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Sample records for room temperature magnetoresistance

  1. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-02-03

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6 nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 Ω at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  2. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  3. Large Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Ferromagnet/Topological Insulator Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sarmita; Guchhait, Samaresh; Dey, Rik; Register, Leonard Franklin; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-07-01

    We report magnetoresistance for current flow through iron/topological insulator (Fe/TI) and Fe/evaporated-oxide/TI contacts when a magnetic field is used to initially orient the magnetic alignment of the incorporated ferromagnetic Fe bar, at temperatures ranging from 100 K to room temperature. This magnetoresistance is associated with the relative orientation of the Fe bar magnetization and spin-polarization of electrons moving on the surface of the TI with helical spin-momentum locking. The magnitude of the observed magnetoresistance is relatively large compared to that observed in prior work.

  4. Spin rectification induced by spin Hall magnetoresistance at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Jiang, S. W.; Luan, Z. Z.; Zhou, L. F.; Ding, H. F.; Zhou, Y.; Tao, X. D.; Wu, D.

    2016-09-01

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the dc voltage generation in the heterostructure of Pt and yttrium iron garnet under the ferromagnetic resonance. Besides a symmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage, an antisymmetric Lorenz line shape dc voltage is observed in field scan, which can solely originate from the spin rectification effect due to the spin Hall magnetoresistance. The angular dependence of the dc voltage is theoretically analyzed by taking into account both the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects. We find that the experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical model, further identifying the spin Hall magnetoresistance origin of the spin rectification effect. Moreover, the spin pumping and the spin rectification effects are quantitatively separated by their different angular dependence at particular experimental geometry.

  5. Room Temperature Giant and Linear Magnetoresistance in Topological Insulator Bi2Te3 Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  6. Room temperature giant and linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-29

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi(2)Te(3) topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  7. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have fabricated Fe3O4/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p++) semiconducting nature of Fe3O4, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe3O4/SiO2/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  8. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-07

    We have fabricated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p{sup ++}) semiconducting nature of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  9. Negative magnetoresistance in a vertical single-layer graphene spin valve at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun Kumar; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-02-26

    Single-layer graphene (SLG) is an ideal material for spintronics because of its high charge-carrier mobility, long spin lifetime resulting from the small spin-orbit coupling, and hyperfine interactions of carbon atoms. Here, we report a vertical spin valve with SLG with device configuration Co/SLG/Al2O3/Ni. We observed negative magnetoresistance (-0.4%) for the Co/SLG/Al2O3/Ni junction at room temperature. However, the Co/Al2O3/Ni junction, which is without graphene, shows positive magnetoresistance. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of both Co/SLG/Al2O3/Ni and Co/Al2O3/Ni junctions are nonlinear, and this reveals that charge transport occurs by a tunneling mechanism. We have also explained the reason for negative magnetoresistance for the Co/SLG/Al2O3/Ni junction. PMID:24495123

  10. Room temperature positive magnetoresistance via charge trapping in polyaniline-iron oxide nanoparticle composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aigu L.; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a polyaniline-iron oxide nanoparticle (PANI-NP) organic hybrid composite device with room temperature positive magnetoresistance of 85.7%. Temperature dependent resistivity measurements attribute this observation to the decrease in localization length of the charge carriers in the presence of an external magnetic field which result in them being trapped within the device between the insulating PANI layer, hence allowing the device to maintain its resistive state even when the power is switched off, thus exhibiting a memory effect.

  11. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  12. Magnetoresistance effect in rubrene-based spin valves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianmin; Ma, Qinli; Suzuki, Kazuya; Sugihara, Atsushi; Qin, Gaowu; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2015-03-01

    We fabricate spin-valve devices with an Fe3O4/AlO/rubrene/Co stacking structure. Their magnetoresistance (MR) effects at room temperature and low temperatures are systemically investigated based on the measurement of MR curves, current-voltage response, etc. A large MR ratio of approximately 6% is achieved at room temperature, which is one of the highest MR ratios reported to date in organic spin valves. With decreasing measurement temperatures, we observe that the MR ratios increase because of decrease in spin scattering, and the width of the MR curves becomes larger owing to increase in the coercivity of the electrodes at low temperature. A nonlinear current-voltage dependence is clearly observed in these organic spin valves. From the measurement of MR curve for the spin valves with different rubrene layer thickness, we observe that the MR ratios monotonously decrease with increasing rubrene-layer thickness. We discuss the spin-dependent transport mechanisms in these devices based on our experimental results and the present theoretical analysis. Moreover, we note that the devices exhibit smaller MR ratios after annealing compared to their counterparts without annealing. On the basis of atomic force microscopy analysis of the organic films and device resistances, we deduce that the increase of interface spin scattering induced by large surface roughness after annealing most probably leads to reduction in the MR ratios. PMID:25668508

  13. Spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in Mn2NiGa at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Rawat, R; Muthu, S Esakki; D'Souza, S W; Suard, E; Senyshyn, A; Banik, S; Rajput, P; Bhardwaj, S; Awasthi, A M; Ranjan, Rajeev; Arumugam, S; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Barman, S R

    2012-12-14

    Spin valves have revolutionized the field of magnetic recording and memory devices. Spin valves are generally realized in thin film heterostructures, where two ferromagnetic (FM) layers are separated by a nonmagnetic conducting layer. Here, we demonstrate spin-valve-like magnetoresistance at room temperature in a bulk ferrimagnetic material that exhibits a magnetic shape memory effect. The origin of this unexpected behavior in Mn(2)NiGa has been investigated by neutron diffraction, magnetization, and ab initio theoretical calculations. The refinement of the neutron diffraction pattern shows the presence of antisite disorder where about 13% of the Ga sites are occupied by Mn atoms. On the basis of the magnetic structure obtained from neutron diffraction and theoretical calculations, we establish that these antisite defects cause the formation of FM nanoclusters with parallel alignment of Mn spin moments in a Mn(2)NiGa bulk lattice that has antiparallel Mn spin moments. The direction of the Mn moments in the soft FM cluster reverses with the external magnetic field. This causes a rotation or tilt in the antiparallel Mn moments at the cluster-lattice interface resulting in the observed asymmetry in magnetoresistance. PMID:23368355

  14. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5 V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  15. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  16. Enhanced Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in La_0.8Ba_0.2MnO3 Epitaxial Thin Film.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2000-03-01

    Mn perovskite oxides ((La_1-xM_x)MnO3 with M=Ba, Sr, Ca) are attracting attention due to their colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) phenomenon. In this study, we have noted the large magnetoresistance of (La_1-xBa_x)MnO3 near room temperature and have fabricated their thin film (x=0.2) on SrTiO3 (001) substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. As a result, it was found that the MR effect of films exhibited higher MR ratio (33 percent at 320K for 40nm thickness, 43 percent at 307K for 65nm thickness, 48 percent at 267K for 130nm thickness) than that of bulk (21 percent at 270K) under the magnetic field of 0.8T. The metal-insulator transition temperature and magnetoresistance strongly depend on film thickness. The MR ratio of our film is very large in comparison with that of other magnetoresistive oxides at room temperature.

  17. Large tunnel magnetoresistance at room temperature with a Co{sub 2}FeAl full-Heusler alloy electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Sugimoto, S.; Tezuka, N.; Inomata, K.

    2005-06-06

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a Co{sub 2}FeAl Heusler alloy electrode are fabricated by the deposition of the film using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system followed by photolithography and Ar ion etching. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of 47% at room temperature (RT) are obtained in a stack of Co{sub 2}FeAl/Al-O{sub x}/Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si substrate despite the A2 type atomic site disorder for Co{sub 2}FeAl. There is no increase of TMR in MTJs with the B2 type Co{sub 2}FeAl, which is prepared by the deposition on a heated substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles in Co{sub 2}FeAl single layer films reveal that Al atoms in Co{sub 2}FeAl are oxidized preferentially at the surfaces. On the other hand, at the interfaces in Co{sub 2}FeAl/Al-O{sub x}/Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25} MTJs, the ferromagnetic layers are hardly oxidized during plasma oxidation for a formation of Al oxide barriers.

  18. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  19. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md I; Maksud, M; Palapati, N K R; Subramanian, A; Atulasimha, J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2016-07-29

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature.

  20. Room temperature magnetoresistance in CoFeB/SrTiO{sub 3}/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hassen, E. M. J.; Viala, B.; Cyrille, M. C.; Cartier, M.; Redon, O.; Lima, P.; Belhadji, B.; Yang, H. X.; Chshiev, M.; Velev, J.

    2012-04-01

    Room temperature transport properties are reported in polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3}-based magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering. The junctions comprise CoFeB electrodes and the SrTiO{sub 3} barrier with thickness varied between 0.9 and 1.9 nm. Resistance area product values between 3 {Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} and 22 k{Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} have been measured with a tunnel magnetoresistance ratio ranging from 3.1 to 13% at room temperature. At low barrier thickness (1.2 nm), ferromagnetic coupling between electrodes is observed, indicating the presence of defects in the structure. A post-oxidation step was found to improve transport properties at lower barrier thickness.

  1. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S; Das, Nirmalya S; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2016-04-21

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (∼1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.

  2. Novel room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in magnetically coupled nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Song, Wendong; Herng, Tun Seng; Qin, Qing; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Ming; Hong, Xiaoliang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun

    2016-08-25

    Herein, we design a room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in a nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure without using a non-magnetic spacer or pinning layer. An Fe3O4 nano-column film is self-assembled on a Ni underlayer by the thermal decomposition method. The wet-chemical self-assembly is facile, economical and scalable. The magnetoresistance (MR) response of the Ni underlayer in the heterostructure under positive and negative out-of-plane magnetic fields differ by ∼0.25 at room temperature and ∼0.43 at 100 K. We attribute the spin-valve-like magnetoresistance to the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni underlayer when being magnetically coupled by the Fe3O4 nano-column film. The out-of-plane negative-field magnetization is higher than the positive-field magnetization, affirming the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure. Temperature-dependent magnetic and resistivity studies illustrate a close correlation between the magnetization transition of Fe3O4 and resistivity transition of Ni and prove a magnetic coupling between the Fe3O4 and Ni. First-principles calculations reveal that the Fe3O4/Ni model under a negative magnetic field is energetically more stable than that under a positive magnetic field. Furthermore, partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrates the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni 3d orbital. This is induced by the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Fe3O4 and Ni via oxygen-mediated Fe 3d-O 2p-Ni 3d hybridizations. PMID:27526860

  3. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  4. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance up to 330% at room temperature in sputter deposited Co{sub 2}FeAl/MgO/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Shan, Rong; Mitani, Seiji; Inomata, Koichiro

    2009-11-02

    Magnetoresistance ratio up to 330% at room temperature (700% at 10 K) has been obtained in a spin-valve-type magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}FeAl electrode and a MgO tunnel barrier fabricated on a single crystal MgO (001) substrate by sputtering method. The output voltage of the MTJ at one-half of the zero-bias value was found to be as high as 425 mV, which is the largest reported to date in MTJs using Heusler alloy electrodes. The present finding suggests that Co{sub 2}FeAl may be one of the most promising candidates for future spintronics devices applications.

  5. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S.; Das, Nirmalya S.; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for

  6. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  7. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    PubMed

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  8. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, X.; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P.; He, Q.; Paull, R. J.; Clarkson, J. D.; Kudrnovský, J.; Turek, I.; Kuneš, J.; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C. T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  9. Low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on bismuth nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ch; Weiss, G.; Cornelius, T. W.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Neumann, R.

    2009-05-01

    We present low temperature resistance R(T) and magnetoresistance measurements for Bi nanowires with diameters between 100 and 500 nm, which are close to being single-crystalline. The nanowires were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in pores of polycarbonate membranes. R(T) varies as T2 in the low temperature range 1.5 Ktemperature dependence of the magnetoresistance. The transverse magnetoresistance of all samples shows a clear B1.5 variation. Its size depends strongly on the diameter of the wires but only weakly on temperature. Finally, a steplike increase in the magnetoresistance of our sample with a wire diameter of 100 nm was found and this might be attributed to a transition from one-dimensional to three-dimensional localization.

  10. Enhanced room temperature magnetoresistance in p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure: A possible spintronics application

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, S. K. Panda, J. Hazra, S. K. Das, P. T. Nath, T. K.

    2014-04-24

    An experimental study of p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure in which La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) and Si are separated by a thin interfacial SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) layer with typical thickness ∼ 15 nm, has been in situ fabricated with the pulsed laser deposition technique. The junction exhibits good rectifying diode like behavior over the temperature range of 10 - 300 K. The heterostructure also exhibits metal-oxide-semiconductor like behavior with all type of possible current flow mechanisms through the heterojunction. The junction magnetoresistance (JMR) (∼ 30% at 300 K) properties of p-LCMO/STO/n-Si heterostructure have been studied over the temperature range of 100-300 K. The JMR is positive and strongly depends on temperature at an applied forward bias voltage of 3 V. The relation between JMR and external magnetic field is found to be Δρ/ρ≈ α H{sup β} type, having both α and β temperature dependent. We attribute the emergence of positive JMR to the quantum mechanical tunneling transport mechanism across the heterojunction.

  11. Room temperature polyesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.S.; Stupp, S.I. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new room temperature polymerization method has been developed for the synthesis of high molecular weight polyesters directly from carboxylic acids and phenols. The solution polymerization reaction proceeds under mild conditions, near neutral pH, and also avoids the use of preactivated acid derivatives for esterification. The reaction is useful in the preparation of isoregic ordered chains with translational polar symmetry and also in the polymerization of functionalized or chiral monomers. The conditions required for polymerization in the carbodiimide-based reaction included catalysis by the 1:1 molecular complex formed by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and p-toluenesulfonic acid. These conditions were established through studies on a model system involving esterification of p-toluic acid and p-cresol. Self-condensation of several hydroxy acid monomers by this reaction has produced routinely good yields of polyesters with molecular weights greater than 15,000. It is believed that the high extents of reaction required for significant degrees of polymerization result from suppression of the side reaction leading to N-acylurea. The utility of this reaction in the formation of polar chains from sensitive monomers is demonstrated hereby the polycondensation of a chiral hydroxy acid.

  12. Low temperature magnetoresistance studies in MBE grown topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rik; Roy, Anupam; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Guchhait, Samaresh; Sonde, Sushant; Rai, Amritesh; Majumder, Sarmita; Ghosh, Bahniman; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We studied low temperature magnetoresistance in molecular beam epitaxy grown topological insulator Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 thin films. The surface and structural characterization of the grown films showed smooth epitaxial growth on Si(111). The magnetoresistance has been measured at low temperatures (2 - 20 K) with magnetic fields upto 9 T. The full range perpendicular field magnetoresistance has been explained with the original Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory. Altshuler-Aronov theory of localization has been used to understand the full range parallel field magnetoresistance. Various scattering times have been estimated by fitting the magnetoresistance data with the theory. It is shown that the Zeeman effect is not needed to explain the magnetoresistance and has not been considered in the theory either. The angle dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance has also been observed and explained using the above theories. This work is funded by NRI-SWAN.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D. Z.; Wang, T.; Sui, W. B.; Si, M. S.; Guo, D. W.; Shi, Z.; Wang, F. C.; Xue, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  14. Corneal storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sachs, U; Goldman, K; Valenti, J; Kaufman, H E

    1978-06-01

    Short-term eye banking is based mainly on moist chamber and McCarey-Kaufman medium (M-K medium) preservation. Both involve a controlled 4 C temperature for storage. Warming the cornea to room temperature, however, drastically affects the endothelial viability. On enzymatic staining and histological study, the M-K medium-stored rabbit corneas had more normal endothelium than did "moist chamber" eyes when storage was prolonged for seven days at room temperature. In human corneas that were kept at 4 C for 24 hours and then exposed to a temperature of 25 C, destruction of organelles had occurred by six hours and was increased by 12 hours. Corneas that were kept in M-K medium had relatively intact endothelium after four days, but cell disruption and vacuolation was present by the seventh day. The M-K medium, therefore, affords protection to tissue warmed to room temperature, where metabolic activity is resumed. PMID:350203

  15. Magnetic field asymmetry and high temperature magnetoresistance in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    2006-03-01

    The length scales and scattering processes in the one-dimensional electron system in single-walled carbon nanotubes remain only partially understood. Measuring the magnetoresistance, in both linear and nonlinear response, is a way to investigate these processes. In disordered nanotubes with ballistic paths much shorter than the length, we observe magnetoresistance in the metallic regime which at low temperatures resembles the universal fluctuations and weak localization seen in higher dimensional metals. A parabolic magnetoresistance persists at room temperature, indicating a significant role for phase coherence and/or interactions at high temperatures. While the linear resistance of a two-terminal sample must be an even function of magnetic field B by Onsager's principle, the nonlinear resistance need not be. Importantly, the B-asymmetric nonlinear terms can in principle be used to infer the strength of electron-electron interactions in the sample [1]. We have therefore also measured in detail the lowest order B-asymmetric current contributions, with a focus on the B-linear term. This has apparently not been done before in any system. Consistent with general theory, at high temperatures the term is small and has a constant sign independent of Fermi energy. At low temperatures it grows and develops mesoscopic fluctuations. Although these result imply that interactions are involved in the transport, calculations specific to nanotubes are needed in order to extract interaction parameters. This work was done by the authors of Ref [2]. References: [1] E.L. Ivchenko and B. Spivak, Phys. Rev. B 66, 155404 (2002); [2] Jiang Wei, Michael Shimogawa, Zenghui Wang, Iuliana Radu, Robert Dormaier, and David H. Cobden, Phys. Rev. Lett. (Dec. 2005) (cond-mat/0506275).

  16. Temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Valencia, S.; Schmitz, D.; Monty, C.; Martínez, B.

    2009-06-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance (MR) of powdered samples consisting of spherical Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles was analyzed. A change of the MR from normal at room temperature to inverse at low temperatures was observed. Concomitant with this, samples showed a sudden increase in the electrical resistance when approaching TV≈120 K, i.e., indicative of the Verwey transition temperature of Fe3O4. Thus, signaling the existence of magnetite at the Fe/MgO interface, further confirmed by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The change from normal to inverse MR is related to the increase in resistance of Fe3O4 on crossing the Verwey transition and reflects the negative spin polarization of Fe3O4.

  17. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  18. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  19. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  20. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  1. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  2. Low temperature magnetothermoelectric effect and magnetoresistance in Te vapor annealed Bi2Te3.

    PubMed

    Hor, Y S; Qu, D; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2010-09-22

    The electrical properties of single crystals of p-type Bi(2)Te(3) are shown to be tuned by annealing as-grown crystals in elemental Te vapor at temperatures in the range of 400-420 °C. While as-grown nominally stoichiometric Bi(2)Te(3) has p-type conductivity below room temperature, Te vapor annealed Bi(2)Te(3) shows a cross over from p- to n-type behavior. The temperature dependent resistivity of the Te annealed crystals shows a characteristic broad peak near 100 K. Applied magnetic fields give rise to a large low temperature magnetothermoelectric effect in the Te annealed samples and enhance the low temperature peak in the resistivity. Further, Te annealed Bi(2)Te(3) shows a large positive magnetoresistance, ∼ 200% at 2 K, and ∼ 15% at room temperature. The annealing procedure described can be employed to optimize the properties of Bi(2)Te(3) for study as a topological insulator.

  3. Observation of a large spin-dependent transport length in organic spin valves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianmin; Mizukami, Shigemi; Kubota, Takahide; Ma, Qinli; Oogane, Mikihiko; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Ando, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2013-01-01

    The integration of organic semiconductors and magnetism has been a fascinating topic for fundamental scientific research and future applications in electronics, because organic semiconductors are expected to possess a large spin-dependent transport length based on weak spin-orbit coupling and weak hyperfine interaction. However, to date, this length has typically been limited to several nanometres at room temperature, and a large length has only been observed at low temperatures. Here we report on a novel organic spin valve device using C(60) as the spacer layer. A magnetoresistance ratio of over 5% was observed at room temperature, which is one of the highest magnetoresistance ratios ever reported. Most importantly, a large spin-dependent transport length of approximately 110 nm was experimentally observed for the C(60) layer at room temperature. These results provide insights for further understanding spin transport in organic semiconductors and may strongly advance the development of spin-based organic devices. PMID:23340432

  4. Temperature and thickness dependence of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in exchange-biased Py/IrMn/MgO/Ta stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Kurosaki, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nishide, A.; Hayakawa, J.; Takahashi, H.; Maryško, M.; Wunderlich, J.; Marti, X.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thickness and temperature dependence of a series of Ni{}0.8Fe{}0.2/Ir{}0.2Mn{}0.8 bilayer samples with varying thickness ratio of the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet ({{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}}) in order to explore the exchange coupling strengths in tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) devices. Specific values of {{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}} lead to four distinct scenarios with specific electric responses to moderate magnetic fields. The characteristic dependence of the measured TAMR signal on applied voltage allows us to confirm its persistence up to room temperature despite an overlapped contribution by a thermal magnetic noise.

  5. Temperature-field phase diagram of extreme magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel; Gibson, Quinn; Kushwaha, Satya; Krizan, Jason W; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2016-06-21

    The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study this effect in the absence of broken inversion symmetry or protected linear band crossing. In this work, we report XMR in LaBi. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a temperature-field phase diagram with triangular shape that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that XMR in LaBi and LaSb originates from a combination of compensated electron-hole pockets and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket. Such orbital texture is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals, giving rise to their small residual resistivity at zero field and subject to strong scattering induced by a magnetic field. PMID:27274081

  6. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  7. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  8. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  9. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  10. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  11. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  12. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  13. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  14. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  15. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  16. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics.

  17. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  18. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  19. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised—silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  20. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ∼100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised--silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  1. Temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in W/CoFeB bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Taniguchi, Takuya; Kim, Sanghoon; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Moriyama, Takahiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in a W/CoFeB bilayer. The SMR is found to increase with decreasing temperature. An analysis based on the SMR theory suggests that the spin Hall angle of W and/or the spin polarization of CoFeB can be the origin of the temperature dependence of the SMR. We also find that the spin diffusion length and the resistivity of W do not significantly vary with temperature, which indicates the necessity of further study on the electron transport mechanism in W films to reveal the origin of the spin Hall effect in W.

  2. Temperature-dependence of current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance spin-valves using Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. R.; Nakatani, T. M.; Stewart, D. A.; York, B. R.; Read, J. C.; Choi, Y.-S.; Childress, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge (CMFG) (x = 0-0.4) Heusler alloy magnetic layers within polycrystalline current-perpendicular-to-the plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) spin-valves are investigated. CMFG films annealed at 220-320 °C exhibit partly ordered B2 structure with an order parameter SB2 = 0.3-0.4, and a lower SB2 was found for a higher Fe content. Nevertheless, CPP-GMR spin-valve devices exhibit a relatively high magnetoresistance ratio of ˜13% and a magnetoresistance-area product (ΔRA) of ˜6 mΩ μm2 at room temperature, which is almost independent of the Fe content in the CMFG films. By contrast, at low temperatures, ΔRA clearly increases with higher Fe content, despite the lower B2 ordering for increasing the Fe content. Indeed, first-principles calculations reveal that the CMFG alloy with a partially disordered B2 structure has a greater density of d-state at the Fermi level in the minority band compared to the Fe-free (Co2MnGe) alloy. This could explain the larger ΔRA measured on CMFG at low temperatures by assuming that s-d scattering mainly determines the spin asymmetry of resistivity as described in Mott's theory.

  3. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  4. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  5. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  7. Individual room temperature control: A peaceful solution to thermostat wars

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, C.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining thermal comfort in individual rooms using an individual room temperature control concept to provide greater occupant comfort and potentially reduce energy consumption. The topics of the article include occupant temperature control methods, multi-room zone control, HVAC system operation, computer simulation, and the results of using individual room temperature control.

  8. Magnetoresistance of ZnO:Co Thin Films at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytin, V. G.; Maximova, O. V.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Muftieva, D. A.; Burova, L. I.; Kaul, A. R.

    2016-03-01

    Large positive magnetoresistance was observed in Co-doped thin ZnO films at low temperatures and analyzed in the frame of the model based on the exchange interaction between the conduction electrons and the electrons of a magnetic impurity for the films with temperature dependence of resistivity described by Mott's law. Estimates of the localization length of electronic states participating in hopping conduction were obtained. The obtained values of the localization length are close to the effective Bohr radii of shallow donors in ZnO.

  9. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  10. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes.

  11. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS₂/Co junctions.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  12. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  13. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  14. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.

  15. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from themore » dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.« less

  16. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. Here, we demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. The imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices. PMID:26446515

  17. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  18. Bioinduced Room-Temperature Methanol Reforming.

    PubMed

    Heim, Leo E; Thiel, Daniel; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2015-08-24

    Imitating nature's approach in nucleophile-activated formaldehyde dehydrogenation, air-stable ruthenium complexes proved to be exquisite catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formaldehyde hydrate as well as for the transfer hydrogenation to unsaturated organic substrates at loadings as low as 0.5 mol %. Concatenation of the chemical hydrogen-fixation route with an oxidase-mediated activation of methanol gives an artificial methylotrophic in vitro metabolism providing methanol-derived reduction equivalents for synthetic hydrogenation purposes. Moreover, for the first time methanol reforming at room temperature was achieved on the basis of this bioinduced dehydrogenation path delivering hydrogen gas from aqueous methanol.

  19. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Temperature Related Effects in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Useinov, Arthur; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2016-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs). The electron tunnel transport through NP was simulated in range of double barrier approach, which was integrated into the model of the magnetic point-like contact. The resonant TMR conditions and temperature impact were explored in detail. Moreover, the possible reasons of the temperature induced resonant conditions were discussed in the range of the lead-tunneling cell (TC)-lead model near Kondo temperature. We also found that redistribution of the voltage drop becomes crucial in this model. Furthermore, the direct tunneling plays the dominant role and cannot be omitted in the quantum systems with the total tunneling thickness up to 5-6nm. Hence, Coulomb blockade model cannot explain Kondo-induced TMR anomalies in nanometer-sized tunnel junctions.

  20. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films: dependence on Pt thickness and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiufeng; Dai, Zhiwen; Huang, Lin; Lu, Guangduo; Liu, Min; Piao, Hongguang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yu, Seong-cho; Pan, Liqing

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature and the Pt layer thickness dependence of the magnetoresistances (MRs) in Co2FeSi/Pt thin films. Based on the field dependent measurements, it can be seen that the spin-current-induced spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) plays the dominant role in the MRs in the Co2FeSi/Pt bilayers in the whole temperature range. Meanwhile, a quite small part of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) existed in the MRs. It proved to be originated from magnetic proximity effect (MPE) by measuring the Pt thickness and temperature dependence of the AMR. Moreover, the Co2FeSi layer thickness has much weaker effect on the SMR and AMR compared to the Pt layer thickness. These results indicate that the Co2FeSi/Pt interface is beneficial to be used in the spin-current-induced physical phenomena.

  1. Temperature dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance in epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using a Co2FeAl Heusler alloy electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2010-09-01

    Spin-valve-type epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) and a MgO tunnel barrier were fabricated on a single-crystal MgO(001) substrate using sputtering method for all the layers. Experimental temperature-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in the MTJs was revealed to be fitted well using spin wave excitation model for tunneling spin polarization, P(T)=P0(1-αT3/2) up to room temperature, where P0 is the spin polarization at 0 K and α is a fitting parameter. The determined P and α are shown to be significantly different between bottom and top CFA electrodes facing a MgO barrier. It is demonstrated that the bottom CFA deposited on a Cr buffer has a low α and behaves as a half-metal with P˜1 in terms of the Δ1 symmetry due to the coherent tunneling through a MgO barrier.

  2. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  3. Quantum conductance in electrodeposited nanocontacts and magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussine, F.; Encinas, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Piraux, L.

    2003-05-01

    We present conductance and magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic Ni-Ni and Co-Ni nanocontacts prepared by electrodeposition within the pores of a track-etched polymer membrane. At room temperature, Ni-Ni constrictions show broad quantization plateaus of conductance during their dissolution into units of e2/h, as expected for ferromagnetic ballistic nanocontacts. Additionally, positive and negative magnetoresistance has been measured in Co-Ni nanocontacts.

  4. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-01

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains.

  5. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  6. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  7. Room Temperature Electrical Detection of Spin Polarized Currents in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Geurs, Johannes; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Charpentier, Sophie; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new class of quantum materials that exhibit a current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking of massless Dirac Fermions in their surface states. This helical spin polarization in three-dimensional (3D) TIs has been observed using photoemission spectroscopy up to room temperatures. Recently, spin polarized surface currents in 3D TIs were detected electrically by potentiometric measurements using ferromagnetic detector contacts. However, these electric measurements are so far limited to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report the room temperature electrical detection of the spin polarization on the surface of Bi2Se3 by employing spin sensitive ferromagnetic tunnel contacts. The current-induced spin polarization on the Bi2Se3 surface is probed by measuring the magnetoresistance while switching the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic detector. A spin resistance of up to 70 mΩ is measured at room temperature, which increases linearly with current bias, reverses sign with current direction, and decreases with higher TI thickness. The magnitude of the spin signal, its sign, and control experiments, using different measurement geometries and interface conditions, rule out other known physical effects. These findings provide further information about the electrical detection of current-induced spin polarizations in 3D TIs at ambient temperatures and could lead to innovative spin-based technologies.

  8. Large Magnetoresistance and low temperature Transport anomalies in Ion implanted HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Nicholas; Zakhidov, Anvar; Salamon, Myron; Gartstein, Yuri; Wang, Xuemei; Freyhardt, Herbert; Kan Chu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Strong positive magnetoresistance (MR) was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) upon ion implantation by boron and phosphorous. Similar effects, but with smaller amplitude, are induced by carbon ion implantation, but due to structural disorder and defect formation without carrier concentration increase. The magnetic field dependence of the MR is linear at high fields with no sign of saturation, but different contact geometries result in a wide range of parameters. Two possible explanations of strong MR are suggested and analyzed. While the MR remains large at all temperatures, plots of R(T) in constant field show a drop at lower T. Future experiments will clarify the origin of the R(T) drop, in particular, whether this might be interpreted as the onset of inhomogeneous superconductivity, as proposed in some previous work, or could be explained in the context of strong linear MR effects seen in high-mobility, disordered materials.

  9. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  10. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  11. Operation of a Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Digital Isolator, Type IL510, Under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Panko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new type of signal isolation based on Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) technology was investigated for potential use in harsh temperature environments. Operational characteristics of the 2Mbps single channel, IL510-Series commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) digital isolator chip was obtained under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling in the range of -190 C to +120 C. The isolator was evaluated in terms of its output signal delivery and stability, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (t(sub f)), and propagation delays at 50% level between input and output during low to high (t(sub PLH)) and high to low (t(sub PHL)) transitions. The device performed very well throughout the entire test temperature range as no significant changes occurred either in its function or in its output signal timing characteristics. The limited thermal cycling, which comprised of 12 cycles between -190 C and +120 C, also had no influence on its performance. In addition, the device packaging underwent no structural damage due to the extreme temperature exposure. These preliminary results indicate that this semiconductor chip has the potential for use in a temperature range that extends beyond its specified regime. Additional and more comprehensive testing, however, is required to establish its operation and reliability and to determine its suitability for long-term use in space exploration missions.

  12. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution.

    PubMed

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F](+) assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F](+) dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  13. Room-temperature nanowire terahertz photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Lorenzo; Coquillant, Dominique; Viti, Leonardo; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Knap, Wojciech; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) represent an ideal building block for implementing rectifying diodes or plasma­ wave detectors that could operate well into the THz, thanks to the typical attofarad-order capacitance. Despite the strong effort in developing these nanostructures for a new generation of complementary metal-oxide semi­ conductors (CMOS), memory and photonic devices, their potential as radiation sensors into the Terahertz is just starting to be explored. We report on the development of NW-based field effect transistors operating as high sensitivity THz detectors in the 0.3 - 2.8 THz range. By feeding the radiation field of either an electronic THz source or a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at the gate-source electrodes by means of a wide band dipole antenna, we measured a photovoltage signal corresponding to responsivity values up to 100 V IW, with impressive noise equivalent power levels < 6 x 10-11W/Hz at room temperature and a > 300kHz modulation bandwidth. The potential scalability to even higher frequencies and the technological feasibility of realizing multi-pixel arrays coupled with QCL sources make the proposed technology highly competitive for a future generation of THz detection systems.

  14. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  15. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  16. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    The anomalous transport properties of highly disordered metallic glasses, which require corrections to the classical Boltzmann theory, are due to quantum interference effects of the scattered electron waves. These corrections provide new contributions to the resistivity: "weak localization" and "electron-electron interaction". To study these quantum interference effects, we have made the highest-precision measurements, so far, of the resistances of the amorphous rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50 } and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} ribbons at much lower temperatures than before (15mK < T < 6K) and in small magnetic fields (0T < B < 0.2T). To measure the resistance and temperature accurately, we developed a novel method: measuring the resistance perpendicular to the ribbons with potassium as the non-superconducting glue between the CuTi ribbons and two Cu electrodes in order to make excellent electrical and thermal contact. With this method, we were able to measure the resistances with a relative precision of Deltarho/rho = 10^{-7}-10 ^{-8} and temperatures reliably down to 15mK with an error of less than 1mK. The zero field resistances and magnetoresistances were analyzed using weak localization theories that include the Zeeman splitting and electron-electron interaction theories. Possible background contributions from the K layers, the Cu electrodes, and their boundaries are quantified in the analysis. In zero field, these background contributions were negligible for T<3K. At zero magnetic field and T<0.15K, we found that electron -electron interaction dominates the resistance, while weak localization makes a nontrivial contribution to the resistance for T>0.15K. In contrast, at the lowest temperatures, the magnetoresistances were dominated by weak localization with Zeeman splitting and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuations. For higher magnetic fields and lowest temperatures (B/T > 1 T/K), we find discrepancies between our data and the theoretical calculations. We found that most of the

  17. Spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures for a Pt/yttrium iron garnet hybrid structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuanhu; Zou, Lvkuan; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Jianwang; Wang, Shufang; Shen, Baogen; Sun, Jirong

    2015-11-14

    Based on unique experimental setups, the temperature dependences of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of the Pt/yttrium iron garnet (Pt/YIG) hybrid structure are determined in a wide temperature range up to the Curie temperature of YIG. From a theoretical analysis of the experimental relationship between the SMR and temperature, the spin mixing conductance of the Pt/YIG interface is deduced as a function of temperature. Adopting the deduced spin mixing conductance, the temperature dependence of the LSSE is well reproduced based on the magnon spin current theory. Our research sheds new light on the controversy about the theoretical models for the LSSE.

  18. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  19. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of electrodeposited Ni-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, B. G.; Péter, L.; Révész, Á.; Pádár, J.; Bakonyi, I.

    2010-05-01

    The electrical resistivity and the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) was investigated for Ni-Co alloys at and below room temperature. The Ni-Co alloy layers having a thickness of about 2 μm were prepared by electrodeposition on Si wafers with evaporated Cr and Cu underlayers. The alloy composition was varied in the whole concentration range by varying the ratio of Ni-sulfate and Co-sulfate in the electrolyte. The Ni-Co alloy deposits were investigated first in the as-deposited state on the substrates and then, by mechanically stripping them from the substrates, as self-supporting layers both without and after annealing. According to an X-ray diffraction study, a strongly textured face-centered cubic (fcc) structure was formed in the as-deposited state with an average grain size of about 10 nm. Upon annealing, the crystal structure was retained whereas the grain size increased by a factor of 3 to 5, depending on alloy composition. The zero-field resistivity decreased strongly by annealing due to the increased grain size. The annealing hardly changed the AMR below 50 at.% Co but strongly decreased it above this concentration. The composition dependence of the resistivity and the AMR of the annealed Ni-Co alloy deposits was in good quantitative agreement with the available literature data both at 13 K and at room temperature. Both transport parameters were found to exhibit a pronounced maximum in the composition range between 20 and 30 at.% Co and the data of the Ni-Co alloys fitted well to the limiting values of the pure component metals (fcc-Ni and fcc-Co). The only theoretical calculation reported formerly on fcc Ni-Co alloys yielded at T = 0 K a resistivity value smaller by a factor of 5 and an AMR value larger by a factor of about 2 than the corresponding low-temperature experimental data, although the theoretical study properly reproduced the composition dependence of both quantities.

  1. Novel spintronics devices for memory and logic: prospects and challenges for room temperature all spin computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Ping

    An energy efficient memory and logic device for the post-CMOS era has been the goal of a variety of research fields. The limits of scaling, which we expect to reach by the year 2025, demand that future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by innovative designs and new materials and physics. Magnetoresistive based devices have been a promising candidate for future integrated magnetic computation because of its unique non-volatility and functionalities. The application of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for potential STT-RAM application was demonstrated and later has been intensively investigated by both academia and industry groups, but there is no clear path way how scaling will eventually work for both memory and logic applications. One of main reasons is that there is no demonstrated material stack candidate that could lead to a scaling scheme down to sub 10 nm. Another challenge for the usage of magnetoresistive based devices for logic application is its available switching speed and writing energy. Although a good progress has been made to demonstrate the fast switching of a thermally stable magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) down to 165 ps, it is still several times slower than its CMOS counterpart. In this talk, I will review the recent progress by my research group and my C-SPIN colleagues, then discuss the opportunities, challenges and some potential path ways for magnetoresitive based devices for memory and logic applications and their integration for room temperature all spin computing system.

  2. Reversible room-temperature ferromagnetism in Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Lü, W. M.; Lim, S. L.; Qiu, X. P.; Bao, N. N.; Motapothula, M.; Yi, J. B.; Yang, M.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando

    2013-06-01

    The search for oxide-based room-temperature ferromagnetism has been one of the holy grails in condensed matter physics. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals is reported in this Rapid Communication. The ferromagnetism can be eliminated by air annealing (making the samples predominantly diamagnetic) and can be recovered by subsequent vacuum annealing. The temperature dependence of magnetic moment resembles the temperature dependence of carrier density, indicating that the magnetism is closely related to the free carriers. Our results suggest that the ferromagnetism is induced by oxygen vacancies. In addition, hysteretic magnetoresistance was observed for magnetic field parallel to the current, indicating that the magnetic moments are in the plane of the samples. The x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, the static time-of-flight and the dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy and proton induced x-ray emission measurements were performed to examine the magnetic impurities, showing that the observed ferromagnetism is unlikely due to any magnetic contaminant.

  3. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  4. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  5. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  6. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  7. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  8. Thermal Effect in Opal Below Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Martin J.; Shoemaker, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Opal, once believed to be amorphous silica, was shown by Levin and Ott (1932, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 54, 828-829) to give an x-ray powder pattern of the high-temperature form of cristobalite. The early explanation of this anomalous existence of a phase below its high-low transition temperature is now known to be untenable. One of us suggested that the tiny sizes of the component cristobalite crystals might explain the anomaly; if so, the transition might be expected below ambient temperatures. The record of a du Pont 900 Thermoanalyzer indeed revealed heat effects in opal below ambient temperatures, with an exotherm having a maximum at about -40° on cooling and an endotherm that began about -50° on heating. This was not a latent-heat effect due to the high-low transition of cristobalite, however, for the low-cristobalite pattern persisted to below -50°. Opal normally contains 4-9% water, which is tenaciously held; water loss is nearly linear with temperatures up to about 422°, when water loss is abruptly complete. Water-free opal does not display the thermal effect, but the same opal rehydrated does display it. Water is housed in minute voids, judged to be a few hundred Ångströms across, between minute particles of cristobalite. This water behaves differently from water in bulk, for its begins to melt at about -50°. PMID:16592025

  9. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  10. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  11. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  12. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  13. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-12

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering.

  14. Near-room temperature relaxor multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Dilsom A.; Kumar, A.; Ortega, N.; Katiyar, R. S.; Scott, J. F.

    2010-11-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of highly oriented Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)0.60(Fe0.5Ta0.5)0.40O3 thin films. Dielectric spectra showed a maximum (Tm) around 350 K for 1 kHz that shifted to higher temperatures (by ˜30 K) with an increase in frequency up to 1 MHz. High dielectric dispersion below and above Tm, low dielectric loss (2%-5%), high dielectric constant (˜1380@1 kHz), ferroelectric polarization, and weak magnetic moment are observed. Real and imaginary dielectric data were fitted with a nonlinear Vogel-Fulcher equation, implying a relaxor nature. The ac conductivity shows frequency-dependent conductivity, low loss, and frequency-dependent kinks near Tm.

  15. Structural and giant magnetoresistance characterization of Ag sbnd Co multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakeris, M.; Poulopoulos, P.; Valassiades, O.; Stoemenos, J.; Kalogirou, O.; Niarchos, D.; Flevaris, N. K.

    1997-01-01

    Ag sbnd Co multilayers were prepared on various substrates (Si, polyimide and glass) by e-beam evaporation under ultra high vacuum. X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy studies showed a deterioration of multilayer structure upon reducing the individual Co-layer thickness to 0.5 nm. Furthermore, the saturation field in the parallel field geometry increases, as SQUID magnetometry revealed, while magnetoresistance reaches 16% at room temperature and exceeds 30% at 30 K. Magnetoresistance values were found to depend strongly on individual layer thicknesses as well as on the total film thickness.

  16. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y W; Lu, Y H; Yi, J B; Feng, Y P; Herng, T S; Liu, X; Gao, D Q; Xue, D S; Xue, J M; Ouyang, J Y; Ding, J

    2012-03-06

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  17. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications. PMID:25042767

  18. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed.

  19. Magnetoresistive sensors for surveillance and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalichaouch, Yacine; Perry, Alexander R.; Whitecotton, Brian W.; Moeller, Charles R.; Czipott, Peter V.

    2001-02-01

    Quantum Magnetics (QM) has developed a sensing array using small and lightweight magnetoresistive (MR) sensors. These sensors, which operate at room temperature with high sensitivity and wide bandwidth, provide new operational performance capabilities. The wide bandwidth makes them ideal for both passive and active detection techniques. Using a DSP-based electronics developed by QM, we have been able to operate these sensors with an unprecedented noise performance at low frequencies. Recent tests using an MR room temperature gradiometer show that its resolution equals that of a fluxgate room-temperature gradiometer we have previously developed. These results represent an important development for both attended and unattended ground sensor applications since MR sensors cost about ten times less than fluxgate sensors.

  20. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  1. Large tunneling magnetoresistance effect at high voltage drop for Co-based Heusler alloy/MgO/CoFe junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Rata, A. D.; Braak, H.; Buergler, D. E.; Schneider, C. M.

    2007-05-01

    Growth and magnetic characterization of thin films of Co{sub 2}Cr{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Al and Co{sub 2}MnSi full-Heusler compounds are investigated. Thin films were deposited by magnetron sputtering at room temperature directly onto oxidized Si wafers. These Heusler films are magnetically very soft and ferromagnetic with Curie temperatures well above room temperature. Polycrystalline Co{sub 2}Cr{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Al Heusler films combined with MgO barriers and CoFe counter electrodes are structured to magnetic tunnel junctions and yield almost 50% magnetoresistance at room temperature. The magnetoresistance shows a strong bias dependence with the maximum occurring at a voltage drop well above 1 V. This special feature is accompanied by only a moderate temperature dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance.

  2. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  3. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material.

  5. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material. PMID:25667996

  6. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  7. Protocols for dry DNA storage and shipment at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Masha L

    2013-01-01

    The globalization of DNA barcoding will require core analytical facilities to develop cost-effective, efficient protocols for the shipment and archival storage of DNA extracts and PCR products. We evaluated three dry-state DNA stabilization systems: commercial Biomatrica® DNAstable® plates, home-made trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) plates on 96-well panels of insect DNA stored at 56 °C and at room temperature. Controls included unprotected samples that were stored dry at room temperature and at 56 °C, and diluted samples held at 4 °C and at −20 °C. PCR and selective sequencing were performed over a 4-year interval to test the condition of DNA extracts. Biomatrica® provided better protection of DNA at 56 °C and at room temperature than trehalose and PVA, especially for diluted samples. PVA was the second best protectant after Biomatrica® at room temperature, whereas trehalose was the second best protectant at 56 °C. In spite of lower PCR success, the DNA stored at −20 °C yielded longer sequence reads and stronger signal, indicating that temperature is a crucial factor for DNA quality which has to be considered especially for long-term storage. Although it is premature to advocate a transition to DNA storage at room temperature, dry storage provides an additional layer of security for frozen samples, protecting them from degradation in the event of freezer failure. All three forms of DNA preservation enable shipment of dry DNA and PCR products between barcoding facilities. PMID:23789643

  8. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  9. Coherent population trapping in a crystalline solid at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman

    2005-11-01

    Observation of coherent population trapping (CPT) at ground-state Zeeman sublevels of Cr3+ ion in ruby at room temperature is reported. A mechanism of CPT, not owing to optical pumping, is revealed in a situation when the optical pulse duration is shorter than the population decay time from the excited optical state.

  10. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  11. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  12. Effects of electrical bias and temperature stress on the negative magnetoresistance of a low-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, B. T.; Nolting, W. M.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    A study of the effect of electrical bias and temperature stress (BTS) on the negative magnetoresistance (MR) of a low-k dielectric composed of SiCOH is presented. The magnitude of the structure's MR decreases with increased time on BTS. There is a correlation between the stress condition and the rate of MR decrease. The voltage and temperature dependencies of the MR decay resemble the dependencies observed for Time Dependent Dielectric Breakdown (TDDB) studies, suggesting that this MR response to BTS could be related to breakdown mechanisms and prove useful for studying the TDDB behavior of these materials. Possible mechanisms that could lead to such a decay in MR when subjected to BTS are discussed.

  13. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  14. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  15. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  16. Effects of room temperature aging on two cryogenic temperature sensor models used in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors used in aerospace applications are typically procured far in advance of the mission launch date. Depending upon the program, the temperature sensors may be stored at room temperature for extended periods as installation and groundbased testing can take years before the actual flight. The effects of long term storage at room temperature are sometimes approximated by the use of accelerated aging at temperatures well above room temperature, but this practice can yield invalid results as the sensing material and/or electrical contacting method can be increasingly unstable with higher temperature exposure. To date, little data are available on the effects of extended room temperature aging on sensors commonly used in aerospace applications. This research examines two such temperature sensors models - the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. model CernoxTM and DT-670-SD temperature sensors. Sample groups of each model type have been maintained for ten years or longer with room temperature storage between calibrations. Over an eighteen year period, the CernoxTM temperature sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±20 mK for T<30 K and better than ±0.1% of temperature for T>30 K. Over a ten year period the model DT-670-SD sensors exhibited a stability of better than ±140 mK for T<25 K and better than ±75 mK for T>25 K.

  17. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect. PMID:24732685

  18. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  19. Room-temperature reactions for self-cleaning molecular nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Keith H; Wang, Bin; Cliffel, David E; Wright, David W; Haglund, Richard F; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2013-02-13

    New sensing techniques for detecting molecules, especially self-cleaning sensors, are in demand. Here we describe a room-temperature process in which a nanostructured substrate catalyzes the reaction of a target molecule with atmospheric oxygen and the reaction energy is absorbed by the substrate, where it can in principle be detected. Specifically, we report first-principles calculations describing a reaction between 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and atmospheric O(2) catalyzed by Fe-porphyrin at room temperature, incorporating an oxygen into the methyl group of DNT and releasing 1.9 eV per reaction. The atomic oxygen left on the Fe site can be removed by reacting with another DNT molecule, restoring the Fe catalyst.

  20. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  1. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  2. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  3. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  4. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  5. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  6. Aggregation-based growth of silver nanowires at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lanlan; Wang, Li; Song, Yonghai; Guo, Cunlan; Sun, Yujing; Peng, Chongyang; Liu, Zhelin; Li, Zhuang

    2008-02-01

    We describe an aggregation-based growth mechanism for formation of silver nanowires at room temperature. It is found that the pH of solution and the concentration of L-cysteine capping molecules have an important effect on the formation and growth of nanowires. Characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectroscopy recorded as time clearly shows that the silver nanowires are grown at the expense of nanoparticles.

  7. Room Temperature, Metal-Free Arylation of Aliphatic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Raju; Lindstedt, Erik; Jalalian, Nazli; Olofsson, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Diaryliodonium salts are demonstrated as efficient arylating agents of aliphatic alcohols under metal-free conditions. The reaction proceeds at room temperature within 90 min to give alkyl aryl ethers in good to excellent yields. Aryl groups with electron-withdrawing substituents are transferred most efficiently, and unsymmetric iodonium salts give chemoselective arylations. The methodology has been applied to the formal synthesis of butoxycaine. PMID:24808991

  8. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  9. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  10. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  11. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  12. Noninvasive liver iron measurements with a room-temperature susceptometer

    PubMed Central

    Avrin, W F; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements on the liver can quantify iron overload accurately and noninvasively. However, established susceptometer designs, using Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) that work in liquid helium, have been too expensive for widespread use. This paper presents a less expensive liver susceptometer that works at room temperature. This system uses oscillating magnetic fields, which are produced and detected by copper coils. The coil design cancels the signal from the applied field, eliminating noise from fluctuations of the source-coil current and sensor gain. The coil unit moves toward and away from the patient at 1 Hz, cancelling drifts due to thermal expansion of the coils. Measurements on a water phantom indicated instrumental errors less than 30 μg of iron per gram of wet liver tissue, which is small compared with other errors due to the response of the patient’s body. Liver iron measurements on eight thalassemia patients yielded a correlation coefficient r=0.98 between the room-temperature susceptometer and an existing SQUID. These results indicate that the fundamental accuracy limits of the room-temperature susceptometer are similar to those of the SQUID. PMID:17395991

  13. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10‑3 S cm‑1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  14. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  15. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  16. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  17. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  18. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  19. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  20. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  1. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  2. Exchange coupling and magnetoresistance in CoFe/NiCu/CoFe spin valves near the Curie point of the spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, S.; Korenivski, V.

    2010-05-01

    Thermal control of exchange coupling between two strongly ferromagnetic layers through a weakly ferromagnetic Ni-Cu spacer and the associated magnetoresistance is investigated. The spacer, having a Curie point slightly above room temperature, can be cycled between its paramagnetic and ferromagnetic states by varying the temperature externally or using joule heating. It is shown that the giant magnetoresistance vanishes due to a strong reduction in the mean free path in the spacer at above ˜30% Ni concentration—before the onset of ferromagnetism. Finally, a device is proposed which combines thermally controlled exchange coupling and large magnetoresistance by separating the switching and the readout elements.

  3. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  4. Room-temperature spin thermoelectrics in metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölle, Sebastian; Gorini, Cosimo; Eckern, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Considering metallic films at room temperature, we present the first theoretical study of the spin Nernst and thermal Edelstein effects that takes into account dynamical spin-orbit coupling, i.e., direct spin-orbit coupling with the vibrating lattice (phonons) and impurities. This gives rise to a novel process, namely, a dynamical side-jump mechanism, and to dynamical Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation, never before considered in this context. Both are the high-temperature counterparts of the well-known T =0 side-jump and Elliott-Yafet, central to the current understanding of the spin Hall, spin Nernst and Edelstein (current-induced spin polarization) effects at low T . We consider the experimentally relevant regime T >TD , with TD the Debye temperature, as the latter is lower than room temperature in transition metals such as Pt, Au and Ta typically employed in spin injection/extraction experiments. We show that the interplay between intrinsic (Bychkov-Rashba type) and extrinsic (dynamical) spin-orbit coupling yields a nonlinear T dependence of the spin Nernst and spin Hall conductivities.

  5. Spatial resolution of SQUID magnetometers and comparison with low noise room temperature magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolabdjian, C.; Qasimi, A.; Bloyet, D.; Mosser, V.

    2002-03-01

    Any magnetic sensor placed in a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field delivers a signal proportional the mean field value taken over an effective area or volume which depends on the type of sensor considered. In the case of the field produced by a magnetic dipole and detected by a square or circular planar sensor, the overall measured spatial resolution ideally depends on the ratio of the mean dipole-sensor distance z0 to the square root of the effective sensor area AE. For Z 0/ A E≪1 , the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the sensor, whereas for z 0/ A E≫1 the dipole-sensor distance is the predominant factor. To compare various low noise magnetic sensors operating either at low temperature or at room temperature, we have measured their sensitivities and spatial responses to the field produced by a magnetic moment having the form of a tiny circular current loop. The sensors could be moved in all directions with respect to the current loop. The transfer of each sensor to the magnetic dipole field was compared to their response in a homogeneous field so as to deduce their effective area and compare this area to that deduced from independent spatial resolution measurements. We report the experimental results given by four types of sensors namely a dc-SQUID, a Hall effect sensor, a giant magneto-resistive sensor and a flux-gate sensor and discuss them by mean of a “figure of merit” criterion combining their spatial resolution and their sensitivity.

  6. Room-temperature and near-room-temperature molecule-based magnets.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Mark D; Crawford, T Daniel; Yee, Gordon T

    2008-07-01

    Additional members of the family of high- T c molecule-based magnets, V[acceptor] 2. yCH 2Cl 2 have been discovered in which the acceptor is a fluorophenyltricyanoethylene. Varying the number and position of the fluorine substitutions around the phenyl ring results in materials with significantly different magnetic ordering temperatures ( T c's) ranging from 160 to 300 K. Density functional theory calculations were performed on the neutral and anionic forms of the acceptors that reveal modest correlation between T c and three calculated quantities: the gas-phase electron affinity, the dihedral angle between the phenyl ring and the olefin, and the Mulliken spin densities on the nitrogen atoms. The electrochemistry of the acceptors has also been examined.

  7. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  8. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  9. Room temperature GaAsSb single nanowire infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyuan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Fu, Lan; Peng, Kun; Wang, Fan; Fu, Xiao; Caroff, Philippe; White, Thomas P; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-11-01

    Antimonide-based ternary III-V nanowires (NWs) allow for a tunable bandgap over a wide range, which is highly interesting for optoelectronics applications, and in particular for infrared photodetection. Here we demonstrate room temperature operation of GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW infrared photodetectors grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. These GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs have uniform axial composition and show p-type conductivity with a peak field-effect mobility of ∼12 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Under light illumination, single GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW photodetectors exhibited typical photoconductor behavior with an increased photocurrent observed with the increase of temperature owing to thermal activation of carrier trap states. A broadband infrared photoresponse with a long wavelength cutoff at ∼1.66 μm was obtained at room temperature. At a low operating bias voltage of 0.15 V a responsivity of 2.37 (1.44) A/W with corresponding detectivity of 1.08 × 10(9) (6.55 × 10(8)) cm√Hz/W were achieved at the wavelength of 1.3 (1.55) μm, indicating that ternary GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs are promising photodetector candidates for small footprint integrated optical telecommunication systems. PMID:26451616

  10. Room temperature luminescence and ferromagnetism of AlN:Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Cai, G. M.; Wang, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    AlN:Fe polycrystalline powders were synthesized by a modified solid state reaction (MSSR) method. Powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results reveal the single phase nature of the doped samples. In the doped AlN samples, Fe is in Fe2+ state. Room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is observed in AlN:Fe samples. Two photoluminescence peaks located at about 592 nm (2.09 eV) and 598 nm (2.07 eV) are observed in AlN:Fe samples. Our results suggest that AlN:Fe is a potential material for applications in spintronics and high power laser devices.

  11. Icelike water monolayer adsorbed on mica at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P.B.; Xu, L.; Shen, Y.R.; Salmeron, M.

    1998-10-01

    The structure of a water film formed on mica at room temperature, in equilibrium with water vapor at various relative humidities (RH), was studied using sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM). Analysis of the O-D stretch modes in the SFG spectra of D{sub 2}O on mica indicates that as RH increases, the submonolayer water structure evolves into a more ordered hydrogen-bonding network. At full monolayer coverage ({approximately} 90% RH), the SFG spectrum suggests an icelike film with no dangling O-D groups, in agreement with a recent molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  13. CuInP₂S₆ Room Temperature Layered Ferroelectric.

    PubMed

    Belianinov, A; He, Q; Dziaugys, A; Maksymovych, P; Eliseev, E; Borisevich, A; Morozovska, A; Banys, J; Vysochanskii, Y; Kalinin, S V

    2015-06-10

    We explore ferroelectric properties of cleaved 2-D flakes of copper indium thiophosphate, CuInP2S6 (CITP), and probe size effects along with limits of ferroelectric phase stability, by ambient and ultra high vacuum scanning probe microscopy. CITP belongs to the only material family known to display ferroelectric polarization in a van der Waals, layered crystal at room temperature and above. Our measurements directly reveal stable, ferroelectric polarization as evidenced by domain structures, switchable polarization, and hysteresis loops. We found that at room temperature the domain structure of flakes thicker than 100 nm is similar to the cleaved bulk surfaces, whereas below 50 nm polarization disappears. We ascribe this behavior to a well-known instability of polarization due to depolarization field. Furthermore, polarization switching at high bias is also associated with ionic mobility, as evidenced both by macroscopic measurements and by formation of surface damage under the tip at a bias of 4 V-likely due to copper reduction. Mobile Cu ions may therefore also contribute to internal screening mechanisms. The existence of stable polarization in a van-der-Waals crystal naturally points toward new strategies for ultimate scaling of polar materials, quasi-2D, and single-layer materials with advanced and nonlinear dielectric properties that are presently not found in any members of the growing "graphene family".

  14. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  15. Wetting behavior of dialkylimidazolium chloroaluminate, a room temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, J.

    1985-08-01

    Eberhart (1979) has found that the wetting behavior of a battery electrolyte can have a dramatic effect on the internal resistance of the battery as well as its cycle life. Good wetting of battery separators by electrolyte is essential for the easy passage of ions through the separator pores, while porous, gas diffusion electrodes require a lesser degree of wetting. For several years, a room temperature molten salt system has been under study. This system is composed of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (C6N2H11Cl or MeEtImCl) plus aluminum chloride. The application of this novel liquid solution as a battery electrolyte appears to be promising. Available data suggest that likely candidates include cells with a chlorine positive electrode reactant and a magnesium, aluminum, or zinc negative electrode material. The present investigation is concerned with an assessment of the wetting behavior in the considered system, taking into account a study of the contact angles of various room temperature molten salts on candidate battery separator and porous electrode materials. 10 references.

  16. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  17. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  18. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm. PMID:21152492

  19. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm.

  20. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-06-09

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  1. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  2. Synthesis of manganese spinel nanoparticles at room temperature by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannelli, F.; Autret-Lambert, C.; Mathieu, C.; Chartier, T.; Delorme, F.; Seron, A

    2012-08-15

    This paper is focused on a new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by alkalisation by sodium hydroxide on a manganeous solution at room temperature. The precipitates obtained at different pH values have been characterized by XRD and TEM. Since the first addition of sodium hydroxide, a white Mn(OH){sub 2} precipitate appears. At pH=7, {gamma}-MnOOH phase is predominant with needle like shaped particles. At pH=10, hausmanite nanoparticles, which exhibits well defined cubic shape in the range 50-120 nm are obtained. This new precipitation route is a fast and easy environmentally friendly process to obtain well crystallized hausmanite nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles after a precipitation at pH=10. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis has been performed by precipitation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is between 50 and 120 nm.

  3. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.

  4. Directional molecular sliding at room temperature on a silicon runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouju, Xavier; Chérioux, Frédéric; Coget, Sébastien; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Palmino, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations.The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational details, additional STM images and movies showing DETB molecules sliding on the SmSi(111)-(7 × 1) reconstruction obtained from semi-empirical calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01685d

  5. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuanyuan; Lu, Haidong; Yin, Yuewei; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Ahmadi, Zahra; Costa, Paulo S.; DiChiara, Anthony D.; Cheng, Xuemei; Gruverman, Alexei; Enders, Axel; Xu, Xiaoshan

    2016-09-01

    Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50-100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

  6. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Z. Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  7. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  8. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  9. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D.; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions.

  10. Enabling NIR imaging at room temperature using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Calvez, S.; Bourvon, H.; Kanaan, H.; Meunier-Della Gatta, S.; Philippot, C.; Reiss, P.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging in visible light at room temperature is now a well-mastered technology, whereas imaging in the near infrared (NIR) remains a challenge. NIR imaging has many applications like sensing, night vision and biological diagnostics. Unfortunately, silicon detectors are inefficient above 1000 nm, and other IR technologies still need low working temperatures and are thus expensive. Colloidal quantum dots can overcome these limitations thanks to their absorption wavelength tunability depending on their chemical composition and size. After a brief review of this research field, we will present the preparation of hybrid photodetectors using NIR absorbing PbS quantum dots in combination with poly(3-hexylthiopene) and PCBM. We discuss different solution based deposition processes for device fabrication (spincoating, dip-coating, doctor blading, inkjet printing). Preliminary device tests result in a detectivity of 4.7.109 Jones at 1300 nm.

  11. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  12. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  13. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-01

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  14. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance due to magnetoelectric currents in Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xian; Su, Zhijuan; Sokolov, Alexander; Hu, Bolin; Andalib, Parisa; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-09-15

    The giant magnetoresistance and magnetoelectric (ME) effects of Z-type hexaferrite Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} were investigated. The present experiments indicated that an induced magnetoelectric current in a transverse conical spin structure not only presented a nonlinear behavior with magnetic field and electric field but also depended upon a sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. More interestingly, the ME current induced magnetoresistance was measured, yielding a giant room temperature magnetoresistance of 32.2% measured at low magnetic fields (∼125 Oe). These results reveal great potential for emerging applications of multifunctional magnetoelectric ferrite materials.

  16. [Studies on the health standard for room temperature in cold regions].

    PubMed

    Meng, Z L

    1990-03-01

    The microclimate of 205 rooms of single storey houses in four new rural residential districts in coastal and inland Shandong was monitored and studied the blood circulation of the finger, skin temperature, sweating function and other physiological indexes among 2,401 peasants. We interrogated their personal sensation to cold and warmth. The count was done by the application of thermal equilibrium index (TEI), predicted 4-hour Sweat Rate (P4SR) and the uncomfortable index. The standard room temperature is recommended as follows. In rural area in winter the appropriate room temperature is 14-16 degrees C, the comfortable room temperature is 16-20 degrees C, the lowest room temperature must not be below 14 degrees C. In summer the appropriate room temperature is 25-28 degrees C, the comfortable room temperature is 26-27 degrees C, the highest temperature must not be above 28 degrees C. PMID:2364801

  17. Room-temperature ultrasensitive mass spectrometer via dynamical decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Yin, Zhang-qi

    2014-10-01

    We propose an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer based on a coupled quantum-bit-oscillator system. Under dynamical decoupling control of the quantum bit (qubit), the qubit coherence exhibits a comb structure in the time domain. The time-comb structure enables high-precision measurements of oscillator frequency, which can be used as an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. We show that, in the ideal case, the sensitivity η of the proposed mass spectrometer has better performance at higher temperature and scales with the temperature T as η ˜T-1 /2 . While taking into account qubit and oscillator decay, the optimal sensitivity reaches a universal value independent of environmental temperature T . The measurement sensitivity η also shows an improved dependence on the control-pulse number N as η ˜N-3 /2 , in comparison with the N-1 /2 scaling in previous magnetometry studies. With the present technology on solid-state spin qubit and high-quality optomechanical system, our proposal is feasible to realize an ultrasensitive room-temperature mass spectrometer.

  18. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors.

  19. Contracting cardiomyocytes in hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Fujita, Kyoko; Higashi, Ayako; Sakiyama, Keiko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatible room-temperature ionic liquid was applied on beating cardiomyocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lifetime of beating cardiomyocytes was depended on anion functional group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A longer lifetime was recorded for no functional group on alkyl chain on their anion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino group on alkyl chain and fluorine in anion induced fatal condition changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reported liquid electrolyte interface to stimulate cardiomyocytes. -- Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are drawing attention as a new class of nonaqueous solvents to replace organic and aqueous solvents for chemical processes in the liquid phase at room temperature. The RTILs are notable for their characteristics of nonvolatility, extremely low vapor pressure, electric conductivity, and incombustibility. These distinguished properties of RTILs have brought attention to them in applications with biological cells and tissue in vacuum environment for scanning electron microscopy, and in microfluidic devices for micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS). Habitable RTILs could increase capability of nonaqueous micro-TAS for living cells. Some RTILs seemed to have the capability to replace water in biological applications. However, these RTILs had been applied to just supplemental additives for biocompatible test, to fixed cells as a substitute for an aqueous solution, and to simple molecules. None of RTILs in which directly soaks a living cell culture. Therefore, we demonstrated the design of RTILs for a living cell culture and a liquid electrolyte to stimulate contracting cardiomyocytes using the RTILs. We assessed the effect of RTILs on the cardiomyocytes using the beating lifetime to compare the applicability of RTILs for biological applications. Frequent spontaneous contractions of cardiomyocytes were confirmed in amino acid anion RTILs [P{sub 8,8,8,8}][Leu] and [P{sub 8

  20. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  1. Magnetoresistance behavior of UNiGe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakotte, H.; Lacerda, A.; Purwanto, A.; Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Torikachvili, M.S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have measured the temperature dependences of the magnetoresistance of single-crystalline UNiGe for both parallel (i//B//c-axis) and perpendicular configurations (i//a-axis, B//c-axis) in magnetic fields up to 18 T. Both configurations yield similar magnetoresistance behavior, which emphasizes the strong magnetic contribution to the resistivity in all directions. Crossing magnetic-phase boundaries causes anomalies in the magnetoresistance, which allowed a completion of the previously proposed magnetic phase diagram.

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  3. Outcome of impact disruption of iron meteorites at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, T.; Nakamura, A.; Takabe, A.; Okamoto, T.; Sangen, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Liu, X.; Mashimo, T.

    2014-07-01

    The iron meteorites and some M-class asteroids are generally understood to originate in the cores of differentiated planetesimals or in the local melt pools of primitive bodies. On these primitive bodies and planetesimals, a wide range of collisional events at different mass scales, temperatures, and impact velocities would have occurred. Iron materials have a brittle-ductile transition at a certain temperature, which depends on metallurgical factors such as grain size and purity, and on conditions such as strain-rate and confining pressure [1]. An evolutional scenario of iron meteorite parent bodies was proposed in which they formed in the terrestrial planet region, after which they were scattered into the main belt by collisions, Yarkovsky thermal forces, and resonances [2]. In this case, they may have experienced collisional evolution in the vicinity of the Earth before they were scattered into the main belt. The size distribution of iron bodies in the main belt may therefore have depended on the disruption threshold of iron bodies at temperature above the brittle-ductile transition. This paper presents the results of impact-disruption experiments of iron meteorite and steel specimens mm-cm in size as projectiles or targets conducted at room temperature using three light-gas guns and one powder gun. Our iron specimens were almost all smaller in size than their counterparts (as targets or projectiles, respectively). The fragment size distribution of iron material was different from that of rocks. In iron fragmentation, a higher percentage of the mass is concentrated in larger fragments, i.e., the mass fraction of fine fragments is much less than that of rocks shown in the Figure (left). This is probably due to the ductile nature of the iron materials at room temperature. Furthermore, the Figure (right) shows that the largest fragment mass fraction f is dependent not only on the energy density but also on the size of the specimens. In order to obtain a generalized

  4. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  5. Creep of Mg-PSZ at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, T.R. . Dept. of Physics); Gross, A.K. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Griffiths, J.R. . Div. of Manufacturing Technology); Kisi, E.H. . Faculty of Science and Technology)

    1994-03-01

    Transient [beta], or Andrade, creep occurs when magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia is loaded in tension at room temperature. The equation relating the longitudinal or tensile creep strain [var epsilon][sub l][sup c] to the tensile stress, [sigma], and to the time, t, has been determined to be [var epsilon][sub l][sup c] = A[sigma][sup m]t[sup n] in which the constants A, m, and n depend on the phase content of the zirconia. Observations are reported of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic and tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transformations which occur during creep: there is also a progressive development of microcracking. It is shown that a combination of these phenomena can account for the observed creep behavior.

  6. Room temperature water splitting at the surface of magnetite.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gareth S; Novotný, Zbyněk; Jacobson, Peter; Schmid, Michael; Diebold, Ulrike

    2011-08-17

    An array of surface science measurements has revealed novel water adsorption behavior at the Fe(3)O(4)(001) surface. Following room temperature exposure to water, a low coverage of hydrogen atoms is observed, with no associated water hydroxyl group. Mild annealing of the hydrogenated surface leads to desorption of water via abstraction of surface oxygen atoms, leading to a reduction of the surface. These results point to an irreversible splitting of the water molecule. The observed phenomena are discussed in the context of recent DFT calculations (Mulakaluri, N.; Pentcheva, R.; Scheffler, M. J. Phys. Chem. C 2010, 114, 11148), which show that the Jahn-Teller distorted surface isolates adsorbed H in a geometry that could kinetically hinder recombinative desorption. In contrast, the adsorption geometry facilitates interaction between water hydroxyl species, which are concluded to leave the surface following a reactive desorption process, possibly via the creation of O(2).

  7. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop. PMID:25551062

  8. Extraordinary room-temperature photoluminescence in triangular WS2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Humberto R; Perea-López, Nestor; Elías, Ana Laura; Berkdemir, Ayse; Wang, Bei; Lv, Ruitao; López-Urías, Florentino; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio

    2013-08-14

    Individual monolayers of metal dichalcogenides are atomically thin two-dimensional crystals with attractive physical properties different from those of their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the direct synthesis of WS2 monolayers with triangular morphologies and strong room-temperature photoluminescence (PL). The Raman response as well as the luminescence as a function of the number of S-W-S layers is also reported. The PL weakens with increasing number of layers due to a transition from direct band gap in a monolayer to indirect gap in multilayers. The edges of WS2 monolayers exhibit PL signals with extraordinary intensity, around 25 times stronger than that at the platelet's center. The structure and chemical composition of the platelet edges appear to be critical for PL enhancement.

  9. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  10. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  11. Electrically Injected Photon-Pair Source at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitier, Fabien; Orieux, Adeline; Autebert, Claire; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Manquest, Christophe; Sirtori, Carlo; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Ducci, Sara

    2014-05-01

    One of the main challenges for future quantum information technologies is the miniaturization and integration of high performance components in a single chip. In this context, electrically driven sources of nonclassical states of light have a clear advantage over optically driven ones. Here we demonstrate the first electrically driven semiconductor source of photon pairs working at room temperature and telecom wavelengths. The device is based on type-II intracavity spontaneous parametric down-conversion in an AlGaAs laser diode and generates pairs at 1.57 μm. Time-correlation measurements of the emitted pairs give an internal generation efficiency of 7×10-11 pairs/injected electron. The capability of our platform to support the generation, manipulation, and detection of photons opens the way to the demonstration of massively parallel systems for complex quantum operations.

  12. Icelike Water Monolayer Adsorbed on Mica at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P.B.; Xu, L.; Shen, Y.R.; Salmeron, M.

    1998-12-01

    The structure of a water film formed on mica at room temperature, in equilibrium with water vapor at various relative humidities (RH), was studied using sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM). Analysis of the O-D stretch modes in the SFG spectra of D{sub 2}O on mica indicates that as RH increases, the submonolayer water structure evolves into a more ordered hydrogen-bonding network. At full monolayer coverage ({approximately} 90{percent} RH) , the SFG spectrum suggests an icelike film with no dangling O-D groups, in agreement with a recent molecular dynamics simulation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  14. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  15. Emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity at reduced dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Lu, H; Gu, Y; Choi, S-Y; Li, S-D; Ryu, S; Paudel, T R; Song, K; Mikheev, E; Lee, S; Stemmer, S; Tenne, D A; Oh, S H; Tsymbal, E Y; Wu, X; Chen, L-Q; Gruverman, A; Eom, C B

    2015-09-18

    The enhancement of the functional properties of materials at reduced dimensions is crucial for continuous advancements in nanoelectronic applications. Here, we report that the scale reduction leads to the emergence of an important functional property, ferroelectricity, challenging the long-standing notion that ferroelectricity is inevitably suppressed at the scale of a few nanometers. A combination of theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, and structural analyses provides evidence of room-temperature ferroelectricity in strain-free epitaxial nanometer-thick films of otherwise nonferroelectric strontium titanate (SrTiO3). We show that electrically induced alignment of naturally existing polar nanoregions is responsible for the appearance of a stable net ferroelectric polarization in these films. This finding can be useful for the development of low-dimensional material systems with enhanced functional properties relevant to emerging nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26383947

  16. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  17. Complete S matrix in a microwave cavity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, Jérôme; Legrand, Olivier; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    We experimentally study the widths of resonances in a two-dimensional microwave cavity at room temperature. By developing a model for the coupling antennas, we are able to discriminate their contribution from those of Ohmic losses to the broadening of resonances. Concerning Ohmic losses, we experimentally put to evidence two mechanisms: damping along propagation and absorption at the contour, the latter being responsible for variations of widths from mode to mode due to its dependence on the spatial distribution of the field at the contour. A theory, based on an S -matrix formalism, is given for these variations. It is successfully validated through measurements of several hundreds of resonances in a rectangular cavity.

  18. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shixuan

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice. (L.D. Pan et al., Nano Lett. 2015, 15, 6464. In collaboration with Lida Pan, Yande Que, Hui Chen, Dongfei Wang, Jun Li, Chengmin Shen, Wende Xiao, Hongjun Gao in CAS, and S. Pantellides in Vanderbilt University.)

  19. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lida; Que, Yande; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dongfei; Li, Jun; Shen, Chengmin; Xiao, Wende; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2015-10-14

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice.

  20. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays.

    PubMed

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A; Fisher, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ∼4.67 emu cm(-3) and coercivity of ∼105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm(-3) and ∼75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals. PMID:21264436

  1. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ~4.67 emu cm-3 and coercivity of ~105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm-3 and ~75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals.

  2. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  3. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ganhua; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Chen, Junhong

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 °C) or one-step heating (200 °C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO2 and NH3 gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO2/NH3). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  4. The temperature dependence of the crossover magnetic field of linear magnetoresistance in the Cu0.1Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiu-Ming; Yu, Shih-Hsun; Chou, Mitch

    2016-08-01

    A non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) is observed in Cu0.1Bi2Se3 in a wide range of temperatures. The crossover magnetic field, B*, deviating from the linear MR, increases as the temperature increases. The experimental results show that the normalized B*, inverse MR slope and mobility follow the same temperature dependence that is consistent with the model constructed by Parich and Littlewood (PL model). The mechanism of the T 2 dependent B* is systematically and comprehensively discussed through existing theories, and might be due to the electron‑electron scattering in a highly uniform system with a few low mobility defects.

  5. Excess Ni-doping induced enhanced room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni-Mn-Sn based shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-09-15

    Present work reports on the observation of large magnetoresistance (∼−30% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (∼12 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} for 0–50 kOe) near room temperature (∼290 K) on the Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56}. The sample can be thought of being derived from the parent Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.6} alloy, where excess Ni was doped at the expense of Sn. Such Ni doping enhances the martensitic transition temperature and for the Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56} it is found to be optimum (288 K). The doped alloy shows enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduced saturation magnetization as compared to the undoped counterpart at low temperature. A probable increment of antiferromagnetic correlation between Mn-atoms on Ni substitution can be accounted for the enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduction in saturation moment.

  6. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  7. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  8. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  9. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  10. Engineering Room-temperature Superconductors Via ab-initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, Mamikon; Melkonyan, Gurgen; Gulian, Armen

    The BCS, or bosonic model of superconductivity, as Little and Ginzburg have first argued, can bring in superconductivity at room temperatures in the case of high-enough frequency of bosonic mode. It was further elucidated by Kirzhnitset al., that the condition for existence of high-temperature superconductivity is closely related to negative values of the real part of the dielectric function at finite values of the reciprocal lattice vectors. In view of these findings, the task is to calculate the dielectric function for real materials. Then the poles of this function will indicate the existence of bosonic excitations which can serve as a "glue" for Cooper pairing, and if the frequency is high enough, and the dielectric matrix is simultaneously negative, this material is a good candidate for very high-Tc superconductivity. Thus, our approach is to elaborate a methodology of ab-initio calculation of the dielectric function of various materials, and then point out appropriate candidates. We used the powerful codes (TDDF with the DP package in conjunction with ABINIT) for computing dielectric responses at finite values of the wave vectors in the reciprocal lattice space. Though our report is concerned with the particular problem of superconductivity, the application range of the data processing methodology is much wider. The ability to compute the dielectric function of existing and still non-existing (though being predicted!) materials will have many more repercussions not only in fundamental sciences but also in technology and industry.

  11. A computed room temperature line list for phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    An accurate and comprehensive room temperature rotation-vibration transition line list for phosphine (31PH3) is computed using a newly refined potential energy surface and a previously constructed ab initio electric dipole moment surface. Energy levels, Einstein A coefficients and transition intensities are computed using these surfaces and a variational approach to the nuclear motion problem as implemented in the program TROVE. A ro-vibrational spectrum is computed, covering the wavenumber range 0-8000 cm-1. The resulting line list, which is appropriate for temperatures up to 300 K, consists of a total of 137 million transitions between 5.6 million energy levels. Several of the band centres are shifted to better match experimental transition frequencies. The line list is compared to the most recent HITRAN database and other laboratorial sources. Transition wavelengths and intensities are generally found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data, with particularly close agreement for the rotational spectrum. An analysis of the comparison between the theoretical data created and the existing experimental data is performed, and suggestions for future improvements and assignments to the HITRAN database are made.

  12. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  13. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  14. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  15. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  16. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is ‘dark’ with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  17. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-01

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  18. Large oscillations of the magnetoresistance in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Sochnikov, Ilya; Shaulov, Avner; Yeshurun, Yosef; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozović, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometres(8-11). Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La(1.84)Sr(0.16)CuO(4), a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below approximately 38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry, or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes. PMID:20543834

  19. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  20. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-22

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  1. Room temperature semiconductor detectors for hard x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ann M.; Stahle, Carl M.; Lisse, Casey M.; Babu, Sachi; Gehrels, Neil A.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Shu, Peter K.

    1994-09-01

    Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and mercuric iodide (HgI2) semiconductor hard X-ray detectors are currently being evaluated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use in future balloon and satellite applications. PoRTIA, a small engineering prototype hard X-ray (20 - 150 keV) balloon instrument will contain both a CdZnTe and a HgI2 detector, each 6.5 cm2 x .15 - .2 cm and sharing the same 5 degree(s) field-of-view. PoRTIA will be launched from Alice Springs, Australia in the Spring of 1995 as a piggyback instrument aboard the GRIS balloon payload. PoRTIA will provide valuable information about detector efficiency, durability and material dependent detector background components at balloon altitudes as it observes the Crab Nebula. In addition, a CdZnTe research and development program has been initiated to develop the capability to produce improved CdZnTe detectors for astrophysics applications. The work at Goddard continues in an effort to develop CdZnTe detectors with improvements in electronics, contacts and packaging methods.

  2. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  3. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  4. Proactive aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of room-temperature ionic liquids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulacki, K.J.; Chaloner, D.T.; Larson, J.H.; Costello, D.M.; Evans-White, M. A.; Docherty, K.M.; Bernot, R.J.; Brueseke, M.A.; Kulpa, C.F.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments are being contaminated with a myriad of anthropogenic chemicals, a problem likely to continue due to both unintentional and intentional releases. To protect valuable natural resources, novel chemicals should be shown to be environmentally safe prior to use and potential release into the environment. Such proactive assessment is currently being applied to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs). Because most ILs are water-soluble, their effects are likely to manifest in aquatic ecosystems. Information on the impacts of ILs on numerous aquatic organisms, focused primarily on acute LC50 and EC50 endpoints, is now available, and trends in toxicity are emerging. Cation structure tends to influence IL toxicity more so than anion structure, and within a cation class, the length of alkyl chain substituents is positively correlated with toxicity. While the effects of ILs on several aquatic organisms have been studied, the challenge for aquatic toxicology is now to predict the effects of ILs in complex natural environments that often include diverse mixtures of organisms, abiotic conditions, and additional stressors. To make robust predictions about ILs will require coupling of ecologically realistic laboratory and field experiments with standard toxicity bioassays and models. Such assessments would likely discourage the development of especially toxic ILs while shifting focus to those that are more environmentally benign. Understanding the broader ecological effects of emerging chemicals, incorporating that information into predictive models, and conveying the conclusions to those who develop, regulate, and use those chemicals, should help avoid future environmental degradation. ?? 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  5. Mesophases in nearly 2D room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Cesaratto, M; Del Pópolo, M G; Ballone, P

    2009-11-26

    Computer simulations of (i) a [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] film of nanometric thickness squeezed at kbar pressure by a piecewise parabolic confining potential reveal a mesoscopic in-plane density and composition modulation reminiscent of mesophases seen in 3D samples of the same room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Near 2D confinement, enforced by a high normal load, as well as relatively long aliphatic chains are strictly required for the mesophase formation, as confirmed by computations for two related systems made of (ii) the same [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] adsorbed at a neutral solid surface and (iii) a shorter-chain RTIL ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) trapped in the potential well of part i. No in-plane modulation is seen for ii and iii. In case ii, the optimal arrangement of charge and neutral tails is achieved by layering parallel to the surface, while, in case iii, weaker dispersion and packing interactions are unable to bring aliphatic tails together into mesoscopic islands, against overwhelming entropy and Coulomb forces. The onset of in-plane mesophases could greatly affect the properties of long-chain RTILs used as lubricants. PMID:19886615

  6. High-power room-temperature-operated CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kouki; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi; Kumagai, Mikio; Takashima, Yoich; Naito, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hasuike, Toru

    2000-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to achieve high-power, efficient operation of a room-temperature CO laser and to collect data for designing the CO laser system for nuclear reactor decommissioning. The influence of the H2O concentration in the laser gas on the output performance was investigated, and it was found that the H2O concentration should be kept as low as possible (less than 260 ppm) to obtain stable, high-power outputs. To improve output performance, the rf frequency was increased from 13.56 MHz to 27.12 MHz. The output power for the 27.12 MHz excitation was increased by 10 to 20% compared with that for the 13.56 MHz excitation. The laser output was scaled by extending the discharge tube inner diameter from 19 mm to 30 mm. By optimizing the air gap length and the curvature radius of the outer metallic electrode, the operating gas conditions, and the reflectivity of the output coupler, a maximum output of 830 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 12.2% with adding neither Kr nor Xe. The addition of Kr was more effective for increasing the output than the addition of Xe. A maximum output of 910 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 14.8% with Kr addition, and a maximum output of 810 W was obtained at a laser efficiency of 16.2% with Xe addition.

  7. Realization of Ground State Artificial Skyrmion Lattices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Fischer, Peter; Liu, Kai

    Artificial skyrmion lattices stable at ambient conditions offer a convenient and powerful platform to explore skyrmion physics and topological phenomena and motivates their inclusion in next-generation data and logic devices. In this work we present direct experimental evidence of artificial skyrmion lattices with a stable ground state at room temperature. Our approach is to pattern vortex-state Co nanodots (560 nm diameter) in hexagonal arrays on top of a Co/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; the skyrmion state is prepared using a specific magnetic field sequence. Ion irradiation has been employed to suppress PMA in the underlayer and allow imprinting of the vortex structure from the nanodots to form skyrmion lattices, as revealed by polarized neutron reflectometry. Circularity control is realized through Co dot shape asymmetry, and confirmed by microscopy and FORC magnetometry. The vortex polarity is set during the field sequence and confirmed by magnetometry. Spin-transport studies further demonstrate a sensitivity to the skyrmion spin texture.Work supported by NSF (DMR-1008791, ECCS-1232275 and DMR-1543582)

  8. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  9. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  10. Controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yingpu; Lu, Gongxuan

    2008-07-01

    Large quantities of pentagonal gold nanotubes have been synthesized by reducing chloroauric acid with silver nanowires in an aqueous solution of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at room temperature. These gold nanotubes possess perfect structures, smooth surfaces, highly crystalline walls, and similar cross-sections to that of the silver template. In this process, the CTAB participation was found to be crucial for shape-controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes. In the absence of CTAB, loose and hollow gold structures were routinely generated, while bundled gold nanotubes with rough surfaces were obtained by replacing the CTAB with poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The possible formation mechanism of pentagonal gold nanotubes has also been discussed on the basis of various growth stages studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images. In addition, the catalytic properties of these hollow nanostructures for hydrogen generation reaction from HCHO solution have also been investigated. They showed higher activity than that of spherical gold nanoparticles. PMID:21828702

  11. Water-driven structure transformation in nanoparticles at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengzhong; Gilbert, Benjamin; Huang, Feng; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-08-28

    The thermodynamic behaviour of small particles differs from that of the bulk material by the free energy term gammaA--the product of the surface (or interfacial) free energy and the surface (or interfacial) area. When the surfaces of polymorphs of the same material possess different interfacial free energies, a change in phase stability can occur with decreasing particle size. Here we describe a nanoparticle system that undergoes structural changes in response to changes in the surface environment rather than particle size. ZnS nanoparticles (average diameter 3 nm) were synthesized in methanol and found to exhibit a reversible structural transformation accompanying methanol desorption, indicating that the particles readily adopt minimum energy structural configurations. The binding of water to the as-formed particles at room temperature leads to a dramatic structural modification, significantly reducing distortions of the surface and interior to generate a structure close to that of sphalerite (tetrahedrally coordinated cubic ZnS). These findings suggest a route for post-synthesis control of nanoparticle structure and the potential use of the nanoparticle structural state as an environmental sensor. Furthermore, the results imply that the structure and reactivity of nanoparticles at planetary surfaces, in interplanetary dust and in the biosphere, will depend on both particle size and the nature of the surrounding molecules. PMID:12944961

  12. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  13. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  14. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold kit therefor

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.; Hupf, Homer B.; Wanek, Philip M.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free .sup.125 I.sup.- is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  15. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test... B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test day... Temperatures shall be controlled to ± 1 °C....

  16. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, E. J.; Mclaughlin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05–0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = −95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K–290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  17. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05.

    PubMed

    Wildman, E J; Mclaughlin, A C

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  18. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, E. J.; McLaughlin, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom.

  19. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  20. Tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance in CoFeB|MgO|Ta junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, S.; Miwa, S. Matsuda, K.; Nawaoka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Morishita, H.; Goto, M.; Mizuochi, N.; Shinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-08-24

    We found that CoFeB|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions exhibit tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) at room temperature. The tunnel junctions exhibit positive magnetoresistance with the application of a magnetic field normal to the film plane. The dependencies on the applied magnetic field angle and MgO thickness reveal that the magnetoresistance originates from the TAMR, caused by the spin polarization and the spin-orbit interaction at the CoFeB|MgO interface. We also found that the TAMR can be used to detect ferromagnetic resonance in the CoFeB. This detection method could be useful for the characterization of nanomagnets that are free from the spin-transfer effect and the stray field of a reference layer, unlike conventional magnetic tunnel junctions.

  1. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A.; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A.; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  2. Towards Room Temperature Silicon Memory Using Single Electron Effects.^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    1996-03-01

    In a semiconductor device, transport, where single electron effects prevail, is usually characterized by sub-μ A currents, large time-constants, and non-linearities that are not suitably harnessed by conventional methods of implementing logic. However, many of the attributes of single electron effects are quite appropriate for memories and we summarize one promising implementation involving low interface state density nano-crystals of silicon that are electrostatically coupled to a conducting channel whose conduction is modulated by a control gate.(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 52nd Annual Device Research Conference IVA-4 (1994))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of 53rd Annual Device Research Conference, 50 (1995))(S. Tiwari, et al., Digest of International Electron Devices Meeting (1995)) Single electron effects manifest themselves in the nano-crystals of silicon (5--7 nm in dimensions) where Coulombic energies of ≈ 60 meV are presently achieved, sufficient for 77 K demonstrations. Large threshold voltage shifts (> 0.2--0.25 V) are achieved by using large enough density of such nano-crystals where single/multiple electron storage occurs and appear as plateaus in threshold voltage - gate voltage characteristics. The charging of the nano-crystals occurs from an inversion layer and discharging occurs to a depletion region. Scaling of nano-crystals size is expected to shift this operational behavior to room temperature, and very low power behavior should be expected from scaled structures utilizing only a single nano-crystal. ^*Performed in collaboration with F. Rana, K. Chan, J. Welser, and H. Hanafi

  3. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce.

  4. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  5. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  6. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  7. Quantitative current measurements using scanning magnetoresistance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takezaki, Taiichi; Sueoka, Kazuhisa

    2008-08-01

    We have demonstrated the capability of scanning magnetoresistance microscope (SMRM) to be used for quantitative current measurements. The SMRM is a magnetic microscope that is based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) and simultaneously measures the localized surface magnetic field distribution and surface topography. The proposed SMRM employs an in-house built AFM cantilever equipped with a miniaturized magnetoresistive (MR) sensor as a magnetic field sensor. In this study, a spin-valve type MR sensor with a width of 1 microm was used to measure the magnetic field distribution induced by a current carrying wire with a width of 5 microm and a spacing of 1.6 microm at room temperature and under ambient conditions. Simultaneous imaging of the magnetic field distribution and the topography was successfully performed in the DC current ranging from 500 microA to 8 mA. The characterized SV sensor, which has a linear response to magnetic fields, offers the quantitative analysis of a magnetic field and current. The measured magnetic field strength was in good agreement with the result simulated using Biot-Savart's law. PMID:18599218

  8. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C.; Jacquemart, D.; Buldyreva, J.; Lacome, N.; Perrin, A.

    2012-07-01

    Methyl chloride is of interest for atmospheric applications, since this molecule is directly involved in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. In a previous work [Bray et al. JQSRT 2011;112:2446], lines positions and intensities of self-perturbed 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl have been studied into details for the 3.4 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurement and calculation of N2-broadening coefficients of the 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues. High-resolution Fourier Transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures at room-temperature have been recorded between 2800 and 3200 cm-1 at LADIR (using a classical source) and between 47 and 59 cm-1 at SOLEIL (using the synchrotron source on the AILES beamline). 612 mid-infrared transitions of the ν1 band and 86 far-infrared transitions of the pure rotational band have been analyzed using a multispectrum fitting procedure. Average accuracy on the deduced N2-broadening coefficients has been estimated to 5% and 10% in the mid- and far-infrared spectral regions, respectively. The J- and K-rotational dependences of these coefficients have been observed in the mid-infrared region and then a simulation has been performed using an empirical model for 0≤J≤50, K≤9. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line widths for 0≤J≤50 and K≤10 of the ν1 band and for 55≤J≤67 and K≤15 of the pure rotational band have been computed using a semi-classical approach involving exact trajectories and a real symmetric-top geometry of the active molecule. Finally, a global comparison with the experimental and theoretical data existing in the literature has been performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been appeared while no clear evidence for any vibrational or isotopic dependences have been pointed out.

  9. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  10. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  11. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm−3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm−3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  12. Current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance of multilayered nanowires electrodeposited in anodic aluminum oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. R.; Yi, G.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2000-01-01

    Co-Ni-Cu/Cu multilayered nanowires were prepared by electrodeposition using nanoporous aluminum oxide membranes rather than the more usual track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Very large values of the current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) were recorded: 55% at room temperature and 115% at 77 K. The use of aluminum oxide membranes also made possible a study of the effects of annealing on the CPP-GMR.

  13. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  14. Nano-structured TiO2 film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2009-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO2 thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers. PMID:19672322

  15. Free-standing and single-crystalline Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism and excellent magnetic response.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiu; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Tang, Jianshi; Lin, Ching-Chun; Hou, Te-Chien; Jiang, Xiaowei; Wang, Kang L; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2012-06-26

    High-aspect-ratio Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires with room-temperature ferromagnetism were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method in one step. This is the first report of ternary silicide nanowires using magnetic Mn ions to partially replace metal sites in the host matrix. Here we report the excellent magnetic characteristics of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, which exhibit strong ferromagnetism at room temperature and high magnetoresistance (MR) variation. As-synthesized Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires show a hyperbranched morphology and a spin-disorder behavior. The strong spin interaction in Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires, induced by the substitution of Fe sublattices for magnetic Mn ions, was revealed in the hysteresis loops. The magnetization versus magnetic field (M-H) curves of Fe(1-x)Mn(x)Si nanowires are much less sensitive to the temperature variation from 10 to 300 K than those of FeSi nanowires. Remarkably, the excellent MR performance, -41.6% at 25 K with a magnetic field of 9 T, was demonstrated in an individual Fe(0.88)Mn(0.12)Si nanowire.

  16. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  17. Substrate Temperature Effects on Room Temperature Sensing Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jonnala Rakesh; Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Shankar, Prabakaran; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using chemical spray pyrolysis technique at different substrate temperatures such as 523, 623 and 723 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of polycrystalline films with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and revealed the change in preferential orientation of the crystal planes. Scanning electron micrographs showed the formation of uniformly distributed spherical shaped grains at low deposition temperature and pebbles like structure at the higher temperature. Transmittance of 85% was observed for the film deposited at 723 K. The band gap of the films was found to be increased from 3.15 to 3.23 eV with a rise in deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films was found to be improved with an increase in substrate temperature. Surface of ZnO thin films deposited at 523 K, 623 K and 723 K were found to be hydrophobic with the contact angles of 92°, 105° and 128° respectively. The room temperature gas sensing characteristics of all the films were studied and found that the film deposited at 623 K showed a better response towards ammonia vapour. PMID:27398478

  18. Deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Electron fractographic and thin foil electron metallographic techniques were used to evaluate the deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at temperatures ranging from 24 to 816/sup 0/C. Operative dislocation mechanisms and fracture surface morphologies were related to the overall tensile response of this nickel-base superalloy. At room temperature, failure occurred primarily by an intergranular dimple rupture mechanism associated with microvoid coalescence along grain boundary denuded regions. A fairly high density of dislocations throughout the matrix resulted in relatively high ductility levels even though failure occurred by an intergranular mechanism. Under intermediate temperature conditions (316 to 427/sup 0/C), increased transgranular fracture coupled with extensive dislocation activity within the Inconel X-750 matrix caused a slight increase in ductility. At progressively higher temperatures, 538 to 704/sup 0/C, all dislocation activity was channeled through narrow slip bands which subsequently initiated localized separation and resulted in a very faceted fracture surface appearance. The absence of a homogeneous dislocation substructure in this temperature regime resulted in a severe degradation in ductility levels. At the highest test temperature (816/sup 0/C), a uniform dislocation network throughout the Inconel X-750 matrix coupled with intense dislocation activity in the grain boundary denuded zone resulted in a marked improvement in ductility. Furthermore, the extensive dislocation activity along grain boundary regions ultimately resulted in an intergranular fracture morphology.

  19. Magnetoresistance control in granular Zn 1 - x - y CdxMnyGeAs2 nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Górska, M.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Nedelko, N.; Podgórni, A.; Avdonin, A.; Lähderanta, E.; Dobrowolski, W.; Aronov, A. N.; Marenkin, S. F.

    2015-09-01

    We present studies of structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Zn 1 - x - y CdxMnyGeAs2 nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductor samples with changeable chemical composition. The presence of MnAs clusters induces the studied alloy room temperature ferromagnetism with the Curie temperature, TC, around 305 K. The chemical composition of the chalcopyrite matrix controls the geometrical parameters of the clusters, inducing different magnetoresistance effects in the crystals. The presence of ferromagnetic clusters in the alloy induces either negative or positive magnetoresistance with different values. The Cd-content allows a change of magnetoresistance sign in our samples from negative (for x ≈ 0.85 ) to positive (for x ≈ 0.12 ). The negative magnetoresistance present in the samples with x ≈ 0.85 is observed at temperatures T < 25 K with maximum values of about -32% at T = 1.4 K and B = 13 T, strongly depending on the Mn content, y. The positive magnetoresistance present in the samples with x ≈ 0.12 is observed with maximum values not exceeding 50% at B = 13 T and T = 4.3 K, changing with the Mn content, y.

  20. Pentacene on Ni(111): room-temperature molecular packing and temperature-activated conversion to graphene.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L E; De Marchi, F; MacLeod, J M; Lipton-Duffin, J; Gatti, R; Ma, D; Perepichka, D F; Rosei, F

    2015-02-21

    We investigate, using scanning tunnelling microscopy, the adsorption of pentacene on Ni(111) at room temperature and the behaviour of these monolayer films with annealing up to 700 °C. We observe the conversion of pentacene into graphene, which begins from as low as 220 °C with the coalescence of pentacene molecules into large planar aggregates. Then, by annealing at 350 °C for 20 minutes, these aggregates expand into irregular domains of graphene tens of nanometers in size. On surfaces where graphene and nickel carbide coexist, pentacene shows preferential adsorption on the nickel carbide phase. The same pentacene to graphene transformation was also achieved on Cu(111), but at a higher activation temperature, producing large graphene domains that exhibit a range of moiré superlattice periodicities.

  1. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in a canted ferrimagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Barker, Joseph; Schlitz, Richard; Piot, Benjamin A.; Ollefs, Katharina; Guillou, Francois; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Rogalev, Andrei; Opel, Matthias; Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the spin Hall magnetoresistance effect in ferrimagnet/normal metal bilayers, comparing the response in collinear and canted magnetic phases. In the collinear magnetic phase, in which the sublattice magnetic moments are all aligned along the same axis, we observe the conventional spin Hall magnetoresistance. In contrast, in the canted phase, the magnetoresistance changes sign. Using atomistic spin simulations and x-ray absorption experiments, we can understand these observations in terms of the magnetic field and temperature dependent orientation of magnetic moments on different magnetic sublattices. This enables a magnetotransport based investigation of noncollinear magnetic textures.

  2. Rapid and controllable covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rubí, Yadienka; Guan, Jingwen; Lin, Shuqiong; Scriver, Christine; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Simard, Benoit

    2007-12-28

    We report a rapid and efficient procedure to functionalize SWNT where free radicals generated at room temperature by a redox reaction between reduced SWNT and diacyl peroxide derivatives were covalently attached to the SWNT wall. PMID:18060123

  3. Evaluation of DNA/RNAshells for room temperature nucleic acids storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopan; Li, Qiyuan; Wang, Xian; Zhou, Xiaolin; He, Xuheng; Liao, Qiuyan; Zhu, Fengqin; Cheng, Le; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Traditional nucleic acids preservation methods rely on maintaining samples in cold environments, which are costly to operate and time sensitive. Recent work validated that using room temperature for the storage of nucleic acids is possible if the samples are completely protected from water and oxygen. Here, we conducted accelerated aging and real-time degradation studies to evaluate the new technology DNAshell and RNAshell, which preserves DNA and RNA at room temperature, including the DNA and RNA yield, purity, and integrity. DNA and RNA solutions are dried in the presence of stabilizers in stainless steel minicapsules, then redissolved after different time points of heating and storing at room temperature. Results show that DNAshell and RNAshell ensure the safe storage of nucleic acids at room temperature for long periods of time, and that the quality of these nucleic acids is suitable for common downstream analysis.

  4. Robust room temperature valley polarization in monolayer and bilayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Pramoda K; Lin, Fan-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Huang, Jer-Shing; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-21

    We report robust room temperature valley polarization in chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown monolayer and bilayer WS2via polarization-resolved photoluminescence measurements using excitation below the bandgap. We show that excitation with energy slightly below the bandgap of the multi-valleyed transition metal chalcogenides can effectively suppress the random redistribution of excited electrons and, thereby, greatly enhance the efficiency of valley polarization at room temperature. Compared to mechanically exfoliated WS2, our CVD grown WS2 films also show enhancement in the coupling of spin, layer and valley degree of freedom and, therefore, provide improved valley polarization. At room temperature, using below-bandgap excitation and CVD grown monolayer and bilayer WS2, we have reached a record-high valley polarization of 35% and 80%, respectively, exceeding the previously reported values of 10% and 65% for mechanically exfoliated WS2 layers using resonant excitation. This observation provides a new direction to enhance valley control at room temperature.

  5. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK AND TEMPLATE-FREE SYNTHESIS OF LEUCOEMARLDINE POLYANILINE NANOFIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe a simple strategy for the bulk and template-free synthesis of reduced leucoemarldine polyaniline nanofibers size ranging from as low as 10 nm to 50 nm without the use of any reducing agents at room temperature.

  6. Saccharides as Prospective Immobilizers of Nucleic Acids for Room-Temperature Structural EPR Studies.

    PubMed

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Tormyshev, Victor M; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedin, Matvey V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for structural studies of biomolecules and their complexes. This method, whose applicability has been recently extended to room temperatures, requires immobilization of the studied biosystem to prevent averaging of dipolar couplings; at the same time, the modification of native conformations by immobilization must be avoided. In this work, we provide first demonstration of room-temperature EPR distance measurements in nucleic acids using saccharides trehalose, sucrose, and glucose as immobilizing media. We propose an approach that keeps structural conformation and unity of immobilized double-stranded DNA. Remarkably, room-temperature electron spin dephasing time of triarylmethyl-labeled DNA in trehalose is noticeably longer compared to previously used immobilizers, thus providing a broader range of available distances. Therefore, saccharides, and especially trehalose, can be efficiently used as immobilizers of nucleic acids, mimicking native conditions and allowing wide range of structural EPR studies at room temperatures. PMID:27320083

  7. Red photoluminescence of living systems at the room temperature : measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, I. S.; Rud, V. Yu; Shpunt, V. Ch; Rud, Yu V.; Glinushkin, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Presents results of a study of the red luminescence of living plants at room temperature. The analysis of obtained results allows to conclude that the photoluminescence spectra for green leaves in all cases represent the two closely spaced bands.

  8. A room-temperature adenosine-based molecular beacon for highly sensitive detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hsiu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2012-06-25

    This study developed a simple, sensitive, and selective molecular beacon for detecting nucleic acids at room temperature based on coralyne induced conformational change of a MB through A(2)-coralyne-A(2) coordination.

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in zinc-blende and deformed CrAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J. F.; Zhao, J. H.; Deng, J. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Li, S. S.; Wu, X. G.; Jia, Q. J.

    2006-04-01

    We try to clarify the controversy about the origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in a CrAs compound. Two kinds of CrAs thin films were grown on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy. Structural analyses confirm that the as-grown CrAs film is a pure zinc-blende phase. Magnetic measurements suggest that room-temperature ferromagnetism exists in zinc-blende CrAs. In contrast, the CrAs film turns into a mixture of zinc-blende and deformed CrAs after annealing. A ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature demonstrates that zinc-blende CrAs remains room-temperature ferromagnetism even when it is partly deformed into a non-zinc-blende phase.

  10. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  11. Room temperature exchange bias in SmFeO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang (王晓雄), Xiaoxiong; Cheng (程相义), Xiangyi; Gao (高尚), Shang; Song (宋俊达), Junda; Ruan (阮可青), Keqing; Li (李晓光), Xiaoguang

    2016-02-01

    Exchange bias phenomenon is generally ascribed to the unidirectional magnetic shift along the field axes at interface of two magnetic materials. Room temperature exchange bias is found in SmFeO3 single crystal. The behavior after different cooling procedure is regular, and the training behavior is attributed to the athermal training and its pinning origin is attributed to the antiferromagnetic clusters. Its being single phase and occurring at room temperature make it an appropriate candidate for application.

  12. Copper-Catalyzed N-Arylation of 2-Pyridones Employing Diaryliodonium Salts at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seo-Hee; Sung, Dan-Bi; Park, Cho-Hee; Kim, Won-Suk

    2016-09-01

    A new and mild synthetic approach for the N-arylation of 2-pyridones with diaryliodonium salts has been developed. Most reactions proceed readily at room temperature in the presence of 10 mol % of copper chloride. As a result, a wide range of N-arylpyridine-2-ones were synthesized in yields of 23% to 99%. With this method, an antifibrotic drug, Pirfenidone, was successfully synthesized in 99% yield within 30 min at room temperature. PMID:27484240

  13. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  14. Room-temperature single-photon sources based on nanocrystal fluorescence in photonic/plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, S. G.; Winkler, J. M.; Bissell, L. J.; Mihaylova, D.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Shi, Z.; Goldberg, D.; Menon, V. M.; Boyd, R. W.; Chen, G.; Prasad, P.

    2014-10-01

    Results are presented here towards robust room-temperature SPSs based on fluorescence in nanocrystals: colloidal quantum dots, color-center diamonds and doped with trivalent rare-earth ions (TR3+). We used cholesteric chiral photonic bandgap and Bragg-reflector microcavities for single emitter fluorescence enhancement. We also developed plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas and 2D-Si-photonic bandgap microcavities. The paper also provides short outlines of other technologies for room-temperature single-photon sources.

  15. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  16. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  17. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits. PMID:26541203

  18. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits.

  19. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  20. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  1. Magnetothermopower and magnetoresistance of single Co-Ni/Cu multilayered nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnert, Tim; Niemann, Anna Corinna; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Bäßler, Svenja; Gooth, Johannes; Tóth, Bence G.; Neuróhr, Katalin; Péter, László; Bakonyi, Imre; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor M.; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2014-10-01

    The magnetothermopower and the magnetoresistance of single Co-Ni/Cu multilayered nanowires with various thicknesses of the Cu spacer are investigated. Both kinds of measurement are performed as a function of temperature (50-325 K) and under applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the nanowire axis, with magnitudes up to -15% at room temperature. A linear relation between thermopower S and electrical conductivity σ of the nanowires is found, with the magnetic field as an implicit variable. Combining the linear behavior of the S vs σ relation and the Mott formula, the energy derivative of the resistivity is determined. In order to extract the true nanowire materials parameters from the measured thermopower, a simple model based on the Mott formula is employed to distinguish the individual thermopower contributions of the sample. By assuming that the nondiffusive thermopower contributions of the nanowire can be neglected, it is found that the magnetic-field-induced changes of thermopower and resistivity are equivalent. The emphasis in the present paper is on the comparison of the magnetoresistance and magnetothermopower results and it is found that the same correlation is valid between the two sets of data for all samples, irrespective of the relative importance of the giant magnetoresistance or anisotropic magnetoresistance contributions in the various individual nanowires.

  2. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  3. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aigu L; Rodrigues, J N B; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A H Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m(2)/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. PMID:26100970

  4. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite.

  5. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  6. Positive magnetoresistance of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/C composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirov, Yu. V.; Gavrilyachenko, V. G.; Bogatin, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The perovskite manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 compound is used as a component in ceramic (1‑x)(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)-xC composites at x = 0.15-0.85. It is found that every studied specimen is characterized by the linear dependence of the positive magnetoresistance (PMR) on the magnetic field strength at room temperature. The 0.6(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)-0.4C composite has the largest magnetoresistance value (15%) at room temperature and intensity of magnetic field H=15kOe. A possible mechanism for the PMR of (1‑x)(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)-xC composites is discussed.

  7. Variable temperature study of the crystal and magnetic structures of the giant magnetoresistant materials LMnAsO(L = La, Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, N.; Wildman, E. J.; Skakle, J. M. S.; McLaughlin, A. C.; Smith, R. I.; Fitch, A. N.

    2011-04-01

    A variable temperature neutron and synchrotron diffraction study has been performed on the giant magnetoresistant oxypnictides LMnAsO (L = La, Nd). The low-temperature magnetic structures have been studied, and results show a spin reorientation of the Mn2+ spins below TN (Nd) for NdMnAsO. The Mn2+ spins rotate from alignment along c to alignment into the basal plane, and the Mn2+ and Nd3+ moments refine to 3.54(4) μB and 1.93(4) μB, respectively, at 2 K. In contrast, there is no change in magnetic structure with temperature for LaMnAsO. There is no evidence of a structural transition down to 2 K; however, discontinuities in the cell volume and L-O and Mn-As bond lengths are detected at ˜150 K for both materials. This temperature coincides with the electronic transition previously reported and suggests a coupling between electronic and lattice degrees of freedom.

  8. Room-temperature observations of the weak localization in low-mobility graphene films

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junhao; Wang, Shanyue; Qian, Di; Song, Fengqi E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Baigeng E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Han, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Xuefeng

    2013-12-07

    We report room-temperature observations of the quantum conductance corrections caused by the weak localization in graphene films synthesized using solid-state-source chemical vapor deposition. Both Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements showed strong disorder in the samples with a low mobility of ∼430 cm{sup 2}/V s. The emergence of weak localization at room temperature arises from the competition between the valley-dependent scattering and the thermal dephasing in such low-quality samples, although quantum effects normally appear in the samples that have an ideal structure at cryogenic temperatures. The large disorder in our low-mobility samples unexpectedly preserved the quantum mechanical weak localization.

  9. Room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films modulated by cation concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Junxing; Liang, Yan; Li, Wentao; Wang, Weihua; Jin, Kuijuan; Gu, Lin; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-24

    The room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} is promising for oxide electronic devices controlled by multiple fields. An effective way to control the ferroelectricity is highly demanded. Here, we show that the off-centered antisite-like defects in SrTiO{sub 3} films epitaxially grown on Si (001) play the determinative role in the emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity. The density of these defects changes with the film cation concentration sensitively, resulting in a varied coercive field of the ferroelectric behavior. Consequently, the room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films can be effectively modulated by tuning the temperature of metal sources during the molecular beam epitaxy growth. Such an easy and reliable modulation of the ferroelectricity enables the flexible engineering of multifunctional oxide electronic devices.

  10. Fundamental Properties of TBAF Clathrate for Usage as a Latent Heat Storage at a Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takanari; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takao, Shingo; Yabe, Akira

    For promotion of further energy conservation, development of a coolant with a higher heat capacity regulated around a room temperature is strongly required. As a candidate of such a new coolant, we employ the clathrate hydrate, i.e., a mixture of Tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) and water. This clathrate hydrate is composed of the micro crystals with an order of 100 μm in dimension. It retains fluidity and melting point at a room temperature of about 25 °C. Moreover, the melting point is able to be controlled between 25 °C and 0 °C by changing the concentration of TBAF. The temperature can be regulated by its latent heat at the melting point. Characteristics such as the latent heat and the crystal structure of the clathrate have been experimentally obtained to confirm the feasibility for its usage as the latent heat storage around a room temperature.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Room-Temperature Spin Transport in n-Type Germanium Epilayers.

    PubMed

    Dushenko, S; Koike, M; Ando, Y; Shinjo, T; Myronov, M; Shiraishi, M

    2015-05-15

    We report an experimental demonstration of room-temperature spin transport in n-type Ge epilayers grown on a Si(001) substrate. By utilizing spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance, which inherently endows a spin battery function for semiconductors connected with a ferromagnet, a pure spin current is generated in the n-Ge at room temperature. The pure spin current is detected by using the inverse spin-Hall effect of either a Pt or Pd electrode on n-Ge. From a theoretical model that includes a geometrical contribution, the spin diffusion length in n-Ge at room temperature is estimated to be 660 nm. Moreover, the spin relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature, in agreement with a recently proposed theory of donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

  12. Proposal of a general scheme to obtain room-temperature spin polarization in asymmetric antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Wu, Xiaojun; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-09-01

    Exploring magnetic semiconductors is one of the most important questions for spintronic applications. Although various solutions, such as dilute magnetic semiconductors, have been proposed, a practical spintronic device working at room temperature has not been realized. The key to address this issue is to find magnetic materials with both room-temperature magnetic ordering and large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level. Here, we predict a new concept of asymmetric antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (AAFMSs) with both features. The high temperature magnetic ordering originates from the AFM coupling between different transition metal ions with strong super-exchange interaction, whereas the large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level owes to d orbital mismatch among these ions. Through first-principles calculations, a family of double perovskites A2Cr M O6 (A =Ca ,Sr ,Ba , and M =Ru ,Os ) are predicted to be AAFMSs. This paper provides a way for developing spintronic devices working at room temperature.

  13. Experimental Demonstration of Room-Temperature Spin Transport in n -Type Germanium Epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushenko, S.; Koike, M.; Ando, Y.; Shinjo, T.; Myronov, M.; Shiraishi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of room-temperature spin transport in n -type Ge epilayers grown on a Si(001) substrate. By utilizing spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance, which inherently endows a spin battery function for semiconductors connected with a ferromagnet, a pure spin current is generated in the n -Ge at room temperature. The pure spin current is detected by using the inverse spin-Hall effect of either a Pt or Pd electrode on n -Ge . From a theoretical model that includes a geometrical contribution, the spin diffusion length in n -Ge at room temperature is estimated to be 660 nm. Moreover, the spin relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature, in agreement with a recently proposed theory of donor-driven spin relaxation in multivalley semiconductors.

  14. Designing room-temperature multiferroic materials in a single-phase solid-solution film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. J.; Song, C.; Cui, B.; Peng, J. J.; Li, F.; Xiao, L. R.; Pan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The search for multiferroic materials with simultaneous ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in a single phase at room temperature continues to be fuelled from the perspective of developing multifunctional devices. Here we design a single-phase multiferroic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-BaTiO3 film, which possesses epitaxial single-crystal and solid-solution structure, high magnetic Curie temperature (~640 K) as well as switchable ferroelectric polarization. Moreover, a notable strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature in the way of modulating the magnetism with an external applied voltage is also observed. The synthetic solid-solution multiferroic film may open an extraordinary avenue for exploring a series of room-temperature multiferroic materials.

  15. Subtle variation in ambient room temperature influences the expression of social cognition.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Swartz, Tyler J; Rowell, Lauren N

    2013-10-01

    Social signaling models predict that subtle variation in climatic temperature induces systematic changes in expressed cognition. An experiment showed that perceived room temperature was associated with variability in self-descriptions, social reactions of others, and desiring differing types of social networks. The findings reflect the tendency to inflate capacity demonstrations in warmer climates as a result of the social networking opportunities they enable.

  16. Mn,Cd-metallothionein-2: a room temperature magnetic protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lee, Shang-Fan; Sun, Kein-Wen; Ho, Chien-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Hung; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2006-02-24

    Naturally occurring metallothionein (MT) is a metal binding protein, which binds to seven Zn2+ through 20 conserved cysteines and forms two metal binding clusters with a Zinc-Blende structure. We demonstrate that the MT, when substituting the Zn2+ ions by Mn2+ and Cd2+, exhibits magnetic hysteresis loop observable by SQUID from 10 to 330 K. The magnetic moment may have originated from the bridging effect of the sulfur atoms between the metal ions that leads to the alignment of the electron spins of the Mn2+ ions inside the clusters. The protein backbone may restrain the net spin moment of Mn2+ ions from thermal fluctuation. The modified magnetic-metallothionein is a novel approach to creating molecular magnets with operating temperatures up to 330 K. PMID:16403435

  17. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  18. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Revin, D. G. Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  19. Geopolymer - room-temperature ceramic matrix for composites

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J.; Davidovics, M.

    1988-08-01

    The semiamorphous three-dimensional networks of polymeric Na, K, Li, and Mg aluminosilicates of both poly(sialate) and poly(sialate-siloxo) type, collectively known as geopolymers, harden at 20-120 C and are similar to thermoset resins, but are stable at up to 1200-1400 C without shrinkage. A wide variety of alkaline-resistant inorganic reinforcements, notably SiC fibers, have been combined with geopolymer matrices to yield nonburning, nonsmoking high-temperature composites. An SiC fiber-reinforced K-poly(sialate-siloxo) matrix, shaped and hardened at 70 C for 1.5 hr, develops flexural mean strengths of the order of 380 MPa that are retained after firing at up to 900 C. 16 references.

  20. Effects of reduced nocturnal temperature on pig performance and energy consumption in swine nursery rooms.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L J; Brumm, M C; Moeller, S J; Pohl, S; Shannon, M C; Thaler, R C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of a reduced nocturnal temperature (RNT) regimen on performance of weaned pigs and energy consumption during the nursery phase of production. The age of weaned pigs assigned to experiments ranged from 16 to 22 d. In Exp. 1, 3 stations conducted 2 trials under a common protocol that provided data from 6 control rooms (CON; 820 pigs) and 6 RNT rooms (818 pigs). Two mirror-image nursery rooms were used at each station. Temperature in the CON room was set to 30°C for the first 7 d, then reduced by 2°C per week through the remainder of the experiment. Room temperature settings were held constant throughout the day and night. The temperature setting in the RNT room was the same as CON during the first 7 d, but beginning on the night of d 7, the room temperature setting was reduced 6°C from the daytime temperature from 1900 to 0700 h. The use of heating fuel and electricity were measured weekly in each room. Overall, ADG (0.43 kg), ADFI (0.62 kg), and G:F (0.69) were identical for CON and RNT rooms. Consumption of heating fuel [9,658 vs. 7,958 British thermal units (Btu)·pig(-1)·d(-1)] and electricity (0.138 vs. 0.125 kilowatt-hour (kWh)·pig(-1)·d(-1)] were not statistically different for CON and RNT rooms, respectively. In Exp. 2, 4 stations conducted at least 2 trials that provided data from 9 CON rooms (2,122 pigs) and 10 RNT rooms (2,176 pigs). Experimental treatments and protocols were the same as Exp. 1, except that the RNT regimen was imposed on the night of d 5 and the targeted nighttime temperature reduction was 8.3°C. Neither final pig BW (21.8 vs. 21.5 kg; SE = 0.64), ADG (0.45 vs. 0.44 kg; SE = 0.016), ADFI (0.61 vs. 0.60 kg; SE = 0.019), nor G:F (0.75 vs. 0.75; SE = 0.012) were different for pigs housed in CON or RNT rooms, respectively. Consumption of heating fuel and electricity was consistently reduced in RNT rooms for all 4 stations. Consumption of heating fuel (10,019 vs. 7,061 Btu

  1. High-sensitivity two-terminal magnetoresistance devices using InGaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional channel on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di-Cheng; Pan, You-Wei; Wu, Jenq-Shinn; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the two-terminal magnetic sensors exhibiting an extraordinary magneto-resistance effect by using an InGaAs quantum well channel with a metal-shunting structure. A high magneto-resistance of 17.3% and a sensitivity of 488.1 Ω/T have been obtained at 1 T and room temperature with our geometrical design. The two-contact configuration and the high-mobility electron transistor-compatible epitaxy structure make the devices promising for high-sensitivity magnetic sensing integration and applications.

  2. Enhancement and sign inversion of junction magnetoresistance on Mn substitution in magnetite/p-Si heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aireddy, H.; Das, Amal K.

    2016-10-01

    Fe3-x Mn x O4/p-Si heterostructures (x  =  0, 0.25, and 0.5) were prepared using pulse laser deposition to explore their magneto-electric transport characteristics. All the heterostructures exhibit a rectifying property and junction magnetoresistance of 90% (x  =  0), 117% (x  =  0.25) and 120% (x  =  0.5) at room temperature (300 K), low bias voltage (0 to  -4 V) and low magnetic field (<1 T). Significantly, the sign (positive or negative) of junction magnetoresistance depends on the range of bias voltage for all heterostructures, but for a particular range of voltage, the sign inversion (positive to negative and vice versa) of junction magnetoresistance is observed in the heterostructure of Mn substituted Fe3O4 (Fe3-x Mn x O4) compared to the virgin (Fe3O4) one. The enhancement of junction magnetoresistance and its sign inversion upon Mn substitution in Fe3O4 are assigned to the enhancement of magnetization and the spin filtering at the junction of the heterostructures. The electronic band structure of the Fe3O4/SiO2/p-Si heterostructure and the p-type degenerate semiconducting feature of Mn-substituted Fe3-x Mn x O4 films are considered to explain the results.

  3. A moment model for phonon transport at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Struchtrup, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Heat transfer in solids is modeled by deriving the macroscopic equations for phonon transport from the phonon-Boltzmann equation. In these equations, the Callaway model with frequency-dependent relaxation time is considered to describe the Resistive and Normal processes in the phonon interactions. Also, the Brillouin zone is considered to be a sphere, and its diameter depends on the temperature of the system. A simple model to describe phonon interaction with crystal boundary is employed to obtain macroscopic boundary conditions, where the reflection kernel is the superposition of diffusive reflection, specular reflection and isotropic scattering. Macroscopic moments are defined using a polynomial of the frequency and wave vector of phonons. As an example, a system of moment equations, consisting of three directional and seven frequency moments, i.e., 63 moments in total, is used to study one-dimensional heat transfer, as well as Poiseuille flow of phonons. Our results show the importance of frequency dependency in relaxation times and macroscopic moments to predict rarefaction effects. Good agreement with data reported in the literature is obtained.

  4. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-Ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the `frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr.cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region.

  5. Room temperature aluminum antimonide radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Aberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Coombs, III, Arthur W; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2015-03-03

    In one embodiment, a method for producing a high-purity single crystal of aluminum antimonide (AlSb) includes providing a growing environment with which to grow a crystal, growing a single crystal of AlSb in the growing environment which comprises hydrogen (H.sub.2) gas to reduce oxide formation and subsequent incorporation of oxygen impurities in the crystal, and adding a controlled amount of at least one impurity to the growing environment to effectively incorporate at least one dopant into the crystal. In another embodiment, a high energy radiation detector includes a single high-purity crystal of AlSb, a supporting structure for the crystal, and logic for interpreting signals obtained from the crystal which is operable as a radiation detector at a temperature of about 25.degree. C. In one embodiment, a high-purity single crystal of AlSb includes AlSb and at least one dopant selected from a group consisting of selenium (Se), tellurium (Te), and tin (Sn).

  6. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the ‘frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  7. Performance evaluation of ZnO–CuO hetero junction solid state room temperature ethanol sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ming-Ru; Suyambrakasam, Gobalakrishnan; Wu, Ren-Jang; Chavali, Murthy

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Sensor response (resistance) curves of time were changed from 150 ppm to 250 ppm alcohol concentration of ZnO–CuO 1:1. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The sensing material ZnO–CuO is a high potential alcohol sensor which provides a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature. Highlights: ► The main advantages of the ethanol sensor are as followings. ► Novel materials ZnO–CuO ethanol sensor. ► The optimized ZnO–CuO hetero contact system. ► A good sensor response and room working temperature (save energy). -- Abstract: A semiconductor ethanol sensor was developed using ZnO–CuO and its performance was evaluated at room temperature. Hetero-junction sensor was made of ZnO–CuO nanoparticles for sensing alcohol at room temperature. Nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method and optimized with different weight ratios. Sensor characteristics were linear for the concentration range of 150–250 ppm. Composite materials of ZnO–CuO were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). ZnO–CuO (1:1) material showed maximum sensor response (S = R{sub air}/R{sub alcohol}) of 3.32 ± 0.1 toward 200 ppm of alcohol vapor at room temperature. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The linearity R{sup 2} of the sensor response was 0.9026. The sensing materials ZnO–CuO (1:1) provide a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature.

  8. Magnetoresistance from quantum interference effects in ferromagnets

    PubMed

    Manyala; Sidis; DiTusa; Aeppli; Young; Fisk

    2000-04-01

    The desire to maximize the sensitivity of read/write heads (and thus the information density) of magnetic storage devices has stimulated interest in the discovery and design of new magnetic materials exhibiting magnetoresistance. Recent discoveries include the 'colossal' magnetoresistance in the manganites and the enhanced magnetoresistance in low-carrier-density ferromagnets. An important feature of these systems is that the electrons involved in electrical conduction are different from those responsible for the magnetism. The latter are localized and act as scattering sites for the mobile electrons, and it is the field tuning of the scattering strength that ultimately gives rise to the observed magnetoresistance. Here we argue that magnetoresistance can arise by a different mechanism in certain ferromagnets--quantum interference effects rather than simple scattering. The ferromagnets in question are disordered, low-carrier-density magnets where the same electrons are responsible for both the magnetic properties and electrical conduction. The resulting magnetoresistance is positive (that is, the resistance increases in response to an applied magnetic field) and only weakly temperature-dependent below the Curie point.

  9. Giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses in insulating nanogranular films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    The electric and magnetic properties of matter are of great interest for materials science and their use in electronic applications. Large dielectric and magnetoelectric responses of materials at room temperature are a great advantage for electromagnetic device applications. Here we present a study of FeCo-MgF nanogranular films exhibiting giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses at room temperature; with dielectric constant ε′=490 and magnetoelectric response Δε′/ε′0=3%. In these films, Fe-Co alloy-based nanometer-sized magnetic granules are dispersed in a Mg-fluoride-based insulator matrix. Insulating nanogranular films are a new class of multifunctional materials. The giant responses are caused by spin-dependent charge oscillation between magnetic granules via quantum-mechanical tunnelling. A possible application of such insulating nanogranular materials with giant response is in the construction of a tunable device, in which impedance components such as capacitance and inductance are tunable at room temperature. PMID:25048805

  10. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  11. Room temperature optical and magnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone capped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chakrabarti, Keka R.; Sanyal, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2009-09-15

    Defect induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped nanocrystalline ZnO samples have been studied. Crystal phase and the lattice parameter of the synthesized nanocrystalline samples have been determined from X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron micrographs (HR-TEM). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum for the bare ZnO sample shows a strong band at {approx} 379 nm and another band at {approx} 525 nm. The PL spectra also revealed that the number of oxygen vacancies in the uncapped sample is more than the PVP capped sample. Both sample exhibit ferromagnetic property at room temperature when annealed at 500 deg. C for 3 h, due to the formation of adequate oxygen vacancy related defects. The saturation magnetization for the annealed PVP capped sample is found to be larger compared to that for the uncapped sample.

  12. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal; Song, Qunliang

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150 mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  13. Ultrafast room temperature single-photon source from nanowire-quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bounouar, S; Elouneg-Jamroz, M; Hertog, M den; Morchutt, C; Bellet-Amalric, E; André, R; Bougerol, C; Genuist, Y; Poizat, J-Ph; Tatarenko, S; Kheng, K

    2012-06-13

    Epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots are particularly promising as realistic single-photon sources for their compatibility with manufacturing techniques and possibility to be implemented in compact devices. Here, we demonstrate for the first time single-photon emission up to room temperature from an epitaxial quantum dot inserted in a nanowire, namely a CdSe slice in a ZnSe nanowire. The exciton and biexciton lines can still be resolved at room temperature and the biexciton turns out to be the most appropriate transition for single-photon emission due to a large nonradiative decay of the bright exciton to dark exciton states. With an intrinsically short radiative decay time (≈300 ps) this system is the fastest room temperature single-photon emitter, allowing potentially gigahertz repetition rates.

  14. Ferromagnetism at room temperature in Cr-doped anodic titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yulong E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Li, Jie; Yu, Guoliang; Zhong, Zhiyong; Bai, Feiming; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Shihong; Zhong, Peng

    2014-05-07

    This study reports the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) synthesized via the electrochemical method followed by a novel Cr-doping process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the TiO{sub 2} NTs were highly ordered with length up to 26 μm, outer diameter about 110 nm, and inner diameter about 100 nm. X-ray diffraction results indicated there were no magnetic contaminations of metallic Cr clusters or any other phases except anatase TiO{sub 2}. The Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} NTs were further annealed in oxygen, air and argon, and room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed in all Cr-doped samples. Moreover, saturation magnetizations and coercivities of the Cr-doped under various annealing atmosphere were further analyzed, and results indicate that oxygen content played a critical role in the room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  15. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  16. Quality of red blood cells isolated from umbilical cord blood stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  17. Magnetic switching of ferroelectric domains at room temperature in multiferroic PZTFT

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D.M.; Schilling, A.; Kumar, Ashok; Sanchez, D.; Ortega, N.; Arredondo, M.; Katiyar, R.S.; Gregg, J.M.; Scott, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-phase magnetoelectric multiferroics are ferroelectric materials that display some form of magnetism. In addition, magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters are not independent of one another. Thus, the application of either an electric or magnetic field simultaneously alters both the electrical dipole configuration and the magnetic state of the material. The technological possibilities that could arise from magnetoelectric multiferroics are considerable and a range of functional devices has already been envisioned. Realising these devices, however, requires coupling effects to be significant and to occur at room temperature. Although such characteristics can be created in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites, to date they have only been weakly evident in single-phase multiferroics. Here in a newly discovered room temperature multiferroic, we demonstrate significant room temperature coupling by monitoring changes in ferroelectric domain patterns induced by magnetic fields. An order of magnitude estimate of the effective coupling coefficient suggests a value of ~1 × 10−7 sm−1. PMID:23443562

  18. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in TiO2 Nanocrystals Synthesized by the Controlled Hydrolysis Procedure.

    PubMed

    Gu, Deen; Sun, Zhanhong; Zhou, Lv; Hu, Yongda; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 nanocrystals were prepared by a controlled hydrolysis procedure at room temperature. The effect of V-doping, N-doping and V/N codoping on the lattice parameters and magnetic properties of TiO2 nanocrystals was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibration sample magnetometry. Doping performed at room temperature causes the expansion of lattice parameters. Undoped and doped TiO2 nanocrystals show room-temperature ferromagnetism. A monotonic correlation between saturation magnetization and the ratio of the lattice parameter c to a (c/a) was observed. Saturation magnetization of TiO2 nanocrystals increases with the value of c/a.

  19. Stage for texture measurements above room temperature in a Philips X'Pert Pro MPD diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrero, Cesar E.; Castellani, Daniel; Bolmaro, Raul E.; Malarria, Jorge A.

    2009-11-15

    A special stage for texture measurements above room temperature was designed with the proper size and weight to be fitted onto the Eulerean cradle of the Philips X'Pert Pro MPD diffractometer. With such device, flat samples of 2x2 cm{sup 2} area can be analyzed at a nearly constant temperature with variations below {+-}4 deg. C in the range between ambient temperature and 200 deg. C.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)-Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS-Ag-CFAS-IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  1. Assessment of DNA Encapsulation, a New Room-Temperature DNA Storage Method

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells®). Samples were stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells® are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells® for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  2. Magnetoresistance in magnetic and nonmagnetic rare earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, E.; Maikis, M.; Bauer, E.; Nowotny, H.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance Δρ/ ρ of selected magnetic and nonmagnetic RE compounds in fields up to 10 T has been measured. The discussion of the positive magnetoresistance is based on Kohler's rule. It was found that deviations from Kohler's rule at low temperatures depend on the magnitude of the individual residual resistivity. Ferromagnetic compounds exhibit negative values and a minimum in the vicinity of the Curie temperature in accordance to a model calculation of Yamada and Takada. The positive Δρ/ ρ contribution in the low temperature region, observed in all magnetic compounds, is due to the dominating classical magnetoresistance in this temperature range.

  3. Room-temperature wafer scale bonding using smoothed Au seal ring surfaces for hermetic sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Yuichi; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated room-temperature bonding characteristics of electroplated Au surfaces smoothed by the lift-off and imprint methods. As a result, we found that smoothed surfaces enable strong bonding; on the other hand, electroplated rough surfaces result in very weak bonding. In transmission electron microscopy observations, no delamination was observed at the bonding interface bonded at room temperature using a smooth surface prepared by the lift-off method. Moreover, the hermeticity of the bonding interface prepared using smoothed surfaces was evaluated using diaphragm structures. As a result, we confirmed that good hermetic sealing was achieved using the electroplated Au surface smoothed by the lift-off method.

  4. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing.

  5. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    2011-08-12

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

  6. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes sensor for organic liquid detection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as room temperature chemical sensor for the detection of organic liquids such as ethanol, propanol, methanol and toluene. MWCNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. The interdigitated electrodes were fabricated by conventional photolithography technique. The sensor was fabricated by drop depositing MWCNT suspension onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensing properties of MWCNTs sensor was studied for organic liquids detection. The resistance of sensor was found to increase upon exposure to these liquids. Sensor shows good reversibility and fast response at room temperature. Charge transfer between the organic liquid and sensing element is the dominant sensing mechanism.

  7. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  8. Some problems on rf breakdown in room temperature accelerator structure, a possible criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    The discussion is confined to high gradient, room-temperature accelerators which have clean well-finished cavity surfaces and good vacuum conditions. Breakdown-initiating mechanisms due to ''cold'' field electron emission occurring at isolated sites on broad-area cavity surfaces, where the field is enhanced, are described. The influences of an alternating field and transition time tunneling are taken into account. The thermal instability resulting in vacuum voltage breakdown is hypothesized to derive a new criterion for room-temperature accelerator structure. 18 refs., 5 figs. (DWL)

  9. A 2.5-2.7 THz Room Temperature Electronic Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Mehdi, Imran; Lin, Robert; Siles, Jose Vicente; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Bertrand, Thomas; Ward, John

    2011-01-01

    We report on a room temperature 2.5 to 2.7 THz electronic source based on frequency multipliers. The source utilizes a cascade of three frequency multipliers with W-band power amplifiers driving the first stage multiplier. Multiple-chip multipliers are utilized for the two initial stages to improve the power handling capability and a sub-micron anode is utilized for the final stage tripler. Room temperature measurements indicate that the source can put out a peak power of about 14 microwatts with more than 4 microwatts in the 2.5 to 2.7 THz range.

  10. Photoexcited Individual Nanowires: Key Elements in Room Temperature Detection of Oxidizing Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Prades, J. D.; Jimenez-Diaz, R.; Manzanares, M.; Andreu, T.; Cirera, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J. R.

    2009-05-23

    Illuminating metal oxide semiconductors with ultra-violet light is a feasible alternative to activate chemical reactions at their surface and thus, using them as gas sensors without the necessity of heating them. Here, the response at room temperature of individual single-crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanowires towards NO{sub 2} is studied in detail. The results reveal that similar responses to those obtained with thermally activated sensors can be achieved by choosing the optimal illumination conditions. This finding paves the way to the development of conductometric gas sensors operated at room temperature. The power consumption in these devices is in range with conventional micromachined sensors.

  11. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

  12. Exploiting fast detectors to enter a new dimension in room-temperature crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robin L. Paterson, Neil; Axford, Danny; Aishima, Jun; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2014-05-01

    A departure from a linear or an exponential decay in the diffracting power of macromolecular crystals is observed and accounted for through consideration of a multi-state sequential model. A departure from a linear or an exponential intensity decay in the diffracting power of protein crystals as a function of absorbed dose is reported. The observation of a lag phase raises the possibility of collecting significantly more data from crystals held at room temperature before an intolerable intensity decay is reached. A simple model accounting for the form of the intensity decay is reintroduced and is applied for the first time to high frame-rate room-temperature data collection.

  13. High room temperature optical polarization due to spin-valley coupling in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. S.; Friedman, A. L.; Jonker, B. T.

    2016-05-01

    We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral exciton or the negatively charged trion. While the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization at room temperature, we observe a room temperature optical polarization in excess of 40% for the trion. Using an applied gate voltage, we can modulate the electron density, and subsequently the polarization of the trion emission continuously from 20-40%. Both the polarization and the emission energy monotonically track the gate voltage with the emission energy increasing by 45 meV. We discuss the role electron capture by the exciton has on suppressing the intervalley scattering process.

  14. Efficient, resonantly pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Ter-Gabrielyan, N; Fromzel, V; Ryba-Romanowski, W; Lukasiewicz, T; Dubinskii, M

    2012-04-01

    We report an efficient room-temperature operation of a resonantly pumped Er3+:GdVO4 laser at 1598.5 nm. The maximum continuous wave (CW) output power of 3.5 W with slope efficiency of 56% was achieved with resonant pumping by an Er-fiber laser at 1538.6 nm. With pumping by a commercial laser diode bar stack, a quasi-CW (QCW) output of 7.7 W and maximum slope efficiency of ~53% versus absorbed pump power were obtained. This is believed to be the first resonantly (in-band) pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

  15. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Miyokawa, Norihiko; Ide, Keisuke; Toda, Yoshitake; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  16. Metal-Based Room-Temperature Operating Single Electron Devices Using Scanning Probe Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Gotoh, Yoshitaka; TatsuroMaeda, TatsuroMaeda; Dagata, John; Harris, JamesS.

    1999-01-01

    Coulomb oscillation was clearly observed at room temperature in the singleelectron transistor fabricated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nano-oxidationprocess. In order to obtain a clear Coulomb oscillation at room temperature, newand improved fabrication processes and measurement systems such as a pulse-modeAFM nano-oxidation process and a triaxial active feedback measurement system areintroduced. The Coulomb oscillation peaks appear with the period of 1.9 V at thedrain bias conditions of 0.25 V and 0.3 V. The current modulation rate ranges from20% to 30%.

  17. Single Event Effects on Space Radiation Hardened 64K SRAMS at Room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, O.; Schwartz, H.; McCarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser threshold linear Energy transfer for single event upsetscan be estimaed, even at room temperature, for space radiation hardened 64K SRAMs. The memories where independently developed to quality for the Qualified Manufacturer's List by IBM and Honeywell. The memory was so hard that high energy heavy ions generated by the Van de Graff could not determine the SEU threshold at room temperature. Use of pulsed Laser tests would meake it possible to forgo very expensive testing at ultra-high energy accelerators.

  18. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  19. Room Temperature Semiconductor-Metal Transition of MoTe2 Thin Films Engineered by Strain.

    PubMed

    Song, Seunghyun; Keum, Dong Hoon; Cho, Suyeon; Perello, David; Kim, Yunseok; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a room temperature semiconductor-metal transition in thin film MoTe2 engineered by strain. Reduction of the 2H-1T' phase transition temperature of MoTe2 to room temperature was realized by introducing a tensile strain of 0.2%. The observed first-order SM transition improved conductance ∼10 000 times and was made possible by an unusually large temperature-stress coefficient, which results from a large volume change and small latent heat. The demonstrated strain-modulation of the phase transition temperature is expected to be compatible with other TMDs enabling the 2D electronics utilizing polymorphism of TMDs along with the established materials. PMID:26713902

  20. Enhanced performance of room-temperature-grown epitaxial thin films of vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Joyeeta; Payzant, E Andrew; More, Karren Leslie; HaglundJr., Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometric vanadium dioxide in bulk, thin film and nanostructured forms exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) accompanied by a structural phase transformation, induced by temperature, light, electric fields, doping or strain. We have grown epitaxial films of vanadium dioxide on c-plane (0001) of sapphire using two different procedures involving (1) room temperature growth followed by annealing and (2) direct high temperature growth. Strain at the film-substrate interface due to growth at different temperatures leads to interesting differences in morphologies and phase transition characteristics. Comparison of the morphologies and switching characteristics of the two films shows that contrary to conventional wisdom, the room-temperature grown films have smoother, more continuous morphologies and better switching performance, consistent with the behavior of epitaxially grown semiconductors.

  1. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ~4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals--dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices.

  2. Self-generated Local Heating Induced Nanojoining for Room Temperature Pressureless Flexible Electronic Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Hu, Anming; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Liu, Yangai; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bonding at an interface is determined by the application of heat and/or pressure. The means by which these are applied are the most critical for joining nanoscale structures. The present study considers the feasibility of room-temperature pressureless joining of copper wires using water-based silver nanowire paste. A novel mechanism of self-generated local heating within the silver nanowire paste and copper substrate system promotes the joining of silver-to-silver and silver-to-copper without any external energy input. The localized heat energy was delivered in-situ to the interfaces to promote atomic diffusion and metallic bond formation with the bulk component temperature stays near room-temperature. This local heating effect has been detected experimentally and confirmed by calculation. The joints formed at room-temperature without pressure achieve a tensile strength of 5.7 MPa and exhibit ultra-low resistivity in the range of 101.3 nOhm·m. The good conductivity of the joint is attributed to the removal of organic compounds in the paste and metallic bonding of silver-to-copper and silver-to-silver. The water-based silver nanowire paste filler material is successfully applied to various flexible substrates for room temperature bonding. The use of chemically generated local heating may become a potential method for energy in-situ delivery at micro/nanoscale. PMID:25788019

  3. A simple atmospheric pressure room-temperature air plasma needle device for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Z.; Zhao, F.; Xian, Y.; Xiong, Q.; Gong, W.; Zou, C.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-11-01

    Rather than using noble gas, room air is used as the working gas for an atmospheric pressure room-temperature plasma. The plasma is driven by submicrosecond pulsed directed current voltages. Several current spikes appear periodically for each voltage pulse. The first current spike has a peak value of more than 1.5 A with a pulse width of about 10 ns. Emission spectra show that besides excited OH, O, N2(C-B), and N2+(B-X) emission, excited NO, N2(B-A), H, and even N emission are also observed in the plasma, which indicates that the plasma may be more reactive than that generated by other plasma jet devices. Utilizing the room-temperature plasma, preliminary inactivation experiments show that Enterococcus faecalis can be killed with a treatment time of only several seconds.

  4. Development and Application of Wide Bandwidth Magneto-Resistive Sensor Based Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John

    2010-01-01

    The integration of magneto-resistive sensors into eddy current probes can significantly expand the capabilities of conventional eddy current nondestructive evaluation techniques. The room temperature solid-state sensors have typical bandwidths in the megahertz range and resolutions of tens of microgauss. The low frequency sensitivity of magneto-resistive sensors has been capitalized upon in previous research to fabricate very low frequency eddy current sensors for deep flaw detection in multilayer conductors. In this work a modified probe design is presented to expand the capabilities of the device. The new probe design incorporates a dual induction source enabling operation from low frequency deep flaw detection to high frequency high resolution near surface material characterization. Applications of the probe for the detection of localized near surface conductivity anomalies are presented. Finite element modeling of the probe is shown to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. [DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, H. Jr.; Hupf, H.B.; Wanek, P.M.

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free /sup 125/I/sup -/ is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  6. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-12-06

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T{sub c}, our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from {approx} 3 {micro}B to {approx} 4 {micro}B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale {approx}200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T{sub c}. Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 {angstrom} inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature.

  7. Deterministic switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature using an electric field.

    PubMed

    Heron, J T; Bosse, J L; He, Q; Gao, Y; Trassin, M; Ye, L; Clarkson, J D; Wang, C; Liu, Jian; Salahuddin, S; Ralph, D C; Schlom, D G; Iñiguez, J; Huey, B D; Ramesh, R

    2014-12-18

    The technological appeal of multiferroics is the ability to control magnetism with electric field. For devices to be useful, such control must be achieved at room temperature. The only single-phase multiferroic material exhibiting unambiguous magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature is BiFeO3 (refs 4 and 5). Its weak ferromagnetism arises from the canting of the antiferromagnetically aligned spins by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Prior theory considered the symmetry of the thermodynamic ground state and concluded that direct 180-degree switching of the DM vector by the ferroelectric polarization was forbidden. Instead, we examined the kinetics of the switching process, something not considered previously in theoretical work. Here we show a deterministic reversal of the DM vector and canted moment using an electric field at room temperature. First-principles calculations reveal that the switching kinetics favours a two-step switching process. In each step the DM vector and polarization are coupled and 180-degree deterministic switching of magnetization hence becomes possible, in agreement with experimental observation. We exploit this switching to demonstrate energy-efficient control of a spin-valve device at room temperature. The energy per unit area required is approximately an order of magnitude less than that needed for spin-transfer torque switching. Given that the DM interaction is fundamental to single-phase multiferroics and magnetoelectrics, our results suggest ways to engineer magnetoelectric switching and tailor technologically pertinent functionality for nanometre-scale, low-energy-consumption, non-volatile magnetoelectronics. PMID:25519134

  8. Glycosylation in room temperature ionic liquid using unprotected and unactivated donors.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Joon; Weïwer, Michel; Yuan, Xuejun; Baytas, Sultan N; Munoz, Eva M; Murugesan, Saravanababu; Linhardt, Robert J

    2007-02-26

    Glycosylation in room temperature ionic liquid is demonstrated using unprotected and unactivated donors. Modest yields of simple benzyl glycosides and disaccharides of glucose, mannose and N-acetylgalactosamine were obtained in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium benzoate with Amberlite IR-120 (H(+)) resin or p-toluenesulfonic acid as promoters.

  9. Electrical Resistivity of Natural Diamond and Diamond Films Between Room Temperature and 1200 C: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of diamond films has been measured between room temperature and 1200 C. The films were grown by either microwave Plasma CVD or combustion flame at three different places. The resistivities of the current films are compared to those measured for both natural IIa diamond and films grown only one to two years ago.

  10. High resolution InSb quantum well ballistic nanosensors for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Adam; Cohen, L. F.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-12-04

    We report the room temperature operation of a quasi-ballistic InSb quantum well Hall sensor that exhibits a high frequency sensitivity of 560nT/√Hz at 20uA bias current. The device utilizes a partitioned buffer layer design that suppresses leakage currents through the mesa floor and can sustain large current densities.

  11. Room-Temperature Gold-Catalysed Arylation of Heteroarenes: Complementarity to Palladium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Alexander J; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-08-26

    Tailoring of the pre-catalyst, the oxidant and the arylsilane enables the first room-temperature, gold-catalysed, innate C-H arylation of heteroarenes. Regioselectivity is consistently high and, in some cases, distinct from that reported with palladium catalysis. Tolerance to halides and boronic esters, in both the heteroarene and silane partners, provides orthogonality to Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. PMID:27325239

  12. GREEN SYNTHESIS OF SILVER AND PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES AT ROOM TEMPERATURE USING COFFEE AND TEA EXTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extremely simple green approach that generates bulk quantities of nanocrystals of noble metals such as silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) using coffee and tea extract at room temperature is described. The single-pot method uses no surfactant, capping agent, and/or template. The ob...

  13. Room temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO using non-magnetic dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Atri, Asha; Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic properties of Ag and Cu doped ZnO thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in the films. Comparative to Cu doped films Ag doped films shows significant increase in ferromagnetism. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies are also done to see the change in band structure with different metal doping content.

  14. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection.

  15. A Knoevenagel Initiated Annulation Reaction Using Room Temperature or Microwave Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is presented that has the student execute a Knoevenagel initiated annulation reaction. The reaction can be carried out either through use of a microwave reactor or by allowing the mixture to stand at room temperature for two days. The student is then challenged to identify the reaction product through a guided prelab exercise of the…

  16. Copper-catalyzed Chan-Lam coupling between sulfonyl azides and boronic acids at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo-Yeon; Nam, Jungsoo; Rathwell, Kris; Kim, Won-Suk

    2014-01-17

    A mild and efficient method for the synthesis of N-arylsulfonamides in the presence of 10 mol % of CuCl is demonstrated. The reaction proceeds readily at room temperature in an open flask using a variety of sulfonyl azides and boronic acids without any base, ligand, or additive.

  17. Stereoretentive Pd-Catalyzed Kumada–Corriu Couplings of Alkenyl Halides at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Stereoselective palladium-catalyzed Kumada–Corriu reactions of functionalized alkenyl halides and a variety of Grignard reagents, including those bearing β-hydrogen atoms and sensitive functional groups, can be carried out at room temperature using a new combination of reagents. PMID:25102436

  18. Analysis of coal-derived products and environmental systems by synchronous fluorescence and room temperature phosphorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Gammage, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Two simple room temperature techniques, synchronous fluorescence and phosphorescence, were utilized to determine the polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds in various complex systems including synthetic multicomponent mixtures and real-life samples such as workplace air particulate extracts and coal-derived samples. The results demonstrate that as many as a dozen PNA compounds can be identified and quantified by these two analytical methods.

  19. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Conditions B Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test...

  20. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Conditions B Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test...

  1. Homogeneous linewidths of Rhodamine 6G at room temperature from cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Arnold, S.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1992-11-15

    Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G in levitated micron-sized droplets have been measured using a time-correlated photon counting technique. The coupling of emission into spherical cavity modes of the droplet results in significant emission rate enhancements which allow estimation of the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature.

  2. Room-temperature ferroelectricity in hexagonal TbMnO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Jik; Paudel, Tula R; Lu, Haidong; Burton, John D; Connell, John G; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Ambrose Seo, S S; Gruverman, Alexei

    2014-12-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy imaging in conjunction with first-principles calculations provide strong evidence for room-temperature ferroelectricity in epitaxially stabilized hexagonal TbMnO3 thin films, which in the bulk form are with orthorhombic structure. The obtained results demonstrate that new phases and functional properties of complex oxide materials can be strain-engineered using epitaxial growth. PMID:25327617

  3. Room-temperature broadband emission of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots laser.

    PubMed

    Djie, H S; Ooi, B S; Fang, X-M; Wu, Y; Fastenau, J M; Liu, W K; Hopkinson, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the first demonstration to our knowledge of an ultrabroad emission laser using InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots by cycled monolayer deposition. The device exhibits a lasing wavelength coverage of approximately 40 nm at an approximately 1160 nm center wavelength at room temperature. The broadband signature results from the superposition of quantized lasing states from highly inhomogeneous dots.

  4. Adhesive for polyester films cures at room temperature, has high initial tack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, C. M.; Fust, G. W.; Welchel, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Quick room-temperature-cure adhesive bonds polyester-insulated flat electrical cables to metal surfaces and various other substrates. The bond strength of the adhesive may be considerably increased by first applying a commercially available polyamide primer to the polyester film.

  5. Copper-catalyzed Chan-Lam coupling between sulfonyl azides and boronic acids at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo-Yeon; Nam, Jungsoo; Rathwell, Kris; Kim, Won-Suk

    2014-01-17

    A mild and efficient method for the synthesis of N-arylsulfonamides in the presence of 10 mol % of CuCl is demonstrated. The reaction proceeds readily at room temperature in an open flask using a variety of sulfonyl azides and boronic acids without any base, ligand, or additive. PMID:24404934

  6. Stereoretentive Pd-catalyzed Kumada-Corriu couplings of alkenyl halides at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Krasovskiy, Arkady L; Haley, Stephen; Voigtritter, Karl; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2014-08-15

    Stereoselective palladium-catalyzed Kumada-Corriu reactions of functionalized alkenyl halides and a variety of Grignard reagents, including those bearing β-hydrogen atoms and sensitive functional groups, can be carried out at room temperature using a new combination of reagents. PMID:25102436

  7. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  8. Crystal induced phosphorescence from Benz(a)anthracene microcrystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Samir; Mazumdar, Prativa; Shyamal, Milan; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Misra, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Pure organic compounds that are also phosphorescent at room temperature are very rare in literature. Here, we report efficient phosphorescence emission from aggregated hydrosol of Benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at room temperature. Aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been synthesized by re-precipitation method and SDS is used as morphology directing agent. Morphology of the particles is characterized using optical and scanning electronic microcopy (SEM). Photophysical properties of the aggregated hydrosol are carried out using UV-vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence study. The large stoke shifted structured emission from aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been explained due to phosphorescence emission of BaA at room temperature. In the crystalline state, the restricted intermolecular motions (RIM) such as rotations and vibrations are activated by crystal lattice. This rigidification effect makes the chromophore phosphorescent at room temperature. The possible stacking arrangement of the neighboring BaA within the aggregates has been substantiated by computing second order Fukui parameter as local reactivity descriptors. Computational study also reveals that the neighboring BaA molecules are present in parallel slipped conformation in its aggregated crystalline form.

  9. LDA-Mediated Synthesis of Triarylmethanes by Arylation of Diarylmethanes with Fluoroarenes at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinfei; Huang, Tao; Wu, Wei; Liang, Fang; Cao, Song

    2015-10-16

    A practical and convenient approach for the secondary C(sp(3))-H arylation of diarylmethanes with various fluoroarenes is described. The reaction proceeds smoothly in the presence of LDA (lithium diisopropylamide) at room temperature and affords triarylmethanes in moderate to high yields.

  10. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection. PMID:26542882

  11. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  12. Mechanochemical synthesis of maghemite/silica nanocomposites: advanced materials for aqueous room-temperature catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Manuel; Pineda, Antonio; Romero, Antonio A; Barrón, Vidal; Luque, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, and highly reproducible protocol has been developed for the mechanochemical preparation of advanced nanocatalytic materials in a one-pot process. The materials proved to have unprecedented activities in aqueous Suzuki couplings at room temperature, paving the way for a new generation of highly active and stable advanced nanocatalysts.

  13. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  14. Room-Temperature Palladium-Catalyzed Direct 2-Arylation of Benzoxazoles with Aryl and Heteroaryl Bromides†

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Byeong-Seon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    An efficient room-temperature palladium-catalyzed direct 2-arylation of benzoxazoles with aryl bromides is presented. The Pd(OAc)2/NiXantphos-based catalyst enables the introduction of various aryl and heteroaryl groups, via a deprotonative cross-coupling process (DCCP) in good to excellent yields (75–99%). PMID:25078988

  15. Room temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Larumbe, S.; Pastor, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism in non-magnetic doped TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles is analyzed in the present work. Undoped and N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained employing sol-gel procedure using urea as the nitrogen source. The obtained gels were first dried at 70 °C and afterwards calcined in air at 300 °C. A residual carbon concentration was retained in the samples as a consequence of the organic decomposition process. Post-annealing treatments at 300 °C under air and vacuum conditions were also performed. The crystallographic structure of nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, obtaining a single anatase crystalline phase after the calcinations (mean nanoparticle diameters around 5-8 nm). SQUID magnetometry was employed to analyze the magnetic response of the samples. Whereas for the undoped samples synthesized with hydrolysis rate h = 6, paramagnetic like behavior is observed at room temperature, the N-doped nanoparticles (h = 3) show a weak ferromagnetic response (saturation magnetization ≈10-3 emu/g). Moreover, a clear reinforcement of the room-temperature ferromagnetism response is found with the post-annealing treatments, in particular that performed in vacuum. Thus, the results indicate the dominant role of the oxygen stoichiometry and the oxygen vacancies in the room temperature ferromagnetic response of these TiO2 nanoparticles.

  16. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  17. Room-Temperature Gold-Catalysed Arylation of Heteroarenes: Complementarity to Palladium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Alexander J; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-08-26

    Tailoring of the pre-catalyst, the oxidant and the arylsilane enables the first room-temperature, gold-catalysed, innate C-H arylation of heteroarenes. Regioselectivity is consistently high and, in some cases, distinct from that reported with palladium catalysis. Tolerance to halides and boronic esters, in both the heteroarene and silane partners, provides orthogonality to Suzuki-Miyaura coupling.

  18. Room-temperature steady-state optomechanical entanglement on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Changling; Zou Xubo; Sun Fangwen; Han Zhengfu; Guo Guangcan

    2011-09-15

    A potential experimental system, based on high-stress stoichiometric silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), is proposed to generate steady-state optomechanical entanglement at room temperature. In the proposed structure, a nanostring interacts dispersively and reactively with a microdisk cavity via the evanescent field. We study the role of both dispersive and reactive couplings in generating optomechanical entanglement, and show that the room-temperature entanglement can be effectively obtained through the dispersive couplings under the reasonable experimental parameters. In particular, in the limits of high temperature (T) and high mechanical quality factor (Q{sub m}), we find that the logarithmic entanglement depends only on the ratio T/Q{sub m}. This indicates that improvements of the material quantity and structure design may lead to more efficient generation of stationary high-temperature entanglement.

  19. Room-temperature magnetism on the zigzag edges of phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Xu, Shenglong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Tianxing; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-01

    Searching for room-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors has evolved into a broad field of material science and spintronics for decades, nevertheless, these novel states remain rare. Phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus with a puckered honeycomb lattice structure possessing a finite band gap and high carrier mobility, has been synthesized recently. Here we show, by means of two different large-scale quantum Monte Carlo methods, that relatively weak interactions can lead to remarkable edge magnetism in the phosphorene nanoribbons. The ground state constrained path quantum Monte Carlo simulations reveal strong ferromagnetic correlations along the zigzag edges, and the finite temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations show a high Curie temperature up to room temperature.

  20. Analysis of a workplace air particulate sample by synchronous luminescence and room-temperature phosphorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Gammage, R.B.; Martinez, P.R.

    1981-02-01

    An analysis of a XAD-2 resin extract of a particulate air sample collected at an industrial environment was conducted by use of two simple spectroscopic methods performed at ambient temperature, the synchronous luminescence and room-temperature phosphorescence techniques. Results of the analysis of 13 polynuclear aromatic compounds including anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, 2,3-benzofluorene, chrysene, 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene, dibenzthiophene, fluoranthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, perylene, pyrene, and tetracene were reported.

  1. Experimental data of the static behavior of reinforced concrete beams at room and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mirzazadeh, M Mehdi; Noël, Martin; Green, Mark F

    2016-06-01

    This article provides data on the static behavior of reinforced concrete at room and low temperature including, strength, ductility, and crack widths of the reinforced concrete. The experimental data on the application of digital image correlation (DIC) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) in measuring crack widths and the accuracy and precision of DIC/PIV method with temperature variations when is used for measuring strains is provided as well.

  2. A high-energy room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sen; Yin, Ya-Xia; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-02-26

    Employing small sulfur molecules as the active cathode component for room-temperature Na-S batteries, reveals a novel mechanism that is verified for the batteries' electrochemistry. The sulfur cathode enables a complete two-electron reaction to form Na2 S, bringing a tripled specific capacity and an increased specific energy compared with traditional high-temperature Na-S batteries. At the same time, it offers better cycling stability endowing the batteries with a longer lifespan.

  3. Experimental data of the static behavior of reinforced concrete beams at room and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Mirzazadeh, M. Mehdi; Noël, Martin; Green, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides data on the static behavior of reinforced concrete at room and low temperature including, strength, ductility, and crack widths of the reinforced concrete. The experimental data on the application of digital image correlation (DIC) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) in measuring crack widths and the accuracy and precision of DIC/PIV method with temperature variations when is used for measuring strains is provided as well. PMID:27158650

  4. Thiazolylimines as novel ligand-systems for spin-crossover centred near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Struch, N; Wagner, N; Schnakenburg, G; Weisbarth, R; Klos, S; Beck, J; Lützen, A

    2016-09-28

    A new thiazolylimine ligand system for iron(ii) complexes which stabilises spin-crossover in solution and solid states with T1/2 temperatures around room temperature has been developed. This effect is studied in solution and solid states. Furthermore crystal packing effects are investigated offering a variety of T1/2 and even hysteresis centred at -3 °C in the solid state. PMID:27534997

  5. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Linlong; Du, Jinglei; Shi, Haofei Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei

    2014-10-15

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  6. Thiazolylimines as novel ligand-systems for spin-crossover centred near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Struch, N; Wagner, N; Schnakenburg, G; Weisbarth, R; Klos, S; Beck, J; Lützen, A

    2016-09-28

    A new thiazolylimine ligand system for iron(ii) complexes which stabilises spin-crossover in solution and solid states with T1/2 temperatures around room temperature has been developed. This effect is studied in solution and solid states. Furthermore crystal packing effects are investigated offering a variety of T1/2 and even hysteresis centred at -3 °C in the solid state.

  7. Experimental data of the static behavior of reinforced concrete beams at room and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mirzazadeh, M Mehdi; Noël, Martin; Green, Mark F

    2016-06-01

    This article provides data on the static behavior of reinforced concrete at room and low temperature including, strength, ductility, and crack widths of the reinforced concrete. The experimental data on the application of digital image correlation (DIC) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) in measuring crack widths and the accuracy and precision of DIC/PIV method with temperature variations when is used for measuring strains is provided as well. PMID:27158650

  8. MICROSPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF CYTOCHROMES IN THE SINGLE CELL AT ROOM AND LIQUID NITROGEN TEMPERATURES

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, B.; Chance, B.; Legallais, V.

    1965-01-01

    By increasing further the sensitivity of microspectrophotometry, it is now possible to measure, under favorable conditions, the smaller absorption bands of the respiratory pigments of single cells in the visible region of the spectrum. A considerable aid in the distinction between cytochromes is afforded by liquid nitrogen microspectrophotometry. Under favorable conditions, the height of the peaks is increased over 8-fold at low temperatures. In diploid yeast, characteristically sharpened components not resolvable at room temperature are observed at low temperature; and in pentaploid yeast, a hitherto unrecognized pigment is observed at 583 mµ. These preliminary results indicate the feasibility and the value of low temperature microspectrophotometry of biological materials. PMID:19866677

  9. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  10. Certification of NIST Room Temperature Low-Energy and High-Energy Charpy Verification Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lucon, Enrico; McCowan, Chris N.; Santoyo, Ray L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for NIST to certify Charpy reference specimens for testing at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) instead of −40 °C was investigated by performing 130 room-temperature tests from five low-energy and four high-energy lots of steel on the three master Charpy machines located in Boulder, CO. The statistical analyses performed show that in most cases the variability of results (i.e., the experimental scatter) is reduced when testing at room temperature. For eight out of the nine lots considered, the observed variability was lower at 21 °C than at −40 °C. The results of this study will allow NIST to satisfy requests for room-temperature Charpy verification specimens that have been received from customers for several years: testing at 21 °C removes from the verification process the operator’s skill in transferring the specimen in a timely fashion from the cooling bath to the impact position, and puts the focus back on the machine performance. For NIST, it also reduces the time and cost for certifying new verification lots. For one of the low-energy lots tested with a C-shaped hammer, we experienced two specimens jamming, which yielded unusually high values of absorbed energy. For both specimens, the signs of jamming were clearly visible. For all the low-energy lots investigated, jamming is slightly more likely to occur at 21 °C than at −40 °C, since at room temperature low-energy samples tend to remain in the test area after impact rather than exiting in the opposite direction of the pendulum swing. In the evaluation of a verification set, any jammed specimen should be removed from the analyses. PMID:26958453

  11. Low and room temperature magnetic features of the traffic related urban airborne PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A.; Sagnotti, L.

    2012-04-01

    We used magnetic measurements and analyses - such as hysteresis loops and FORCs both at room temperature and at 10K, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) vs temperature curves (from 10K to 293K) and IRM vs time decay curves - to characterize the magnetic properties of the traffic related airborne particulate matter (PM) in Rome. This study was specifically addressed to the identification of the ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles, which are particularly sensitive to thermal relaxation effects, and on the eventual detection of low temperature phase transitions which may affect various magnetic minerals. We compared the magnetic properties at 10K and at room temperature of Quercus ilex leaves, disk brakes, diesel and gasoline exhaust pipes powders collected from vehicles circulating in Rome. The magnetic properties of the investigated powders significantly change upon cooling, and no clear phase transition occurs, suggesting that the thermal dependence is mainly triggered by the widespread presence of ultrafine SP particles. The contribution of the SP fraction to the total remanence of traffic related PM samples was quantified at room temperature measuring the decay of a IRM 100 s after the application of a saturation magnetic field. This same method has been also tested at 10K to investigate the temperature dependence of the observed time decay.

  12. Impact of Seasonal Variant Temperatures and Laboratory Room Ambient Temperature on Mortality of Rats with Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishanan, Sivakumar; Babu, Mg. Ramesh; Thangarajan, Rajesh; Punja, Dhiren; Jaganath, Vidyadhara Devarunda; Kanth, Akriti B.; Rao, Mohandas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A popular rat model for hypoperfusion ischemic brain injury is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). BCCAO surgery when performed in varying geographical locations and during different seasons of the year is reported to have variable mortality rates. Studies have also documented the diminishing influence of Ketamine-Xylazine (KT-XY) on thermoregulatory functions in rodents. Aim To explore the impact of seasonal variant temperatures and laboratory room ambient temperatures on mortality of rats following BCCAO surgery. Materials and Methods The study has two parts: 1 The first part is an analysis of a three year retrospective data to explore the association between the geographical season (hot summer and cold winter) induced laboratory room ambient temperature variations and the mortality rate in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO rats. 2. The second part investigated the effect of conditioned laboratory room ambient temperature (CAT) (23-250C) in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO group of rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups(n =8/group) as-Normal control, BCCAO and Sham BCCAO where they were all exposed to unconditioned ambient temperature (UCAT) during their surgery and postoperative care. And finally fourth group rats exposed to CAT during the BCCAO surgery and postoperative care. Results Pearson’s chi-square test indicates a significantly high association (p<0.006) between post-BCCAO mortality and hot season of the year. CAT during the hot season reduced the mortality rate (24% less) in post- BCCAO rats compared to the rats of UCAT. Conclusion Despite seasonal variations in temperature, conditioning the laboratory room ambient temperatures to 23–250C, induces hypothermia in KT-XY anaesthetized ischemic brain injured rodents and improves their survival rate. PMID:27190796

  13. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  14. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  15. Giant electrocaloric effect in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Infante, Ingrid C.; Dkhil, Brahim; Lou, Xiaojie

    2014-02-24

    Room-temperature electrocaloric properties of Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are studied by using a multiscale thermodynamic model. It is found that there is a divergence in the adiabatic temperature change ΔT for the two opposite polarization orientations. This difference under a typical writing voltage of 3 V can reach over 1 K as the barrier thickness decreases. Thanks to the ultrahigh external stimulus, a giant electrocaloric effect (1.53 K/V) with ΔT being over 4.5 K can be achieved at room temperature, which demonstrates the perspective of FTJs as a promising solid-state refrigeration.

  16. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; McKamey, Claudette G.

    1993-01-01

    Iron-aluminum alloys having selectable room-temperature ductilities of greater than 20%, high resistance to oxidation and sulfidation, resistant pitting and corrosion in aqueous solutions, and possessing relatively high yield and ultimate tensile strengths are described. These alloys comprise 8 to 9.5% aluminum, up to 7% chromium, up to 4% molybdenum, up to 0.05% carbon, up to 0.5% of a carbide former such as zirconium, up to 0.1 yttrium, and the balance iron. These alloys in wrought form are annealed at a selected temperature in the range of 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. for providing the alloys with selected room-temperature ductilities in the range of 20 to about 29%.

  17. Optically induced strong intermodal coupling in mechanical resonators at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, R.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hey, R.; Friedland, K. J.

    2015-08-31

    Strong parametric mode coupling in mechanical resonators is demonstrated at room temperature by using the photothermal effect in thin membrane structures. Thanks to the large stress modulation by laser irradiation, the coupling rate of the mechanical modes, defined as half of the mode splitting, reaches 2.94 kHz, which is an order of magnitude larger than electrically induced mode coupling. This large coupling rate exceeds the damping rates of the mechanical resonators and results in the strong coupling regime, which is a signature of coherent mode interaction. Room-temperature coherent mode coupling will enable us to manipulate mechanical motion at practical operation temperatures and provides a wide variety of applications of integrated mechanical systems.

  18. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  19. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  20. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulillo, B.; Manceau, J.-M.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Colombelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2ΩRabi), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  1. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  2. Room temperature continuous wave operation of InAs-based quantum cascade lasers at 15 µm.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Alexei N; Bahriz, Michael; Teissier, Roland

    2016-08-01

    We report low threshold InAs/AlSb quantum cascade lasers emitting near 15 µm. The devices are based on a vertical design similar to those employed previously in far infrared InAs-based QCLs, whereas the doping level of the active core is considerably decreased. The lasers exhibit a threshold current density as low as 730 A/cm2 in pulsed mode at room temperature and can operate in this regime up to 410K. The continuous wave regime of operation has been achieved in these devices at temperatures up to 20°C. The cw regime is demonstrated for InAs-based QCLs for the first time at room temperature.

  3. Exchange bias and room-temperature magnetic order in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Manuel; Ibrahim, Fatima; Boukari, Samy; Isshiki, Hironari; Joly, Loïc; Peter, Moritz; Studniarek, Michał; Da Costa, Victor; Jabbar, Hashim; Davesne, Vincent; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Chen, Jinjie; Arabski, Jacek; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Chen, Kai; Ohresser, Philippe; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Scheurer, Fabrice; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mebarek; Beaurepaire, Eric; Bowen, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Molecular semiconductors may exhibit antiferromagnetic correlations well below room temperature. Although inorganic antiferromagnetic layers may exchange bias single-molecule magnets, the reciprocal effect of an antiferromagnetic molecular layer magnetically pinning an inorganic ferromagnetic layer through exchange bias has so far not been observed. We report on the magnetic interplay, extending beyond the interface, between a cobalt ferromagnetic layer and a paramagnetic organic manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) layer. These ferromagnetic/organic interfaces are called spinterfaces because spin polarization arises on them. The robust magnetism of the Co/MnPc spinterface stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature within subsequent MnPc monolayers away from the interface. The inferred magnetic coupling strength is much larger than that found in similar bulk, thin or ultrathin systems. In addition, at lower temperature, the antiferromagnetic MnPc layer induces an exchange bias on the Co film, which is magnetically pinned. These findings create new routes towards designing organic spintronic devices.

  4. Room temperature preparation of cuprous oxide hollow microspheres by a facile wet-chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; He, Hongcai; Han, Li

    2010-09-01

    Cuprous oxide hollow spheres have potential applications in drug-delivery carriers, biomedical diagnosis agents, and cell imaging. From a commercial point of view, the low-temperature, template-free, facile method is widely popular synthetic method for the synthesis of cuprous oxide hollow spheres. In this letter, we describe a novel facile template-free wet-chemical route to prepare crystallized cuprous oxide microspheres at room temperature. XRD patterns and SEM images revealed that pure crystallized cuprous oxide hollow microspheres were successfully obtained at room temperature. The diameter of cuprous oxide hollow sphere can be adjusted (0.7-7 μm) by concentration control of hydrazine hydrate. Generated N 2 gas bubbles in the aqueous solution, serving as "soft" templates, play a key role in the formation of hollow microspheres.

  5. A novel lipid extraction method from wet microalga Picochlorum sp. at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangfang; Xiang, Wenzhou; Sun, Xiumei; Wu, Hualian; Li, Tao; Long, Lijuan

    2014-03-01

    A novel method using ethanol was proposed for extracting lipids from wet microalga Picochlorum sp. at room temperature and pressure. In this study, Central Composite design (CCD) was applied to investigate the optimum conditions of lipid extraction. The results revealed that the solvent to biomass ratio had the largest effect on lipid extraction efficiency, followed by extraction time and temperature. A high lipid extraction yield (33.04% of the dry weight) was obtained under the following extraction conditions: 5 mL solvents per gram of wet biomass for 37 min with gentle stirring at room temperature. The extraction yield was comparable to that obtained by the widely used Bligh-Dyer method. Furthermore, no significant differences in the distribution of lipid classes and fatty acid composition were observed according to different extraction methods. In conclusion, these results indicated that the proposed procedure using ethanol could extract lipids from wet biomass efficiently and had giant potential for lipid extraction at large scale.

  6. Ratchetting behavior of type 304 stainless steel at room and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.; Krempl, E.

    1988-01-01

    The zero-to-tension ratchetting behavior was investigated under uniaxial loading at room temperature and at 550, 600 and 650/degree/ C. In History I the maximum stress level of ratchetting was equal to the stress reached in a tensile test at one percent strain. For History II the maximum stress level was established as the stress reached after a 2100 s relaxation at one percent strain. Significant ratchetting was observed for History I at room temperature but not at the elevated temperatures. The accumulated ratchet strain increases with decreasing stress rate. Independent of the stress rates used insignificant ratchet strain was observed at room temperature for History II. This observation is explained in the context of the viscoplasticity theory based on overstress by the exhaustion of the viscous contribution to the stress during relaxation. The viscous part of the stress is the driving force for the ratchetting in History I. Strain aging is presumably responsible for the lack of short-time inelastic deformation resulting in a nearly rate-independent behavior at the elevated temperatures. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Room temperature table-like magnetocaloric effect in amorphous Gd50Co45Fe5 ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. L.; Zhao, D. Q.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.

    2016-02-01

    Gd50Co45Fe5 amorphous alloy ribbon with a table-like magnetocaloric effect (MCE) suitable for the ideal Ericsson cycle at room temperature has been developed. In addition to a high magnetic transition temperature of 289 K very close to that of Gd (294 K), a relatively large value of refrigerant capacity (~521 J kg-1) has been achieved under a field change of 5 T. This value of refrigerant capacity (RC) is about 27% and 70% larger than those of Gd (~410 J kg-1) and Gd5Si2Ge2 (~306 J kg-1). More importantly, the peak value of magnetic entropy change (-Δ S\\text{M}\\max ) approaches a nearly constant value of ~3.8 J  ṡ  kg-1  ṡ  K-1 under an applied field change of 0~5 T in a wide temperature span over 40 K around room temperature, which could be used as the candidate working material in the Ericsson-cycle magnetic regenerative refrigerator around room temperature.

  8. A general route toward complete room temperature processing of printed and high performance oxide electronics.

    PubMed

    Baby, Tessy T; Garlapati, Suresh K; Dehm, Simone; Häming, Marc; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-03-24

    Critical prerequisites for solution-processed/printed field-effect transistors (FETs) and logics are excellent electrical performance including high charge carrier mobility, reliability, high environmental stability and low/preferably room temperature processing. Oxide semiconductors can often fulfill all the above criteria, sometimes even with better promise than their organic counterparts, except for their high process temperature requirement. The need for high annealing/curing temperatures renders oxide FETs rather incompatible to inexpensive, flexible substrates, which are commonly used for high-throughput and roll-to-roll additive manufacturing techniques, such as printing. To overcome this serious limitation, here we demonstrate an alternative approach that enables completely room-temperature processing of printed oxide FETs with device mobility as large as 12.5 cm(2)/(V s). The key aspect of the present concept is a chemically controlled curing process of the printed nanoparticle ink that provides surprisingly dense thin films and excellent interparticle electrical contacts. In order to demonstrate the versatility of this approach, both n-type (In2O3) and p-type (Cu2O) oxide semiconductor nanoparticle dispersions are prepared to fabricate, inkjet printed and completely room temperature processed, all-oxide complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) invertors that can display significant signal gain (∼18) at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V. PMID:25693653

  9. Large magnetoresistance of insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2016-10-01

    We report on large negative and positive magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous, insulating Si:Ga films below a critical temperature of about 7 K. The magnetoresistance effect exceeds 300 % at temperatures below 3 K and fields of 8 T. The comparison of the transport properties of superconducting samples with that of insulating ones reveals that the large magnetoresistance is associated with the appearance of local superconductivity. A simple phenomenological model based on localized Cooper pairs and hopping quasiparticles is able to describe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the sheet resistance of such films.

  10. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures. PMID:26537978

  11. Quantized thermal conductance of nanowires at room temperature due to Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Ordonez-Miranda, José; Tranchant, Laurent; Kim, Beomjoon; Chalopin, Yann; Antoni, Thomas; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-02-01

    Based on the Landauer formalism, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance due to the propagation of Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons along a polar nanowire is independent of the material characteristics and is given by π2kB2T/3h. The giant propagation length of these energy carriers establishes that this quantization holds not only for a temperature much smaller than 1 K, as is the case for electrons and phonons, but also for temperatures comparable to room temperature, which can significantly facilitate its observation and application in the thermal management of nanoscale electronics and photonics.

  12. Diode-end-pumped Tm, Ho:YVO4 microchip laser at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Chen, F.; Wu, C. T.; Wang, Q.; Li, G.; Zhang, C. H.; Wang, Y. Z.; Ju, Y. L.

    2011-04-01

    Room temperature Tm, Ho:YVO4 microchip laser operated around 2 μm was demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. At a heat sink temperature of 283 K, a maximum output power of 47 mW was obtained by using a 0.25 mm length crystal at an absorbed pump power of 912 mW, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 9.1%. Increasing the temperature to 288 K, as much as 16.5 mW 2052.3 nm single-longitudinal-mode laser was achieved. The M 2 factor was measured to be 1.4.

  13. Diode-End-Pumped Tm:Ho:GdVO4 Microchip Laser at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Bao-Quan; Chen, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Chun-Ting; Li, Gang; Zhang, Chao-Hui; Wang, Yue-Zhu; Ju, You-Lun

    2011-02-01

    Room-temperature Tm:Ho:GdVO4 microchip laser operated around 2 μm is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. At a heat sink temperature of 283 K, maximum output power of 29.7 mW is obtained by using a 0.25-mm-long crystal at an absorbed pump power of 912 mW, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 5.0%. At the temperature to 283 K, a single-longitudinal-mode laser as much as 8mW at 2048.5 nm is achieved. The M 2 factor is measured to be 1.4.

  14. Epitaxy of nanocrystalline silicon carbide on Si(111) at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Verucchi, Roberto; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco V; Taioli, Simone; a Beccara, Silvio; Alfè, Dario; Nasi, Lucia; Rossi, Francesca; Salviati, Giancarlo; Iannotta, Salvatore

    2012-10-24

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has unique chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. A factor strongly limiting SiC-based technologies is the high-temperature synthesis. In this work, we provide unprecedented experimental and theoretical evidence of 3C-SiC epitaxy on silicon at room temperature by using a buckminsterfullerene (C(60)) supersonic beam. Chemical processes, such as C(60) rupture, are activated at a precursor kinetic energy of 30-35 eV, far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This result paves the way for SiC synthesis on polymers or plastics that cannot withstand high temperatures.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nano crystalline nickel zinc ferrite for chlorine gas sensor at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, C. S.; Gujar, M. P.; Mathe, V. L.

    2015-06-24

    Nano crystalline Nickel Zinc ferrite (Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) thin films were synthesized by Sol Gel method for gas response. The phase and microstructure of the obtained Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanostructured Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film shows single spinel phase. Magnetic study was obtained with the help of VSM. The effects of working temperature on the gas response were studied. The results reveal that the Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film gas sensor shows good selectivity to chlorine gas at room temperature. The sensor shows highest sensitivity (∼50%) at room temperature, indicating its application in detecting chlorine gas at room temperature in the future.

  16. Halide-stabilized LiBH4, a room-temperature lithium fast-ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hideki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Takamura, Hitoshi; Ando, Mariko; Noda, Yasuto; Karahashi, Taiki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-28

    Solid state lithium conductors are attracting much attention for their potential applications to solid-state batteries and supercapacitors of high energy density to overcome safety issues and irreversible capacity loss of the currently commercialized ones. Recently, we discovered a new class of lithium super ionic conductors based on lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)). LiBH(4) was found to have conductivity as high as 10(-2) Scm(-1) accompanied by orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition above 115 degrees C. Polarization to the lithium metal electrode was shown to be extremely low, providing a versatile anode interface for the battery application. However, the high transition temperature of the superionic phase has limited its applications. Here we show that a chemical modification of LiBH(4) can stabilize the superionic phase even below room temperature. By doping of lithium halides, high conductivity can be obtained at room temperature. Both XRD and NMR confirmed room-temperature stabilization of superionic phase for LiI-doped LiBH(4). The electrochemical measurements showed a great advantage of this material as an extremely lightweight lithium electrolyte for batteries of high energy density. This material will open alternative opportunities for the development of solid ionic conductors other than previously known lithium conductors. PMID:19119813

  17. Protolytic decomposition of n-octane on graphite at near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    Graphite basal surface is inert, and decomposition of n-alkanes on the graphite surface has not been discovered. We here report the evidence of decomposition of n-octanes on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, heat-treated up to 1200 °C under high vacuum (10−7 Pa), at near room temperatures. Using a temperature programmed desorption apparatus equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer showed the production of hydrogen molecules, methane, and ethane, suggesting that the protonation of n-octane takes place on graphite surface at near room temperature. It is known that acidic functional groups are terminated at edges on the air-cleaved HOPG surface and they increase their acidity via reactions with water. However, it is most unlikely that they protonate n-alkanes at near room temperature such as superacids. We anticipate that superacidic protons, which can protonate n-octanes, are produced on the graphite surface through a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:27335263

  18. Ultra-High Sensitivity Zinc Oxide Nanocombs for On-Chip Room Temperature Carbon Monoxide Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an on-chip gas sensor based on novel zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocombs for carbon monoxide (CO) sensing. With ZnO gas sensing nanocombs fully integrated on a single silicon chip, the concept of low cost complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) microsensor capable of on-chip gas sensing and processing is enabled. Compared with all previous implementations, the proposed ZnO nanocombs feature much larger effective sensing area and exhibit ultra-high sensitivity even at the room temperature. Specifically, at room temperature, we demonstrate peak sensitivities as high as 7.22 and 8.93 for CO concentrations of 250 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively. As a result, by operating the proposed ZnO-nanocomb-based gas sensor at the room temperature, the widely adopted power consuming heating components are completely removed. This leads to not only great power saving, but also full compatibility between the gas sensor and the on-chip circuitry in term of acceptable operating temperature. In addition, the reported fast response/recovery time of ~200 s/~50 s (250 ppm CO) makes it well suited to real-life applications. PMID:25894935

  19. Protolytic decomposition of n-octane on graphite at near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    Graphite basal surface is inert, and decomposition of n-alkanes on the graphite surface has not been discovered. We here report the evidence of decomposition of n-octanes on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, heat-treated up to 1200 °C under high vacuum (10-7 Pa), at near room temperatures. Using a temperature programmed desorption apparatus equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer showed the production of hydrogen molecules, methane, and ethane, suggesting that the protonation of n-octane takes place on graphite surface at near room temperature. It is known that acidic functional groups are terminated at edges on the air-cleaved HOPG surface and they increase their acidity via reactions with water. However, it is most unlikely that they protonate n-alkanes at near room temperature such as superacids. We anticipate that superacidic protons, which can protonate n-octanes, are produced on the graphite surface through a novel reaction mechanism.

  20. Protolytic decomposition of n-octane on graphite at near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-23

    Graphite basal surface is inert, and decomposition of n-alkanes on the graphite surface has not been discovered. We here report the evidence of decomposition of n-octanes on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, heat-treated up to 1200 °C under high vacuum (10(-7) Pa), at near room temperatures. Using a temperature programmed desorption apparatus equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer showed the production of hydrogen molecules, methane, and ethane, suggesting that the protonation of n-octane takes place on graphite surface at near room temperature. It is known that acidic functional groups are terminated at edges on the air-cleaved HOPG surface and they increase their acidity via reactions with water. However, it is most unlikely that they protonate n-alkanes at near room temperature such as superacids. We anticipate that superacidic protons, which can protonate n-octanes, are produced on the graphite surface through a novel reaction mechanism.

  1. High performance hydrogen storage from Be-BTB metal-organic framework at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei-Xian; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M; Hill, Matthew R

    2013-07-01

    The metal-organic framework beryllium benzene tribenzoate (Be-BTB) has recently been reported to have one of the highest gravimetric hydrogen uptakes at room temperature. Storage at room temperature is one of the key requirements for the practical viability of hydrogen-powered vehicles. Be-BTB has an exceptional 298 K storage capacity of 2.3 wt % hydrogen. This result is surprising given that the low adsorption enthalpy of 5.5 kJ mol(-1). In this work, a combination of atomistic simulation and continuum modeling reveals that the beryllium rings contribute strongly to the hydrogen interaction with the framework. These simulations are extended with a thermodynamic energy optimization (TEO) model to compare the performance of Be-BTB to a compressed H2 tank and benchmark materials MOF-5 and MOF-177 in a MOF-based fuel cell. Our investigation shows that none of the MOF-filled tanks satisfy the United States Department of Energy (DOE) storage targets within the required operating temperatures and pressures. However, the Be-BTB tank delivers the most energy per volume and mass compared to the other material-based storage tanks. The pore size and the framework mass are shown to be contributing factors responsible for the superior room temperature hydrogen adsorption of Be-BTB.

  2. Protolytic decomposition of n-octane on graphite at near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    Graphite basal surface is inert, and decomposition of n-alkanes on the graphite surface has not been discovered. We here report the evidence of decomposition of n-octanes on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, heat-treated up to 1200 °C under high vacuum (10‑7 Pa), at near room temperatures. Using a temperature programmed desorption apparatus equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer showed the production of hydrogen molecules, methane, and ethane, suggesting that the protonation of n-octane takes place on graphite surface at near room temperature. It is known that acidic functional groups are terminated at edges on the air-cleaved HOPG surface and they increase their acidity via reactions with water. However, it is most unlikely that they protonate n-alkanes at near room temperature such as superacids. We anticipate that superacidic protons, which can protonate n-octanes, are produced on the graphite surface through a novel reaction mechanism.

  3. Room temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb nBn detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Hoglund, Linda; Rosenberg, Robert; Kowalczyk, Robert; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Fisher, Anita; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the high temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb-AlAsSb nBn detectors with cut-off wavelengths near 4.5 μm. The quantum efficiency of these devices is 35% without antireflection coatings and does not change with temperature in the 77-325 K temperature range, indicating potential for room temperature operation. The device dark current stays diffusion limited in the 150-325 K temperature range and becomes dominated by generation-recombination processes at lower temperatures. Detector detectivities of D*(λ) = 1 × 109 (cm Hz0.5/W) at T = 300 K and D*(λ) = 5 × 109 (cm Hz0.5/W) at T = 250 K, which is easily achievable with a one stage TE cooler.

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped NiO nanoparticles of the series Ni1-xMnxO (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) are successfully synthesized using a low temperature hydrothermal method. Samples up to 6% Mn-doping are single phase in nature as observed from powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data shows that all the single phase samples crystallize in the NaCl like fcc structure with space group Fm-3m. Unit cell volume decreases with increasing Mn-doping. Pure NiO nanoparticles show weak ferromagnetism, may be due to nanosize nature. Introduction of Mn within NiO lattice improves the magnetic properties significantly. Room temperature ferromagnetism is found in all the doped samples whereas the magnetization is highest for 2% Mn-doping and then decreases with further doping. The ZFC and FC branches in the temperature dependent magnetization separate well above 350 K indicating transition temperature well above room temperature for 2% Mn-doped NiO Nanoparticle. The ferromagnetic Curie temperature is found to be 653 K for the same sample as measured by temperature dependent magnetization study using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in high vacuum.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  7. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  8. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  9. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Fina, I; Marti, X; Yi, D; Liu, J; Chu, J H; Rayan-Serrao, C; Suresha, S; Shick, A B; Zelezný, J; Jungwirth, T; Fontcuberta, J; Ramesh, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in devices comprising metal antiferromagnets have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel spintronic concept in which spin-dependent phenomena are governed by an antiferromagnet instead of a ferromagnet. Here we report experimental observation of the anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr2IrO4. Based on ab initio calculations, we associate the origin of the phenomenon with large anisotropies in the relativistic electronic structure. The antiferromagnet film is exchange coupled to a ferromagnet, which allows us to reorient the antiferromagnet spin-axis in applied magnetic fields via the exchange spring effect. We demonstrate that the semiconducting nature of our AFM electrode allows us to perform anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements in the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry without introducing a tunnel barrier into the stack. Temperature-dependent measurements of the resistance and anisotropic magnetoresistance highlight the large, entangled tunabilities of the ordinary charge and spin-dependent transport in a spintronic device utilizing the antiferromagnet semiconductor.

  10. Quantum dot made in metal oxide silicon-nanowire field effect transistor working at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lavieville, Romain; Triozon, François; Barraud, Sylvain; Corna, Andrea; Jehl, Xavier; Sanquer, Marc; Li, Jing; Abisset, Antoine; Duchemin, Ivan; Niquet, Yann-Michel

    2015-05-13

    We report the observation of an atomic like behavior from T = 4.2 K up to room temperature in n- and p-type Ω-gate silicon nanowire (NW) transistors. For that purpose, we modified the design of a NW transistor and introduced long spacers between the source/drain and the channel in order to separate the channel from the electrodes. The channel was made extremely small (3.4 nm in diameter with 10 nm gate length) with a thick gate oxide (7 nm) in order to enhance the Coulomb repulsion between carriers, which can be as large as 200 meV when surface roughness promotes charge confinement. Parasitic stochastic Coulomb blockade effect can be eliminated in our devices by choosing proper control voltages. Moreover, the quantum dot can be tuned so that the resonant current at T = 4.2 K exceeds that at room temperature.

  11. Opening of DNA double helix at room temperature: Application of α-cyclodextrin self-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Syed S.; Ghosh, Prasun; Das, Anindita; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2010-08-01

    Self-aggregation of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) can induce DNA opening at room temperature (25 °C) owing to the hydroxyl groups on the surface of the spherical aggregates of α-CD, which promote hydrogen bonding with the flipped-out bases in DNA duplex prohibiting them from reverting back.Self-aggregation of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) can induce DNA opening at room temperature (25 °C) owing to the hydroxyl groups on the surface of the spherical aggregates of α-CD, which promote hydrogen bonding with the flipped-out bases in DNA duplex prohibiting them from reverting back. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details; absorbance data of ds-DNA at higher concentration of α-CD. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00184h

  12. Tannic acid assisted synthesis of flake-like hydroxyapatite nanostructures at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Maricela Santana; Estevez, O.; Ascencio-Aguirre, F.; Mendoza-Cruz, R.; Bazán-Díaz, L.; Zorrila, C.; Herrera-Becerra, R.

    2016-09-01

    A simple and non-expensive procedure was performed to synthesize hydroxyapatite (HAp) flake-like nanostructures, by using a co-precipitation method with tannic acid as stabilizing agent at room temperature and freeze drying. Samples were synthesized with two different salts, Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2. X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy characterizations reveal Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 HAp particles with hexagonal structure and P63/m space group in both cases. In addition, the particle size was smaller than 20 nm. The advantage of this method over the works reported to date lies in the ease for obtaining HAp particles with a single morphology (flakes), in high yield. This opens the possibility of expanding the view to the designing of new composite materials based on the HAp synthesized at room temperature.

  13. Reversible swelling of the cell wall of poplar biomass by ionic liquid at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Marcel; Wagner, Greg L.; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Hanson, Leif; Samayam, Indira P.; Schall, Constance A.; Langan, Paul; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved autofluorescence, Raman microspectroscopy, and scanning microprobe X-ray diffraction were combined in order to characterize lignocellulosic biomass from poplar trees and how it changes during treatment with the ionic liquid 1-n-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAC) at room temperature. The EMIMAC penetrates the cell wall from the lumen, swelling the cell wall by about a factor of two towards the empty lumen. However, the middle lamella remains unchanged, preventing the cell wall from swelling outwards. During this swelling, most of the cellulose microfibrils are solubi-lized but chain migration is restricted and a small percentage of microfibrils persist. When the EMIMAC is expelled, the cellulose recrystallizes as microfibrils of cellulose I. There is little change in the relative chemical composition of the cell wall after treatment. The action of EMIMAC on the poplar cell wall at room temperature would therefore appear to be a reversible swelling and a reversible decrystallization of the cell wall. PMID:21247757

  14. Grain boundary sliding in aluminum nano-bi-crystals deformed at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zachary H; Jang, Dongchan; Weinberger, Christopher R; Greer, Julia R

    2014-01-15

    Room-temperature uniaxial compressions of 900-nm-diameter aluminum bi-crystals, each containing a high-angle grain boundary with a plane normal inclined at 24° to the loading direction, revealed frictional sliding along the boundary plane to be the dominant deformation mechanism. The top crystallite sheared off as a single unit in the course of compression instead of crystallographic slip and extensive dislocation activity, as would be expected. Compressive stress strain data of deforming nano bicrystals was continuous, in contrast to single crystalline nano structures that show a stochastic stress strain signature, and displayed a peak in stress at the elastic limit of ~ 176 MPa followed by gradual softening and a plateau centered around ~ 125 MPa. An energetics-based physical model, which may explain observed room-temperature grain boundary sliding, in presented, and observations are discussed within the framework of crystalline nano-plasticity and defect microstructure evolution.

  15. Silicon carbide light-emitting diode as a prospective room temperature source for single photons

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, F.; Soltamov, V. A.; Väth, S.; Baranov, P. G.; Mokhov, E. N.; Astakhov, G. V.; Dyakonov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Generation of single photons has been demonstrated in several systems. However, none of them satisfies all the conditions, e.g. room temperature functionality, telecom wavelength operation, high efficiency, as required for practical applications. Here, we report the fabrication of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on intrinsic defects in silicon carbide (SiC). To fabricate our devices we used a standard semiconductor manufacturing technology in combination with high-energy electron irradiation. The room temperature electroluminescence (EL) of our LEDs reveals two strong emission bands in the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral ranges, associated with two different intrinsic defects. As these defects can potentially be generated at a low or even single defect level, our approach can be used to realize electrically driven single photon source for quantum telecommunication and information processing. PMID:23572127

  16. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; Esquinazi, P.; Arenholz, E.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-05-01

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the average magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite. Also, our findings show that the magnetic properties of graphite surfaces, thin films or two dimensional graphene samples can be reliably studied using soft x-ray dichroism. Fundamental new insight into the magnetic properties of carbon based systems can thus be obtained.

  17. Densification and strain hardening of a metallic glass under tension at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z T; Pan, J; Li, Y; Schuh, C A

    2013-09-27

    The deformation of metallic glasses involves two competing processes: a disordering process involving dilatation, free volume accumulation, and softening, and a relaxation process involving diffusional ordering and densification. For metallic glasses at room temperature and under uniaxial loading, disordering usually dominates, and the glass can fail catastrophically as the softening process runs away in a localized mode. Here we demonstrate conditions where the opposite, unexpected, situation occurs: the densifying process dominates, resulting in stable plastic deformation and work hardening at room temperature. We report densification and hardening during deformation in a Zr-based glass under multiaxial loading, in a notched tensile geometry. The effect is driven by stress-enhanced diffusional relaxation, and is attended by a reduction in exothermic heat and hardening signatures similar to those observed in the classical thermal relaxation of glasses. The result is significant, stable, plastic, extensional flow in metallic glasses, which suggest a possibility of designing tough glasses based on their flow properties.

  18. Room Temperature Single-Photon Source: Single-Dye Molecule Fluorescence in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; McNamara, A.J.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, C.R.Jr.

    2003-12-31

    OAK-(B204)We report on new approaches toward an implementation of an efficient, room temperature, deterministically polarized, single-photon source (SPS) on demand-a key hardware element for quantum information and quantum communication. Operation of a room temperature SPS is demonstrated via photon antibunching in the fluorescence from single terrylene-dye molecules embedded in a cholesteric liquid crystal host. Using oxygen-depleted liquid crystal hosts, dye-bleaching was avoided over the course of more than 1 h of continuous 532-nm excitation. Liquid crystal hosts (including liquid crystal oligomers/polymers) permit further increase of the efficiency of the source: (1) by aligning the dye molecules along a direction preferable for the maximum excitation efficiency; (2) by tuning a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic-band-gap microcavity of planar-aligned cholesteric (chiral nematic) liquid crystal layer to the dye fluorescence band.

  19. One-dimensional ZnO exciton polaritons with negligible thermal broadening at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichet, A.; Sun, L.; Pavlovic, G.; Gippius, N. A.; Malpuech, G.; Xie, W.; Chen, Z.; Richard, M.; Dang, Le Si

    2011-01-01

    Single ZnO microwires are investigated by angle-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We show that confined optical modes similar to whispering gallery modes can strongly interact with excitons to form one-dimensional exciton polaritons at room temperature, with normal mode splitting exceeding 200 meV. With such a splitting, which is much larger than LO phonon energy, a strong quenching of the polariton-phonon interaction is achieved, even at room temperature and for large excitonic fractions. Thus, a record figure of merit of 50 for the ratio of the Rabi splitting to the polariton full width at half maximum is achieved as a consequence of negligible thermal contribution to dephasing.

  20. A Fiber Bragg grating based tilt sensor suitable for constant temperature room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guoyu; Wei, Jue; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Mingyu; Yang, Meichao; Xie, Ruijun; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Constant-temperature rooms have been widely used in industrial production, quality testing, and research laboratories. This paper proposes a high-precision tilt sensor suitable for a constant- temperature room, which has achieved a wide-range power change while the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflection peak wavelength shifted very little, thereby demonstrating a novel method for obtaining a high-precision tilt sensor. This paper also studies the effect of the reflection peak on measurement precision. The proposed sensor can distinguish the direction of tilt with an excellent sensitivity of 403 dBm/° and a highest achievable resolution of 2.481 × 10-5 ° (that is, 0.08% of the measuring range).

  1. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  2. Room temperature ammonia sensor based on copper nanoparticle intercalated polyaniline nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, U. V.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Karmakar, N.; Bhogale, A.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of copper nanoparticles intercalated-polyaniline nanocomposites (NC) have been deposited at room temperatures by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different concentrations of Cu nanoparticles. The response characteristics of the NC thin films toward different gases namely NH3, CO, CO2, NO and CH4 were examined at room temperature. Both pure polyaniline (PANI) and NC films exhibited a selective response toward NH3. Incorporation of Cu nanoparticles resulted in an improvement of the sensors response and response kinetics. The response and the recovery times of composite film toward 50 ppm of NH3 were 7 and 160 s, respectively. Additionally, the NC sensor film could reversibly detect as low as 1 ppm of NH3 concentrations. The enhanced response of NC films toward NH3 is attributed to the deprotonation and reprotonation processes as also supported by Raman investigations.

  3. Electroluminescence from localized defects in zinc oxide: toward electrically driven single photon sources at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sumin; Berhane, Amanuel M; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-18

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography, and quantum communications. However, the majority of room temperature emitters to date are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically driven light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit in the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open possibilities for building new ZnO-based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies. PMID:25741632

  4. Room temperature NO2-sensing properties of WO3 nanoparticles/porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenjun; Hu, Ming; Zeng, Peng; Ma, Shuangyun; Li, Mingda

    2014-02-01

    WO3 nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method with tungsten hexachloride (WCl6) as precursor and deposited onto porous silicon and alumina substrates by dip-coating. The morphology and crystal structure of samples were investigated by means of field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. It is the experimental results demonstrated by gas sensing tests that WO3 nanoparticles combining with the substrate of porous silicon presented an improved NO2-sensing property at room temperature. Compared to WO3 deposited on alumina working above 100 °C, the WO3 nanoparticles/porous silicon exhibited higher properties upon exposure to sub-ppm concentrations of NO2 gas at room temperature. Additionally, the NO2-sensing performance of WO3 nanoparticles/porous silicon was enhanced markedly, in comparison to pure porous silicon. The mechanism of WO3/porous silicon composite structure on the NO2 sensing was explained in detail.

  5. Room-Temperature Continuous-Wave Operation of a Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Wan-Feng; Liu, Feng-Qi; Yin, Wen; Liu, Jun-Qi; Li, Lu; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2011-07-01

    A room-temperature cw operation of a tunable external cavity (EC) quantum cascade laser (QCL) at an emitting wavelength of 4.6 μm is presented. Strain-compensation combined with two-phonon resonance in an active region design promises low threshold current density. A very low threshold current density of 1.47kA/cm2 for an EC-QCL operated in cw mode is realized. Single-mode cw operation with a side-mode suppression ratio of 20 dB and a wide tuning range of over 110cm-1 are achieved. Moreover, an even wider tuning range of over 135cm-1 is obtained in pulsed mode at room temperature.

  6. The growth and Raman scattering studies of TGSP crystal as the IR room temperature infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekfar, R.; Abbasi, B.

    2005-09-01

    The partial substitution of sulphate (SO42-) by phosphate (PO43-) in triglycine sulfate (TGS) single crystal can improve the properties of the TGS family crystal as room temperature infrared (IR) detector. Phosphoric acid (H3PO4)-doped triglycine sulfate (TGSP) single crystal has strong pyroelectric properties due to its high pyroelectric coefficient and reasonably low dielectric constant. This family of single crystals can grow easily and rapidly and are reasonably good uniform detectors in the electromagnetic region from UV to IR at room temperature and without using cryogenic cooling. TGSP single crystals were grown by saturated solution method. In order to investigate the detection sensitivity of the TGSP crystal, single crystals with different dopant concentration of phosphate (PO43-) ion were grown. A rather complete back-scattering Raman scattering spectra and hysteresis loops of the grown crystals were recorded and compared with each other. The Raman spectra and their assignments only will be reported here.

  7. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-12-01

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  8. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-12-04

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  9. Physicochemical, spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization of magnesium ion-conducting, room temperature, ternary molten electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, N. S. Venkata; Ashok Raj, B. V.; Sampath, S.

    Room temperature, magnesium ion-conducting molten electrolytes are prepared using a combination of acetamide, urea and magnesium triflate or magnesium perchlorate. The molten liquids show high ionic conductivity, of the order of mS cm -1 at 298 K. Vibrational spectroscopic studies based on triflate/perchlorate bands reveal that the free ion concentration is higher than that of ion-pairs and aggregates in the melt. Electrochemical reversibility of magnesium deposition and dissolution is demonstrated using cyclic voltammetry and impedance studies. The transport number of Mg 2+ ion determined by means of a combination of d.c. and a.c. techniques is ∼0.40. Preliminary studies on the battery characteristics reveal good capacity for the magnesium rechargeable cell and open up the possibility of using this unique class of acetamide-based room temperature molten electrolytes in secondary magnesium batteries.

  10. Implication of potassium trimolybdate nanowires as highly sensitive and selective ammonia sensor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Aditee C.; Gangal, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Potassium trimolybdate nanowires are demonstrated as unique and highly selective NH3 sensing materials at room temperature. The nanowires were synthesized by using chemical route under normal ambient conditions and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Gas sensors based on nanowires were fabricated by isolating and aligning nanowires between microspaced electrodes using dielectrophoresis. Room temperature gas sensing studies for different vapors indicated excellent selectivity for NH3 and capability to detect NH3 at concentrations down to ppb level. The sensors exhibited higher sensitivity for concentration range much below toxic limit of NH3 from 500 ppb up to 25 ppm. Since nanowires are isolated and aligned, the gas sensing reaction is rapid, and the availability of abundant oxide and hydroxyl surface groups on nanowires surface makes the reaction significantly prominent and selective with highly reducing nature of NH3.

  11. Unveiling the Room-Temperature Magnetoelectricity of Troilite FeS.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabio; Bousquet, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We report on a first-principles study of the troilite phase of iron sulfide (FeS). We show that even if, a few decades ago, this material was thought to be ferroelectric, the structural transition from the high P6_{3}/mmc to the low P6[over ¯]2c symmetry phase does not involve polar instabilities, though the space inversion center symmetry is broken. Our calculations and symmetry analysis nevertheless reveal that FeS is magnetoelectric at room temperature with a response larger than the prototypical room-temperature magnetoelectric crystal Cr_{2}O_{3}. We also show that the spin channel decomposition of the polarization exhibits nonzero values in the opposite direction in FeS, which is actually a general hint of the presence of a magnetoelectric monopole in diagonal magnetoelectrics.

  12. Unveiling the Room-Temperature Magnetoelectricity of Troilite FeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fabio; Bousquet, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We report on a first-principles study of the troilite phase of iron sulfide (FeS). We show that even if, a few decades ago, this material was thought to be ferroelectric, the structural transition from the high P 63/m m c to the low P 6 ¯2 c symmetry phase does not involve polar instabilities, though the space inversion center symmetry is broken. Our calculations and symmetry analysis nevertheless reveal that FeS is magnetoelectric at room temperature with a response larger than the prototypical room-temperature magnetoelectric crystal Cr2 O3 . We also show that the spin channel decomposition of the polarization exhibits nonzero values in the opposite direction in FeS, which is actually a general hint of the presence of a magnetoelectric monopole in diagonal magnetoelectrics.

  13. Scalable photonic network architecture based on motional averaging in room temperature gas.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Zugenmaier, M; Petersen, J M; Shen, H; Vasilakis, G; Jensen, K; Polzik, E S; Sørensen, A S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum interfaces between photons and atomic ensembles have emerged as powerful tools for quantum technologies. Efficient storage and retrieval of single photons requires long-lived collective atomic states, which is typically achieved with immobilized atoms. Thermal atomic vapours, which present a simple and scalable resource, have only been used for continuous variable processing or for discrete variable processing on short timescales where atomic motion is negligible. Here we develop a theory based on motional averaging to enable room temperature discrete variable quantum memories and coherent single-photon sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to scalable quantum memories with a proof-of-principle experiment with room temperature atoms contained in microcells with spin-protecting coating, placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental conditions correspond to a few photons per pulse and a long coherence time of the forward scattered photons is demonstrated, which is the essential feature of the motional averaging. PMID:27076381

  14. New frontiers in quantum cascade lasers: high performance room temperature terahertz sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Mikhail A.; Capasso, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become the most widely used source of mid-infrared radiation, finding large scale applications because of their wide tunability and overall high performance. However far-infrared (terahertz) QCLs have lagged behind in terms of performance and impact due to the inability so far of achieving room temperature operation. Here we review recent research that has led to a new class of QCL light sources that has overcome these limitations leading to room temperature operation in the terahertz spectral range, with nearly 2 mW of optical power and significant tunability, opening up also this region of the spectrum to a wide range of applications.

  15. A variationally calculated room temperature line-list for H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Refaie, Ahmed F.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    A room temperature line list for hydrogen peroxide is computed using a high level ab initio potential energy surface by Małyszek and Koput (2013) with a small adjustment of the equilibrium geometry and height of the torsional barrier and a new ab initio dipole moment surface (CCSD(T)-f12b/aug-cc-pv(T+d)Z). In order to improve further the ab initio accuracy, the vibrational band centers were shifted to match experimental values when available. The line list covers the wavenumber region up to 8000 cm-1 with the rotational excitations J ⩽ 40 . Room temperatures synthetic spectra of H2O2 are generated and compared to the spectra from the HITRAN and PNNL-IR databases showing good agrement.

  16. Electroluminescence from localized defects in zinc oxide: toward electrically driven single photon sources at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sumin; Berhane, Amanuel M; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-18

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography, and quantum communications. However, the majority of room temperature emitters to date are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically driven light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit in the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open possibilities for building new ZnO-based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

  17. Grain boundary sliding in aluminum nano-bi-crystals deformed at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zachary H; Jang, Dongchan; Weinberger, Christopher R; Greer, Julia R

    2014-01-15

    Room-temperature uniaxial compressions of 900-nm-diameter aluminum bi-crystals, each containing a high-angle grain boundary with a plane normal inclined at 24° to the loading direction, revealed frictional sliding along the boundary plane to be the dominant deformation mechanism. The top crystallite sheared off as a single unit in the course of compression instead of crystallographic slip and extensive dislocation activity, as would be expected. Compressive stress strain data of deforming nano bicrystals was continuous, in contrast to single crystalline nano structures that show a stochastic stress strain signature, and displayed a peak in stress at the elastic limit of ~ 176 MPa followed by gradual softening and a plateau centered around ~ 125 MPa. An energetics-based physical model, which may explain observed room-temperature grain boundary sliding, in presented, and observations are discussed within the framework of crystalline nano-plasticity and defect microstructure evolution. PMID:23873787

  18. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Anielski, Pawel; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2014-11-15

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature {sup 85}Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT/√(Hz) at 7.6 μT. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 μT to 75 μT. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  19. Scalable photonic network architecture based on motional averaging in room temperature gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borregaard, J.; Zugenmaier, M.; Petersen, J. M.; Shen, H.; Vasilakis, G.; Jensen, K.; Polzik, E. S.; Sørensen, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum interfaces between photons and atomic ensembles have emerged as powerful tools for quantum technologies. Efficient storage and retrieval of single photons requires long-lived collective atomic states, which is typically achieved with immobilized atoms. Thermal atomic vapours, which present a simple and scalable resource, have only been used for continuous variable processing or for discrete variable processing on short timescales where atomic motion is negligible. Here we develop a theory based on motional averaging to enable room temperature discrete variable quantum memories and coherent single-photon sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to scalable quantum memories with a proof-of-principle experiment with room temperature atoms contained in microcells with spin-protecting coating, placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental conditions correspond to a few photons per pulse and a long coherence time of the forward scattered photons is demonstrated, which is the essential feature of the motional averaging.

  20. Room-Temperature Transport of Indirect Excitons in (Al ,Ga )N /GaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedichkin, F.; Guillet, T.; Valvin, P.; Jouault, B.; Brimont, C.; Bretagnon, T.; Lahourcade, L.; Grandjean, N.; Lefebvre, P.; Vladimirova, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the exciton propagation in polar (Al ,Ga )N /GaN quantum wells over several micrometers and up to room temperature. The key ingredient to achieve this result is the crystalline quality of GaN quantum wells grown on GaN substrate that limits nonradiative recombination. From the comparison of the spatial and temporal dynamics of photoluminescence, we conclude that the propagation of excitons under continuous-wave excitation is assisted by efficient screening of the in-plane disorder. Modeling within drift-diffusion formalism corroborates this conclusion and suggests that exciton propagation is still limited by the exciton scattering on defects rather than by exciton-exciton scattering so that improving interface quality can boost exciton transport further. Our results pave the way towards room-temperature excitonic devices based on gate-controlled exciton transport in wide-band-gap polar heterostructures.

  1. Room Temperature Synthesis of Covalent–Organic Framework Films through Vapor-Assisted Conversion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe the facile synthesis of several two-dimensional covalent–organic frameworks (2D COFs) as films by vapor-assisted conversion at room temperature. High-quality films of benzodithiophene-containing BDT-COF and COF-5 with tunable thickness were synthesized under different conditions on various substrates. BDT-COF films of several micrometer thickness exhibit mesoporosity as well as textural porosity, whereas thinner BDT-COF films materialize as a cohesive dense layer. In addition, we studied the formation of COF-5 films with different solvent mixture compositions serving as vapor source. Room temperature vapor-assisted conversion is an excellent method to form COF films of fragile precursors and on sensitive substrates. PMID:25539131

  2. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Anielski, Pawel; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2014-11-01

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature (85)Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT / √Hz at 7.6 μT. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 μT to 75 μT. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  3. Room temperature manipulation of long lifetime spins in metallic-like carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Choucair, Mohammad; Dinse, Klaus-Peter; Forró, László

    2016-07-01

    The time-window for processing electron spin information (spintronics) in solid-state quantum electronic devices is determined by the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of electrons. Minimizing the effects of spin-orbit coupling and the local magnetic contributions of neighbouring atoms on spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times at room temperature remain substantial challenges to practical spintronics. Here we report conduction electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of 175 ns at 300 K in 37+/-7 nm carbon spheres, which is remarkably long for any conducting solid-state material of comparable size. Following the observation of spin polarization by electron spin resonance, we control the quantum state of the electron spin by applying short bursts of an oscillating magnetic field and observe coherent oscillations of the spin state. These results demonstrate the feasibility of operating electron spins in conducting carbon nanospheres as quantum bits at room temperature.

  4. Flake like V2O5 nanoparticles for ethanol sensing at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, M.; Uthayarani, K.; Rajasekaran, N.; Neelakandeswari, N.; Girija, E. K.; Padiyan, D. Pathinettam

    2016-05-01

    The versatile redox property of vanadium oxide explores it in various applications like catalysis, electrochromism, electrochemistry, energy storage, sensors, microelectronics, batteries etc., In this present work, vanadium oxide was prepared via hydrothermal route followed by calcination. The structural and lattice parameters were analysed from the powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The morphology and the composition of the sample were obtained from Field emission Scanning electron microscopic (FeSEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDAX) Spectrometric analysis respectively. The sensitivity, response - recovery time of the sample towards ethanol (0 ppm - 300 ppm) sensing at room temperature was measured and the present investigation on vanadium oxide nanoparticles over the flakes shows better sensitivity (30%) at room temperature.

  5. Unveiling the Room-Temperature Magnetoelectricity of Troilite FeS.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabio; Bousquet, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We report on a first-principles study of the troilite phase of iron sulfide (FeS). We show that even if, a few decades ago, this material was thought to be ferroelectric, the structural transition from the high P6_{3}/mmc to the low P6[over ¯]2c symmetry phase does not involve polar instabilities, though the space inversion center symmetry is broken. Our calculations and symmetry analysis nevertheless reveal that FeS is magnetoelectric at room temperature with a response larger than the prototypical room-temperature magnetoelectric crystal Cr_{2}O_{3}. We also show that the spin channel decomposition of the polarization exhibits nonzero values in the opposite direction in FeS, which is actually a general hint of the presence of a magnetoelectric monopole in diagonal magnetoelectrics. PMID:27314737

  6. Scalable photonic network architecture based on motional averaging in room temperature gas

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, J.; Zugenmaier, M.; Petersen, J. M.; Shen, H.; Vasilakis, G.; Jensen, K.; Polzik, E. S.; Sørensen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum interfaces between photons and atomic ensembles have emerged as powerful tools for quantum technologies. Efficient storage and retrieval of single photons requires long-lived collective atomic states, which is typically achieved with immobilized atoms. Thermal atomic vapours, which present a simple and scalable resource, have only been used for continuous variable processing or for discrete variable processing on short timescales where atomic motion is negligible. Here we develop a theory based on motional averaging to enable room temperature discrete variable quantum memories and coherent single-photon sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to scalable quantum memories with a proof-of-principle experiment with room temperature atoms contained in microcells with spin-protecting coating, placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental conditions correspond to a few photons per pulse and a long coherence time of the forward scattered photons is demonstrated, which is the essential feature of the motional averaging. PMID:27076381

  7. High-energy electron-induced damage production at room temperature in aluminum-doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. W.; Cheng, L. J.; Jaworowski, A.; Karins, J. P.; Lee, Y. H.; Lindstroem, L.; Mooney, P. M.; Oehrlen, G.; Wang, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    DLTS and EPR measurements are reported on aluminum-doped silicon that was irradiated at room temperature with high-energy electrons. Comparisons are made to comparable experiments on boron-doped silicon. Many of the same defects observed in boron-doped silicon are also observed in aluminum-doped silicon, but several others were not observed, including the aluminum interstitial and aluminum-associated defects. Damage production modeling, including the dependence on aluminum concentration, is presented.

  8. Femtosecond dynamics of exciton bleaching in bulk GaN at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin-Chieh; Chern, Gia-Wei; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Liang, Jian-Chin; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2002-07-01

    Femtosecond transient transmission pump-probe technique was used to investigate exciton dynamics in a nominally undoped GaN thin film at room temperature. An exciton ionization time of 100-250 femtoseconds was observed by the time-resolved pump-probe measurement. A comparison experiment with pre-excited free carriers also confirmed the observation of the exciton ionization process in bulk GaN.

  9. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  10. Room-Temperature Electron Spin Relaxation of Triarylmethyl Radicals at X- and Q-bands

    PubMed Central

    Krumkacheva, Olesya A.; Strizhakov, Rodion K.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Troitskaya, Tatiana I.

    2016-01-01

    Triarylmethyl radicals (trityls, TAMs) represent a relatively new class of spin labels. The long relaxation of trityls at room temperature in liquid solutions makes them a promising alternative for traditional nitroxides. In this work we have synthesized a series of TAMs including perdeuterated Finland trityl (D36 form) , mono-, di-, and tri-ester derivatives of Finland-D36 trityl, deuterated form of OX63, dodeca-n-butyl homologue of Finland trityl, and triamide derivatives of Finland trityl with primary and secondary amines attached. We have studied room-temperature relaxation properties of these TAMs in liquids using pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) at two microwave frequency bands. We have found the clear dependence of phase memory time (Tm~T2) on magnetic field: room-temperature Tm values are ~1.5-2.5 times smaller at Q-band (34 GHz, 1.2 T) compared to X-band (9 GHz, 0.3 T). This trend is ascribed to the contribution from g-anisotropy that is negligible at lower magnetic fields but comes into play at Q-band. In agreement with this, while T1~Tm at X-band, we observe T1>Tm at Q-band due to increased contributions from incomplete motional averaging of g-anisotropy. In addition, the viscosity dependence shows that (1/Tm-1/T1) is proportional to the tumbling correlation time of trityls. Based on the analysis of previous data and results of the present work, we conclude that in general situation where spin label is at least partly mobile, X-band is most suitable for application of trityls for room-temperature pulsed EPR distance measurements. PMID:26001103

  11. Room-temperature gas sensing through electronic coupling between tin oxide nanocrystal and carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.; Ocola, L.; Chen, J.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee

    2009-01-01

    A new gas-sensing platform for low-concentration gases (NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO) comprises discrete SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals uniformly distributed on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The resulting hybrid nanostructures are highly sensitive, even at room temperature, because their gas sensing abilities rely on electron transfer between the nanocrystals and the CNTs.

  12. Room temperature (nπ∗) phosphorescence of indanetrione (anhydrous ninhydrine) in phthalic anhydride matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mondal, S.; Ghosh, Sanjib

    1997-02-01

    Indanetrione, a cis vicinal cyclic triketone, is found to exhibit room temperature (nπ∗) phosphorescence (RTP) in a phthalic anhydride matrix in addition to (nπ∗) fluorescence. The compound does not show RTP in benzophenone mixed crystals or in any other solvent studied. A rigid binding of the cyclic triketone in the phthalic anhydride matrix, lowering the T 1 → S 0 nonradiative rate, has been proposed as the explanation for RTP.

  13. Rhodium-catalyzed anti-Markovnikov addition of secondary amines to arylacetylenes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kazunori; Kochi, Takuya; Kakiuchi, Fumitoshi

    2011-08-01

    An efficient method for synthesis of E-enamines by the anti-Markovnikov addition of secondary amines to terminal alkynes is described. The reaction of a variety of aryl- and heteroarylacetylenes proceeded at room temperature using a combination of a 8-quinolinolato rhodium complex and P(p-MeOC(6)H(4))(3) as a catalyst. The products were obtained as enamines by simple bulb-to-bulb distillation. PMID:21699251

  14. Tribological reactions of perfluoroalkyl polyether oils with stainless steel under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1989-01-01

    The reaction between three types of commercial perfluoroalkyl polyether (PFPE) oils and stainless steel 440C was investigated experimentally during sliding under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature. It is found that the tribological reaction of PFPE is mainly affected by the activity of the mechanically formed fresh surfaces of metals rather than the heat generated at the sliding contacts. The fluorides formed on the wear track act as a boundary layer, reducing the friction coefficient.

  15. The advent of multilayer antimonene nanoribbons with room temperature orange light emission.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Ching-Hung; Ouyang, Hao; Liang, Jenq-Horng

    2016-06-28

    Multilayer antimonene nanoribbons with room temperature orange light emission uniformly distributed on InSb were synthesized by the plasma-assisted process. The bandgap opening was caused by the quantum confinement effect of the nanoribbon structure and the turbostratic stacking of antimonene layers. This attractive two-dimensional material, whose band structure is proper for applications of transistors and light-emitting diodes, was first synthesized. PMID:27301584

  16. Mixing of 10-microm radiation in room-temperature Schottky diodes.

    PubMed

    Tannenwald, P E; Fetterman, H R; Freed, C; Parker, C D; Clifton, B J; O'Donnell, R G

    1981-10-01

    Schottky diodes have been used as room-temperature mixers of CO(2)-laser radiation. When a microwave local oscillator signal was introduced directly into the diode, beat notes between lasers separated by up to 69 GHz were observed. At CO(2) frequencies (30 THz) the photon energy exceeds the measured dc nonlinearities, and the device is expected to approach operation as a photon counter rather than a classical resistive mixer.

  17. Research on CdZnTe and Other Novel Room Temperature Gamma Ray Spectrometer Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold Burger; Michael gGoza; Yunlong Cui; Utpal N. Roy; M. Guo

    2007-05-05

    Room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers are being developed for a number of years for national security applications where high sensitivity, low operating power and compactness are indispensable. The technology has matured now to the point where large volume (several cubic centimeters) and high energy resolution (approximately 1% at 660 eV) of gamma photons, are becoming available for their incorporation into portable systems for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials.

  18. Red Phosphorescence from Benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory D; Sazama, Graham T; Wu, Tony; Baldo, Marc A; Swager, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    We describe the red phosphorescence exhibited by a class of structurally simple benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles at room temperature. The photophysical properties of these molecules in deoxygenated cyclohexane, including their absorption spectra, steady-state photoluminescence and excitation spectra, and phosphorescence lifetimes, are presented. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were carried out to better understand the electronic excited states of these benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazoles and why they are capable of phosphorescence.

  19. Nonlinear behavior of three-terminal graphene junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wonjae; Pasanen, Pirjo; Riikonen, Juha; Lipsanen, Harri

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate nonlinear behavior in three-terminal T-branch graphene devices at room temperature. A rectified nonlinear output at the center branch is observed when the device is biased by a push-pull configuration. Nonlinearity is assumed to arise from a difference in charge transfer through the metal-graphene contact barrier between two contacts. The sign of the rectification can be altered by changing the carrier type using the back-gate voltage.

  20. Anion pairs in room temperature ionic liquids predicted by molecular dynamics simulation, verified by spectroscopic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-level spectroscopic analyses of an aprotic and a protic room-temperature ionic liquid, BMIM OTf and BMIM HSO4, respectively, have been carried out with the aim of verifying molecular dynamics simulations that predict anion pair formation in these fluid structures. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of various nuclei support the theoretically-determined average molecular arrangements.