLaO 2 and CuYO 2 suggests that there is room enough to accomodate intercalated oxide ions and the charge compensation resulting simply from the oxidation of an equivalent amount of Cu + into Cu 2+. Reaction with hypohalites in an aqueous solution leads to color change. Evidence of the formation of Cu 2+ is given by TGA, iodometric titration, and magnetic (static and EPR) measurements. The obtained La and Y compounds seem to behave in a different way: whereas CuLaO 2+ x appears as a single phase, CuYO 2+ x corresponds to a two-phase mixture, with respectively low and high x values, the latter being isostructural with the thermally oxidized compound recently reported by Cava et al. Comparison is stressed between the oxides obtained by oxidation at room and those obtained at higher temperatures.

  8. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction.

  9. Single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.

    1996-12-01

    The spirit of studying single-molecule behaviors dates back to the turn of the century. In addition to Einstein`s well-known work on Brownian motion, there has been a tradition for studying single {open_quotes}macromolecules{close_quotes} or a small number of molecules either by light scattering or by fluorescence using an optical microscope. Modern computers have allowed detailed studies of single-molecule behaviors in condensed media through molecular dynamics simulations. Optical spectroscopy offers a wealth of information on the structure, interaction, and dynamics of molecular species. With the motivation of removing {open_quotes}inhomogeneous broadening{close_quotes}, spectroscopic techniques have evolved from spectral hole burning, fluorescence line narrowing, and photo-echo to the recent pioneering work on single-molecule spectroscopy in solids at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution spectroscopic work on single molecules relies on zero phonon lines which appear at cryogenic temperatures, and have narrow line widths and large absorption cross sections. Recent advances in near-field and confocal fluorescence have allowed not only fluorescence imaging of single molecules with high spatial resolutions but also single-molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. In this Account, the author provides a physical chemist`s perspective on experimental and theoretical developments on room-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics, with the emphasis on the information obtainable from single-molecule experiments. 61 refs., 9 figs.

  10. The Effect of Planar Magnetic Inhomogeneities on the Critical Temperature of Ferromagnet-Superconductor Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanov, V. A.; Proshin, Yu. N.

    2016-12-01

    We study superconducting systems with the inhomogeneous effective exchange field background. A model of magnetic superconductor which takes into account the collectivized electrons interaction with the inhomogeneous effective exchange field is used. With local unitary rotation in spinor space we rewrite the Hamiltonian in a new basis where this interaction is diagonal. The problem is reduced to the one with a uniform exchange field but the effective tensor field appears. This method allows us to simplify the Gor'kov, Eilenberger, and Usadel equations in many symmetric cases. We calculate the critical temperature of the superconductor/ferromagnet proximity system in the dirty limit where the ferromagnet has periodic domain structure with planar domain walls.

  11. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Julia A; Brooks, Charles M; Holtz, Megan E; Moyer, Jarrett A; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F; Heron, John T; Clarkson, James D; Disseler, Steven M; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A; Ratcliff, William D; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A; Schlom, Darrell G

    2016-09-22

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3-the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling-we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially-from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering.

  12. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Julia A.; Brooks, Charles M.; Holtz, Megan E.; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F.; Heron, John T.; Clarkson, James D.; Disseler, Steven M.; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A.; Ratcliff, William D.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J.; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3—the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling—we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially—from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering.

  13. Temperature dependent ferromagnetic relaxation and gyromagnetic ratio in Ni80Fe20 / Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mohammadi, Jamileh; Mewes, Claudia; Mewes, Tim; Eggers, Tatiana; Miller, Casey; MINT Center Team; Rochester Institute of Technology Team

    2015-03-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the magnetization dynamics of NiFe thin films (5nm & 10nm) capped with a 3nm Gd layer using broadband ferromagnetic resonance. We observe that the effective Gilbert damping parameter determined from the broadband measurements increases as the temperature approaches the Curie-temperature of the Gd layer. Part of the enhancement can be explained by an increase of the spin-pumping contribution to the relaxation as the temperature approaches the Curie temperature of Gd. We also measure a strong increase of the gyromagnetic ratio with decreasing temperature which resembles the increase of the gyromagnetic ratio in rare earth containing transition metals near the compensation point. This increase in the gyromagnetic ratio is expected to lead to an increased Gilbert type damping due to spin-orbit interaction, that likely also contributes to the increase in damping. NSF-CAREER Award No. 0952929 and NSF-ECCS-1231929.

  14. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  15. Large electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric polymers near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Neese, Bret; Chu, Baojin; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Wang, Yong; Furman, E; Zhang, Q M

    2008-08-08

    Applying an electrical field to a polar polymer may induce a large change in the dipolar ordering, and if the associated entropy changes are large, they can be explored in cooling applications. With the use of the Maxwell relation between the pyroelectric coefficient and the electrocaloric effect (ECE), it was determined that a large ECE can be realized in the ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] copolymer at temperatures above the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition (above 70 degrees C), where an isothermal entropy change of more than 55 joules per kilogram per kelvin degree and adiabatic temperature change of more than 12 degrees C were observed. We further showed that a similar level of ECE near room temperature can be achieved by working with the relaxor ferroelectric polymer of P(VDF-TrFE-chlorofluoroethylene).

  16. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  17. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  18. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Si, M S; Gao, Daqiang; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z Y; Xue, Desheng; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G P

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  19. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  20. Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Goodell, Jennifer; Molt, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ten types of ferritic and martensitic stainless steels have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K. The steel samples studied were in the annealed state as received from the manufacturer. Our room temperature measurements indicate significantly harder magnetic properties than those quoted in the ASM International Handbook, which studied fully annealed stainless steel samples. Despite having harder magnetic properties than fully annealed steels some of the as-received steels still display soft magnetic properties adequate for magnetic applications. The carbon content of the steels was found to affect the permeability and coercive force, with lower-carbon steels displaying significantly higher permeability and lower coercive force. The decrease in coercive force with reduced carbon content is attributed to fewer carbide inclusions which inhibit domain wall motion. Cooling to 77 K resulted in harder magnetic properties. Averaged over the ten steels tested the maximum permeability decreased by 8%, the coercive force increased by 14%, and the residual and saturation flux densities increased by 4% and 3%, respectively. The change in coercive force when cooled is comparable to the theoretical prediction for iron, based on a model of domain wall motion inhibited by inclusions. The modest changes of the magnetic properties indicate that the stainless steels can still be used in magnetic applications at very low temperatures.

  1. Conformation of protonated glutamic acid at room and cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Aude; Klyne, Johanna; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2017-01-27

    Recognition properties of biologically relevant molecules depend on their conformation. Herein, the conformation of protonated glutamic acid (H(+)Glu) isolated in quadruple ion traps is characterized by vibrational spectroscopy at room and cryogenic temperatures and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-D3/aug-cc-pVTZ level. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum recorded in the fingerprint range at room temperature using an IR free electron laser is attributed to the two most stable and nearly isoenergetic conformations (1-cc and 2-cc) with roughly equal population (ΔG298 = 0.0 kJ mol(-1)). Both have bridging C[double bond, length as m-dash]O(HNH)(+)O[double bond, length as m-dash]C ionic H-bonds of rather different strengths but cannot be distinguished by their similar IRMPD spectra. In contrast, the higher-resolution single-photon IRPD spectrum of H2-tagged H(+)Glu recorded in the conformation-sensitive X-H stretch range in a trap held at 10 K distinguishes both conformers. At low temperature, 1-cc is roughly twice more abundant than 2-cc, in line with its slightly lower calculated energy (ΔE0 = 0.5 kJ mol(-1)). This example illustrates the importance of cryogenic cooling, single-photon absorption conditions, and the consideration of the X-H stretch range for the identification of biomolecular conformations involving hydrogen bonds.

  2. Directional molecular sliding at room temperature on a silicon runway.

    PubMed

    Bouju, Xavier; Chérioux, Frédéric; Coget, Sébastien; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Palmino, Frank

    2013-08-07

    The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations.

  3. Laser phosphoroscope and applications to room-temperature phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah J; Zhang, Guoqing; Demas, James N; Fraser, Cassandra L; Degraff, Ben A

    2011-11-01

    A simple phosphoroscope with no moving parts is described. In one scan the total luminescence, the long-lived phosphorescence, and the short-lived fluorescence can be determined. A 50% duty cycle excitation from a diode laser is used to excite the sample, and from the digitized waveform the phosphorescence is extracted from the off period, the total emission from the full cycle, and the fluorescence from the on period corrected for the phosphorescence contribution. The performance of the system is demonstrated using room-temperature phosphorescence of organic dyes in boric acid glasses, a multi-emissive boron-polymer dye, and a europium chelate.

  4. Development of bulk GaAs room temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.S.; Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eisen, Y. . Soreq Nuclear Research Center); Brake, R. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on GaAs, a wide band gap semiconductor with potential use as a room temperature radiation detector. Various configurations of Schottky diode detectors were fabricated with bulk crystals of liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) semi-insulating undoped GaAs material. Basic detector construction utilized one Ti/Au Schottky contact and one Au/Ge/Ni alloyed ohmic contact. Pulsed X-ray analysis indicated pulse decay times dependent on bias voltage. Pulse height analysis disclosed non-uniform electric field distributions across the detectors tentatively explained as a consequence of native deep level donors (EL2) in the crystal.

  5. Ultrafast excitonic room temperature nonlinearity in neutron irradiated quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ten, S.; Williams, J.G.; Guerreiro, P.T.; Khitrova, G.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1997-01-01

    Sharp room temperature exciton features and complete recovery of the excitonic absorption with 21 ps time constant are demonstrated in neutron irradiated (Ga,Al)As/GaAs multiple quantum wells. Carrier lifetime reduction is consistent with the EL2 midgap defect which is efficiently generated by fast neutrons. Influence of gamma rays accompanying neutron irradiation is discussed. Neutron irradiation provides a straightforward way to control carrier lifetime in semiconductor heterostructures with minor deterioration of their excitonic properties. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0067 Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces Michael Fayer LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamics and Interactions in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids, Surfaces and Interfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...were performed. Room temperature ionic liquids were also investigated. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are intrinsically interesting because

  7. Oxygen-vacancy-induced room-temperature magnetization in lamellar V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Cezar, A. B.; Graff, I. L. Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the local atomic and electronic structures as well as oxygen-vacancy-induced magnetic properties of electrodeposited V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films. Unlike stoichiometric V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which is a diamagnetic lamellar semiconductor, our oxygen-defective V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films are ferromagnetic at room-temperature and their saturation magnetization decreases with air exposure time. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the aging effect on these films, revealing that freshly-made samples exhibit only local crystalline order, whereas the aged ones undoubtedly show an enhancement of crystallinity and coordination symmetry. The mean number of oxygen atoms around V tends to increase, indicating a decrease of oxygen vacancies with time. Concurrently with the decrease of oxygen vacancies, a loss of saturation magnetization is also observed. Hence, it can be concluded that the ferromagnetism of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films originates from a vacancy-induced mechanism, confirming the universality of this class of ferromagnetism.

  8. Ferromagnetism in Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, T.; Liberati, M.; Aubriet, H.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Bali, R.; Becker, C.; Ruch, D.; MacManus-Driscoll, J.L.; Arenholz, E.; Blamire, M.G.

    2009-04-21

    The origin of ferromagnetism in Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films is discussed. While the as-grown samples are not ferromagnetic at room temperature or at 10 K, ferromagnetism at room temperature appears after annealing the films in reducing conditions and disappears after annealing in oxidizing conditions. Magnetic measurements, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments indicate that within the resolution of the instruments the activation of the ferromagnetism is not due to the presence of pure Co.

  9. Room-Temperature Equation of State for CO2-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. P.; Kinney, T. W.; Frank, M. R.; Lin, J.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the room-temperature bulk modulus (K0T) and its pressure derivative (K') for solid carbon dioxide in its relatively low-pressure phase I (space group: Pa3; CO2-I) between 0.9 and 9 GPa. This pressure range closely matches the actual room-temperature stability field for this phase. The motivation for our investigation is to address an apparent discrepancy in two earlier publications and provide a complete and internally consistent set of equation of state (EoS) parameters for future investigators to conveniently predict the diffraction peak positions for CO2-I at elevated pressures. We note that there is much interest in the chemical reactivity of CO2 at elevated pressures and temperatures and anticipate that this will be a useful addition to the literature. Because the solid phase is unquenchable at room temperature, we used the estimated zero-pressure volume extrapolated to 300 K from lower temperatures by Olinger (1982) and held this value fixed: V0 = 197.9 Å3/unit cell. We performed fits with both the Vinet (K0T = 3.1 ± 0.1 GPa, K' = 9.1 ± 0.2) and Birch-Murnaghan (K0T = 2.5 ± 0.2 GPa, K' = 13.0 ± 0.9) EoS models. The observed difference is not surprising given the very high compressibility of this phase and the inherent covariance between K0T and K'. Although we note that both sets of EoS parameters produce acceptable fits to our data, we favor the Vinet values, especially in terms of determining a realistic value for K', because the phase is so compressible. However, many workers utilize software with built-in routines for calculating peak positions at high pressures, and these often assume a Birch Murnaghan EoS. To facilitate the usage of our results with such programs, we have also performed a Birch-Murnaghan fit for which the K' value from the Vinet fit was held fixed and K0T was the only fit parameter. Accordingly, we present the following EoS parameters for the convenient calculation of expected peak positions for CO2-I at high

  10. Optically pumped room-temperature GaAs nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Dhruv; Mokkapati, Sudha; Parkinson, Patrick; Jiang, Nian; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared lasers are important for optical data communication, spectroscopy and medical diagnosis. Semiconductor nanowires offer the possibility of reducing the footprint of devices for three-dimensional device integration and hence are being extensively studied in the context of optoelectronic devices. Although visible and ultraviolet nanowire lasers have been demonstrated widely, progress towards room-temperature infrared nanowire lasers has been limited because of material quality issues and Auger recombination. (Al)GaAs is an important material system for infrared lasers that is extensively used for conventional lasers. GaAs has a very large surface recombination velocity, which is a serious issue for nanowire devices because of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature lasing in core-shell-cap GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires by properly designing the Fabry-Pérot cavity, optimizing the material quality and minimizing surface recombination. Our demonstration is a major step towards incorporating (Al)GaAs nanowire lasers into the design of nanoscale optoelectronic devices operating at near-infrared wavelengths.

  11. Experiments on room temperature optical fiber-fiber direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinping; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qirong; Wang, Yaping; Gong, Mali

    2012-08-01

    High quality permanent connection between optical fibers is a significant issue in optics and communication. Studies on room temperature optical large diameter fiber-fiber direct bonding, which is essentially surface interactions of glass material, are presented here. Bonded fiber pairs are obtained for the first time through the bonding technics illustrated here. Two different kinds of bonding technics are provided-fresh surface (freshly grinded and polished) bonding and hydrophobic surface (activated by H2SO4 and HF) bonding. By means of fresh surface bonding, a bonded fiber pair with light transmitting efficiency of 98.1% and bond strength of 21.2 N is obtained. Besides, in the bonding process, chemical surface treatment of fibers' end surfaces is an important step. Therefore, various ways of surface treatment are analyzed and compared, based on atomic force microscopy force curves of differently disposed surfaces. According to the comparison, fresh surfaces are suggested as the prior choice in room temperature optical fiber-fiber bonding, owing to their larger adhesive force, attractive force, attractive distance, and adhesive range.

  12. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  13. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  14. Room-temperature Magnetic Ordering in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeongmin; Bekyarova, Elena; Liang, Ping; de Heer, Walt A.; Haddon, Robert C.; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    Despite theoretical predictions, the question of room-temperature magnetic order in graphene must be conclusively resolved before graphene can fully achieve its potential as a spintronic medium. Through scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and point I-V measurements, the current study reveals that unlike pristine samples, graphene nanostructures, when functionalized with aryl radicals, can sustain magnetic order. STM images show 1-D and 2-D periodic super-lattices originating from the functionalization of a single sub-lattice of the bipartite graphene structure. Field-dependent super-lattices in 3-nm wide “zigzag” nanoribbons indicate local moments with parallel and anti-parallel ordering along and across the edges, respectively. Anti-parallel ordering is observed in 2-D segments with sizes of over 20 nm. The field dependence of STM images and point I-V curves indicates a spin polarized local density of states (LDOS), an out-of-plane anisotropy field of less than 10 Oe, and an exchange coupling field of 100 Oe at room temperature. PMID:22953045

  15. Identifying multiexcitons in Mo S2 monolayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-04-01

    One of the unique features of atomically thin two-dimensional materials is strong Coulomb interactions due to the reduced dielectric screening effect; this feature enables the study of many-body phenomena such as excitons, trions, and biexcitons. However, identification of biexcitons remains unresolved owing to their broad peak feature at room temperature. Here, we investigate multiexcitons in monolayer Mo S2 using both electrical and optical doping and identify the transition energies for each exciton. The binding energy of the assigned biexciton is twice that of the trion, in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The biexciton population is predominant under optical doping but negligible under electrical doping. The biexciton population is quadratically proportional to the exciton population, obeying the mass-action theory. Our results illustrate the stable formation of not only trions but also biexcitons due to strong Coulomb interaction even at room temperature; therefore, these results provide a deeper understanding of the complex excitonic behaviors in two-dimensional semiconductors.

  16. [Preservation and stability of corn tortillas at room temperature].

    PubMed

    Higuera-Ciapara, I; Nieblas, J M

    1995-06-01

    Three treatments with chemical preservative (sodium propionate, potassium sorbate-methylparaben and hydrogen peroxidemethyl paraben) were tested to delay microbial spoilage and extend shelf-life of corn tortillas at room temperature (25 degrees C). The treatment with the best results was selected for further studies using two types of packaging: Paper and high density polyethylene. Quality of corn tortillas during storage was assessed by measuring water content, microbial analysis (Total Plate Count, molds and yeast) and throguh sensory evaluation. Results were analyzed by covariance analysis and slope contrast between packaging materials at p<0.05. Spoilage of tortilla without preservative occurred within 24 hours due to a large number of gram negative bacteria, molds and yeasts, which were responsible for offensive odors. Only the combination of hydrogen peroxide-methyl paraben had a significant effect on retarding bacterial yeast spoilage. In addition, hydrogen peroxide residues could not [correction of no] be chemically detected after 2 days of storage. Results from this study show that tortilla can be kept for up to six days at room temperature with acceptable sensory properties with proper preservative treatment and packaging.

  17. Self-transducing silicon nanowire electromechanical systems at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L; Yang, Peidong

    2008-06-01

    Electronic readout of the motions of genuinely nanoscale mechanical devices at room temperature imposes an important challenge for the integration and application of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we report the first experiments on piezoresistively transduced very high frequency Si nanowire (SiNW) resonators with on-chip electronic actuation at room temperature. We have demonstrated that, for very thin (~90 nm down to ~30 nm) SiNWs, their time-varying strain can be exploited for self-transducing the devices' resonant motions at frequencies as high as approximately 100 MHz. The strain of wire elongation, which is only second-order in doubly clamped structures, enables efficient displacement transducer because of the enhanced piezoresistance effect in these SiNWs. This intrinsically integrated transducer is uniquely suited for a class of very thin wires and beams where metallization and multilayer complex patterning on devices become impractical. The 30 nm thin SiNW NEMS offer exceptional mass sensitivities in the subzeptogram range. This demonstration makes it promising to advance toward NEMS sensors based on ultrathin and even molecular-scale SiNWs, and their monolithic integration with microelectronics on the same chip.

  18. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  19. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  20. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-06-09

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  1. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  2. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  3. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit.

    PubMed

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-20

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  4. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  5. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  6. Generation of coherent terahertz pulses in ruby at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kolesov, Roman; Kocharovskaya, Olga; Scully, Marlan O.

    2006-08-15

    We have shown that a coherently driven solid state medium can potentially produce strong controllable short pulses of THz radiation. The high efficiency of the technique is based on excitation of maximal THz coherence by applying resonant optical pulses to the medium. The excited coherence in the medium is connected to macroscopic polarization coupled to THz radiation. We have performed detailed simulations by solving the coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations. By using a simple V-type energy scheme for ruby, we have demonstrated that the energy of generated THz pulses ranges from hundreds of pico-Joules to nano-Joules at room temperature and micro-Joules at liquid helium temperature, with pulse durations from picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. We have also suggested a coherent ruby source that lases on two optical wavelengths and simultaneously generates THz radiation. We discussed also possibilities of extension of the technique to different solid-state materials.

  7. Silicon Nanowires Light Emitting Devices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, Pietro; Irrera, A.; Franzò', G.; Fazio, B.; Galli, M.; Pecora, E.; Iacona, F.; Priolo, F.

    Group-IV semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are attracting interest among the scientific community as building blocks for a wide range of future nanoscaled devices. Vapor-liquid-Solid (VLS) is the most used technique for semiconductor NWs growth. Si NWs are promising as building blocks for photovoltaic elements, sensors and high-performance batteries; however, Si NWs are less explored for photonic applications, probably since there are many drawbacks due to the NW structure obtained by VLS. In fact, there is a minimum obtainable size which reduces the possibility to have quantum confinement effects without high temperature oxidation processes; metal used as a catalyst may be incorporated inside the NW thus affecting its electrical and optical properties. Moreover, by VLS method the doping is no easily controllable because of the segregation of the dopants at the NWs interface. Indeed, the possibility of obtaining light from silicon at room temperature under optical and electrical pumping is strategic for the communication technology.

  8. Investigation of the room temperature annealing peak in ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, R.J.; Grady, B.P.; Cooper, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    A number of studies appearing in the literature have documented an endothermic peak in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) scans for ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymer ionomers which appears only upon annealing at room temperature. This peak has been attributed to either polyethylene crystallites, ionic crystallite, or water absorption. In a novel polyurethane cationomer with a quarternized amine contained in hard segment, the same phenomena has been found in DSC scans when the neutralizing anion is bromine or iodine. Since this material does not crystallize, the authors were able to conclusively eliminate crystallization as the cause of the endotherm. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of bromine has been measured to differentiate between water absorption and ionic crystallites. Spectra were collected above and below the temperature corresponding to the endothermic peak. The results of the EXAFS analysis will be presented.

  9. Cadmium selenide: a promising novel room temperature radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Shilo, I.

    1983-02-01

    Large single crystals of CdSe weighing about 30g were grown by the vertical unseeded vapor growth technique at a linear growth rate of 5mm/day and a temperature gradient of 10/sup 0/C/cm. Crystal perfection and homogeneity were evaluated by Laue X-ray diffraction, etch pit density, SEM and microprobe analysis methods. The dark resistivity of the as-grown and the heat treated crystal was about 1..cap omega..cm and 10/sup 12/..cap omega..cm respectively. Slices were used to fabricate room temperature detectors for nuclear radiation energy. The detectors showed high efficiency and stability as a function of time for radiation sources from 10KeV to 660KeV.

  10. Airtight metallic sealing at room temperature under small mechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen

    2013-10-01

    Metallic seals can be resistant to air leakage, resistant to degradation under heat, and capable of carrying mechanical loads. Various technologies - such as organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes - need, at least benefit from, such metallic seals. However, these technologies involve polymeric materials and can tolerate neither the high-temperature nor the high-pressure processes of conventional metallic sealing. Recent progress in nanorod growth opens the door to metallic sealing for these technologies. Here, we report a process of metallic sealing using small well-separated Ag nanorods; the process is at room temperature, under a small mechanical pressure of 9.0 MPa, and also in ambient. The metallic seals have an air leak rate of 1.1 × 10-3 cm3atm/m2/day, and a mechanical shear strength higher than 8.9 MPa. This leak rate meets the requirements of organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes.

  11. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  12. Characterization of ZnO:Co particles prepared by hydrothermal method for room temperature magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingzi; Huo, Dexuan; He, Haiping; Li, Yuan; Li, Lingwei; Wang, Huawen; Qian, Zhenghong

    2012-03-01

    ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor particles (ZnO:Co) have been grown using a hydrothermal method with good crystallinity. The atomic percentage of Co presented in the specimen is about 0.01. Based on the x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transition electron, Co is found to be incorporated into ZnO lattice without evidence of obvious Co precipitates. However, from photoluminescence (PL) spectra in the range of 1.94 -3.45 eV, a strong broad emission centered around 600 nm (2.07 eV) in the visible range as well as a relatively weak peak at 2.81 eV are observed, indicating the presence of Co impurities. Moreover, intrinsic emissions such as DOX suggest that at least some Co have been doped into ZnO lattice, substituting for Zn2+ ions. The PL results further confirm the substitution of Zn2+ ions by Co, which leads to the changes of the electronic band structures. Magnetism could be realized at room temperature for the ZnO:Co nanoparticles under our experimental conditions although with low coercivity. The field-cooled and zero-field-cooled curves can be explained as a result of competition between the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic ordering in the ZnO:Co nanoparticles. Combining the results from PL and magnetism characterization, it is reasonable to think that both doped Co in the ZnO lattice and Co impurities contribute to magnetism in ZnO:Co nanoparticles at room temperature.

  13. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors.

  14. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  15. Tailoring room temperature photoluminescence of antireflective silicon nanofacets

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Tanmoy; Kumar, M.; Ghatak, J.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, a fluence-dependent antireflection performance is presented from ion-beam fabricated nanofaceted-Si surfaces. It is also demonstrated that these nanofacets are capable of producing room temperature ultra-violet and blue photoluminescence which can be attributed to inter-band transitions of the localized excitonic states of different Si-O bonds at the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements further confirm defect-induced radiative emission from the surface of silicon nanofacets. It is observed that the spectral characteristics remain unchanged, except an enhancement in the photoluminescence intensity with increasing ion-fluence. The increase in photoluminescence intensity by orders of magnitude stronger than that of a planar Si substrate is due to higher absorption of incident photons by nanofaceted structures.

  16. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e2/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  17. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-11-25

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks.

  18. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  19. Room-temperature spin-photon interface for quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Fang-Yu; Fu, Jing-Li; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Zhi-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Although remarkable progress has been achieved recently, to construct an optical cavity where a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centre in diamond is coupled to an optical field in the strong coupling regime is rather difficult. We propose an architecture for a scalable quantum interface capable of interconverting photonic and NV spin qubits, which can work well without the strong coupling requirement. The dynamics of the interface applies an adiabatic passage to sufficiently reduce the decoherence from an excited state of a NV colour centre in diamond. This quantum interface can accomplish many quantum network operations like state transfer and entanglement distribution between qubits at distant nodes. Exact numerical simulations show that high-fidelity quantum interface operations can be achieved under room-temperature and realistic experimental conditions.

  20. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  1. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  2. Using room temperature current noise to characterize single molecular spectra.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Smitha; Ghosh, Avik W

    2014-03-25

    We propose a way to use room temperature random telegraph noise to characterize single molecules adsorbed on a backgated silicon field-effect transistor. The overlap of molecule and silicon electronic wave functions generates a set of trap levels that impose their unique scattering signatures on the voltage-dependent current noise spectrum. Our results are based on numerical modeling of the current noise, obtained by coupling a density functional treatment of the trap placement within the silicon band gap, a quantum kinetic treatment of the output current, and a Monte Carlo evaluation of the trap occupancy under resonance. As an illustrative example, we show how we can extract molecule-specific "fingerprints" of four benzene-based molecules directly from a frequency-voltage colormap of the noise statistics. We argue that such a colormap carries detailed information about the trap dynamics at the Fermi energy, including the presence of correlated interactions, observed experimentally in backgated carbon nanotubes.

  3. Experimental evidence for ice formation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jinesh, K B; Frenken, J W M

    2008-07-18

    The behavior of water under extreme confinement and, in particular, the lubrication properties under such conditions are subjects of long-standing controversy. Using a dedicated, high-resolution friction force microscope, scanning a sharp tungsten tip over a graphite surface, we demonstrate that water nucleating between the tip and the surface due to capillary condensation rapidly transforms into crystalline ice at room temperature. At ultralow scan speeds and modest relative humidities, we observe that the tip exhibits stick-slip motion with a period of 0.38+/-0.03 nm, very different from the graphite lattice. We interpret this as the consequence of the repeated sequence of shear-induced fracture and healing of the crystalline condensate. This phenomenon causes a significant increase of the friction force and introduces relaxation time scales of seconds for the rearrangements after shearing.

  4. Dissolution of cellulose in room temperature ionic liquids: anion dependence.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Bejagam, Karteek K; Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-01-29

    The dissolution of cellulosic biomass in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is studied through free energy calculations of its monomer, viz., cellobiose, within a molecular dynamics simulation approach. The solvation free energy (SFE) of cellobiose in ionic liquids containing any of seven different anions has been calculated. The ranking of these liquids based on SFE compares well with experimental data on the solubility of cellulose. The dissolution is shown to be enthalpically dominated, which is correlated with the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between cellobiose and the anions of the IL. Large entropic changes upon solvation in [CF3SO3](-) and [OAc](-) based ionic liquids have been explained in terms of the solvent-aided conformational flexibility of cellobiose.

  5. Quantum memory, entanglement and sensing with room temperature atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Wasilewski, W.; Krauter, H.; Fernholz, T.; Nielsen, B. M.; Petersen, J. M.; Renema, J. J.; Balabas, M. V.; Owari, M.; Plenio, M. B.; Serafini, A.; Wolf, M. M.; Muschik, C. A.; Cirac, J. I.; Müller, J. H.; Polzik, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Room temperature atomic ensembles in a spin-protected environment are useful systems both for quantum information science and metrology. Here we utilize a setup consisting of two atomic ensembles as a memory for quantum information initially encoded in the polarization state of two entangled light modes. We also use the ensembles as a radio frequency entanglement-assisted magnetometer with projection noise limited sensitivity below femtoTesla/. The performance of the quantum memory as well as the magnetometer was improved by spin-squeezed or entangled atomic states generated by quantum non demolition measurements. Finally, we present preliminary results of long lived entangled atomic states generated by dissipation. With the method presented, one should be able to generate an entangled steady state.

  6. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  7. Room-temperature effects of UV radiation in KBr:? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Salas, R.; Meléndrez, R.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    1996-07-01

    Thermoluminescence and optical absorption measurements have been carried out in KBr:0953-8984/8/27/009/img9 crystals irradiated with monochromatic UV light (200 - 300 nm) and x-rays at room temperature. For UV- and x-irradiated crystals strong similarities between the thermoluminescence glow curves have been found, suggesting that the low-energy UV radiation produces the same defects as produced by x-irradiation in this material. The thermoluminescence glow curves are composed of six glow peaks located at 337, 383, 403, 435, 475 and 509 K. Thermal annealing experiments in previously irradiated crystals show clearly a correlation between the glow peak located at 383 K and the F-centre thermal bleaching process. Also, the excitation spectrum for each thermoluminescence glow peak has been investigated, showing that the low-energy radiation induces the formation of F centres.

  8. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  9. Room temperature magnesium electrorefining by using non-aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesik; Jung, Yeojin; Kusumah, Priyandi; Dilasari, Bonita; Ku, Heesuk; Kim, Hansu; Kwon, Kyungjung; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    The increasing usage of magnesium inevitably leads to a fast increase in magnesium scrap, and magnesium recycling appears extremely beneficial for cost reduction, preservation of natural resources and protection of the environment. Magnesium refining for the recovery of high purity magnesium from metal scrap alloy (AZ31B composed of magnesium, aluminum, zinc, manganese and copper) at room temperature is investigated with a non-aqueous electrolyte (tetrahydrofuran with ethyl magnesium bromide). A high purity (99.999%) of electrorefined magneisum with a smooth and dense surface is obtained after potentiostatic electrolysis with an applied voltage of 2 V. The selective dissolution of magnesium from magnesium alloy is possible by applying an adequate potential considering the tolerable impurity level in electrorefined magnesium and processing time. The purity estimation method suggested in this study can be useful in evaluating the maximum content of impurity elements.

  10. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  11. Extraction of organic compounds with room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F; Poole, Salwa K

    2010-04-16

    Room temperature ionic liquids are novel solvents with a rather specific blend of physical and solution properties that makes them of interest for applications in separation science. They are good solvents for a wide range of compounds in which they behave as polar solvents. Their physical properties of note that distinguish them from conventional organic solvents are a negligible vapor pressure, high thermal stability, and relatively high viscosity. They can form biphasic systems with water or low polarity organic solvents and gases suitable for use in liquid-liquid and gas-liquid partition systems. An analysis of partition coefficients for varied compounds in these systems allows characterization of solvent selectivity using the solvation parameter model, which together with spectroscopic studies of solvent effects on probe substances, results in a detailed picture of solvent behavior. These studies indicate that the solution properties of ionic liquids are similar to those of polar organic solvents. Practical applications of ionic liquids in sample preparation include extractive distillation, aqueous biphasic systems, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, supported liquid membrane extraction, matrix solvents for headspace analysis, and micellar extraction. The specific advantages and limitations of ionic liquids in these studies is discussed with a view to defining future uses and the need not to neglect the identification of new room temperature ionic liquids with physical and solution properties tailored to the needs of specific sample preparation techniques. The defining feature of the special nature of ionic liquids is not their solution or physical properties viewed separately but their unique combinations when taken together compared with traditional organic solvents.

  12. Tuning structural instability toward enhanced magnetocaloric effect around room temperature in MnCo1-xZnxGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Suzuki, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetocaloric effect is the phenomenon that temperature change of a magnetic material is induced by application of a magnetic field. This effect can be applied to environmentally-benign magnetic refrigeration technology. Here we show a key role of magnetic-field-induced structural instability in enhancing the magnetocaloric effect for MnCo1-xZnxGe alloys (x = 0-0.05). The increase in x rapidly reduces the martensitic transition temperature while keeping the ferromagnetic transition around room temperature. Fine tuning of x around x = 0.03 leads to the concomitant structural and ferromagnetic transition in a cooling process, giving rise to enhanced magnetocaloric effect as well as magnetic-field-induced structural transition. Analyses of the structural phase diagrams in the T-H plane in terms of Landau free-energy phenomenology accounts for the characteristic x-dependence of the observed magnetocaloric effect, pointing to the importance of the magnetostructural coupling for the design of high-performance magnetocalorics.

  13. Tuning structural instability toward enhanced magnetocaloric effect around room temperature in MnCo1−xZnxGe

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Suzuki, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetocaloric effect is the phenomenon that temperature change of a magnetic material is induced by application of a magnetic field. This effect can be applied to environmentally-benign magnetic refrigeration technology. Here we show a key role of magnetic-field-induced structural instability in enhancing the magnetocaloric effect for MnCo1−xZnxGe alloys (x = 0–0.05). The increase in x rapidly reduces the martensitic transition temperature while keeping the ferromagnetic transition around room temperature. Fine tuning of x around x = 0.03 leads to the concomitant structural and ferromagnetic transition in a cooling process, giving rise to enhanced magnetocaloric effect as well as magnetic-field-induced structural transition. Analyses of the structural phase diagrams in the T-H plane in terms of Landau free-energy phenomenology accounts for the characteristic x-dependence of the observed magnetocaloric effect, pointing to the importance of the magnetostructural coupling for the design of high-performance magnetocalorics. PMID:25519919

  14. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature. PMID:27982127

  15. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature.

  16. A glass microfluidic chip adhesive bonding method at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Jen; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method using UV epoxy resin for the bonding of glass blanks and patterned plates at room temperature. There is no need to use a high-temperature thermal fusion process and therefore avoid damaging temperature-sensitive metals in a microchip. The proposed technique has the further advantage that the sealed glass blanks and patterned plates can be separated by the application of adequate heat. In this way, the microchip can be opened, the fouling microchannels may be easily cleaned-up and the plates then re-bonded to recycle the microchip. The proposed sealing method is used to bond a microfluidic device, and the bonding strength is then investigated in a series of chemical resistance tests conducted in various chemicals. Leakage of solution was evaluated in a microfluidic chip using pressure testing to 1.792 × 102 kPa (26 psi), and the microchannel had no observable leak. Electrical leakage between channels was tested by comparing the resistances of two bonding methods, and the result shows no significant electrical leakage. The performance of the device obtained from the proposed bonding method is compared with that of the thermal fusion bonding technique for an identical microfluidic device. It is found that identical results are obtained under the same operating conditions. The proposed method provides a simple, quick and inexpensive method for sealing glass microfluidic chips.

  17. Nearly ferromagnetic Fermi-liquid behaviour in YFe2Zn20 and high-temperature ferromagnetism of GdFe2Zn20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Canfield, P. C.

    2007-05-01

    One of the historic goals of alchemy was to turn base elements into precious ones. Although the practice of alchemy has been superseded by chemistry and solid-state physics, the desire to dramatically change or tune the properties of a compound, preferably through small changes in stoichiometry or composition, remains. This desire becomes even more compelling for compounds that can be tuned to extremes in behaviour. Here, we report that the RT2Zn20 (R=rare earth and T=transition metal) family of compounds manifests exactly this type of versatility, even though they are more than 85% Zn. By tuning T, we find that YFe2Zn20 is closer to ferromagnetism than elemental Pd, the classic example of a nearly ferromagnetic Fermi liquid. By submerging Gd in this highly polarizable Fermi liquid, we tune the system to a remarkably high-temperature ferromagnetic (TC=86K) state for a compound with less than 5% Gd. Although this is not quite turning lead into gold, it is essentially tuning Zn to become a variety of model compounds.

  18. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in YBCO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhonghua; Gao, Daqiang; Dong, Chunhui; Yang, Guijin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jinlin; Shi, Zhenhua; Gao, Hua; Luo, Honggang; Xue, Desheng

    2012-03-21

    Nanoparticles of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) were synthesized via a citrate pyrolysis technique. Room temperature ferromagnetism was revealed in the samples by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Electron spin resonance spectra at selected temperatures indicated that there is a transition from the normal to the superconducting state at temperatures below 100 K. The M-T curves with various applied magnetic fields showed that the superconducting transition temperatures are 92 K and 55 K for the air-annealed and the post-annealed samples, respectively. Compared to the air-annealed sample, the saturation magnetization of the sample by reheating the air-annealed one in argon atmosphere is enhanced but its superconductivity is weakened, which implies that the ferromagnetism maybe originates from the surface oxygen defects. By superconducting quantum interference device measurements, we further confirmed the ferromagnetic behavior at high temperatures and interesting upturns in field cooling magnetization curves within the superconducting region are found. We attributed the upturn phenomena to the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity at low temperatures. Room temperature ferromagnetism of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) nanoparticles has been observed in some previous related studies, but the issue of the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity within the superconducting region is still unclear. In the present work, it will be addressed in detail. The cooperation phenomena found in the spin-singlet superconductors will help us to understand the nature of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in more depth.

  19. Evidence for Stable High Temperature Ferromagnetism in Fluorine Treated C60 (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-02

    Gauss showing a small hysteresis . Figure 4 presents the temperature dependence of the magnetization above room temperature measured in a 3000 Gauss...through the center of the microwave cavity. The magnetization was obtained by measuring the magnetic field dependence of the AC susceptibility at 350...which is proportional to the change in susceptibility, is measured as a function of dc magnetic field strength using a HP 5314 frequency counter. The

  20. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Vo Pham, Long; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4), in which S1 is the dark-stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  1. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; ...

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  2. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-21

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

  3. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  4. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  5. Dielectric Behavior of Biomaterials at Different Frequencies on Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, B. D.; Barde, Ravindra; Mishra, A.; Phadke, S.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in radiofrequency (RF) and microwave systems is described mathematically by Maxwell's equations with corresponding boundary conditions. Dielectric properties of lossless and lossy materials influence EM field distribution. For a better understanding of the physical processes associated with various RF and microwave devices, it is necessary to know the dielectric properties of media that interact with EM waves. For telecommunication and radar devices, variations of complex dielectric permittivity (referring to the dielectric property) over a wide frequency range are important. For RF and microwave applicators intended for thermal treatments of different materials at ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) frequencies, one needs to study temperature and moisture content dependencies of the Permittivity of the treated materials. Many techniques have been developed for the measurement of materials. In the present paper authors used Bones and scales of Fish taken from Narmada River (Rajghat Dist. Barwani) as biomaterials. Dielectric properties of Biomaterials with the frequency range from 1Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature with low water content were measured by in-situ performance dielectric kit. Analysis has been done by Alpha high performance impedance analyzer and LCR meters. The experimental work were carried out in Inter University Consortium UGC-DAE, CSR center Indore MP. Measured value indicates the dielectric constant (ɛ') dielectric loss (ɛ") decreases with increasing frequency while conductivity (σ) increases with frequency increased.

  6. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  7. Properties of High-Temperature Ceramics and Cermets. Elasticity and Density at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-01-01

    property character- r. Molybdenum Disilicide -MoSi2 (Tables 24 and 24a) istics; the uniformity of bulk density ap)pea’s to Coode 39: Six groups) of hot...SEP .NBS MONOGAPH 6 AD-A285 483 0 DTIC, I’IELECTE 00 Properties of High-Temperature Ceramics and Cermets Elasticity and Density at Room Temperature...measurements consistent with these standards; the determination of physical constants and properties of materials; the development of methods and

  8. Simple and advanced ferromagnet/molecule spinterfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Djedhloul, F.; Barraud, C.; Garreau, G.; Boukari, S.; Isshiki, H.; Joly, L.; Urbain, E.; Peter, M.; Studniarek, M.; Da Costa, V.; Jabbar, H.; Bulou, H.; Davesne, V.; Halisdemir, U.; Chen, J.; Xenioti, D.; Arabski, J.; Bouzehouane, K.; Deranlot, C.; Fusil, S.; Otero, E.; Choueikani, F.; Chen, K.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Wulfhekel, W.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Wetzel, P.; Seneor, P.; Mattana, R.; Petroff, F.; Scheurer, F.; Weber, W.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Bowen, M.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-polarized charge transfer between a ferromagnet and a molecule can promote molecular ferromagnetism 1, 2 and hybridized interfacial states3, 4. Observations of high spin-polarization of Fermi level states at room temperature5 designate such interfaces as a very promising candidate toward achieving a highly spin-polarized, nanoscale current source at room temperature, when compared to other solutions such as half-metallic systems and solid-state tunnelling over the past decades. We will discuss three aspects of this research. 1) Does the ferromagnet/molecule interface, also called an organic spinterface, exhibit this high spin-polarization as a generic feature? Spin-polarized photoemission experiments reveal that a high spin-polarization of electronics states at the Fermi level also exist at the simple interface between ferromagnetic cobalt and amorphous carbon6. Furthermore, this effect is general to an array of ferromagnetic and molecular candidates7. 2) Integrating molecules with intrinsic properties (e.g. spin crossover molecules) into a spinterface toward enhanced functionality requires lowering the charge transfer onto the molecule8 while magnetizing it1,2. We propose to achieve this by utilizing interlayer exchange coupling within a more advanced organic spinterface architecture. We present results at room temperature across the fcc Co(001)/Cu/manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) system9. 3) Finally, we discuss how the Co/MnPc spinterface's ferromagnetism stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature onto subsequent molecules away from the spinterface, which in turn can exchange bias the Co layer at low temperature10. Consequences include tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance across a CoPc tunnel barrier11. This augurs new possibilities to transmit spin information across organic semiconductors using spin flip excitations12.

  9. Effects of Ni addition on the magnetostriction and microstructures of Fe70-xPd30Nix high-temperature ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chien-Feng

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of adding a third alloying element, Ni, to create Fe70-xPd30Nix (x = 2, 4, 6, and 8 at. % Ni) ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. The Ni replaced a portion of the Fe. The magnetostriction and microstructures of Fe70-xPd30Nix high-temperature ferromagnetic shape memory alloys were studied in detail. Investigation of the magnetostriction and microstructures indicated that the greater Ni amount in the Fe70-xPd30Nix alloys caused the less saturation magnetostriction at room temperature (RT); it was also observed that it was more difficult to generate an annealed recrystallization. However, greater Ni addition into the Fe70-xPd30Nix (x = 6 and 8 at. % Ni) alloys, the L10 + L1m twin phase decomposition into stoichiometric L10 + L1m + αbct structures could be suppressed when the alloys were aged at 500 °C for 100 h. The result was that the Fe70-xPd30Nix (x = 6 and 8 at. % Ni) alloys maintained a high magnetostriction and magnetostrictive susceptibility (Δλ‖s/ΔH) after the 500 °C/100 h aged treatment. This magnetic property of the Fe70-xPd30Nix (x = 6 and 8 at. % Ni) alloys is suitable for application in a high temperature (T > 500 °C) and high frequency environment.

  10. Magnon energy renormalization and low-temperature thermodynamics of O(3) Heisenberg ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Radošević, Slobodan M. Pantić, Milan R.; Pavkov-Hrvojević, Milica V.; Kapor, Darko V.

    2013-12-15

    We present the perturbation theory for lattice magnon fields of the D-dimensional O(3) Heisenberg ferromagnet. The effective Hamiltonian for the lattice magnon fields is obtained starting from the effective Lagrangian, with two dominant contributions that describe magnon–magnon interactions identified as a usual gradient term for the unit vector field and a part originating in the Wess–Zumino–Witten term of the effective Lagrangian. Feynman diagrams for lattice scalar fields with derivative couplings are introduced, on the basis of which we investigate the influence of magnon–magnon interactions on magnon self-energy and ferromagnet free energy. We also comment appearance of spurious terms in low-temperature series for the free energy by examining magnon–magnon interactions and internal symmetry of the effective Hamiltonian (Lagrangian). -- Highlights: •Lattice magnon Hamiltonian constructed from the effective Lagrangian. •New Feynman diagrams with colored propagators and vertices for lattice scalar fields. •Influence of magnon–magnon interactions from the WZW term on magnon energies and free energy of O(3) HFM.

  11. Weak ferromagnetic behavior of BiFeO{sub 3} at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungkyu; Kim, Chul Sung

    2013-05-07

    Polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3}, having a spherical shape with a diameter of about 78 {mu}m, has been synthesized by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The observed Raman and x-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra of the sample show the spectra of typical single-phased BiFeO{sub 3}, and the x-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement further confirmed that the synthesized sample is single phase. The value of isomer shift from Moessbauer analysis indicates the Fe{sup 3+} ionic state without Fe{sup 2+} ionic state as observed from XPS measurement. The experimentally measured M-H curves show antiferromagnetic behavior at 295 K and weak ferromagnetic behavior at 4.2 K. The appearance of two different magnetic behaviors is due to the fact that the antiferromagnetic coupling becomes weak because of the presence of two distorted octahedral sites. Since the effect of the lattice distortion strongly depends on the thermal agitation effect, the weak ferromagnetic behavior can be observed only at 4.2 K. The detailed Moessbauer spectra analysis result confirms the existence of two distortion octahedral sites, which is in an agreement with XRD results.

  12. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-07

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  13. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm−3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics. PMID:28262746

  14. Proactive aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of room-temperature ionic liquids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulacki, K.J.; Chaloner, D.T.; Larson, J.H.; Costello, D.M.; Evans-White, M. A.; Docherty, K.M.; Bernot, R.J.; Brueseke, M.A.; Kulpa, C.F.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments are being contaminated with a myriad of anthropogenic chemicals, a problem likely to continue due to both unintentional and intentional releases. To protect valuable natural resources, novel chemicals should be shown to be environmentally safe prior to use and potential release into the environment. Such proactive assessment is currently being applied to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs). Because most ILs are water-soluble, their effects are likely to manifest in aquatic ecosystems. Information on the impacts of ILs on numerous aquatic organisms, focused primarily on acute LC50 and EC50 endpoints, is now available, and trends in toxicity are emerging. Cation structure tends to influence IL toxicity more so than anion structure, and within a cation class, the length of alkyl chain substituents is positively correlated with toxicity. While the effects of ILs on several aquatic organisms have been studied, the challenge for aquatic toxicology is now to predict the effects of ILs in complex natural environments that often include diverse mixtures of organisms, abiotic conditions, and additional stressors. To make robust predictions about ILs will require coupling of ecologically realistic laboratory and field experiments with standard toxicity bioassays and models. Such assessments would likely discourage the development of especially toxic ILs while shifting focus to those that are more environmentally benign. Understanding the broader ecological effects of emerging chemicals, incorporating that information into predictive models, and conveying the conclusions to those who develop, regulate, and use those chemicals, should help avoid future environmental degradation. ?? 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  15. A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, S.; Johnson, B. C.; Ivády, V.; Stavrias, N.; Umeda, T.; Gali, A.; Ohshima, T.

    2014-02-01

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules, quantum dots, diamond colour centres and others. The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics and measurement theory. An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing. Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2×106 counts s-1) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices.

  16. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  17. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; ...

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  18. Room temperature syntheses of entirely diverse substituted β-fluorofurans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wheeler, Kraig A; Dembinski, Roman

    2012-03-28

    Synthesis of highly substituted 3-fluorofurans is reported. The sequence began with preparation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl alk-1-en-3-yn-1-yl ethers from 1,4-disubstituted alk-3-yn-1-ones. Subsequent fluorination of alkenynyl silyl ethers with Selectfluor gave 2-fluoroalk-3-yn-1-ones in almost quantitative yield. Subsequent 5-endo-dig cyclizations using chlorotriphenylphosphine gold(I)/silver trifluoromethanesulfonate (5/5 mol%), N-bromo- or N-iodosuccinimide and gold(I) chloride/zinc bromide (5/20 mol%), all at room temperature, provided a facile method for the generation of substituted 3-fluoro-, 3-bromo-4-fluoro-, and 3-fluoro-4-iodofurans in good yields. Also, 2,2-difluoroalk-3-yn-1-ones were prepared by fluorination of alk-3-yn-1-ones under organocatalytic conditions. The structures of (Z)-tert-butyldimethylsilyl but-1-en-3-yn-1-yl ether, 3-bromo-4-fluorofuran, and 3-fluoro-4-(phenylethynyl)furan were confirmed by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Laser desorption from a room temperature ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter Ronald

    We report laser desorption from a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid (RTIL) as a novel source for time of flight mass spectrometry. We use the 2nd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser to deposit intensities of 1-50 MW/cm2 via backside illumination onto our RTIL desorption sample. A microstructured metal grid situated on top of a glass microscope slide coated with RTIL serves as our desorption sample. The RTIL we use, 1-Butyl, 3-Methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate, remains liquid at pressures below 10-8 torr. The use of liquid desorption sample allows for improved surface conditions, homogeneity and sample life as compared to Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) techniques. Our desorption technique is also unique as it allows the study of both multiphoton and acoustic desorption processes within the same time of flight spectra. Our technique yields intrinsically high resolution, low noise data. We observe differences between ion species in their preference for desorption by a particular desorption method. Specifically, we observe desorption solely by acoustic means of an entire RTIL molecule adducted with an RTIL cation. Finally, we report the applicability of this technique for the desorption of biomolecules.

  20. Room-temperature terahertz detection based on CVD graphene transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-Xin; Sun, Jian-Dong; Qin, Hua; Lv, Li; Su, Li-Na; Yan, Bo; Li, Xin-Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Peng; Fang, Jing-Yue

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a single-layer graphene field-effect terahertz detector, which is coupled with dipole-like antennas based on the self-mixing detector model. The graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition and then transferred onto an SiO2/Si substrate. We demonstrate room-temperature detection at 237 GHz. The detector could offer a voltage responsivity of 0.1 V/W and a noise equivalent power of 207 nW/Hz1/2. Our modeling indicates that the observed photovoltage in the p-type gated channel can be well fit by the self-mixing theory. A different photoresponse other than self-mixing may apply for the n-type gated channel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271157, 61401456, and 11403084), Jiangsu Provincial Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (Grant No. 1301054B), the Fund from Suzhou Industry Technology Bureau (Grant No. ZXG2012024), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M551678), the Graduate Student Innovation Program for Universities of Jiangsu Province (Grant No. CXLX12_0724), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. JUDCF 12032), and the Fund from National University of Defense Technology (Grant No. JC13-02-14).

  1. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  2. Chemically reduced graphene oxide for ammonia detection at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ruma; Midya, Anupam; Santra, Sumita; Ray, Samit K; Guha, Prasanta K

    2013-08-14

    Chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has recently attracted growing interest in the area of chemical sensors because of its high electrical conductivity and chemically active defect sites. This paper reports the synthesis of chemically reduced GO using NaBH4 and its performance for ammonia detection at room temperature. The sensing layer was synthesized on a ceramic substrate containing platinum electrodes. The effect of the reduction time of graphene oxide (GO) was explored to optimize the response, recovery, and response time. The RGO film was characterized electrically and also with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor response was found to lie between 5.5% at 200 ppm (parts per million) and 23% at 2800 ppm of ammonia, and also resistance recovered quickly without any application of heat (for lower concentrations of ammonia). The sensor was exposed to different vapors and found to be selective toward ammonia. We believe such chemically reduced GO could potentially be used to manufacture a new generation of low-power portable ammonia sensors.

  3. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  4. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  5. Room temperature lithium polymer batteries based on ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, G. B.; Kim, G. T.; Montanino, M.; Alessandrini, F.; Passerini, S.

    In this manuscript are reported the results of an investigation performed on rechargeable, all-solid-state, solvent-free, Li/LiFePO 4 polymer batteries incorporating N-butyl- N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, PYR 14TFSI, ionic liquid (IL). The tests show clearly the beneficial effect due to the incorporation of ionic liquids on room temperature battery performance that, conversely, results extremely poor in IL-free lithium polymer batteries. The theoretical capacity is delivered at 30 °C whereas about 115 mA h g -1 are discharged at 20 °C with excellent capacity retention and high coulombic efficiency. At 40 °C large capacities (125 mA h g -1) are discharged even at medium rates (C/3). Impedance measurements revealed that the overall battery resistance is almost fully located (e.g., above 93%) at the lithium anode/polymer electrolyte interface, which plays a key role in determining the battery performance.

  6. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  7. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm‑3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics.

  8. New insight into the thermodynamics of Heisenberg ferromagnets as inferred from high-temperature series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    In search of a suitable equation of state for ferromagnets, we revise the information about the Heisenberg model obtainable from high-temperature series. Special attention is paid to the ratio χ3 /χ4 (where χ ⁢ and ⁢χ3 are the linear and cubic susceptibilities) related to Landau's quartic coefficient b. It is found in particular that both χ3 /χ4 and b tend to a finite limit as T →TC . This limit is small - an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by Weiss's molecular field and similar theories - but contrary to the common belief, nonzero. This implies a rejection of the generally accepted critical-point exponents and a return to those of Landau: α = 0 , β = 1/2, γ = 1 , etc.

  9. Room-Temperature Formation of Highly Crystalline Multication Perovskites for Efficient, Low-Cost Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Taisuke; Seo, Ji-Youn; Saliba, Michael; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2017-01-20

    A room-temperature perovskite material yielding a power conversion efficiency of 18.1% (stabilized at 17.7%) is demonstrated by judicious selection of cations. Both cesium and methylammonium are necessary for room-temperature formamidinium-based perovskite to obtain the photoactive crystalline perovskite phase and high-quality crystals. This room-temperature-made perovskite material shows great potential for low-cost, large-scale manufacturing such as roll-to-roll process.

  10. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold kit therefor

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.; Hupf, Homer B.; Wanek, Philip M.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free .sup.125 I.sup.- is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  11. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  12. Room-Temperature Creation and Spin-Orbit Torque Manipulation of Skyrmions in Thin Films with Engineered Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoqiang; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenyuan; Kim, Se Kwon; Fan, Yabin; Wong, Kin L; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L

    2016-03-09

    Magnetic skyrmions, which are topologically protected spin textures, are promising candidates for ultralow-energy and ultrahigh-density magnetic data storage and computing applications. To date, most experiments on skyrmions have been carried out at low temperatures. The choice of available materials is limited, and there is a lack of electrical means to control skyrmions in devices. In this work, we demonstrate a new method for creating a stable skyrmion bubble phase in the CoFeB-MgO material system at room temperature, by engineering the interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the ferromagnetic layer. Importantly, we also demonstrate that artificially engineered symmetry breaking gives rise to a force acting on the skyrmions, in addition to the current-induced spin-orbit torque, which can be used to drive their motion. This room-temperature creation and manipulation of skyrmions offers new possibilities to engineer skyrmionic devices. The results bring skyrmionic memory and logic concepts closer to realization in industrially relevant and manufacturable thin film material systems.

  13. C_60/Ferromagnet Composites: Observation of a Temperature-Dependent Crossover from Negative to Positive Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, Q. M.; Arnason, S. B.; Hebard, A. F.

    2001-03-01

    In this work we report on the fabrication and characterization of composite thin films (M_xC_60) of C_60 with ferromagnetic metals (M). Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements will be presented for Ni_xC_60 samples with x in the range 20 - 90. A change in MR from negative (characteristic of pure Ni) at high temperatures to positive at low temperatures is observed as the sample temperature is decreased from 300 to 2 K. This crossover from negative to positive MR is similar to that seen below 1 K in phosphorous-doped silicon[1], and more recently at higher temperatures in Fe_1-yCo_ySi[2] and is attributed to quantum interference effects in the presence of Coulomb interactions with spin splitting. This interpretation can be tested for the M_xC_60 composites by comparing the MR of M_xC_60 (M= Fe, Co, Ni) with Gd_xC_60. In the Gd composite we would expect the positive MR to be absent since magnetism in Gd arises from local moments and the carriers are no longer responsible for both magnetism and conduction as they are in Fe_1-yCo_ySi. [1] T. F. Rosenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 1758 (1981). [2] N. Manyala, et al., Nature 404, 581 (2000).

  14. Ferromagnetism in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ren-Wei; Wang, Hua-Jie; Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Fei; Liu, Xue-Chao Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal. An initial increase in proton dose leads to pronounced ferromagnetism, accompanying with obvious increase in vacancy concentration. Further increase in irradiation dose lowers the saturation magnetization with the decrease in total vacancy defects due to the defects recombination. It is found that divacancies are the mainly defects in proton irradiated 4H-SiC and responsible for the observed ferromagnetism.

  15. The design of an embedded system for controlling humidity and temperature room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Teguh, R.; Didik Eko, S.; Laksono, Pringgo D.; Jamaluddin, Anif

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the system is to design an embedded system for maintenance confortable room. The confortable room was design by controlling temperature (on range 18 - 34 °C) and humidity (on range 40% - 70%.) of room condition. Temperature and humidity of room were maintained using four variable such as lamp for warm, water pump for distributing water vapour, a fan for air circullation and an exhaust-fan for air cleaner. The system was constucted both hardware (humidity sensor, microcontroller, pump, lamp, fan) and software (arduino IDE). The result shows that the system was perfectly performed to control room condition.

  16. Resonance electromagnetoacoustic method of measuring viscoelastic properties of amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons subjected to low-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len'kov, S. V.; Fedorova, N. V.

    2014-08-01

    Stationary and damped vibrations of the s 0 Lamb mode in a viscoelastic amorphous ferromagnetic ribbon excited upon the electromagnetoacoustic (EMA) transformation have been considered. A resonance method is suggested that employs double EMA transformation for measuring elasticity moduli E and internal friction in amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons. The effect of low-temperature isochronous annealing on the field dependences of Young's modulus and internal friction of the Fe80Si10B10 and Fe73.7Cu1.0Nb3.2Si12.7B9.4 alloys has been studied.

  17. Thiol-capped ZnO nanowire/nanotube arrays with tunable magnetic properties at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Deng, Su-Zi; Fan, Hai-Ming; Wang, Miao; Zheng, Min-Rui; Yi, Jia-Bao; Wu, Rong-Qin; Tan, Hui-Ru; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Ding, Jun; Feng, Yuan-Ping; Loh, Kian-Ping

    2010-01-26

    The present study reports room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviors in three-dimensional (3D)-aligned thiol-capped single-crystalline ZnO nanowire (NW) and nanotube (NT) arrays as well as polycrystalline ZnO NT arrays. Besides the observation of height-dependent saturation magnetization, a much higher M(s) of 166 microemu cm(-2) has been found in NTs compared to NWs (36 microemu cm(-2)) due to larger surface area in ZnO NTs, indicating morphology-dependent magnetic properties in ZnO NW/NT systems. Density functional calculations have revealed that the origin of ferromagnetism is mainly attributed to spin-polarized 3p electrons in S sites and, therefore, has a strong correlation with Zn-S bond anisotropy. The preferential magnetization direction of both single-crystalline NTs and NWs lies perpendicular to the tube/wire axis due to the aligned high anisotropy orientation of the Zn-S bonds on the lateral (100) face of ZnO NWs and NTs. Polycrystalline ZnO NTs, however, exhibit a preferential magnetization direction parallel to the tube axis which is ascribed to shape anisotropy dominating the magnetic response. Our results demonstrate the interplay of morphology, dimensions, and crystallinity on spin alignment and magnetic anisotropy in a 3D semiconductor nanosystem with interfacial magnetism.

  18. Observation of ferroelectricity at room temperature in ~1 nm thick conducting BaTiO3-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungran; Baasanforj, L.; Chang, Jungwon; Hwang, Inwoong; Kim, Jungrae; Shim, Seungbo; Song, Jonghyun; Kim, Jinhee

    Efforts to search for new and multi-functionalities in thin-film systems have led important findings of unknown phenomena and functionality which do not appear in bulk systems. As film growth technique is advanced, one can decrease the film thickness even thinner down to ~ nm, its unique physical properties are still appearing. For example, the superconducting metallic state of an LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure was found where LAO is about 3-4 unit cells (uc). An SrRuO3 film exhibited its ferromagnetic metallicity down to 4-6 uc; a few years later, its ferromagnetism was found to be disappeared at 2-3 uc. Meanwhile, theoretical methods have predicted existence of ferroelectrical properties mostly in prototype ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO): 3-6 uc. However, experimental verification to find such predicted thickness was hindered by large leakage current. Here we observed that ~1 nm-thick conducting BTO fillms show ferroelectric switching at room temperature (RT), and BTO films are fully-strained on LAO/STO heterostructures thicker than 5 nm thickness. Our experimental results will enlarge applicable functional oxide devices for future applications.

  19. Room temperature syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two new heterometallic polymers based on 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shu-Hua Zhao, Ru-Xiao; Li, Gui; Zhang, Hai-Yang; Huang, Qiu-Ping; Liang, Fu-Pei

    2014-12-15

    Two new heterometallic coordination polymers [ZnNa(ehbd){sub 2}(N{sub 3})]{sub n} (1) and [Cu{sub 3}Na{sub 2}(ehbd){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sub n} (2) (Hehbd is 3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde) have been synthesized under room temperature and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV, TG and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca, showing a one-dimensional (1-D) chain. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group Pī, constructing a heterometallic 2D layer structure. Luminescent properties and magnetic properties have been studied for 1 and 2, respectively and the fluorescence quantum yield of 1 is 0.077. - Highlights: • Two novel complexes 1 and 2 have been synthesized. • Complex 1 represents a novel qualitative change of luminescence property. • Complex 2 displays ferromagnetic interaction through symmetric μ{sub 1,1}–N{sub 3} bridges. • Complex 2 displays anti-ferromagnetic interaction through asymmetric μ{sub 1,1}–N{sub 3} bridges.

  20. Synthesis of tin nanocrystals in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Le Vot, Steven; Dambournet, Damien; Groult, Henri; Ngo, Anh-tu; Petit, Christophe; Rizzi, Cécile; Salzemann, Caroline; Sirieix-Plenet, Juliette; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Gaillon, Laurent

    2014-12-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the synthesis of tin nanoparticles (NPs) or tin/carbon composites, in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), that could be used as structured anode materials for Li-ion batteries. An innovative route for the synthesis of Sn nanoparticles in such media is successfully developed. Compositions, structures, sizes and morphologies of NPs were characterized by high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Our findings indicated that (i) metallic tetragonal β-Sn was obtained and (ii) the particle size could be tailored by tuning the nature of the RTILs, leading to nano-sized spherical particles with a diameter ranging from 3 to 10 nm depending on synthesis conditions. In order to investigate carbon composite materials for Li-ion batteries, Sn nanoparticles were successfully deposited on the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Moreover, electrochemical properties have been studied in relation to a structural study of the nanocomposites. The poor electrochemical performances as a negative electrode in Li-ion batteries is due to a significant amount of RTIL trapped within the pores of the nanotubes as revealed by XPS investigations. This dramatically affected the gravimetric capacity of the composites and limited the diffusion of lithium. The findings of this work however offer valuable insights into the exciting possibilities for synthesis of novel nano-sized particles and/or alloys (e.g. Sn-Cu, Sn-Co, Sn-Ni, etc.) and the importance of carbon morphology in metal pulverization during the alloying/dealloying process as well as prevention of ionic liquid trapping.

  1. Quantum-annealing correction at finite temperature: Ferromagnetic p -spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Vinci, Walter; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of open-system quantum annealing is adversely affected by thermal excitations out of the ground state. While the presence of energy gaps between the ground and excited states suppresses such excitations, error correction techniques are required to ensure full scalability of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that aims to improve the performance of quantum annealers when control over only the problem (final) Hamiltonian is possible, along with decoding. Building on our earlier work [S. Matsuura et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 220501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.220501], we study QAC using analytical tools of statistical physics by considering the effects of temperature and a transverse field on the penalty qubits in the ferromagnetic p -body infinite-range transverse-field Ising model. We analyze the effect of QAC on second (p =2 ) and first (p ≥3 ) order phase transitions, and construct the phase diagram as a function of temperature and penalty strength. Our analysis reveals that for sufficiently low temperatures and in the absence of a transverse field on the penalty qubit, QAC breaks up a single, large free-energy barrier into multiple smaller ones. We find theoretical evidence for an optimal penalty strength in the case of a transverse field on the penalty qubit, a feature observed in QAC experiments. Our results provide further compelling evidence that QAC provides an advantage over unencoded quantum annealing.

  2. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  3. Thermomechanical analysis of Natural Rubber behaviour stressed at room temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caborgan, R.; Muracciole, J. M.; Wattrisse, B.; Chrysochoos, A.

    2010-06-01

    Owing to their high molecular mobility, stressed rubber chains can easily change their conformations and get orientated. This phenomena leads to so high reversible draw ratio that this behaviour is called rubber elasticity [1-3]. The analogy with ideal gases leads to an internal energy independent of elongation, the stress being attributed to a so-called configuration entropy. However, this analysis cannot take thermal expansion into account and moreover prohibits predicting standard thermo-elastic effect noticed at small elongations and the thermoelastic inversion effects [4]. This paper aims at : observing and quantifying dissipative and coupling effects associated with deformation energy, generated when Natural Rubber is stretched. re-examine the thermomechanical behaviour model of rubberlike materials, under the generalised standard material concept. From an experimental viewpoint, energy balance is created using infrared and quantitative imaging techniques. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) provides in-the-plane displacement fields and, after derivation, strain and strain-rate fields. We have used those techniques to evidence the thermoelastic inversion effect as shown on Figure 1 where different weights have been fixed to warmed specimen and we monitored the sample deformation while it recovers room temperature. But we have also used those techniques to perform energy balance : analysis of the mechanical equilibrium allows estimates of the stress pattern and computation of deformation energy rates under a plane stress hypothesis [5]. Infrared Thermography (IRT) gives the surface temperature of the sample. To estimate the distribution of heat sources, image processing with a local heat equation and a minimal set of approximation functions (image filtering) was used. The time courses of deformation energy and heat associated with cyclic process are plotted in

  4. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S.; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A.; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T.; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M.; Glownia, James M.; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S.; Lane, Thomas J.; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E.; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Waterman, David G.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment-protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction center with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) (Fig. 1a, Extended Data Fig. 1). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4)1, where S1 is the dark stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution2,3. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and elucidating the structures of the OEC in the different S-states, as well as the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site4-6, is a prerequisite for this purpose. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage free, room temperature (RT) structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å structure of PS II7 at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, RT measurements are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions8,9, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analog, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states10. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site10-13. Thus, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms. PMID:27871088

  5. Room Temperature Synthesis of Magnetite (Fe3-δO4) Nanoparticles by a Simple Reverse Co-Precipitation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmed, N.; Heczko, O.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3-δO4) nanoparticles with the size less than 30 nm have been synthesized by using a simple reverse co-precipitation method at room temperature. During the process, ferrous sulfate (FeSO4·7H2O) powder was used as an iron precursor, and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) as a precipitating agent. The experiment was carried out in ambient atmosphere without any surfactant added. In this method, the base solution for the precipitation process was adjusted to have a pH value suitable for the formation of the magnetite phase. The iron salt precursor was added into the solution during the synthesis by two different synthesis protocols. The phase, morphology and magnetic characteristic of differently synthesized magnetite particles were characterized by using an X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The morphologies of the particles were spherical or irregular in shape depending on the synthesis protocol used. Magnetic measurement shows that the particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature with relatively high saturation magnetization and low hysteresis. The saturation magnetization and magnetic hysteresis of the particles varied with preparation reaction conditions and the resulting oxidation state of the particles.

  6. Stability of headspace volatiles in a ‘Fallglo’ tangerine juice matrix system at room temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas chromatography systems are usually equipped with autosamplers. Samples held in the autosampler tray can stay up to one day or longer at room temperature, if the tray is not equipped with a cooling mechanism. The objective of this research was to determine if holding samples at room temperature i...

  7. Sensitive Infrared Photodetectors: Optimized Electron Kinetics for Room-Temperature Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-20

    photoelectron lifetime (the capture time of photoelectrons) and improve the device responsivity, photoconductive gain, and sensitivity. Combining QD...parameter for improving the efficiency of room-temperature semiconductor optoelectronic devices, such as mid- and far infrared detectors, solar cells... improving the room- temperature optoelectronic devices due to expected slow relaxation between discrete QD levels. These expectations were based on the

  8. Electrical spin injection in InAs quantum dots at room temperature and adjustment of the emission wavelength for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A.; Roescu, R.; Rai, A. K.; Trunov, K.; Stromberg, F.; Li, M.; Soldat, H.; Ebbing, A.; Gerhardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.; Wende, H.; Keune, W.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.

    2011-05-01

    We have observed room temperature (RT) electrical spin injection in an InAs quantum dot (QD) light emitting diode (LED) grown on a p-type GaAs substrate from a ferromagnetic Fe/Tb electrode with strong out-of-plane anisotropy in remanence, i.e. without applied magnetic field. The QDs in the LED emit at 1275 nm (ground state luminescence), which is beyond the range for highly sensitive detectors, and therefore not optimum for various applications, e.g. quantum information studies. We will present two different ways to blue-shift the emission wavelength and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the experiments.

  9. Giant enhancement of magnetocaloric effect at room temperature by the formation of nanoparticle of La0.48Ca0.52MnO3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is the change in temperature or entropy of a material due to the application of external magnetic field. The temperature dependence of MCE shows maximum value near the ferromagnetic transition of the material. Material with large MCE near room temperature will make revolutionary change in cooling technology and will have large impact in human society. We have transformed antiferromagnetic bulk manganite material La0.48Ca0.52MnO3 to ferromagnetic material by the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale. MCE, as well as the Relative cooling power (RCP) of the material at room temperature (RT) systematically increase with the reduction of the particle sizes. The RCP value for the 45 nm particle size sample at RT is about 400% larger compared with the bulk counterpart. Our detail study on the nano form of the compound highlights an effective way to enhance the MCE. It opens up a vast possibility of achieving giant enhancement of MCE of several already known materials just by the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale.

  10. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  11. Observation of inverse Edelstein effect in Rashba-split 2DEG between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Zhang, Hongrui; Su, Tang; Yuan, Wei; Chen, Yangyang; Xing, Wenyu; Shi, Jing; Sun, Jirong; Han, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The Rashba physics has been intensively studied in the field of spin orbitronics for the purpose of searching novel physical properties and the ferromagnetic (FM) magnetization switching for technological applications. We report our observation of the inverse Edelstein effect up to room temperature in the Rashba-split two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) between two insulating oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, with the LaAlO3 layer thickness from 3 to 40 unit cells (UC). We further demonstrate that the spin voltage could be markedly manipulated by electric field effect for the 2DEG between SrTiO3 and 3-UC LaAlO3. These results demonstrate that the Rashba-split 2DEG at the complex oxide interface can be used for efficient charge-and-spin conversion at room temperature for the generation and detection of spin current.

  12. Observation of inverse Edelstein effect in Rashba-split 2DEG between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Zhang, Hongrui; Su, Tang; Yuan, Wei; Chen, Yangyang; Xing, Wenyu; Shi, Jing; Sun, Jirong; Han, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The Rashba physics has been intensively studied in the field of spin orbitronics for the purpose of searching novel physical properties and the ferromagnetic (FM) magnetization switching for technological applications. We report our observation of the inverse Edelstein effect up to room temperature in the Rashba-split two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) between two insulating oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, with the LaAlO3 layer thickness from 3 to 40 unit cells (UC). We further demonstrate that the spin voltage could be markedly manipulated by electric field effect for the 2DEG between SrTiO3 and 3-UC LaAlO3. These results demonstrate that the Rashba-split 2DEG at the complex oxide interface can be used for efficient charge-and-spin conversion at room temperature for the generation and detection of spin current. PMID:28345050

  13. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect at room temperature of Ni50- x Ag x Mn37Sn13 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Tran Dang; Mai, Nguyen Thi; Dan, Nguyen Huy; Phan, The-Long; Yu, Seong-Cho

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the magnetic properties and the magnetocaloric effect at room temperature of Ni50- x Ag x Mn37Sn13 alloys with x = 1, 2, and 4, which were prepared by using an arc-melting method. Experimental results reveal that a partial replacement of Ag for Ni leads to a decrease in the anti-FM phase in the alloys. In addition, the martensitic-austenitic phase transition shifts towards lower temperature and is broaded. The Curie temperature ( T C A ) for the austenitic phase also shifts toward to lower temperature, but not by much. The Curie temperature was found to be 308, 305, and 298 K for x = 1, 2, and 4, respectively. The magnetic entropy change (Δ S m ) of the samples was calculated by using isothermal magnetization data. Under an applied magnetic field change of 10 kOe, the maximum value of Δ S m (|Δ S max |) was achieved at around room temperature and did not change much (~0.8 J·kg-1·K-1) with increasing Ag-doping concentration. Particularly, the M 2 vs. H/ M curves prove that all the samples exhibited a second-order magnetic phase transition. Based on Landau's phase-transition theory and careful analyses of the magnetic data around the T C A , we have determined the critical parameters β, γ, δ, and T C . The results show that the β values are located between those expected for the 3D-Heisenberg model ( β = 0.365) and mean-field theory ( β = 0.5). Such a result proves the coexistence of short-range and long-range ferromagnetic interactions in Ni50- x Ag x Mn37Sn13 alloys. The nature of the changes in the critical parameters and the |Δ S max | is thoroughly discussed by means of structural analyses.

  14. Ferromagnetic ordering in Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Zn1 - x Mn x O nanoparticles have been synthesized by hydrothermal technique. The doping concentration of Mn can reach up to 9 at% without precipitation or secondary phase, confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in the as-prepared nanoparticles. However, the room-temperature ferromagnetism disappears after post-annealing in either argon or air atmosphere, indicating the importance of post-treatment for nanostructured magnetic semiconductors. PMID:25435834

  15. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  16. Positronium bubble oscillation in room temperature ionic liquids-Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirade, T.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependent oscillation of the ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate was successfully observed for a room temperature ionic liquid (IL), N,N,N-trimethyl-N- propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI). The fundamental frequencies at 25C and 30C were 5.85GHz and 4.00GHz, respectively. The decay of the oscillation was faster at higher temperature, 30C. Moreover, the higher harmonic frequencies could explain the change of ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate successfully. The macroscopic viscosity of the IL could not explain the appearance of the oscillation. It indicated that the positron annihilation methods were very strong tools to study the properties of IL's in sub-nanometer scale that must be very different from the macroscopic properties.

  17. Cooling field and temperature dependent exchange bias in spin glass/ferromagnet bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rui, W. B.; Hu, Y.; Du, A.; You, B.; Xiao, M. W.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, S. M.; Du, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental and theoretical studies of cooling field (HFC) and temperature (T) dependent exchange bias (EB) in FexAu1 − x/Fe19Ni81 spin glass (SG)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers. When x varies from 8% to 14% in the FexAu1 − x SG alloys, with increasing T, a sign-changeable exchange bias field (HE) together with a unimodal distribution of coercivity (HC) are observed. Significantly, increasing in the magnitude of HFC reduces (increases) the value of HE in the negative (positive) region, resulting in the entire HE ∼ T curve to move leftwards and upwards. In the meanwhile, HFC variation has weak effects on HC. By Monte Carlo simulation using a SG/FM vector model, we are able to reproduce such HE dependences on T and HFC for the SG/FM system. Thus this work reveals that the SG/FM bilayer system containing intimately coupled interface, instead of a single SG layer, is responsible for the novel EB properties. PMID:26348277

  18. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  19. Bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for general lattice ferromagnetic spin systems at high temperature

    PubMed

    Schor; O'Carroll

    2000-08-01

    We obtain different properties of general d dimensional lattice ferromagnetic spin systems with nearest neighbor interactions in the high temperature region (beta<1). Each model is characterized by a single site a priori spin distribution, taken to be even. We state our results in terms of the parameter alpha=-3(2) where denotes the kth moment of the a priori distribution. Associated with the model is a lattice quantum field theory that is known to contain particles. We show that for alpha>0, beta small, there exists a bound state with mass below the two-particle threshold. For alpha<0, bound states do not exist. The existence of the bound state has implications on the decay of correlations, i.e., the four-point function decays at a slower rate than twice that of the two-point function. These results are obtained using a lattice version of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation. The existence and nonexistence results generalize to N-component models with rotationally invariant a priori spin distributions.

  20. Excitations for lattice ferromagnetic classical spin systems at high temperature: noneven single-spin distributions

    PubMed

    Schor; O'Carroll

    2000-06-01

    We consider general d-dimensional lattice ferromagnetic spin systems with nearest neighbor interactions in the high temperature region (beta<1). Each model is characterized by a single-site a priori spin probability distribution taken to be noneven. We state our results in terms of the parameter alpha=(<&smacr; (4)>-3<&smacr; (2)>(2)-<&smacr; (3)>(2)<&smacr; (2)>(-1))/(<&smacr; (4)>-<&smacr; (2)>(2)-<&smacr; (3)>(2)<&smacr; (2)>(-1)), where &smacr;=s-, and denotes the kth moment of the single-site distribution. Associated with the model is a lattice quantum field theory which is known to contain a particle of mass m approximately ln beta. Assuming <&smacr;(3)> not equal0 we show that for alpha>0, beta small, there exists a bound state with mass below the two-particle threshold 2m. For alpha<0 bound states do not exist. These results are obtained using a Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation in the ladder approximation in conjunction with a representation for the inverse of the two-point function designed to analyze the spectrum below but close to 2m.

  1. Ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO-based thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Hua; Zhan, Bin; Nan, Ce-Wen; Zhao, Rongjuan; Xu, Xiang; Kobayashi, M.

    2011-08-01

    Polycrystalline NiO-based thin films with Li or/and transition metal ions (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn) doping have been prepared by a sol-gel spin-coating method. Magnetization measurements reveal that V-, Fe-, and Mn-doped NiO thin films show obvious room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviors and ferromagnetic properties can be enhanced by the Li co-doping. Microstructure and X-ray core-level photoemission spectra analysis indicate that the ferromagnetism was not from the impurity TM metal cluster and may be ascribed to double exchange coupling effects via Li-induced holes.

  2. The deformation and fracture characteristics of inconel X-750 at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. J.

    1980-06-01

    Electron fractographic and thin foil electron metallographic techniques were used to evaluate the deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at temperatures ranging from 24 to 816 °C. Operative dislocation mechanisms and fracture surface morphologies were related to the overall tensile response of this nickel-base superalloy. At room temperature, failure occurred primarily by an intergranular dimple rupture mechanism associated with microvoid coalescence along grain boundary denuded regions. A fairly high density of dislocations throughout the matrix resulted in relatively high ductility levels even though failure occurred by an intergranular mechanism. Under intermediate temperature conditions (316 to 427 °C), increased transgranular fracture coupled with extensive dislocation activity within the Inconel X-750 matrix caused a slight increase in ductility. At progressively higher temperatures, 538 to 704 °C, all dislocation activity was channeled through narrow slip bands which subsequently initiated localized separation and resulted in a very faceted fracture surface appearance. The absence of a homogeneous dislocation substructure in this temperature regime resulted in a severe degradation in ductility levels. At the highest test temperature (816 °C), a uniform dislocation network throughout the Inconel X-750 matrix coupled with intense dislocation activity in the grain boundary denuded zone resulted in a marked improvement in ductility. Furthermore, the extensive dislocation activity along grain boundary regions ultimately resulted in an intergranular fracture morphology.

  3. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and temperature dependence of switching field in (Ga, Mn) as ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Kamara, S; Terki, F; Dumas, R; Dehbaoui, M; Sadowski, J; Galéra, R M; Tran, Q-H; Charar, S

    2012-06-01

    We explore the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor by Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements. Using low magnitude of applied magnetic field (i.e., when the magnitude H is smaller than both cubic Hc and uniaxial Hu anisotropy field), we have observed various shapes of applied magnetic field direction dependence of Planar Hall Resistance (PHR). In particular, in two regions of temperature. At T < Tc/2, the "square-shape" signal and at T > Tc/2 the "zigzag-shape" signal of PHR. They reflect different magnetic anisotropy and provide information about magnetization reversal process in GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor. The theoretical model calculation of PHR based on the free energy density reproduces well the experimental data. We report also the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants and magnetization orientations. The transition of easy axis from biaxial to uniaxiale axes has been observed and confirmed by SQUID measurements.

  4. Low-temperature specific heat and magnetic properties of the filled skutterudite ferromagnet NdRu4As12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, A.; Henkie, Z.; Cichorek, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present the low-temperature specific heat and magnetic properties of the filled skutterudite compound NdRu4As12 that exhibits a ferromagnetic transition at TC ≃ 2.3 K . Magnetic entropy considerations point at a quartet ground state of the Nd3+ ions. Deep in the ferromagnetic state, the heat capacity shows a Schottky anomaly that we ascribe to the Zeeman splitting in the presence of a molecular field. Comparison of the specific heats of NdRu4As12 and its Os-based homologue near their Curie temperatures supports our earlier observation suggesting an unusual lowering of the Th cubic point symmetry in the latter filled skutterudite.

  5. A new class of room-temperature multiferroic thin films with bismuth-based supercell structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Zhou, Honghui; Bi, Zhenxing; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Zhiping; Bayraktaroglu, Adrian; Phillips, Jamie; Choi, Eun-Mi; Macmanus-Driscoll, Judith L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Narayan, Jagdish; Jia, Quanxi; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-02-20

    Intergrowth of two partially miscible phases of BiFeO(3) and BiMnO(3) gives a new class of room-temperature multiferroic phase, Bi(3) Fe(2) Mn(2) O(10+δ) , which has a unique supercell (SC) structure. The SC heterostructures exhibit simultaneously room-temperature ferrimagnetism and remanent polarization. These results open up a new avenue for exploring room-temperature single-phase multiferroic thin films by controlling the phase mixing of two perovskite BiRO(3) (R = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) materials.

  6. Existence of the multiferroic property at room temperature in Ti doped CoFeO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, G. D.; Joshi, Amish G.; Kevin, H.; Shahi, P.; Kumar, A.; Ghosh, A. K.; Yang, H. D.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of ferroelectricity has been observed in magnetically ordered Co(Fe1-xTix)2O4 at room temperature. Magnetization and dielectric constant is found to increase with Ti doping. It is observed from an X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy study that Ti goes to the octahedral site with (+4) ionic state. An M-H hysteresis curve at room temperature shows the ferrimagnetic ordering and a P-E loop at room temperature clearly indicates the existence of ferroelectricity.

  7. Efficient room-temperature nuclear spin hyperpolarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Puttisong, Y; Wang, X J; Buyanova, I A; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Ptak, A J; Tu, C W; Chen, W M

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization is essential to future solid-state quantum computation using nuclear spin qubits and in highly sensitive magnetic resonance imaging. Though efficient dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors has been demonstrated at low temperatures for decades, its realization at room temperature is largely lacking. Here we demonstrate that a combined effect of efficient spin-dependent recombination and hyperfine coupling can facilitate strong dynamic nuclear polarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor at room temperature. We provide direct evidence that a sizeable nuclear field (~150 Gauss) and nuclear spin polarization (~15%) sensed by conduction electrons in GaNAs originates from dynamic nuclear polarization of a Ga interstitial defect. We further show that the dynamic nuclear polarization process is remarkably fast and is completed in <5 μs at room temperature. The proposed new concept could pave a way to overcome a major obstacle in achieving strong dynamic nuclear polarization at room temperature, desirable for practical device applications.

  8. The room-temperature shapes of four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear extension of classical lamination theory developed by Hyer (1981) for predicting the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates is reformulated using relaxed restrictions regarding the inplane strains. The inplane residual strains of unsymmetric laminates which have cooled from curing into a cylindrical room-temperature shape are examined numerically. Results show that the residual strains are compressive and practically independent of spatial location on the laminate. In addition, the room temperature shapes of the four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates are predicted, and it is shown that the temperature shapes are a strong function of their size and their stacking arrangement. It is demonstrated that, depending on the parameters selected, the room-temperature shape of a four-layer cross-ply unsymmetric laminate can be a unique saddle shape, a unique cylindrical shape, or a cylindrical shape that can be snapped through to another cylindrical shape.

  9. Excess Ni-doping induced enhanced room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni-Mn-Sn based shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-09-15

    Present work reports on the observation of large magnetoresistance (∼−30% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (∼12 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} for 0–50 kOe) near room temperature (∼290 K) on the Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56}. The sample can be thought of being derived from the parent Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.6} alloy, where excess Ni was doped at the expense of Sn. Such Ni doping enhances the martensitic transition temperature and for the Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56} it is found to be optimum (288 K). The doped alloy shows enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduced saturation magnetization as compared to the undoped counterpart at low temperature. A probable increment of antiferromagnetic correlation between Mn-atoms on Ni substitution can be accounted for the enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduction in saturation moment.

  10. Room temperature multiferroic properties of (Fe{sub x}, Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Cheolbok; Fang, Sheng-Po; Yoon, Yong-Kyu

    2014-09-08

    This letter reports the structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and magnetic properties of Fe substituted SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in room temperature. The structural data obtained from x-ray diffraction indicates that (Fe{sub x},Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3}, the so called FST, transforms from pseudocubic to tetragonal structures with increase of the Fe content in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, featuring the ferroelectricity, while vibrating sample magnetometer measurements show magnetic hysteresis loops for the samples with low iron contents indicating their ferromagnetism. The characterized ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism confirms strong multiferroitism of the single phase FST thin films in room temperature. Also, an FST thin film metal-insulator-metal multiferroic capacitor has been fabricated and characterized in microwave frequencies between 10 MHz and 5 GHz. A capacitor based on Fe{sub 0.1}Sr{sub 0.9}TiO{sub 3} with a thickness of 260 nm shows a high electric tunability of 18.6% at 10 V and a maximum magnetodielectric value of 1.37% at 0.4 mT with a loss tangent of 0.021 at 1 GHz. This high tuning and low loss makes this material as a good candidate for frequency agile microwave devices such as tunable filters, phase shifters, and antennas.

  11. Spin pumping in Ferromagnet-Topological Insulator-Ferromagnet Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Baker, A. A.; Figueroa, A. I.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; van der Laan, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are enticing prospects for the future of spintronics due to their large spin-orbit coupling and dissipationless, counter-propagating conduction channels in the surface state. However, a means to interact with and exploit the topological surface state remains elusive. Here, we report a study of spin pumping at the TI-ferromagnet interface, investigating spin transfer dynamics in a spin-valve like structure using element specific time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and ferromagnetic resonance. Gilbert damping increases approximately linearly with increasing TI thickness, indicating efficient behaviour as a spin sink. However, layer-resolved measurements suggest that a dynamic coupling is limited. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel material class, and suggest great potential for TIs in spintronic devices, through their novel magnetodynamics that persist even up to room temperature. PMID:25601364

  12. Branched quaternary ammonium amphiphiles: nematic ionic liquid crystals near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Li, Bao; Zhang, Mingliang; Wu, Lixin

    2009-09-21

    Branched quaternary ammonium molecules were synthesized and characterized by calorimetric, optical and X-ray diffraction studies; two of the molecules exhibited interesting nematic liquid crystalline behavior close to room temperature.

  13. Red photoluminescence of living systems at the room temperature : measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, I. S.; Rud, V. Yu; Shpunt, V. Ch; Rud, Yu V.; Glinushkin, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Presents results of a study of the red luminescence of living plants at room temperature. The analysis of obtained results allows to conclude that the photoluminescence spectra for green leaves in all cases represent the two closely spaced bands.

  14. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK AND TEMPLATE-FREE SYNTHESIS OF LEUCOEMARLDINE POLYANILINE NANOFIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe a simple strategy for the bulk and template-free synthesis of reduced leucoemarldine polyaniline nanofibers size ranging from as low as 10 nm to 50 nm without the use of any reducing agents at room temperature.

  15. Room temperature operation of GaSb-based resonant tunneling diodes by prewell injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Knebl, Georg; Hartmann, Fabian; Weih, Robert; Bader, Andreas; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    We present room temperature resonant tunneling of GaSb/AlAsSb double barrier resonant tunneling diodes with pseudomorphically grown prewell emitter structures comprising the ternary compound semiconductors GaInSb and GaAsSb. At room temperature, resonant tunneling is absent for diode structures without prewell emitters. The incorporation of Ga0.84In0.16Sb and GaAs0.05Sb0.95 prewell emitters leads to room temperature resonant tunneling with peak-to-valley current ratios of 1.45 and 1.36 , respectively. The room temperature operation is attributed to the enhanced Γ-L-valley energy separation and consequently depopulation of L-valley states in the conduction band of the ternary compound emitter prewell with respect to bulk GaSb.

  16. Low-Temperature Properties of Quasi-One-Dimensional Molecule-Based Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shoji; Sakai, Tôru

    2001-05-01

    Quantum and thermal behaviors of low-dimensional mixed-spin systems are investigated with particular emphasis on the design of molecule-based ferromagnets. One can obtain a molecular ferromagnet by assembling molecular bricks so as to construct a low-dimensional system with a magnetic ground state and then coupling the chains or the layers again in a ferromagnetic fashion. Two of thus-constructed quasi-one-dimensional bimetallic compounds are qualitatively viewed within the spin-wave treatment, one of which successfully grows into a bulk magnet, while the other of which ends in a singlet ground state. Then, concentrating on the ferrimagnetic arrangement on a two-leg ladder which is well indicative of general coupled-chain ferrimagnets, we develop the spin-wave theory and fully reveal its low-energy structure. We inquire further into the ferromagnetic aspect of the ferrimagnetic ladder numerically calculating the sublattice magnetization and the magnetic susceptibility. There exists a moderate coupling strength between the chains in order to obtain the most ferromagnetic ferrimagnet.

  17. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; ...

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  18. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; Mays, Jimmy; Wang, Weiyu; White, Benjamin T.

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffine tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.

  19. An active homopolar magnetic bearing with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-08-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in liquid nitrogen. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 200 lb (890 N) radial load capacity (measured non-rotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that in Cu in liquid nitrogen. Design compromises permitted use of circular coils with rectangular cross section. Conductor improvements will eventually permit coil shape optimization, higher current density and higher bearing load capacity. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, required negligible power to carry its direct current. The control coils were wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag. These dissipated negligible power for direct current (i.e. for steady radial load components). When an alternating current (AC) was added, the AC component dissipated power which increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. In fact at frequencies above about 2 hz, the effective resistance of the control coil conductor actually exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. This is at least qualitatively understandable in the context of a Bean-type model of flux and current penetration into a Type II superconductor. Fortunately the dynamic currents required for bearing stability are of small amplitude. These results show that while twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation, twisted multifilaments will be required to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads, such as those due to unbalance.

  20. An active homopolar magnetic bearing with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in liquid nitrogen. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 200 lb (890 N) radial load capacity (measured non-rotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that in Cu in liquid nitrogen. Design compromises permitted use of circular coils with rectangular cross section. Conductor improvements will eventually permit coil shape optimization, higher current density and higher bearing load capacity. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, required negligible power to carry its direct current. The control coils were wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag. These dissipated negligible power for direct current (i.e. for steady radial load components). When an alternating current (AC) was added, the AC component dissipated power which increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. In fact at frequencies above about 2 hz, the effective resistance of the control coil conductor actually exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. This is at least qualitatively understandable in the context of a Bean-type model of flux and current penetration into a Type II superconductor. Fortunately the dynamic currents required for bearing stability are of small amplitude. These results show that while twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation, twisted multifilaments will be required to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads, such as those due to unbalance.

  1. Qualification of room-temperature-curing structural adhesives for use on JPL spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Alain; O'Donnell, Tim

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the comparative advantages of numerous room temperature-cure structural primers and adhesives applicable to spacecraft structures. The EA 9394 adhesive and BR 127 primer were chosen for use in all primary structure bonding on the Galileo spacecraft, in virtue of adequate room-temperature lap shear and peel strengths and superior mechanical properties above 200 F. EA 9394 also offers superior work life, shelf-life, and storage properties, by comparison with the EA 934 alternative.

  2. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  3. [Temperature and humidity monitoring system of imaging equipment room based on wireless network].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuejun; Yu, Kaijun

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless temperature and humidity control system for hospital's video room. The system realizes one to multiple communication using wireless communication module CC1020 and SHT11 as sensors, and then sets up the communication between system and the central station with serial communication controller MSCOMM. The system uses VISUAL C++ programming to realize the video room temperature and humidity alarm control. It is wireless, efficacious and manpower-efficient.

  4. Microemulsions with an ionic liquid surfactant and room temperature ionic liquids as polar pseudo-phase.

    PubMed

    Zech, Oliver; Thomaier, Stefan; Bauduin, Pierre; Rück, Thomas; Touraud, Didier; Kunz, Werner

    2009-01-15

    In this investigation we present for the first time microemulsions comprising an ionic liquid as surfactant and a room-temperature ionic liquid as polar pseudo-phase. Microemulsions containing the long- chain ionic liquid1-hexadecyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([C16mim][Cl]) as surfactant, decanol as cosurfactant, dodecaneas continuous phase and room temperature ionic liquids (ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim

  5. Comparison of the ferromagnetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model and the AF spin-1 longitudinal Ising model at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, M. T.; Corrêa Silva, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    We derive the exact Helmholtz free energy (HFE) of the standard and staggered one-dimensional Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) model in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. We discuss in detail the thermodynamic behavior of the ferromagnetic version of the model, which exhibits magnetic field-dependent plateaux in the z-component of its magnetization at low temperatures. We also study the behavior of its specific heat and entropy, both per site, at finite temperature. The degeneracy of the ground state, at T=0, along the lines that separate distinct phases in the phase diagram of the ferromagnetic BEG model is calculated, extending the study of the phase diagram of the spin-1 antiferromagnetic (AF) Ising model in S.M. de Souza and M.T. Thomaz, J. Magn. and Magn. Mater. 354 (2014) 205 [5]. We explore the implications of the equality of phase diagrams, at T=0, of the ferromagnetic BEG model with K/|J| = - 2 and of the spin-1 AF Ising model for D/|J| > 1/2.

  6. Linear Chains of Magnetic Ions Stacked with Variable Distance: Ferromagnetic Ordering with a Curie Temperature above 20 K.

    PubMed

    Friedländer, Stefan; Liu, Jinxuan; Addicoat, Matt; Petkov, Petko; Vankova, Nina; Rüger, Robert; Kuc, Agnieszka; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Wencai; Lukose, Binit; Wang, Zhengbang; Weidler, Peter G; Pöppl, Andreas; Ziese, Michael; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2016-10-04

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the SURMOF-2 series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Contrary to bulk MOF-2 crystals, where Cu(2+) ions form paddlewheels and are antiferromagnetically coupled, in this case the Cu(2+) ions are connected via carboxylate groups in a zipper-like fashion. This unusual coupling of the spin 1/2 ions within the resulting one-dimensional chains is found to stabilize a low-temperature, ferromagnetic (FM) phase. In contrast to other ordered 1D systems, no strong magnetic fields are needed to induce the ferromagnetism. The magnetic coupling constants describing the interaction between the individual metal ions have been determined in SQUID experiments. They are fully consistent with the results of ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations. The theoretical results allow the unusual magnetic behavior of this exotic, yet easy-to-fabricate, material to be described in a detailed fashion.

  7. Robust spin-orbit torque and spin-galvanic effect at the Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Decker, M; Kronseder, M; Islinger, R; Gmitra, M; Schuh, D; Bougeard, D; Fabian, J; Weiss, D; Back, C H

    2016-12-13

    Interfacial spin-orbit torques (SOTs) enable the manipulation of the magnetization through in-plane charge currents, which has drawn increasing attention for spintronic applications. The search for material systems providing efficient SOTs, has been focused on polycrystalline ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal bilayers. In these systems, currents flowing in the non-magnetic layer generate-due to strong spin-orbit interaction-spin currents via the spin Hall effect and induce a torque at the interface to the ferromagnet. Here we report the observation of robust SOT occuring at a single crystalline Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature. We find that the magnitude of the interfacial SOT, caused by the reduced symmetry at the interface, is comparably strong as in ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal systems. The large spin-orbit fields at the interface also enable spin-to-charge current conversion at the interface, known as spin-galvanic effect. The results suggest that single crystalline Fe/GaAs interfaces may enable efficient electrical magnetization manipulation.

  8. Robust spin-orbit torque and spin-galvanic effect at the Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L.; Decker, M.; Kronseder, M.; Islinger, R.; Gmitra, M.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Fabian, J.; Weiss, D.; Back, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial spin-orbit torques (SOTs) enable the manipulation of the magnetization through in-plane charge currents, which has drawn increasing attention for spintronic applications. The search for material systems providing efficient SOTs, has been focused on polycrystalline ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal bilayers. In these systems, currents flowing in the non-magnetic layer generate—due to strong spin–orbit interaction—spin currents via the spin Hall effect and induce a torque at the interface to the ferromagnet. Here we report the observation of robust SOT occuring at a single crystalline Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature. We find that the magnitude of the interfacial SOT, caused by the reduced symmetry at the interface, is comparably strong as in ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal systems. The large spin-orbit fields at the interface also enable spin-to-charge current conversion at the interface, known as spin-galvanic effect. The results suggest that single crystalline Fe/GaAs interfaces may enable efficient electrical magnetization manipulation. PMID:27958265

  9. Robust spin-orbit torque and spin-galvanic effect at the Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Decker, M.; Kronseder, M.; Islinger, R.; Gmitra, M.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Fabian, J.; Weiss, D.; Back, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Interfacial spin-orbit torques (SOTs) enable the manipulation of the magnetization through in-plane charge currents, which has drawn increasing attention for spintronic applications. The search for material systems providing efficient SOTs, has been focused on polycrystalline ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal bilayers. In these systems, currents flowing in the non-magnetic layer generate--due to strong spin-orbit interaction--spin currents via the spin Hall effect and induce a torque at the interface to the ferromagnet. Here we report the observation of robust SOT occuring at a single crystalline Fe/GaAs (001) interface at room temperature. We find that the magnitude of the interfacial SOT, caused by the reduced symmetry at the interface, is comparably strong as in ferromagnetic metal/non-magnetic metal systems. The large spin-orbit fields at the interface also enable spin-to-charge current conversion at the interface, known as spin-galvanic effect. The results suggest that single crystalline Fe/GaAs interfaces may enable efficient electrical magnetization manipulation.

  10. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-04

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits.

  11. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  12. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Kato, M; Saito, N; Tono, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%).

  13. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (˜4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%).

  14. Effects of ambient room temperature on cold air cooling during laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ramin; Rosenbach, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Forced air cooling is a well-established technique that protects the epidermis during laser heating of deeper structures, thereby allowing for increased laser fluences. The goal of this prospective study was to identify whether an elevation in ambient room temperature influences the efficacy of forced air cooling. Skin surface temperatures were measured on 24 sites (12 subjects) during cold air exposure in examination rooms with ambient temperatures of 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C) and 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C), respectively. Before cooling, mean skin surface temperature was 9 degrees F (5 degrees C) higher in the warmer room (P < 0.01). Immediately after exposure to forced air cooling (within 1 s), the skin surface temperature remained considerably higher (10.75 degrees F, or 5.8 degrees C, P < 0.01) in the warmer room. We conclude that forced air cooling in a room with an ambient temperature of 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C) is not as effective as in a room that is at 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C).

  15. Fatigue mechanisms in graphite/SiC composites at room and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.L.; Cox, B.N.; Marshall, D.B.; Inman, R.V.; James, M.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Some deductions have been made from fractographic evidence about mechanisms of low-cycle mechanical fatigue in plain woven graphite/SiC composites at room and high temperature in vacuum. At both room temperature and 830 C, fatigue appears to be confined to the crack wake, where attrition reduces the efficacy of bridging fibers. It is inferred that the crack tip advances at some critical value of the crack tip stress intensity factor, as in monotonic growth, rather than by any intrinsic fatigue mechanism in the matrix. However, the manifestations of attrition are very different at room and high temperatures. At high temperature, wear is greatly accelerated by the action of SiC debris within the crack. This distinction is rationalized in terms of the temperature dependence expected in the opening displacement of a bridged crack. This argument leads in turn to plausible explanations of trends in load-life curves and the morphology of cracks as the temperature rises.

  16. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  17. Magnetic refrigeration: an eco-friendly technology for the refrigeration at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, C.; Greco, A.; Maiorino, A.; Masselli, C.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging, environment-friendly technology based on a magnetic solid that acts as a refrigerant by magneto-caloric effect (MCE). In the case of ferromagnetic materials MCE is a warming as the magnetic moments of the atom are aligned by the application of a magnetic field, and the corresponding cooling upon removal of the magnetic field. There are two types of magnetic phase changes that may occur at the Curie point: first order magnetic transition (FOMT) and second order magnetic transition (SOMT). The reference cycle for magnetic refrigeration is AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative cycle) where the magnetic material matrix works both as a refrigerating medium and as a heat regenerating medium, while the fluid flowing in the porous matrix works as a heat transfer medium. Regeneration can be accomplished by blowing a heat transfer fluid in a reciprocating fashion through the regenerator made of magnetocaloric material that is alternately magnetized and demagnetized. In this paper, attention is directed towards the near room-temperature range. We compare the energetic performance of a commercial R134a refrigeration plant to that of a magnetic refrigerator working with an AMR cycle. Attention is devoted to the evaluation of the environmental impact in terms of a greenhouse effect. The comparison is performed in term of TEWI index (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) that takes into account both direct and indirect contributions to global warming. In this paper the AMR cycle works with different magnetic refrigerants: pure gadolinium, second order phase magnetic transition (Pr0.45Sr0.35MnO3) and first order phase magnetic transition alloys (Gd5Si2Ge2, LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52, LaFe1105Co0.94Si110 and MnFeP0.45As0.55). The comparison, carried out by means of a mathematical model, clearly shows that GdSi2Ge2 and LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52 has a TEWI index always lower than that of a vapor compression plant. Furthermore, the TEWI of the AMR

  18. Room temperature synthesis and high temperature frictional study of silver vanadate nanorods.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Polychronopoulou, K; Rebholz, C; Aouadi, S M

    2010-08-13

    We report the room temperature (RT) synthesis of silver vanadate nanorods (consisting of mainly beta-AgV O(3)) by a simple wet chemical route and their frictional study at high temperatures (HT). The sudden mixing of ammonium vanadate with silver nitrate solution under constant magnetic stirring resulted in a pale yellow coloured precipitate. Structural/microstructural characterization of the precipitate through x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the high yield and homogeneous formation of silver vanadate nanorods. The length of the nanorods was 20-40 microm and the thickness 100-600 nm. The pH variation with respect to time was thoroughly studied to understand the formation mechanism of the silver vanadate nanorods. This synthesis process neither demands HT, surfactants nor long reaction time. The silver vanadate nanomaterial showed good lubrication behaviour at HT (700 degrees C) and the friction coefficient was between 0.2 and 0.3. HT-XRD revealed that AgV O(3) completely transformed into silver vanadium oxide (Ag(2)V(4)O(11)) and silver with an increase in temperature from RT to 700 degrees C.

  19. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni-Mn-Sn melt spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziarz, W.; Czaja, P.; Szczerba, M. J.; Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C.; Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T.; Cesari, E.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni48Mn39.5Sn12.5-xAlx (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔTMT=49 K; ΔTRMT=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite TCM decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite TCA remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune TCA and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L21 type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32¯) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31¯) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the TCM has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications.

  20. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  1. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation. PMID:28195181

  2. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-02-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation.

  3. A Promising New Method to Estimate Drug-Polymer Solubility at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Gannon, Natasha; Porsch, Ilona; Rask, Malte Bille; Olesen, Niels Erik; Langguth, Peter; Holm, René; Rades, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The established methods to predict drug-polymer solubility at room temperature either rely on extrapolation over a long temperature range or are limited by the availability of a liquid analogue of the polymer. To overcome these issues, this work investigated a new methodology where the drug-polymer solubility is estimated from the solubility of the drug in a solution of the polymer at room temperature using the shake-flask method. Thus, the new polymer in solution method does not rely on temperature extrapolations and only requires the polymer and a solvent, in which the polymer is soluble, that does not affect the molecular structure of the drug and polymer relative to that in the solid state. Consequently, as this method has the potential to provide fast and precise estimates of drug-polymer solubility at room temperature, we encourage the scientific community to further investigate this principle both fundamentally and practically.

  4. Asymmetric Ferromagnet-Superconductor-Ferromagnet Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden-Zimansky, P.; Bazaliy, Ya.B.; Litvak, L.M.; Jiang, J.S.; Pearson, J.; Gu, J.Y.; You, Chun-Yeol; Beasley, M.R.; Bader, S.D.

    2011-11-04

    In layered ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet F{sub 1} /S/F{sub 2} structures, the critical temperature T{sub c} of the superconductors depends on the magnetic orientation of the ferromagnetic layers F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} relative to each other. So far, the experimentally observed magnitude of change in T{sub c} for structures utilizing weak ferromagnets has been 2 orders of magnitude smaller than is expected from calculations. We theoretically show that such a discrepancy can result from the asymmetry of F/S boundaries, and we test this possibility by performing experiments on structures where F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} are independently varied. Our experimental results indicate that asymmetric boundaries are not the source of the discrepancy. If boundary asymmetry is causing the suppressed magnitude of T{sub c} changes, it may only be possible to detect in structures with thinner ferromagnetic layers.

  5. Low threshold interband cascade lasers operating above room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, B.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Mid-IR type-II interband cascade lasers were demonstrated in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 325 K and in continuous mode up to 200 K. At 80 K, the threshold current density was 8.9 A/cm2 and a cw outpout power of 140 mW/facet was obtained.

  6. Ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites for room-temperature electrocaloric refrigeration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzu; Li, Qi; Gu, Haiming; Jiang, Shenglin; Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew R; Haque, Md Amanul; Zhang, Qiming; Wang, Qing

    2015-02-25

    Solution-processable ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites are developed as a new form of electrocaloric materials that can be effectively operated under both modest and high electric fields at ambient temperature. By integrating the complementary properties of the constituents, the nanocomposites exhibit state-of-the-art cooling energy densities. Greatly improved thermal conductivity also yields superior cooling power densities validated by finite volume simulations.

  7. Atomically Thin B doped g-C3N4 Nanosheets: High-Temperature Ferromagnetism and calculated Half-Metallicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Daqiang; Liu, Yonggang; Liu, Peitao; Si, Mingsu; Xue, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3), which can be seen as C-doped graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4), was reported to display ferromagnetic ground state and intrinsic half-metallicity (Du et al., PRL,108,197207,2012), it has attracted numerous research interest to tune the electronic structure and magnetic properties of g-C3N4 due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, we reported the experimentally achieving of high temperature ferromagnetism in metal-free ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets by introducing of B atoms. Further, first-principles calculation results revealed that the current flow in such a system was fully spin-polarized and the magnetic moment was mainly attributed to the p orbital of N atoms in B doped g-C3N4 monolayer, giving the theoretic evidence of the ferromagnetism and half-metallicity. Our finding provided a new perspective for B doped g-C3N4 spintronic devices in future. PMID:27762348

  8. Atomically Thin B doped g-C3N4 Nanosheets: High-Temperature Ferromagnetism and calculated Half-Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Daqiang; Liu, Yonggang; Liu, Peitao; Si, Mingsu; Xue, Desheng

    2016-10-01

    Since the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3), which can be seen as C-doped graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4), was reported to display ferromagnetic ground state and intrinsic half-metallicity (Du et al., PRL,108,197207,2012), it has attracted numerous research interest to tune the electronic structure and magnetic properties of g-C3N4 due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, we reported the experimentally achieving of high temperature ferromagnetism in metal-free ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets by introducing of B atoms. Further, first-principles calculation results revealed that the current flow in such a system was fully spin-polarized and the magnetic moment was mainly attributed to the p orbital of N atoms in B doped g-C3N4 monolayer, giving the theoretic evidence of the ferromagnetism and half-metallicity. Our finding provided a new perspective for B doped g-C3N4 spintronic devices in future.

  9. Atomically Thin B doped g-C3N4 Nanosheets: High-Temperature Ferromagnetism and calculated Half-Metallicity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daqiang; Liu, Yonggang; Liu, Peitao; Si, Mingsu; Xue, Desheng

    2016-10-20

    Since the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3), which can be seen as C-doped graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4), was reported to display ferromagnetic ground state and intrinsic half-metallicity (Du et al., PRL,108,197207,2012), it has attracted numerous research interest to tune the electronic structure and magnetic properties of g-C3N4 due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, we reported the experimentally achieving of high temperature ferromagnetism in metal-free ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets by introducing of B atoms. Further, first-principles calculation results revealed that the current flow in such a system was fully spin-polarized and the magnetic moment was mainly attributed to the p orbital of N atoms in B doped g-C3N4 monolayer, giving the theoretic evidence of the ferromagnetism and half-metallicity. Our finding provided a new perspective for B doped g-C3N4 spintronic devices in future.

  10. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Suresh, K. G.

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300 K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} was observed near 300 K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300 K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300 K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62 K at 280 K.

  11. Room temperature ferrimagnetism and low temperature disorder effects in zinc ferrite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Lisha; Pookat, Geetha; Thomas, Hysen; Ojha, Sunil; Avasthi, D. K.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite is a normal spinel and antiferromagnetic in nature with a Neel temperature of 10 K in the micron regime. It exhibits interesting features like superparamagnetism, spin glass and ferrimagnetism in the nano-regime. These anomalies make zinc ferrite striking among various other spinels. Further, in the thin film form, the magnetic properties are dependent on preparative techniques, annealing and deposition parameters. In the present work, zinc ferrite thin films were prepared by RF sputtering. The films were annealed at 400° C and 600° C. The thickness and composition of films were estimated by employing Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The structural and microstructural studies conducted using Glancing X Ray Diffractometer (GXRD) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) indicates the formation of a spinel phase and grain growth was observed with annealing. Magnetic measurements were carried out using a Superconducting Quantum Interferometer Device-Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (SQUID VSM). The films were found to be ferrimagnetic at room temperature and Field Cooling-Zero Field Cooling (FC-ZFC) studies indicate the presence of disorders.

  12. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible.

  13. Ferromagnetism in sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in undoped sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures which are synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the sphalerite CdS samples show a spherical-like shape and the wurtzite CdS ones show a flower-like shape, both of which are aggregated by lots of smaller particles. The impurity of the samples has been ruled out by the results of X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetization measurements indicate that all the samples exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism and the saturation magnetization decreases with the increased crystal sizes, revealing that the observed ferromagnetism is defect-related, which is also confirmed by the post-annealing processes. This finding in CdS should be the focus of future electronic and spintronic devices. PMID:23294671

  14. Hydrogen-incorporation stabilization of metallic VO2(R) phase to room temperature, displaying promising low-temperature thermoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzheng; Feng, Feng; Feng, Jun; Dai, Jun; Peng, Lele; Zhao, Jiyin; Yang, Jinlong; Si, Cheng; Wu, Ziyu; Xie, Yi

    2011-09-07

    Regulation of electron-electron correlation has been found to be a new effective way to selectively control carrier concentration, which is a crucial step toward improving thermoelectric properties. The pure electronic behavior successfully stabilized the nonambient metallic VO(2)(R) to room temperature, giving excellent thermoelectric performance among the simple oxides with wider working temperature ranges.

  15. Microplastic Deformation of Submicrocrystalline Copper at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Maletkina, T. Yu.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Osipov, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    of investigations of submicrocrystalline copper subjected to cold rolling after abc pressing by methods of backscatter electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction analysis are presented. It is demonstrated that after such combined intensive plastic deformation, the submicrocrystalline structure with average grain-subgrain structure elements having sizes of 0.63 μm is formed with relative fraction of high-angle grain boundaries of 70% with texture typical for rolled copper. Results of investigation of microplastic deformation of copper with such structure at temperatures in the interval 295-473 K and with submicrocrystalline structure formed by cold rolling of coarse-grained copper are presented.

  16. Room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films modulated by cation concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Junxing; Liang, Yan; Li, Wentao; Wang, Weihua; Jin, Kuijuan; Gu, Lin; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-24

    The room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} is promising for oxide electronic devices controlled by multiple fields. An effective way to control the ferroelectricity is highly demanded. Here, we show that the off-centered antisite-like defects in SrTiO{sub 3} films epitaxially grown on Si (001) play the determinative role in the emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity. The density of these defects changes with the film cation concentration sensitively, resulting in a varied coercive field of the ferroelectric behavior. Consequently, the room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films can be effectively modulated by tuning the temperature of metal sources during the molecular beam epitaxy growth. Such an easy and reliable modulation of the ferroelectricity enables the flexible engineering of multifunctional oxide electronic devices.

  17. A new class of room temperature molten salts for battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, J. S.; Levisky, J. A.; Landers, J. S.; Vaughn, R. L.; Hussey, C. L.; Floreani, D. A.; Stech, D. J.

    1981-10-01

    Salts that are liquid at room temperature would provide a completely ionic electrolyte for rechargeable batteries without the penalty of high operating temperatures. We have discovered and characterized a new class of molten salts that are liquids considerably below room temperature. The new materials are mixtures of dialkyimidazolium chlorides and aluminum chloride. The solid-liquid phase diagram of one member of the class shows that the material is liquid below room temperature over its entire composition range. A proof of concept battery cell using the new electrolyte was demonstrated. Electrochemical tests show that battery anodes and cathodes will operate in the new electrolytes. By varying the ratio of the components of the new melts, the chemical and physical properties can be changed over a very wide range.

  18. Room-Temperature Determination of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Concentration and Mobility in Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, S. E.; Mena, R. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for determination of room-temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration and mobility in heterostructures is presented. Using simultaneous fits of the longitudinal and transverse voltages as a function of applied magnetic field, we were able to separate the parameters associated with the 2DEG from those of the parallel layer. Comparison with the Shubnikov-de Haas data derived from measurements at liquid helium temperatures proves that the analysis of the room-temperature data provides an excellent estimate of the 2DEG concentration. In addition we were able to obtain for the first time the room-temperature mobility of the 2DEG, an important parameter to device application. Both results are significantly different from those derived from conventional Hall analysis.

  19. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  20. Room Temperature Curing Resin Systems for Graphite/Epoxy Composite Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    peroxides , such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), and benzoyl peroxide (BPO), which are activated at room temperature...temperature curing adhesives. A typical system composed of Dow’s fe. .ane resin cured with methyl ethyl ketone peroxide had a glass transition