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Sample records for room temperature solid

  1. Room-temperature solid-state maser.

    PubMed

    Oxborrow, Mark; Breeze, Jonathan D; Alford, Neil M

    2012-08-16

    The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser's birth. The maser's relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic and free-electron masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser's pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing into pentacene's triplet ground state. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser's measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other

  2. Coherent population trapping in a crystalline solid at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesov, Roman

    2005-11-15

    Observation of coherent population trapping (CPT) at ground-state Zeeman sublevels of Cr{sup 3+} ion in ruby at room temperature is reported. A mechanism of CPT, not owing to optical pumping, is revealed in a situation when the optical pulse duration is shorter than the population decay time from the excited optical state.

  3. Room temperature mechanical thinning and imprinting of solid films.

    PubMed

    Cross, Graham L W; O'Connell, Barry S; Ozer, H Ozgür; Pethica, John B

    2007-02-01

    The mechanical patterning of thin films has received recent attention due to significant potential for efficient nanostructure fabrication. For solid films, mechanically thinning wide areas remains particularly challenging. In this work, we introduce a new plastic ratchet mechanism involving small amplitude (<10 nm), oscillatory shear motion of the forging die. This isothermal mechanism significantly extends mass transport across surfaces, broadening the scope of nanoscale processing for a potentially wide class of solid ductile materials.

  4. Complex hydrides as room-temperature solid electrolytes for rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jongh, P. E.; Blanchard, D.; Matsuo, M.; Udovic, T. J.; Orimo, S.

    2016-03-01

    A central goal in current battery research is to increase the safety and energy density of Li-ion batteries. Electrolytes nowadays typically consist of lithium salts dissolved in organic solvents. Solid electrolytes could facilitate safer batteries with higher capacities, as they are compatible with Li-metal anodes, prevent Li dendrite formation, and eliminate risks associated with flammable organic solvents. Less than 10 years ago, LiBH4 was proposed as a solid-state electrolyte. It showed a high ionic conductivity, but only at elevated temperatures. Since then a range of other complex metal hydrides has been reported to show similar characteristics. Strategies have been developed to extend the high ionic conductivity of LiBH4 down to room temperature by partial anion substitution or nanoconfinement. The present paper reviews the recent developments in complex metal hydrides as solid electrolytes, discussing in detail LiBH4, strategies towards for fast room-temperature ionic conductors, alternative compounds, and first explorations of implementation of these electrolytes in all-solid-state batteries.

  5. Scalable architecture for a room temperature solid-state quantum information processor.

    PubMed

    Yao, N Y; Jiang, L; Gorshkov, A V; Maurer, P C; Giedke, G; Cirac, J I; Lukin, M D

    2012-04-24

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Here we propose and analyse an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at room temperature. Our approach is based on recent experimental advances involving nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. In particular, we demonstrate that the multiple challenges associated with operation at ambient temperature, individual addressing at the nanoscale, strong qubit coupling, robustness against disorder and low decoherence rates can be simultaneously achieved under realistic, experimentally relevant conditions. The architecture uses a novel approach to quantum information transfer and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Moreover, it alleviates the stringent constraints currently limiting the realization of scalable quantum processors and will provide fundamental insights into the physics of non-equilibrium many-body quantum systems.

  6. Preparation of Soft Magnetic Fe-Ni-Pb-B Alloy Nanoparticles by Room Temperature Solid-Solid Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy nanoparticles was prepared by a solid-solid chemical reaction of ferric trichloride, nickel chloride, lead acetate, and potassium borohydride powders at room temperature. The research results of the ICP and thermal analysis indicate that the resultants are composed of iron, nickel, lead, boron, and PVP, and the component of the alloy is connected with the mole ratio of potassium borohydride and the metal salts. The TEM images show that the resultants are ultrafine and spherical particles, and the particle size is about a diameter of 25 nm. The largest saturation magnetization value of the 21.18 emu g−1 is obtained in the Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy. The mechanism of the preparation reaction for the Fe-Ni-Pb-B multicomponent alloys is discussed. PMID:24348196

  7. Solid-State Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles at Room Temperature: Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a Tool.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Dipen; Kim, Chorong; Kim, Sung H; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2010-03-16

    Silver nanoparticles have been used for a long time and recently various methods have been additionally developed for their production. Here we report for the first time a solid-state high-speed vibration milling method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles, in which poly(vinylpyrrolidone) is used for the reduction of the silver salt. The synthesis is performed at room temperature and no surfactant to direct the anisotropic growth of the nanoparticles is required. The formation of the nanoparticles was studied by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The nanoparticles synthesized were found to be uniform in size and shape with an average diameter of less than 5 nm. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of these silver nanoparticles was investigated against Escherichia coli and found to be positive.

  8. Advances in room-temperature solid-state gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    This article presents a review and analysis of different concepts of gamma-ray spectrometry using room-temperature solid-state detectors. The classical approach involving the use of a charge-sensitive preamplifier and attempting to collect all the ionization charge produced by the gamma ray is analyzed and discussed in terms of the charge transport parameters of the most promising compound semiconductor materials. It is concluded that compound semiconductor detector materials having a large disparity between the ..mu.. tau products for electrons and holes (such as HgI/sub 2/ and CdTe) will have rather poor energy resolution if the classical method of spectrometry requiring full charge collection is employed. 30 references.

  9. Engineering the metathesis and oxidation-reduction reaction in solid state at room temperature for nanosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Pengfei; Cao, Yali; Jia, Dianzeng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Ruili

    2014-03-01

    It is a long-standing goal to explore convenient synthesis methodology for functional materials. Recently, several multiple-step approaches have been designed for photocatalysts AgnX@Ag (X = Cl-, PO43-, etc.), mainly containing the ion-exchange (metathesis) reaction followed by photoreduction in solution. But they were obsessed by complicated process, the uncontrollability of composition and larger sizes of Ag particles. Here we show a general solid-state route for the synthesis of AgnX@Ag catalysts with hierarchical structures. Due to strong surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles with broad shape and size, the AgnX@Ag showed high photocatalytic activity in visible region. Especially, the composition of AgnX@Ag composites could be accurately controlled by regulating the feed ratio of (NH2OH)2.H2SO4 to anions, by which the performance were easily optimized. Results demonstrate that the metathesis and oxidation-reduction reactions can be performed in solid state at room temperature for nanosynthesis, greatly reducing the time/energy consumption and pollution.

  10. Determination of morestan residues in water and foodstuffs by transmitted room temperature solid phase spectrophosphorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Capitan-Vallvey, L.F.; Deheidel, M.K.; Avidad, R.

    1998-12-01

    A method for the determination of the pesticide morestan by means of transmitted room temperature solid phase spectrophosphorimetry has been developed. The method is based on the native phosphorescence showed by the morestan when it is fixed in a Whatman No. 4 paper as a solid support. The excitation and emission wavelengths were 362 and 527 nm, respectively. The optimum phosphorescent emission was obtained when the delay time was 0.15 ms and the gate time 12.0 ms without need of a heavy atom. The linear dynamic range was between 0.1 and 1.0 {micro}g.ml{sup {minus}1}, and the detection and quantification limits were 0.03 and 0.09 {micro}g.ml{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation of ten samples at the 0.6 {micro}g.ml{sup {minus}1} concentration level, was 3.0%. The method was applied to the determination of the pesticide in different type of waters, potatoes and vegetables.

  11. Engineering the metathesis and oxidation-reduction reaction in solid state at room temperature for nanosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pengfei; Cao, Yali; Jia, Dianzeng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Ruili

    2014-01-01

    It is a long-standing goal to explore convenient synthesis methodology for functional materials. Recently, several multiple-step approaches have been designed for photocatalysts AgnX@Ag (X = Cl−, PO43−, etc.), mainly containing the ion-exchange (metathesis) reaction followed by photoreduction in solution. But they were obsessed by complicated process, the uncontrollability of composition and larger sizes of Ag particles. Here we show a general solid-state route for the synthesis of AgnX@Ag catalysts with hierarchical structures. Due to strong surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles with broad shape and size, the AgnX@Ag showed high photocatalytic activity in visible region. Especially, the composition of AgnX@Ag composites could be accurately controlled by regulating the feed ratio of (NH2OH)2·H2SO4 to anions, by which the performance were easily optimized. Results demonstrate that the metathesis and oxidation-reduction reactions can be performed in solid state at room temperature for nanosynthesis, greatly reducing the time/energy consumption and pollution. PMID:24614918

  12. Highly sensitive detection of residual chlorpromazine hydrochloride with solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Lin, Xuan; Zhou, Ping; Lin, Shao-Qin; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2012-07-01

    Under the condition of 60 °C and 20 min at pH 6.12, chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) could react with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to produce FITC-CPZ, which increased the π-electron density (δ) of carbon atom in FITC conjugated system and the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of FITC. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of residual CPZ was established. The regression equation of working curve was ΔI (p) = 4.254 + 7.906 m(CPZ) (ag spot(-1)) with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9990 in the range of 0.036-9.6 ag spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 0.090-24 fg ml(-1), sample volume: 0.40 μl spot(-1)), and the detection limit (LD) was 0.018 ag spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 4.5 × 10(-17) g ml(-1)). This method with wide linear range and high sensitivity was not only used to diagnose human disease based on the correlation between the residual quantity and lethal dose of CPZ in human serum, but also used to determine residual CPZ in biological samples with the results consisting with those obtained by gas chromatography (GC), showing good accuracy. The constituent of FITC-CPZ was analyzed by GC-MS (mass spectrometry) and the reaction mechanism of SSRTP for the determination of trace CPZ was also discussed.

  13. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  14. Performance evaluation of ZnO–CuO hetero junction solid state room temperature ethanol sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ming-Ru; Suyambrakasam, Gobalakrishnan; Wu, Ren-Jang; Chavali, Murthy

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Sensor response (resistance) curves of time were changed from 150 ppm to 250 ppm alcohol concentration of ZnO–CuO 1:1. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The sensing material ZnO–CuO is a high potential alcohol sensor which provides a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature. Highlights: ► The main advantages of the ethanol sensor are as followings. ► Novel materials ZnO–CuO ethanol sensor. ► The optimized ZnO–CuO hetero contact system. ► A good sensor response and room working temperature (save energy). -- Abstract: A semiconductor ethanol sensor was developed using ZnO–CuO and its performance was evaluated at room temperature. Hetero-junction sensor was made of ZnO–CuO nanoparticles for sensing alcohol at room temperature. Nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method and optimized with different weight ratios. Sensor characteristics were linear for the concentration range of 150–250 ppm. Composite materials of ZnO–CuO were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). ZnO–CuO (1:1) material showed maximum sensor response (S = R{sub air}/R{sub alcohol}) of 3.32 ± 0.1 toward 200 ppm of alcohol vapor at room temperature. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The linearity R{sup 2} of the sensor response was 0.9026. The sensing materials ZnO–CuO (1:1) provide a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature.

  15. A method to predict the equilibrium solubility of drugs in solid polymers near room temperature using thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Bellantone, Robert A; Patel, Piyush; Sandhu, Harpreet; Choi, Duk Soon; Singhal, Dharmendra; Chokshi, H; Malick, A Waseem; Shah, Navnit

    2012-12-01

    A method is presented for determining the equilibrium solubility of a drug in a solid polymer at or near room temperature, which represents a typical storage temperature. The method is based on a thermodynamic model to calculate the Gibbs energy change ΔG(SS) associated with forming a binary drug-polymer solid solution from the unmixed polymer and solid drug. The model includes contributions from heat capacity differences between the solid solution and the corresponding unmixed components, breaking up of the solid drug structure, and drug-polymer mixing. Calculation of ΔG(SS) from thermal analysis data is demonstrated, and it is shown that minima of plots of ΔG(SS) versus the dissolved drug concentration represent the equilibrium drug solubility in the polymer. Solid solutions were produced for drug-polymer systems (griseofulvin, indomethacin, itraconazole; PVP K30, Eudragit L100, Eudragit E100) in drug weight fractions up to ∼25%. At 25°C, it was seen that heat capacity effects were important in determining the drug solubility. It was concluded that drug solubilities in solid polymers can be determined using thermal analysis, and must include heat capacity effects when evaluated near room temperature.

  16. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  17. Liquid-like ionic conduction in solid lithium and sodium monocarba-closo-decaborates near or at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Wan Si; Matsuo, Motoaki; Wu, Hui; ...

    2016-02-05

    Both LiCB9H10 and NaCB9H10 exhibit liquid-like cationic conductivities (≥0.03 S cm–1) in their disordered hexagonal phases near or at room temperature. Furthermore, these unprecedented conductivities and favorable stabilities enabled by the large pseudoaromatic polyhedral anions render these materials in their pristine or further modified forms as promising solid electrolytes in next-generation, power devices.

  18. Reshaping Lithium Plating/Stripping Behavior via Bifunctional Polymer Electrolyte for Room-Temperature Solid Li Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Yin, Ya-Xia; Li, Nian-Wu; Du, Wen-Cheng; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-12-14

    High-energy rechargeable Li metal batteries are hindered by dendrite growth due to the use of a liquid electrolyte. Solid polymer electrolytes, as promising candidates to solve the above issue, are expected to own high Li ion conductivity without sacrificing mechanical strength, which is still a big challenge to realize. In this study, a bifunctional solid polymer electrolyte exactly having these two merits is proposed with an interpenetrating network of poly(ether-acrylate) (ipn-PEA) and realized via photopolymerization of ion-conductive poly(ethylene oxide) and branched acrylate. The ipn-PEA electrolyte with facile processing capability integrates high mechanical strength (ca. 12 GPa) with high room-temperature ionic conductance (0.22 mS cm(-1)), and significantly promotes uniform Li plating/stripping. Li metal full cells assembled with ipn-PEA electrolyte and cathodes within 4.5 V vs Li(+)/Li operate effectively at a rate of 5 C and cycle stably at a rate of 1 C at room temperature. Because of its fabrication simplicity and compelling characteristics, the bifunctional ipn-PEA electrolyte reshapes the feasibility of room-temperature solid-state Li metal batteries.

  19. Trends in the design of front-end systems for room temperature solid state detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, Pier F.; Re, Valerio

    2003-10-07

    The paper discusses the present trends in the design of low-noise front-end systems for room temperature semiconductor detectors. The technological advancement provided by submicron CMOS and BiCMOS processes is examined from several points of view. The noise performances are a fundamental issue in most detector applications and suitable attention is devoted to them for the purpose of judging whether or not the present processes supersede the solutions featuring a field-effect transistor as a front-end element. However, other considerations are also important in judging how well a monolithic technology suits the front-end design. Among them, the way a technology lends itself to the realization of additional functions, for instance, the charge reset in a charge-sensitive loop or the time-variant filters featuring the special weighting functions that may be requested in some applications of CdTe or CZT detectors.

  20. Room temperature gas-solid reaction of titanium on glass surfaces forming a very low resistivity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Hugo; Clark, Neville; Azofeifa, Daniel; Avendano, E.

    2016-09-01

    Titanium films were deposited on quartz, glass, polyamide and PET substrates in a high vacuum system at room temperature and their electrical resistance monitored in vacuo as a function of thickness. These measurements indicate that a low electrical resistance layer is formed in a gas-solid reaction during the condensation of the initial layers of Ti on glass and quartz substrates. Layers begin to show relative low electrical resistance at around 21 nm for glass and 9nm for quartz. Samples deposited on polyamide and PET do not show this low resistance feature.

  1. Solvent permits solid curing agents to be used at room temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, M. C.

    1967-01-01

    Solvent system dissolves the solid curing agents used with polyurethane resins in adhesive systems. The system developed yields bond strengths comparable to 100 percent solid formulations. The optimum solvent chosen was a 55.5 percent solution in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran.

  2. Room-Temperature Tensile Behavior of Oriented Tungsten Single Crystals with Rhenium in Dilute Solid Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    SINGLE CRYSTALS WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION Sby M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio 20060516196 NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND...WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION By M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION For sale by...ORIENTED TUNGSTEN SINGLE CRYSTALS WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION * by M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center SUMMARY Tungsten single crystals

  3. A study of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Saravanan, Kuppan; Jarry, Angelique; Kostecki, Robert; ...

    2015-01-26

    Understanding the kinetic implication of solid-solution vs. biphasic reaction pathways is critical for the development of advanced intercalation electrode materials. Yet this has been a long-standing challenge in materials science due to the elusive metastable nature of solid solution phases. The present study reports the synthesis, isolation, and characterization of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions. In situ XRD studies performed on pristine and chemically-delithiated, micron-sized single crystals reveal the thermal behavior of LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) cathode material consisting of three cubic phases: LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase I), Li0.5Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase II) and Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase III). A phase diagram capturing the structuralmore » changes as functions of both temperature and Li content was established. In conclusion, the work not only demonstrates the possibility of synthesizing alternative electrode materials that are metastable in nature, but also enables in-depth evaluation on the physical, electrochemical and kinetic properties of transient intermediate phases and their role in battery electrode performance.« less

  4. A study of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Kuppan; Jarry, Angelique; Kostecki, Robert; Chen, Guoying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the kinetic implication of solid-solution vs. biphasic reaction pathways is critical for the development of advanced intercalation electrode materials. Yet this has been a long-standing challenge in materials science due to the elusive metastable nature of solid solution phases. The present study reports the synthesis, isolation, and characterization of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions. In situ XRD studies performed on pristine and chemically-delithiated, micron-sized single crystals reveal the thermal behavior of LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) cathode material consisting of three cubic phases: LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase I), Li0.5Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase II) and Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase III). A phase diagram capturing the structural changes as functions of both temperature and Li content was established. The work not only demonstrates the possibility of synthesizing alternative electrode materials that are metastable in nature, but also enables in-depth evaluation on the physical, electrochemical and kinetic properties of transient intermediate phases and their role in battery electrode performance. PMID:25619504

  5. A study of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, Kuppan; Jarry, Angelique; Kostecki, Robert; Chen, Guoying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the kinetic implication of solid-solution vs. biphasic reaction pathways is critical for the development of advanced intercalation electrode materials. Yet this has been a long-standing challenge in materials science due to the elusive metastable nature of solid solution phases. The present study reports the synthesis, isolation, and characterization of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions. In situ XRD studies performed on pristine and chemically-delithiated, micron-sized single crystals reveal the thermal behavior of LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 <= x <= 1) cathode material consisting of three cubic phases: LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase I), Li0.5Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase II) and Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase III). A phase diagram capturing the structural changes as functions of both temperature and Li content was established. The work not only demonstrates the possibility of synthesizing alternative electrode materials that are metastable in nature, but also enables in-depth evaluation on the physical, electrochemical and kinetic properties of transient intermediate phases and their role in battery electrode performance.

  6. Catalytic solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace rhamnose based on its condensation reaction with calcein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Xin; Lin, Shao-Qin; Zhang, Li-Hong; Cai, Wen-Lian; Lin, Xuan; Pan, You-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Calcein (R) could not only emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper using I - as perturber, but also could be oxidized by H 2O 2 to form a non-phosphorescence compound (R'), resulting in the quenching of RTP signal of R. Moreover, the ortho-hydrogen of phenolic hydroxyl in R took condensation reaction with rhamnose (Rha) to produce non-phosphorescence compound (R-Rha) causing the RTP signal of R to further quench, and R-Rha was oxidized by H 2O 2 to form R' and Rha, bringing about the sharp RTP signal quenching of R. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace Rha based on its strong catalytic effect on H 2O 2 oxidizing R has been established, with the detection limit (LD) of 7.8 zg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 2.0 × 10 -17 g ml -1, sample volume: 0.40 μl spot -1). This method has been applied to determine trace Rha in cigarettes and jujubes, with the results coinciding well with those determined by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The component of R-Rha also was analyzed by means of HPLC, mass spectrometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The mechanism of catalytic SSRTP for the determination of trace Rha was discussed.

  7. Room-temperature laser annealing for solid-phase epitaxial crystallization of β-Ga2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiojiri, Daishi; Fukuda, Daiji; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Tsuchimine, Nobuo; Koyama, Koji; Kaneko, Satoru; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The epitaxial crystallization of β-Ga2O3 thin films on NiO-buffered α-Al2O3(0001) substrates via the solid-phase crystallization of amorphous Ga2O3 thin films by KrF excimer laser annealing at room temperature (RT) was examined. The results of X-ray and reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements indicated that the epitaxial β-Ga2O3 (\\bar{2}01) thin films were fabricated by RT laser annealing. The optical bandgap of the thin films was estimated to be 4.9 eV from the results of UV/vis transmittance measurements. In the cathodoluminescence spectrum, UV-green luminescence was observed for the thin films. These optical properties are similar to those of bulk β-Ga2O3.

  8. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  9. Orthogonal optimization for room temperature magnetron sputtering of ZnO:Al films for all-solid electrochromic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Diao, Xungang; Ding, Peng

    2011-02-01

    In order to obtain competent and quality (high transparency, conductivity and stability) aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al, ZAO) films for all solid electrochromic devices, ZAO films were prepared by direct current (D.C.) reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature based on orthogonal design. Optical and electrical property dependences of the films on the four dominant sputtering parameters: sputtering time, target-substrate distance, sputtering power and O2 flow ratio were simultaneously investigated with measured results using mathematical and statistical method. Optimal Parameters to fabricate ZAO films with optimum comprehensive performances were obtained ultimately. Resistivity and carrier concentration of ZAO film deposited with optimized parameters were 3.89 × 10-4 Ω cm and 1.09 × 1021 cm-3, respectively. ZAO films with these superior properties were employed as transparent electrodes eventually in a WO3 based all-solid electrochromic device which displayed good electrochromic performance. The regulation range for transmittance in the visible region of the device was more than 50%, which was comparable to that of the device adopting indium tin oxide (ITO) films as electrodes.

  10. [Room-temperature solid-state synthesis of complexes of copper acetate and multi-nitrogen heterocyclic ligands].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xu-hua; Li, Dan; Feng, Qiao; Huang, Qing-lian; Xu, Yan-ping

    2003-06-01

    At room temperature, sufficiently grinding the mixtures of copper acetate with 1,2,4-triazole and benzotriazole separately resulted in the proceeding of the solid state reaction. It was found that the acetate acid flowed during the grinding. The heterocycle ligand 1,2,4-triazole or benzotriazole replaced the acetate and coordinates to Cu (II) to form a mixed ligands complex. The elementary analysis results show that the compositions of products were consistent with Cu (C2H2N3)(Ac).H2O and Cu (C6H4N3)(Ac).H2O, respectively. Infrared spectra of both complexes have exhibited the characteristics of C=N vibrations [Cu(C2H2N3)(Ac).H2O, 1,513 cm-1; Cu(C6H4N3)(Ac).H2O, 1,446 cm-1] for heterocycle ligands, C=O [Cu(C2H2N3)(Ac).H2O, 1,570 and 1,406 cm-1; Cu(C6H4N3)(Ac).H2O, 1,604 and 1,422 cm-1] for acetate and O-H (-3,400 cm-1) for water, respectively. The solid state reaction provides a way which is rapid, mild and in the absence of solvent for synthesized new complexes.

  11. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SEPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TETROL METABOLITES OF BENZO[A]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS USING HPLC AND SOLID-MATRIX ROOM TEMPERATURE LUMINESCENCE. (R824100)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Four tetrols of benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adducts were separated using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Chromatographic fractions containing a given tetrol were readily characterized with solid-matrix room temperature luminescence techniques. So...

  13. SEPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TETROL METABOLITES OF BENZO[A]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS USING HPLC AND SOLID-MATRIX ROOM TEMPERATURE LUMINESCENCE. (R824100)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Four tetrols of benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adducts were separated using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Chromatographic fractions containing a given tetrol were readily characterized with solid-matrix room temperature luminescence techniques. So...

  14. Room-Temperature All-solid-state Rechargeable Sodium-ion Batteries with a Cl-doped Na3PS4 Superionic Conductor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Kompella, Christopher S; Nguyen, Han; Zhu, Zhuoying; Hy, Sunny; Deng, Zhi; Meng, Ying Shirley; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-20

    All-solid-state sodium-ion batteries are promising candidates for large-scale energy storage applications. The key enabler for an all-solid-state architecture is a sodium solid electrolyte that exhibits high Na(+) conductivity at ambient temperatures, as well as excellent phase and electrochemical stability. In this work, we present a first-principles-guided discovery and synthesis of a novel Cl-doped tetragonal Na3PS4 (t-Na3-xPS4-xClx) solid electrolyte with a room-temperature Na(+) conductivity exceeding 1 mS cm(-1). We demonstrate that an all-solid-state TiS2/t-Na3-xPS4-xClx/Na cell utilizing this solid electrolyte can be cycled at room-temperature at a rate of C/10 with a capacity of about 80 mAh g(-1) over 10 cycles. We provide evidence from density functional theory calculations that this excellent electrochemical performance is not only due to the high Na(+) conductivity of the solid electrolyte, but also due to the effect that "salting" Na3PS4 has on the formation of an electronically insulating, ionically conducting solid electrolyte interphase.

  15. Room-Temperature All-solid-state Rechargeable Sodium-ion Batteries with a Cl-doped Na3PS4 Superionic Conductor

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Kompella, Christopher S.; Nguyen, Han; Zhu, Zhuoying; Hy, Sunny; Deng, Zhi; Meng, Ying Shirley; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state sodium-ion batteries are promising candidates for large-scale energy storage applications. The key enabler for an all-solid-state architecture is a sodium solid electrolyte that exhibits high Na+ conductivity at ambient temperatures, as well as excellent phase and electrochemical stability. In this work, we present a first-principles-guided discovery and synthesis of a novel Cl-doped tetragonal Na3PS4 (t-Na3−xPS4−xClx) solid electrolyte with a room-temperature Na+ conductivity exceeding 1 mS cm−1. We demonstrate that an all-solid-state TiS2/t-Na3−xPS4−xClx/Na cell utilizing this solid electrolyte can be cycled at room-temperature at a rate of C/10 with a capacity of about 80 mAh g−1 over 10 cycles. We provide evidence from density functional theory calculations that this excellent electrochemical performance is not only due to the high Na+ conductivity of the solid electrolyte, but also due to the effect that “salting” Na3PS4 has on the formation of an electronically insulating, ionically conducting solid electrolyte interphase. PMID:27645565

  16. Room-Temperature All-solid-state Rechargeable Sodium-ion Batteries with a Cl-doped Na3PS4 Superionic Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Kompella, Christopher S.; Nguyen, Han; Zhu, Zhuoying; Hy, Sunny; Deng, Zhi; Meng, Ying Shirley; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-01

    All-solid-state sodium-ion batteries are promising candidates for large-scale energy storage applications. The key enabler for an all-solid-state architecture is a sodium solid electrolyte that exhibits high Na+ conductivity at ambient temperatures, as well as excellent phase and electrochemical stability. In this work, we present a first-principles-guided discovery and synthesis of a novel Cl-doped tetragonal Na3PS4 (t-Na3‑xPS4‑xClx) solid electrolyte with a room-temperature Na+ conductivity exceeding 1 mS cm‑1. We demonstrate that an all-solid-state TiS2/t-Na3‑xPS4‑xClx/Na cell utilizing this solid electrolyte can be cycled at room-temperature at a rate of C/10 with a capacity of about 80 mAh g‑1 over 10 cycles. We provide evidence from density functional theory calculations that this excellent electrochemical performance is not only due to the high Na+ conductivity of the solid electrolyte, but also due to the effect that “salting” Na3PS4 has on the formation of an electronically insulating, ionically conducting solid electrolyte interphase.

  17. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-11-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported.

  18. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-11-15

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported.

  19. Room temperature sputtering of inclined c-axis ZnO for shear mode solidly mounted resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rughoobur, G.; DeMiguel-Ramos, M.; Mirea, T.; Clement, M.; Olivares, J.; Díaz-Durán, B.; Sangrador, J.; Miele, I.; Milne, W. I.; Iborra, E.; Flewitt, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    ZnO films with a c-axis significantly inclined away from the surface normal were grown by a remote plasma sputtering technique at room temperature. The films were used to make solidly mounted resonators (SMRs) operating in shear mode at a resonant frequency of 1.35 GHz. Control of the ZnO microstructure was achieved using a polycrystalline AlN seed layer which can be added on top of a sputtered acoustic mirror to give a complete SMR device. The ZnO was reactively sputtered in an atmosphere of argon and oxygen from a zinc target. The c-axis of the ZnO was estimated to be at an angle of ˜45° to the surface normal. SMRs were measured to have quality factors (Q) of up to 140 and effective electromechanical coupling coefficients of up to 2.2% in air. Although an inclined c-axis can be achieved with direct growth onto the acoustic mirror, it is shown that the AlN seed layer provides higher coupling coefficients and narrower inclination angular distribution. The responses of the devices in liquids of different viscosities (acetone, water, and AZ5214E photoresist) were measured. The shear mode Q decreased by 45% in acetone, 72% in water, and 92% in AZ5214E.

  20. An All-Solid-State, Room-Temperature, Heterodyne Receiver for Atmospheric Spectroscopy at 1.2 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siles, Jose V.; Mehdi, Imran; Schlecht, Erich T.; Gulkis, Samuel; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Lin, Robert H.; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John J.; Thomas, Bertrand; Maestrini, Alain E.

    2013-01-01

    Heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths have played a major role in astrophysics as well as Earth and planetary remote sensing. All-solid-state heterodyne receivers using both MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) Schottky-diode-based LO (local oscillator) sources and mixers are uniquely suited for long-term planetary missions or Earth climate monitoring missions as they can operate for decades without the need for any active cryogenic cooling. However, the main concern in using Schottky-diode-based mixers at frequencies beyond 1 THz has been the lack of enough LO power to drive the devices because 1 to 3 mW are required to properly pump Schottky diode mixers. Recent progress in HEMT- (high-electron-mobility- transistor) based power amplifier technology, with output power levels in excess of 1 W recently demonstrated at W-band, as well as advances in MMIC Schottky diode circuit technology, have led to measured output powers up to 1.4 mW at 0.9 THz. Here the first room-temperature tunable, all-planar, Schottky-diode-based receiver is reported that is operating at 1.2 THz over a wide (˜20%) bandwidth. The receiver front-end (see figure) consists of a Schottky-diode-based 540 to 640 GHz multiplied LO chain (featuring a cascade of W-band power amplifiers providing around 120 to 180 mW at W-band), a 200-GHz MMIC frequency doubler, and a 600-GHz MMIC frequency tripler, plus a biasable 1.2-THz MMIC sub-harmonic Schottky-diode mixer. The LO chain has been designed, fabricated, and tested at JPL and provides around 1 to 1.5 mW at 540 o 640 GHz. The sub-harmonic mixer consists of two Schottky diodes on a thin GaAs membrane in an anti-parallel configuration. An integrated metal insulator metal (MIM) capacitor has been included on-chip to allow dc bias for the Schottky diodes. A bias voltage of around 0.5 V/diode is necessary to reduce the LO power required down to the 1 to 1.5 mW available from the LO chain. The epilayer thickness and doping profiles have

  1. Room temperature polyesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.S.; Stupp, S.I. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new room temperature polymerization method has been developed for the synthesis of high molecular weight polyesters directly from carboxylic acids and phenols. The solution polymerization reaction proceeds under mild conditions, near neutral pH, and also avoids the use of preactivated acid derivatives for esterification. The reaction is useful in the preparation of isoregic ordered chains with translational polar symmetry and also in the polymerization of functionalized or chiral monomers. The conditions required for polymerization in the carbodiimide-based reaction included catalysis by the 1:1 molecular complex formed by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and p-toluenesulfonic acid. These conditions were established through studies on a model system involving esterification of p-toluic acid and p-cresol. Self-condensation of several hydroxy acid monomers by this reaction has produced routinely good yields of polyesters with molecular weights greater than 15,000. It is believed that the high extents of reaction required for significant degrees of polymerization result from suppression of the side reaction leading to N-acylurea. The utility of this reaction in the formation of polar chains from sensitive monomers is demonstrated hereby the polycondensation of a chiral hydroxy acid.

  2. system at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoyuan; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xiuhua; Xiao, Yongyin; Ma, Mingyu; Zhu, Wenjie; Wei, Feng

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the moderately and lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) were fabricated by the `one-pot procedure' metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method in the HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature. The effects of H2O2 concentration on the nanostructure of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated. The experimental results indicate that porous structure can be introduced by the addition of H2O2 and the pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of H2O2. The H2O2 species replaces Ag+ as the oxidant and the Ag nanoparticles work as catalyst during the etching. And the concentration of H2O2 influences the nucleation and motility of Ag particles, which leads to formation of different porous structure within the nanowires. A mechanism based on the lateral etching which is catalyzed by Ag particles under the motivation by H2O2 reduction is proposed to explain the PSiNWs formation.

  3. Dimensionality changes in the solid phase at room temperature: 2D → 1D → 3D evolution induced by ammonia sorption-desorption on zinc phosphates.

    PubMed

    Amghouz, Zakariae; Ramajo, Beatriz; Khainakov, Sergei A; da Silva, Iván; Castro, Germán R; García, José R; García-Granda, Santiago

    2014-06-28

    Two-dimensional zinc phosphate NH4Zn2(PO4)(HPO4) (), via ammonia vapor interaction at room temperature, transforms to a one-dimensional novel compound NH4Zn(NH3)PO4 (). By ammonia desorption (in air at room temperature) transforms to NH4ZnPO4 () with a well-known ABW-zeolitic topology. The crystal structure of was solved ab initio using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data (monoclinic, P21/a, a = 16.5227(2) Å, b = 6.21780(8) Å, c = 5.24317(6) Å, β = 91.000(2)°, Z = 4). The structures of three compounds include extra-framework ammonium cations to the 4-fold coordinated zinc (ZnO4 tetrahedra for and , and ZnO3N tetrahedra for ) and phosphorus (PO4 tetrahedra) with bi-, mono- or three-dimensional linkages, respectively for , or . To our knowledge, the process described here constitutes the first example of dimensionality change in the solid phase promoted by a solid-gas interaction at room temperature in metal phosphates.

  4. Liquid-like ionic conduction in solid lithium and sodium monocarba-closo-decaborates near or at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wan Si; Matsuo, Motoaki; Wu, Hui; Stavila, Vitalie; Zhou, Wei; Talin, Albert Alec; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Skoryunov, Roman V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Unemoto, Atsushi; Orimo, Shin -Ichi; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-02-05

    Both LiCB9H10 and NaCB9H10 exhibit liquid-like cationic conductivities (≥0.03 S cm–1) in their disordered hexagonal phases near or at room temperature. Furthermore, these unprecedented conductivities and favorable stabilities enabled by the large pseudoaromatic polyhedral anions render these materials in their pristine or further modified forms as promising solid electrolytes in next-generation, power devices.

  5. Toward room temperature superconductivity?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, C. K. N.; Dynes, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The last 12 months have witnessed frenzied activity in condensed matter physics, unmatched by any other since the invention of the laser. In this article, we summarize the status, promise, and problems in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. We also comment on the mechanisms and policies needed for the United States to economically benefit from the recent discoveries in the face of what can be best described as an international race to win the battle. Images

  6. Transformative Evolution of Organolead Triiodide Perovskite Thin Films from Strong Room-Temperature Solid-Gas Interaction between HPbI3-CH3NH2 Precursor Pair.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shuping; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zaiwei; Yang, Mengjin; Krause, Amanda R; Zhou, Zhongmin; Zhu, Kai; Padture, Nitin P; Cui, Guanglei

    2016-01-27

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a nonsalt-based precursor pair--inorganic HPbI3 solid and organic CH3NH2 gas--for the deposition of uniform CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films. The strong room-temperature solid-gas interaction between HPbI3 and CH3NH2 induces transformative evolution of ultrasmooth, full-coverage perovskite thin films at a rapid rate (in seconds) from nominally processed rough, partial-coverage HPbI3 thin films. The chemical origin of this behavior is elucidated via in situ experiments. Perovskite solar cells, fabricated using MAPbI3 thin films thus deposited, deliver power conversion efficiencies up to 18.2%, attesting to the high quality of the perovskite thin films deposited using this transformative process.

  7. Conductivity Modulation of Gold Thin Film at Room Temperature via All-Solid-State Electric-Double-Layer Gating Accelerated by Nonlinear Ionic Transport.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Omote, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideaki; Fujii, Eiji

    2017-02-15

    We demonstrated the field-effect conductivity modulation of a gold thin film by all-solid-state electric-double-layer (EDL) gating at room temperature using an epitaxially grown oxide fast lithium conductor, La2/3-xLi3xTiO3 (LLT), as a solid electrolyte. The linearly increasing gold conductivity with increasing gate bias demonstrates that the conductivity modulation is indeed due to carrier injection by EDL gating. The response time becomes exponentially faster with increasing gate bias, a result of the onset of nonlinear ionic transportation. This nonlinear dynamic response indicates that the ionic motion-driven device can be much faster than would be estimated from a linear ionic transport model.

  8. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  9. Heteroleptic cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes displaying blue phosphorescence in solution and solid state at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Han; Li, Shih-Wen; Chi, Yun; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Chou, Pi-Tai; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hsiang; Shu, Ching-Fong

    2005-10-31

    A series of heteroleptic Ir(III) metal complexes 1-3 bearing two N-phenyl-substituted pyrazoles and one 2-pyridyl pyrazole (or triazole) ligands were synthesized and characterized to attain highly efficient, room-temperature blue phosphorescence. The N-phenylpyrazole ligands, dfpzH = 1-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyrazole, fpzH = 1-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrazole, dfmpzH = 1-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole, and fmpzH = 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole, show a similar reaction pattern with respect to the typical cyclometalated (C(wedge)N) chelate, which utilizes its ortho-substituted phenyl segment to link with the central Ir(III) atom, while the second 2-pyridylpyrazole (or triazole) ligand, namely, fppzH = 3-(trifluoromethyl)-5-(2-pyridyl)pyrazole, fptzH = 3-(trifluoromethyl)-5-(2-pyridyl)triazole, and hptzH = 3-(heptafluoropropyl)-5-(2-pyridyl)triazole, undergoes typical anionic (N--N) chelation to complete the octahedral framework. X-ray structural analyses on complexes [(dfpz)(2)Ir(fppz)] (1a) and [(fmpz)(2)Ir(hptz)] (3d) were established to confirm their molecular structures. Increases of the pipi energy gaps of the Ir(III) metal complexes were systematically achieved with two tuning strategies. One involves the substitution for one or two fluorine atoms at the N-phenyl segment or the introduction of two electron-releasing methyl substituents at the pyrazole segment of the H(C--N) ligands. Alternatively, we have applied the more electron-accepting triazolate in place of the pyrazolate segment for the third (N--N)H ligand. Our results, on the basis of steady-state, relaxation dynamics, and theoretical approaches, lead to a conclusion that, for complexes 1-3, the weakening of iridium metal-ligand bonding strength in the T(1) state plays a crucial role for the fast radiationless deactivation. For the case of [(fmpz)(2)Ir(hptz)] (3d), a thermal deactivation barrier of 4.8 kcal/mol was further deduced via temperature-dependent studies. The results provide a

  10. Room-temperature solid state synthesis of ZnO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterojunction and their solar light photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Ren, Pengrong; Fan, Huiqing

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • ZnO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized via a solid-state reaction. • The amount of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} plays an important role in controlling the morphology. • The amount of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} plays an important role in controlling the photocatalysis. - Abstract: ZnO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterojunction was prepared by solid state reaction method at room temperature. The as-prepared nanostructures were characterized as the assembled nanosheets of ZnO on which Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were well dispersed. Further studies revealed that the morphology and photocatalytic property could be regulated by tuning the amount of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The introduction of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} can lead to the enhancement of solar light absorption, and the 5% ZnO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples exhibited the best photocatalytic activity under the solar light irradiation. The excellent photocatalytic performances could be ascribed to the synergistic effects of the hierarchical nanostructures and the effective separation of photogenerated carriers. Moreover, the hydroxyl radicals (·OH) are found to be the main active species generated in the oxidation reaction of RhB over ZnO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} photocatalyst. Therefore, our work demonstrated a facile way to prepare hierarchical nanostructures with excellent photocatalytic performance using solid state method at room temperature.

  11. Catalytic solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of residual perphenazine based on the electronic effect of rhodamine 6G.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Ma-Lin; Zhang, Li-Hong; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Jiao, Li; Lin, Xuan; Lin, Shao-Qin; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The rhodamine 6G(+) -perphenazine (Rhod 6G(+) -PPH) compound is formed in the ester-exchange reaction between -OH of PPH and -COOC2 H5 of Rhod 6G(+) . PPH was oxidized to a red compound (PPH') in the presence of K2 S2 O8 . Interestingly, the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) of Rhod 6G(+) was quenched because the -OH of PPH' reacted with -COOC2 H5 of Rhod 6G(+) -PPH to form Rhod 6G(+) -PPH' and PPH, which decreased the π-electron density (δ) of the carbon atom in the Rhod 6G(+) -PPH' conjugated system and enhanced the nonradiation energy loss of the excited Rhod 6G(+) of the triplet state. The PPH content was directly proportional to the ΔIp of the system. Thus, a new catalytic solid-substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) method was established for the determination of PPH. The method had high sensitivity (the limit of detection was 0.019 fg/spot, corresponding to a concentration of 4.8 × 10(-14)  g/mL; the sampling quantity was 0.40 μL/spot), good selectivity, convenience and speed. The analytical results were in accordance with those of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The structures of Rhod 6G(+) , PPH and Rhod 6G(+) -PPH were characterized by infrared spectra. The reaction mechanism by which PPH was determined is discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by solid-substrate room-temperature phosphorimetry based on Triticum vulgare lectin labeled with fullerenol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Fei; Huang, Hong-Hua; Zeng, Li-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Guo-Hui; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2008-04-01

    Fullerenol (F) shows a strong and stable room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) signal on the surface of nitrocellulose membrane (NCM) at lambda ex max/ lambda em max =542.0/709.4 nm. When modified by dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBS), fullerenol emits a stronger signal. It was also found that quantitative specific affinity-adsorption reaction can be carried out between Triticum vulgare lectin (WGA) labeled with DBS-F and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) on the surface of NCM, and the product obtained (WGA-ALP-WGA-F-DBS) emits a strong and stable RTP signal. Furthermore, the content of ALP was proportional to the DeltaI(p) value. Based on the facts above, a new method for the determination of trace amounts of ALP by affinity-adsorption solid-substrate room-temperature phosphorimetry (AA-SS-RTP) was established, using fullerenol modified with DBS to label WGA. The detection limit was 0.011 fg spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 2.8x10(-14) g ml(-1), namely 2.8x10(-16) mol l(-1)). This method with high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision has been successfully applied to the determination of the content of ALP in human serum survey and forecast human disease, and the results are tallied with those using alkaline phosphatase kits. The mechanism for the determination of ALP using AA-SS-RTP was also discussed.

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism of 2H-SiC-α-Al2O3 solid solution nanowires and the physical origin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Lu, Cheng; Cui, Hao; Wang, Jing; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Chengxin

    2015-03-21

    In this work we report the first synthesis of 2H-SiC-α-Al2O3 solid solution (SS) nanowires with 2H-SiC as the host phase. The one dimensional (1D) fake binary-system exhibits interesting room-temperature ferromagnetism and spin-glass-like (SGL) behavior. This novel diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) was designed on the basis of SiC which is the most promising fundamental semiconductor used in next-generation electronics as the substitute for Si. A systematic investigation of the magnetic properties reveals the origin of the material's room-temperature ferromagnetism and spin-glass behavior. Spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the net moment originates from a strong coupling between atoms around local Si vacancies produced by the SS defect reaction. Unlike random defects derived magnetic behavior, the SS resulted magnetism is significant to be utilized in functional devices since it belongs to a stable crystal structure that is possible to be prepared rationally in a controlled manner.

  14. Novel Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Electrolyte to Enable LiFePO4 Quasi-Solid-State Li-Ion Batteries Performed Highly around Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui; Gao, Rongtan; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Mingjian; Xu, Junyi; Yang, Jinlong; Pan, Feng

    2016-11-16

    A novel type of organic-inorganic hybrid polymer electrolytes with high electrochemical performances around room temperature is formed by hybrid of nanofillers, Y-type oligomer, polyoxyethylene and Li-salt (PBA-Li), of which the Tg and Tm are significantly lowered by blended heterogeneous polyethers and embedded nanofillers with benefit of the dipole modification to achieve the high Li-ion migration due to more free-volume space. The quasi-solid-state Li-ion batteries based on the LiFePO4/15PBA-Li/Li-metal cells present remarkable reversible capacities (133 and 165 mAh g(-1) @0.2 C at 30 and 45 °C, respectively), good rate ability and stable cycle performance (141.9 mAh g(-1) @0.2 C at 30 °C after 150 cycles).

  15. A new chemical route to a hybrid nanostructure: room-temperature solid-state reaction synthesis of Ag@AgCl with efficient photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengfei; Cao, Yali

    2012-08-07

    The room-temperature solid-state chemical reaction technique has been used to synthesize the silver nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor silver@silver chloride for the first time. It has the advantages of convenient operation, lower cost, less pollution, and mass production. This simple technique created a wide array of nanosized silver particles which had a strong surface plasmon resonance effect in the visible region, and built up an excellent composite structure of silver@silver chloride hybrid which exhibited high photocatalytic activity and stability towards decomposition of organic methyl orange under visible-light illumination. Moreover, this work achieved the control of composition of the silver@silver chloride composite simply by adjusting the feed ratio of reactants. It offers an alternative method for synthesising metal@semiconductor composites.

  16. Determination of trace formaldehyde by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence quenching method based on the rose bengal-potassium bromate-Tween-80 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaming; Yang, Tianlong; Zhu, Guohui; Chen, Hailing; Li, Pingping; Lin, Xuan; Huang, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    A new method for the determination of trace formaldehyde by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence quenching method has been proposed. It is based on the facts that rose bengal (R) can emit intense and stable room temperature phosphorescence on the solid substrate of filter paper (SS-RTP). Potassium bromate (KBrO 3) can oxidize R, which causes the quenching of RTP. In the presence of HCHO, it can react with KBrO 3 to form Br 2 and Br 2 can oxidize R, which causes smart quenching of RTP. The phosphorescence intensity (Δ Ip) is directly proportional to the concentration of HCHO. In the presence of Tween-80, the Δ Ip will be increased to 9.1 times higher than that without it. The linear range of this method is 0.016-1.6 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 0.040-4.0 pg ml -1, 0.40 μl spot -1) with the detection limit of 4.5 ag spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 1.1 × 10 -14 g ml -1). The regression equation for working curve is Δ Ip = 136.6 + 28.28 mHCHO fg spot -1 ( r = 0.9935, n = 6). This method is sensitive, simple, rapid and has been applied to the determination of trace formaldehyde in real samples with satisfactory results. The mechanism of determination of trace formaldehyde by SS-RTP quenching method based on the rose bengal-KBrO 3-Tween-80 system is also discussed.

  17. Determination of trace formaldehyde by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence quenching method based on the rose bengal-potassium bromate-Tween-80 system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaming; Yang, Tianlong; Zhu, Guohui; Chen, Hailing; Li, Pingping; Lin, Xuan; Huang, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    A new method for the determination of trace formaldehyde by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence quenching method has been proposed. It is based on the facts that rose bengal (R) can emit intense and stable room temperature phosphorescence on the solid substrate of filter paper (SS-RTP). Potassium bromate (KBrO(3)) can oxidize R, which causes the quenching of RTP. In the presence of HCHO, it can react with KBrO(3) to form Br(2) and Br(2) can oxidize R, which causes smart quenching of RTP. The phosphorescence intensity (DeltaI(p)) is directly proportional to the concentration of HCHO. In the presence of Tween-80, the DeltaI(p) will be increased to 9.1 times higher than that without it. The linear range of this method is 0.016-1.6fgspot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 0.040-4.0 pgml(-1), 0.40 microlspot(-1)) with the detection limit of 4.5agspot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 1.1 x 10(-14) gml(-1)). The regression equation for working curve is DeltaI(p)=136.6+28.28m(HCHO)fgspot(-1) (r=0.9935, n=6). This method is sensitive, simple, rapid and has been applied to the determination of trace formaldehyde in real samples with satisfactory results. The mechanism of determination of trace formaldehyde by SS-RTP quenching method based on the rose bengal-KBrO(3)-Tween-80 system is also discussed.

  18. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  19. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  20. Enhanced photoluminescence of SrWO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Anthuvan John Banu, I. B. Shameem

    2015-06-24

    Optically efficient europium activated alkaline earth metal tungstate nano phosphor (SrWO{sub 4}) with different doping concentrations have been synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction at room temperature for the first time. The XRD and Raman spectra results indicated that the prepared powders exhibit a scheelite-type tetragonal structure. FTIR spectra exhibited a high absorption band situated at around 854 cm{sup −1}, which was ascribed to the W–O antisymmetric stretching vibrations into the [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2−} tetrahedron groups. Analysis of the emission spectra with different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations revealed that the optimum dopant concentration for SrWO{sub 4}: x Eu{sup 3+} phosphor is about 8 mol% of Eu{sup 3+}.The red emission intensity of the SSM prepared SrWO{sub 4}: 0.08Eu{sup 3+} phosphors are 2 times greater than that of the commercial Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S: Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method. All the results indicate that the phosphor is a promising red phosphor pumped by NUV InGaN chip for fabricating WLED.

  1. Solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace terbutaline sulfate based on its inhibition oxidation of rhodamine 6G by sodium periodate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Fei; Gao, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Li-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Li, Zhi-Ming; Huang, Xiu-Chai; Lin, Wei-Nv; Wang, Fang-Mei; Nie, Chang-Ling

    2008-03-01

    When 1.00 mol l(-1) I(-) is used as ion perturber, rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) can emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper substrate in KHC(8)H(4)O(4)-HCl buffer solution (pH = 3.50), heated at 70 degrees C for 10 min. NaIO(4) can oxidize Rh 6G, which makes the RTP signal quench. Terbutaline sulfate (TBS) can inhibit NaIO(4) from oxidizing Rh 6G, which makes the RTP signal of Rh 6G enhance sharply. The content of TBS is linear correlation to DeltaIp of the system. Based on the facts above, a new inhibition solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) for the determination of trace TBS has been established. The linear range of this method is 0.0104-2.08 pg spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 0.026-5.2 ng ml(-1), with a sample volume of 0.4 microl) with a detection limit (L.D.) of 2.6 fg spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 6.5 x 10(-12) g ml(-1)), and the regression equation of working curve is DeltaIp = 2.040 + 54.54 m(TBS) (pg spot(-1)), n = 6, correlation coefficient is 0.9994. For the samples containing 0.0104 pg spot(-1) and 2.08 pg spot(-1) TBS, the relative standard deviation (RSD) are 3.8% and 2.3% (n = 8), respectively, indicating good precision. This method has been applied to determination of trace TBS in the practical samples with satisfactory results. The reaction mechanism of NaIO(4) oxidizing Rh 6G to inhibit SS-RTP for the determination of trace TBS is also discussed.

  2. Catalytic solid substrate-room-temperature phosphorimetry detection for trace cadmium with Cd2+ -3.5-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer-Tween-80 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Hong-Xin; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Shao-Qin; Lin, Xuan; Cai, Wen-Lian; Lin, Chang-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    3.5-Generation polyamidoamine dendrimers (3.5-G-D) emitted strong and stable room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper when Pb2+ was used as a heavy atom perturber. The RTP signal of 3.5-G-D was sharply enhanced upon the formation of 3.5-G-D-Tween-80 micelle compound. The complex Cd2+ -3.5-G-D-Tween-80, generated in the coordination reaction between Cd2+ and the tertiary amidocyanogen on the outer layer of 3.5-G-D in 3.5-G-D-Tween-80 micelle compound, could catalyze KBrO3 to oxidize 3.5-G-D in 3.5-G-D-Tween-80, which caused the sharp quenching of the RTP signal of the system. The phosphorescence intensity change (ΔI(p) ) of the system had a linear relationship with the content of Cd2+. Thus a new catalytic solid substrate-room-temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) for the determination of trace cadmium has been established. This highly selective and sensitive method has been applied to determine trace cadmium in biological samples with a limit of detection (LD) of 1.2 ag per spot (when the sample volume was 0.4 μL per spot, the corresponding concentration was 3.0 × 10(-15)  g mL(-1) ), the results agreeing with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry. The mechanism of catalytic SS-RTP for the determination of trace cadmium was also discussed.

  3. Determination of enrofloxacin by room-temperature phosphorimetry after solid phase extraction on an acrylic polymer sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Cabrini F.; Martins, Renata K. S.; da Silva, Andrea R.; da Cunha, Alessandra L. M. C.; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.

    A phosphorimetric method was developed to enable the determination of enrofloxacin using photochemical derivatization which was used to both improve detection limits and to minimize the uncertainty of measurements. Phosphorescence was induced on cellulose containing TlNO3. Absolute limit of detection at the ng range and linear analytical response over three orders of magnitude were achieved. A metrological study was made to obtain the combined uncertainty value and to identify that the precision was mainly affected by the changing of substrates when measuring the signal from each replicate. Pharmaceutical formulations containing enrofloxacin were successfully analyzed by the method and the results were similar to the ones achieved using a HPLC method. A solid phase extraction on an acrylic polymer was optimized to separate enrofloxacin from interferents such as diclofenac and other components from biological matrices, which allowed the successful use of the method in urine analysis.

  4. Vapor-solid growth of p-Te/n-SnO2 hierarchical heterostructures and their enhanced room-temperature gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Her, Yung-Chiun; Yeh, Bu-Yu; Huang, Sing-Lin

    2014-06-25

    We have synthesized brushlike p-Te/n-SnO2 hierarchical heterostructures by a two-step thermal vapor transport process. The morphologies of the branched Te nanostructures can be manipulated by adjusting the source temperature or the argon flow rate. The growth of the branched Te nanotubes on the SnO2 nanowire backbones can be ascribed to the vapor-solid (VS) growth mechanism, in which the inherent anisotropic nature of Te lattice and/or dislocations lying along the Te nanotubes axis should play critical roles. When exposed to CO and NO2 gases at room temperature, Te/SnO2 hierarchical heterostructures changed the resistance in the same trend and exhibited much higher responses and faster response speeds than the Te nanotube counterparts. The enhancement in gas sensing performance can be ascribed to the higher specific surface areas and formations of numerous Te/Te or TeO2/TeO2 bridging point contacts and additional p-Te/n-SnO2 heterojunctions.

  5. Room-temperature synthesis and conductivity of the pyrochlore type Dy 2(Ti 1-yZr y) 2O 7 (0⩽ y⩽1) solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karla J.; Guevara-Liceaga, Manuel A.; Fuentes, Antonio F.; García-Barriocanal, Javier; León, Carlos; Santamaría, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    Different compositions in a solid solution of general formula Dy 2(Ti 1-yZr y) 2O 7, showing high oxygen ion conductivity, have been successfully prepared at room temperature via mechanochemical synthesis. Stoichiometric mixtures of the constituent oxides were dry milled together in a planetary ball mill by using zirconia vials and balls. Chemical changes in the powder mixtures as a function of composition and milling time were followed by X-ray diffraction and revealed that, in all cases and after milling for 19 h, the powder mixtures consisted of a single phase. Electrical properties were measured on sintered pellets as a function of frequency, temperature and zirconium content, revealing an increase in conductivity of more than one order of magnitude for y⩾0.4, which, as observed in the similar Y 2(Ti 1-yZr y) 2O 7, has been related with the onset of disordering of the anion sublattice. Despite increasing structural disorder with increasing Zr content, conductivity remains almost constant for y>0.6, reaching a maximum value of ˜5×10 -3 for Dy 2Zr 2O 7 at 900 °C.

  6. Rapid Room-Temperature 11C-Methylation of Arylamines with [11C]Methyl Iodide Promoted by Solid Inorganic Bases in DMF

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lisheng; Xu, Rong; Guo, Xuelei; Pike, Victor W.

    2013-01-01

    11[C]Methyl iodide is the most widely used reagent for labeling radiotracers with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) for molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. However, some substrates for labeling, especially primary arylamines and pyrroles, are sluggishly reactive towards [11C]methyl iodide. We found that insoluble inorganic bases, especially Li3N or Li2O, are effective in promoting rapid reactions (≤ 10 min) of such substrates with no-carrier-added [11C]methyl iodide in DMF at room temperature to give 11C-methylated products in useful radiochemical yields. In particular, we discovered that some primary arylamines in Li3N-DMF were converted into their formanilides, and that these were readily N-methylated with [11C]methyl iodide, preceding easy basic hydrolysis to the desired [11C]N-methyl secondary arylamines. Use of a solid base permitted selective reaction at an arylamino group and in some cases also avoided undesirable side reaction, such as ester group hydrolysis. An ultrasound device proved useful to provide remote and constant agitation of the radioactive heterogeneous reaction mixtures, but imparted no ‘ultrasound-specific’ chemical effect. PMID:24659907

  7. Determination of trace mercury by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence quenching method based on lead carboxymethyl cellulose (Pb(CMC)(2)) particles containing luminescent salicyl fluorones molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Wu, Ai-Hong; Xu, Huan-Huan; Wang, Qing-Hua; Li, Long-Di; Zhu, Guo-Hui

    2005-01-30

    Luminescent particles of lead carboxymethyl cellulose (Pb(CMC)(2)), which contains salicyl fluorones (THBF), Pb(CMC)(2)-THBF, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Pb(CMC)(2)-THBF can emit intense and stable solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) on filter paper. EDTA can chelate the Pb(2+) in Pb(CMC)(2)-THBF, causing it decompose into aqueous soluble components PbY(2-), CMC(-) and THBF, and these components can react with Hg(2+) to form (CMC)(2)Hg-THBF, causing decrease of phosphorescence intensity. Based on the facts above, a new method for the determination of trace mercury by SS-RTP quenching method was established. The linear range of this method is 2.0-40.0fgspot(-1) (5.0-100.0pgml(-1)) of Hg(2+), with a detection limit (LD) of 0.26fgspot(-1), and the regression equation of working curve is [Formula: see text] (fgspot(-1), 0.4mul spot(-1)), r = 0.9994. This method has been applied to the determination of trace mercury in water sample with satisfactory results. The mechanism of SS-RTP emission is also discussed.

  8. Determination of trace silver by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence quenching method based on lead carboxymethyl cellulose particles (Pb(CMC)2) containing luminescent salicyl fluorenes molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiaming, Liu; Wenqi, Li; Xuelin, Li; Hailing, Chen; Qiaomei, Lu; Longdi, Li; Zhimin, Li; Guohui, Zhu; Cuilian, Chen

    2005-10-01

    Luminescent particles of lead carboxymethyl cellulose (Pb(CMC)2) containing salicyl fluorones (THBF), Pb(CMC)2-THBF were synthesized by the sol-gel method, using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) as precursor and Pb2+ as precipitant. Pb(CMC)2-THBF can emit the intense and stable solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) on filter paper. And EDTA can chelate Pb2+ in Pb(CMC)2-THBF, causing it to decompose into aqueous soluble components PbY2-, CMC- and THBF, which can react with Ag+ to form Ag(CMC)2-THBF, causing the decrease of phosphorescence intensity. Based on the facts above, a new method for the determination of trace silver by SS-RTP quenching method was established. The linear range of this method is 8.0-40.0 fg spot(-1) (20.0-100.0 pg ml(-1)), with a detection limit (LD) of 2.2 fg spot(-1) (corresponding to a concentration range of 5.5 x 10(-13) g ml(-1)), and the regression equation of working curve is DeltaI(p) = 12.56 + 0.5527C(Ag+) (fg spot(-1), 0.4 microl spot(-1)), n = 8, r = 0.9992. This method has been applied to the determination of trace silver in human hair and tea sample with satisfactory results. The mechanism of SS-RTP emission is also discussed.

  9. Solid state synthesis of tin-doped ZnO at room temperature: characterization and its enhanced gas sensing and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaohua; Fan, Huiqing; Afzaal, Mohammad; Wu, Xiangyang; O'Brien, Paul

    2011-10-15

    A room temperature solid-state reaction has been used to prepare crystalline tin-doped ZnO. Zinc nitrate hexahydrate, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, stannic chloride pentahydrate and sodium hydroxide with proper ratios were ground together. As-synthesized samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma analysis (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD); The products were of different morphologies, well dispersed and exhibited good crystallinity, it is also found that the growth direction and morphology of ZnO depend on the amount of Sn doped, which is mainly caused by the difference in sizes between Zn and Sn atoms as well as the change of pH value. Moreover, gas sensing and photocatalytic properties of the obtained products were studied. The materials showed a high gas response to ethanol vapor, and the gas response can reach a maximum of R(a)/R(g) = 124. In addition, tin-doped ZnO materials exhibited improved photocatalytic performance toward methyl orange (MO) solution under a current density of 0.03 mg L(-1) comparison with undoped ZnO.

  10. In Situ Synthesis of Porous Carbons by Using Room-Temperature, Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma as High-Performance Adsorbents for Solid-Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao; Wu, Li; Xu, Kailai; Tian, Yunfei; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-09-21

    A one-step, template-free method is described to synthesize porous carbons (PCs) in situ on a metal surface by using a room-temperature, atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. This method not only features high efficiency, environmentally friendliness, and low cost and simple equipment, but also can conveniently realize large-area synthesis of PCs by only changing the design of the DBD reactor. The synthesized PCs have a regulated nestlike morphology, and thus, provide a high specific surface area and high pore volume, which result in excellent adsorption properties. Its applicability was demonstrated by using a PC-coated stainless-steel fiber as a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber to preconcentrate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prior to analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results showed that the fiber exhibited excellent enrichment factors (4.1×10(4) to 3.1×10(5)) toward all tested PAHs. Thus, the PC-based SPME-GC-FID provides low limits of detection (2 to 20 ng L(-1)), good precision (<7.8%), and good recoveries (80-115%) for ultra-sensitive determination of PAHs in real water samples. In addition, the PC-coated fiber could be stable enough for more than 500 replicate extraction cycles.

  11. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  12. Sulfur and iron co-doped titanoniobate nanosheets: a novel efficient solid acid catalyst for alcoholysis of styrene epoxide at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihong; Hu, Chenhui; Zhang, Junfeng; Cheng, Liyuan; Zhai, Zheng; Chen, Jing; Ding, Weiping; Hou, Wenhua

    2013-09-04

    Sulfur and iron co-doped titanoniobate nanosheets were prepared and evaluated in alcoholysis of styrene epoxide. The resultant co-doped catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic performance (yield of 99% with methanol as the nucleophile in only 1 h at room temperature) and may act as a promising candidate in many acid-catalyzed reactions.

  13. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  14. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-23

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  15. Solid-State Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 9.4 and 18.8 T from 100 K to Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in solids, which enables very high sensitivity NMR experiments, is currently limited to temperatures of around 100 K and below. Here we show how by choosing an adequate solvent, 1H cross effect DNP enhancements of over 80 can be obtained at 240 K. To achieve this we use the biradical TEKPol dissolved in a glassy phase of ortho-terphenyl (OTP). We study the solvent DNP enhancement of both TEKPol and BDPA in OTP in the range from 100 to 300 K at 9.4 and 18.8 T. Surprisingly, we find that the DNP enhancement decreases only relatively slowly for temperatures below the glass transition of OTP (Tg = 243 K), and 1H enhancements around 15–20 at ambient temperature can be observed. We use this to monitor molecular dynamic transitions in the pharmaceutically relevant solids Ambroxol and Ibuprofen. PMID:26555676

  16. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  17. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  18. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  19. Sub-room Temperature Magnetic Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimm, Carl

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic refrigeration has been predicted to be an efficient cooling technology because of the highly reversible nature of the magnetocaloric effect for some materials. However, cooling power and efficiency of past devices has been limited because of the difficulties in exchanging heat with the solid magnetic refrigerant. Astronautics in a joint project with Ames DOE Laboratory has constructed a regenerative magnetic refrigerator that provides cooling near room temperature using gadolinium as a refrigerant and water as a heat transfer fluid. Using a superconducting magnet at 5 T, cooling of 500 watts was obtained at coefficients of performance of 5 or more watts of cooling per watt of work input. Cooling of 150 watts was obtained using a 1.5 T field, which can be obtained from permanent magnet sources. The main losses in the present device are magnet AC losses and seal friction, although limits on temperature span may also be imposed by magnetic material properties. We have identified design, magnet, and magnetic material improvements that should reduce such losses, allowing the construction of devices whose efficiency well exceeds that obtainable from conventional technology. The fluid used in such magnetic refrigerators presents no toxicity, ozone depletion or global warming hazard. This talk will include test results and projections of the capabilities and limitations of the technology.

  20. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  1. Room-temperature wafer bonded InGaP/GaAs//InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction solar cell grown by all-solid state molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Pan; Lu, Shulong; Uchida, Shiro; Ji, Lian; Wu, Yuanyuan; Tan, Ming; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    An InGaP/GaAs tandem cell on a GaAs substrate and an InGaAsP/InGaAs tandem cell on an InP substrate were grown separately by all-solid-state molecular beam epitaxy. A room-temperature direct wafer-bonding technique was used to integrate these subcells into an InGaP/GaAs//InGaAsP/InGaAs wafer-bonded solar cell, which resulted in an abrupt interface with low resistance and high optical transmission. The current-matching design for the base layer thickness of each cell was investigated. The resulting efficiency of the four-junction solar cell was 42.0% at 230 suns, which demonstrates the great potential of the room-temperature wafer-bonding technique to achieve high conversion efficiency for cells with four or more junctions.

  2. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets.

    PubMed

    Celestini, Franck; Frisch, Thomas; Pomeau, Yves

    2013-10-28

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius–Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependence of the evaporation rate is successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave the way for reaching efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  3. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-12

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering.

  4. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO3 thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  5. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10-3 S cm-1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  6. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  7. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  8. Room temperature solid-state synthesis of a conductive polymer for applications in stable I₂-free dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeonggwan; Koh, Jong Kwan; Kim, Jeonghun; Chi, Won Seok; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2012-11-01

    A solid-state polymerizable monomer, 2,5-dibromo-3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (DBProDOT), was synthesized at 25 °C to produce a conducting polymer, poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOT). Crystallographic studies revealed a short interplane distance between DBProDOT molecules, which was responsible for polymerization at low temperature with a lower activation energy and higher exothermic reaction than 2,5-dibromo-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (DBEDOT) or its derivatives. Upon solid-state polymerization (SSP) of DBProDOT at 25 °C, PProDOT was obtained in a self-doped state with tribromide ions and an electrical conductivity of 0.05 S cm⁻¹, which is considerably higher than that of chemically-polymerized PProDOT (2×10⁻⁶ S cm⁻¹). Solid-state ¹³C NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations revealed polarons in PProDOT and a strong perturbation of carbon nuclei in thiophenes as a result of paramagnetic broadening. DBProDOT molecules deeply penetrated and polymerized to fill nanocrystalline TiO₂ pores with PProDOT, which functioned as a hole-transporting material (HTM) for I₂-free solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ssDSSCs). With the introduction of an organized mesoporous TiO₂ (OM-TiO₂) layer, the energy conversion efficiency reached 3.5 % at 100 mW cm⁻², which was quite stable up to at least 1500 h. The cell performance and stability was attributed to the high stability of PProDOT, with the high conductivity and improved interfacial contact of the electrode/HTM resulting in reduced interfacial resistance and enhanced electron lifetime. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo(2)Ti(2)Fe(8)O(19), large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them.

  10. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  11. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  12. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  13. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. Prepared for submission to Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) journal, Green Chemistry as a communication.

  14. Room temperature micro-hydrogen-generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasio, Don; Tasic, Sonja; Zenhausern, Frederic

    A new compact and cost-effective hydrogen-gas generator has been made that is well suited for supplying hydrogen to a fuel-cell for providing base electrical power to hand-carried appliances. This hydrogen-generator operates at room temperature, ambient pressure and is orientation-independent. The hydrogen-gas is generated by the heterogeneous catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous alkaline borohydride solution as it flows into a micro-reactor. This reactor has a membrane as one wall. Using the membrane keeps the liquid in the reactor, but allows the hydrogen-gas to pass out of the reactor to a fuel-cell anode. Aqueous alkaline 30 wt% borohydride solution is safe and promotes long application life, because this solution is non-toxic, non-flammable, and is a high energy-density (≥2200 W-h per liter or per kilogram) hydrogen-storage solution. The hydrogen is released from this storage-solution only when it passes over the solid catalyst surface in the reactor, so controlling the flow of the solution over the catalyst controls the rate of hydrogen-gas generation. This allows hydrogen generation to be matched to hydrogen consumption in the fuel-cell, so there is virtually no free hydrogen-gas during power generation. A hydrogen-generator scaled for a system to provide about 10 W electrical power is described here. However, the technology is expected to be scalable for systems providing power spanning from 1 W to kW levels.

  15. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  16. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  17. Room-temperature semiconductor heterostructure refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. A.; Larsson, Magnus; Mal'shukov, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    With the proper design of semiconductor tunneling barrier structures, we can inject low-energy electrons via resonant tunneling, and take out high-energy electrons via a thermionic process. This is the operation principle of our semiconductor heterostructure refrigerator (SHR) without the need of applying a temperature gradient across the device. Even for the bad thermoelectric material AlGaAs, our calculation shows that at room temperature, the SHR can easily lower the temperature by 5-7K. Such devices can be fabricated with the present semiconductor technology. Besides its use as a kitchen refrigerator, the SHR can efficiently cool microelectronic devices.

  18. A highly reversible room-temperature sodium metal anode

    DOE PAGES

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Sun, Jie; Sun, Yongming; ...

    2015-11-02

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved overmore » 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. In this study, the long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies.« less

  19. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  20. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Mn:Ge(001)

    PubMed Central

    Lungu, George Adrian; Stoflea, Laura Elena; Tanase, Liviu Cristian; Bucur, Ioana Cristina; Răduţoiu, Nicoleta; Vasiliu, Florin; Mercioniu, Ionel; Kuncser, Victor; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a room temperature ferromagnetic Mn-Ge system obtained by simple deposition of manganese on Ge(001), heated at relatively high temperature (starting with 250 °C). The samples were characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). Samples deposited at relatively elevated temperature (350 °C) exhibited the formation of ~5–8 nm diameter Mn5Ge3 and Mn11Ge8 agglomerates by HRTEM, while XPS identified at least two Mn-containing phases: the agglomerates, together with a Ge-rich MnGe~2.5 phase, or manganese diluted into the Ge(001) crystal. LEED revealed the persistence of long range order after a relatively high amount of Mn (100 nm) deposited on the single crystal substrate. STM probed the existence of dimer rows on the surface, slightly elongated as compared with Ge–Ge dimers on Ge(001). The films exhibited a clear ferromagnetism at room temperature, opening the possibility of forming a magnetic phase behind a nearly ideally terminated Ge surface, which could find applications in integration of magnetic functionalities on semiconductor bases. SQUID probed the co-existence of a superparamagnetic phase, with one phase which may be attributed to a diluted magnetic semiconductor. The hypothesis that the room temperature ferromagnetic phase might be the one with manganese diluted into the Ge crystal is formulated and discussed. PMID:28788444

  1. Determination of alkaline phosphatase based on affinity adsorption solid-substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using rhodamine 6G-dibromoluciferin luminescent nanoparticle to label lectin and prediction of diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Liu, Zhen-Bo; Hu, Li-Xiang; He, Hang-Xia; Yang, Min-Lan; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Xin-Hua; Zheng, Min-Min; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Yue-Long

    2006-10-15

    In the presence of heavy atom perturber LiAc, the silicon dioxide nanoparticle containing rhodamine 6G (R) and dibromoluciferin (D) (R-D-SiO(2)) can emit strong and stable solid-substrate room temperature phosphorescence signal of R (lambda(ex)/lambda(em)=481/648 nm) and D (lambda(ex)/lambda(em)=457/622 nm) on the surface of acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). R-D-SiO(2) is used to label triticum vulgare lectin (WGA). Then two types of affinity adsorption reactions, R-D-SiO(2)-WGA- alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (direct method) and WGA-ALP-WGA-R-D-SiO(2) (sandwich method), are carried out on ACM. The conditions and the analytical characteristics for the determination of ALP using affinity adsorption solid-substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (AA-SS-RTP) were studied. For a 0.40-microl drop of sample, results show that the detection limits of the sandwich method are 0.16 ag spot(-1)(457/622 nm) and 0.17 ag spot(-1)(481/648 nm), and the detection limits of the direct method are 0.41 ag spot(-1) (457/622 nm) and 0.44 ag spot(-1) (481/648 nm). The contents of ALP in human serum correlated well with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay. This study shows that AA-SS-RTP whether by the sandwich method or the direct method, can combine very well the characteristics of both high sensitivity of SS-RTP and specificity of the immunoreaction. Simultaneously, whether the phosphorescence excitation/emission wavelength of either R or D in R-D-SiO(2) is chosen to determine ALP, this can promote the agility and widen the adaptability of AA-SS-RTP.

  2. Solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace lead using p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone-multi-wall carbon nanotubes-Tween-80 micellae compound and diagnosis about human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianlong, Yang; Zhenbo, Liu; Jiaming, Liu; Haizhu, Liu; Yahong, Huang; Jianqin, Liu; Xuebing, Chen; Yibing, Zhao

    2009-02-01

    The structures of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified by H 2SO 4-HNO 3 and H 2SO 4-H 2O 2, respectively. The corresponding products were water-soluble MWNTs-A and MWNTs-B. According to the experiment, it was found that MWNTs-B could emit stable solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the surface of paper with Ag + as perturber. Under the conditions of 70 °C and 15 min, MWNTs-B can react with Tween-80 and p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone (R) to form R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound, which could emit RTP of R and MWNTs-B on the surface of paper, respectively. Pb 2+ could cause the RTP of R and MWNTs-B enhanced sharply, respectively. Δ Ip is directly proportional to the content of Pb 2+. A new solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) for the determination of trace Pb 2+ has been established based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule. The detection limit of this method were 0.035 ag Pb 2+ spot -1 (8.8 × 10 -17 g Pb 2+ ml -1, MWNTs-B) and 0.028 ag Pb 2+ spot -1 (7.1 × 10 -17 g Pb 2+ ml -1, R). This method is of high sensitivity, good selectivity, high precision and accuracy. It could be applied to determine trace Pb 2+ in serum samples at wavelength of 453.7/623.0 nm (R) or 475.9/645.0 nm (MWNTs-B) with satisfactory results, showing that SS-RTP has flexibility and utility value. Simultaneously, this method can be used to diagnose human diseases. The reaction mechanism for the determination of trace Pb 2+ by SS-RTP based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule was also discussed.

  3. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  4. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  5. Physical understanding of negative bias temperature instability below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaoli; Liao, Yiming; Yan, Feng; Zhu, Chenxin; Shi, Yi; Guo, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    The physical mechanism of VT degradations under negative bias temperature stress below room temperature has been studied for SiO2 and plasma nitrided oxide (PNO-based) pMOSFETs. It is found that VT degradations in both devices exhibit strong dependence on the electric field and temperature. The analysis shows that this strong dependence follows multi-phonon field-assisted tunneling theory, which indicates the inelastic hole trapping mechanism in the low temperature negative bias temperature instability (NBTI). On the other hand, by applying a low temperature sweeping technique, the energy distribution of these NBTI-induced hole traps below room temperature is indentified. The energy distribution of hole traps has two obvious peaks, one in the lower and one in the upper half of the silicon band gap. Both peaks gradually develop with increasing the stress time and temperature. We attempt to compare the energy profile for SiO2 and PNO devices to identify the trap precursors in NBTI below room temperature.

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  7. A study of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, Kuppan; Jarry, Angelique; Kostecki, Robert; Chen, Guoying

    2015-01-26

    Understanding the kinetic implication of solid-solution vs. biphasic reaction pathways is critical for the development of advanced intercalation electrode materials. Yet this has been a long-standing challenge in materials science due to the elusive metastable nature of solid solution phases. The present study reports the synthesis, isolation, and characterization of room-temperature LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 solid solutions. In situ XRD studies performed on pristine and chemically-delithiated, micron-sized single crystals reveal the thermal behavior of LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) cathode material consisting of three cubic phases: LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase I), Li0.5Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase II) and Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (Phase III). A phase diagram capturing the structural changes as functions of both temperature and Li content was established. In conclusion, the work not only demonstrates the possibility of synthesizing alternative electrode materials that are metastable in nature, but also enables in-depth evaluation on the physical, electrochemical and kinetic properties of transient intermediate phases and their role in battery electrode performance.

  8. Enabling room temperature sodium metal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruiguo; Mishra, Kuber; Li, Xiaolin; Qian, Jiangfeng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-12-01

    Rechargeable batteries based upon sodium (Na+) cations are at the core of many new battery chemistries beyond Li-ion batteries. Rather than using carbon or alloy-based anodes, the direct utilization of solid sodium metal as an anode would be highly advantageous, but its use has been highly problematic due to its high reactivity. In this work, however, it is demonstrated that, by tailoring the electrolyte formulation, solid Na metal can be electrochemically plated/stripped at ambient temperature with high efficiency (> 99%) on both copper and inexpensive aluminum current collectors thereby enabling a shift in focus to new battery chemical couples based upon Na metal operating at ambient temperature. These highly concentrated electrolytes has enabled stable cycling of Na metal batteries based on a Na metal anode and Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode at high rates with very high efficiency.

  9. Generation of coherent terahertz pulses in ruby at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kolesov, Roman; Kocharovskaya, Olga; Scully, Marlan O.

    2006-08-15

    We have shown that a coherently driven solid state medium can potentially produce strong controllable short pulses of THz radiation. The high efficiency of the technique is based on excitation of maximal THz coherence by applying resonant optical pulses to the medium. The excited coherence in the medium is connected to macroscopic polarization coupled to THz radiation. We have performed detailed simulations by solving the coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations. By using a simple V-type energy scheme for ruby, we have demonstrated that the energy of generated THz pulses ranges from hundreds of pico-Joules to nano-Joules at room temperature and micro-Joules at liquid helium temperature, with pulse durations from picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. We have also suggested a coherent ruby source that lases on two optical wavelengths and simultaneously generates THz radiation. We discussed also possibilities of extension of the technique to different solid-state materials.

  10. Room temperature neutron diffraction and magnetic studies of multiferroic Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.55}Nb{sub 0.45}O{sub 3} solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dadami, S. T.; Matteppanavar, S.; Shivaraja, I.; Angadi, B.; Rayaprol, S.; Deshpande, S. K.

    2016-05-23

    The Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.55}Nb{sub 0.45}O{sub 3} (PBFNO) solid solution was synthesized by single step solid state reaction method and the optimized parameters are 700°C for 2hr (calcination) and 800°C for 3hr (sintering). The formation of desired material was confirmed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Neutron Diffraction (ND) studies. The structural and magnetic properties of the sintered pellets were investigated at room temperature (RT) through XRD, ND and Magnetic (M-H) studies. The structural analysis was carried out by Rietveld refinement through the Full Prof program. Rietveld refined XRD and ND patterns confirms the monoclinic structure with Cm space group and obtained cell parameters from the ND data are a = 5.651(2) Å, b = 5.658(2) Å, c = 4.005(1) Å and α = 90°, β = 89.98(1)°, γ = 90°. RT M-H curve studies have been carried out. It shows the clear opening of hysteresis (M–H) loop, is evidenced as the existence of weak ferromagnetism at RT. The M-H data shows existence weak ferromagnetism embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix structure. The dielectric constant with frequency shows the formation of barrier layers at the grain and grain boundary interfaces gives rise to interfacial space charge polarization.

  11. Facile Preparation of Chloride-Conducting Membranes: First Step towards a Room-Temperature Solid-State Chloride-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Gschwind, Fabienne; Steinle, Dominik; Sandbeck, Daniel; Schmidt, Celine; von Hauff, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    Three types of chloride-conducting membranes based on polyvinyl chloride, commercial gelatin, and polyvinyldifluoride-hexafluoropolymer are introduced in this report. The polymers are mixed with chloride-containing salts, such as tetrabutylammonium chloride, and cast to form membranes. We studied the structural properties, thermal stability, and electrochemical response of the membranes to understand chloride migration and transport. Finally, the membranes are tested in a prototype solid-state chloride-ion battery setup. The feasibility of the membranes for their potential use in anion batteries is discussed.

  12. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  13. Room-temperature storage of microalgae in water-in-oil emulsions: influence of solid particle type and concentration in the oil phase.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lorena; Scher, Herbert; Jeoh, Tina; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2015-12-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions containing silica nanoparticles (Aerosil R974) have the potential to stabilize microalgae for long-term storage. Studies were completed to determine if smectite clays could be used as an alternative to Aerosil R974. Emulsions were prepared with Aerosil R974, and hectorite and bentonite clays in the continuous phase and Chlorella sorokiniana was added to the aqueous phase to monitor the effects of solid particles on emulsion stability. Biological stability (cell viability) was determined using cell density measurements, and physical stability was measured from water droplet size distributions obtained by light scattering measurements and by examining phase separation over time. Measurements were also made to determine the effects of particles in the oil phase on emulsion viscosity. Particle concentrations greater than 0.25 wt% in the oil phase were required for maintaining physical stability. In emulsions containing 1 wt% solid particles and microalgae, biological stability of cells could be sustained for 340 days, regardless of particle type. At 1 wt% particles in the oil phase, apparent viscosity was 165% greater for samples containing hectorite and bentonite clays compared to samples containing Aerosil R974. The higher viscosity would need to be considered in large-scale production of emulsions for commercial application.

  14. Determination of trace selenium by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on potassium chlorate oxidizing phenyl hydrazine-1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Cui, Xiao-Jie; Li, Lai-Ming; Fu, Geng-Min; Lin, Shao-Xian; Yang, Min-Lan; Xu, Mei-Ying; Wu, Zhi-Qun

    2007-04-01

    A new method for the determination of trace selenium based on solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) has been established. This method was based on the fact that in HCl-KCl buffer solution, potassium chlorate could oxidize phenyl hydrazine to form chloridize diazo-ion after being heated at 100 °C for 20 min, and then the diazo-ion reacted with 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid to form red azo-compound which could emit strong room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) signal on filter paper. Selenium could catalyze potassium chlorate oxidizing the reaction between phenyl hydrazine and 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid, which caused the sharp enhancement of SS-RTP. Under the optimum condition, the relationship between the phosphorescence emission intensity (Δ Ip) and the content of selenium obeyed Beer's law when the concentration of selenium is within the range of 1.60-320 fg spot -1 (or 0.0040-0.80 ng ml -1 with a sample volume of 0.4 μl). The regression equation of working curve can be expressed as Δ Ip = 13.12 + 0.4839 CSe(IV) (fg spot -1) ( n = 6), with correlation coefficient r = 0.9991 and a detection limit of 0.28 fg spot -1 (corresponding to a concentration range of 7.0 × 10 -13 g ml -1 Se(IV), n = 11). After 11-fold measurement, R.S.D. were 2.8 and 3.5% for the samples containing 0.0040 and 0.80 ng ml -1 of Se(IV), respectively. This accurate and sensitive method with good repeatability has been successfully applied to the determination of trace selenium in Chinese wolfberry and egg yolk with satisfactory results. The mechanism of the enhancement of phosphorescence was also discussed.

  15. Determination of trace mercury by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry quenching method based on catalytic effect of Hg2+ on formation of the ion association complex [Sn(XO)6]4+.[(Fin)4].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Wu, Ruo-Hong; Li, De-Chang; Zhou, Ping; Zheng, Min-Min; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Dong-Xia; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Guo-Hui

    2006-09-01

    A new method for the determination of trace mercury by solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) quenching method has been established. In glycine-HCl buffer solution, xylenol orange (XO) can react with Sn4+ to form the complex [Sn(XO)6]4+. [Sn(XO)6]4+ can interact with Fin- (fluorescein anion) to form the ion associate [Sn(XO)6]4+.[(Fin)4]-, which can emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on polyamide membrane (PAM). Hg2+ can catalyze H2O2 oxidizing the ion association complex [Sn(XO)6]4+.[(Fin)4]-, which causes the RTP to quench. The DeltaIp value is directly proportional to the concentration of Hg2+ in the range of 0.016-1.6 fg spot(-1) (corresponding concentration: 0.040-4.0 pg ml(-1), 0.40 microl spot(-1)), and the regression equation of working cure is DeltaIp=10.03+83.15 m Hg2+ (fg spot(-1)), (r=0.9987, n=6) and the detection limit (LD) is 3.6 ag spot(-1)(corresponding concentration: 9.0 x 10(-15) g ml(-1), the sample volume: 0.4 microl). This simple, rapid, accurate method is of high selectivity and good repeatability, and it has been successfully applied to the determination of trace mercury in real samples. The reaction mechanism for catalyzing H2O2 oxidizing the ion association complex ([Sn(XO)6]4+.[(Fin)4]-) SS-RTP quenching method to determine trace mercury is also discussed.

  16. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  17. Room-temperature ionic liquid battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; Fuller, J.

    1997-12-01

    The room-temperature molten salts possess a number of unique properties that make them ideal battery electrolytes. In particular, they are nonflammable, nonvolatile, and chemically inert, and they display wide electrochemical windows, high inherent conductivities, and wide thermal operating ranges. Although the ionic liquids have excellent characteristics, the chemical and electrochemical properties of desirable battery electrode materials are not well understood in these electrolytes. The research has focused on rechargeable electrodes and has included work on metallic lithium and sodium anodes in buffered neutral chloroaluminate melts, graphite-intercalation electrodes in neutral chloroaluminate and non-chloroaluminate melts, and silane-imidazole polymeric cathodes in acidic chloroaluminate melts. This paper will provide an overview of the research in these areas.

  18. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-01

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains.

  19. Solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace lead using p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone-multi-wall carbon nanotubes-Tween-80 micellae compound and diagnosis about human diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianlong; Liu, Zhenbo; Liu, Jiaming; Liu, Haizhu; Huang, Yahong; Liu, Jianqin; Chen, Xuebing; Zhao, Yibing

    2009-02-01

    The structures of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified by H(2)SO(4)-HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)-H(2)O(2), respectively. The corresponding products were water-soluble MWNTs-A and MWNTs-B. According to the experiment, it was found that MWNTs-B could emit stable solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the surface of paper with Ag(+) as perturber. Under the conditions of 70 degrees C and 15 min, MWNTs-B can react with Tween-80 and p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone (R) to form R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound, which could emit RTP of R and MWNTs-B on the surface of paper, respectively. Pb(2+) could cause the RTP of R and MWNTs-B enhanced sharply, respectively. DeltaI(p) is directly proportional to the content of Pb(2+). A new solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) for the determination of trace Pb(2+) has been established based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule. The detection limit of this method were 0.035 ag Pb(2+) spot(-1) (8.8 x 10(-17) g Pb(2+) ml(-1), MWNTs-B) and 0.028 ag Pb(2+) spot(-1) (7.1 x 10(-17) g Pb(2+) ml(-1), R). This method is of high sensitivity, good selectivity, high precision and accuracy. It could be applied to determine trace Pb(2+) in serum samples at wavelength of 453.7/623.0 nm (R) or 475.9/645.0 nm (MWNTs-B) with satisfactory results, showing that SS-RTP has flexibility and utility value. Simultaneously, this method can be used to diagnose human diseases. The reaction mechanism for the determination of trace Pb(2+) by SS-RTP based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule was also discussed.

  20. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  1. Single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.

    1996-12-01

    The spirit of studying single-molecule behaviors dates back to the turn of the century. In addition to Einstein`s well-known work on Brownian motion, there has been a tradition for studying single {open_quotes}macromolecules{close_quotes} or a small number of molecules either by light scattering or by fluorescence using an optical microscope. Modern computers have allowed detailed studies of single-molecule behaviors in condensed media through molecular dynamics simulations. Optical spectroscopy offers a wealth of information on the structure, interaction, and dynamics of molecular species. With the motivation of removing {open_quotes}inhomogeneous broadening{close_quotes}, spectroscopic techniques have evolved from spectral hole burning, fluorescence line narrowing, and photo-echo to the recent pioneering work on single-molecule spectroscopy in solids at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution spectroscopic work on single molecules relies on zero phonon lines which appear at cryogenic temperatures, and have narrow line widths and large absorption cross sections. Recent advances in near-field and confocal fluorescence have allowed not only fluorescence imaging of single molecules with high spatial resolutions but also single-molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. In this Account, the author provides a physical chemist`s perspective on experimental and theoretical developments on room-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics, with the emphasis on the information obtainable from single-molecule experiments. 61 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Silicon Nanowires Light Emitting Devices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, Pietro; Irrera, A.; Franzò', G.; Fazio, B.; Galli, M.; Pecora, E.; Iacona, F.; Priolo, F.

    Group-IV semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are attracting interest among the scientific community as building blocks for a wide range of future nanoscaled devices. Vapor-liquid-Solid (VLS) is the most used technique for semiconductor NWs growth. Si NWs are promising as building blocks for photovoltaic elements, sensors and high-performance batteries; however, Si NWs are less explored for photonic applications, probably since there are many drawbacks due to the NW structure obtained by VLS. In fact, there is a minimum obtainable size which reduces the possibility to have quantum confinement effects without high temperature oxidation processes; metal used as a catalyst may be incorporated inside the NW thus affecting its electrical and optical properties. Moreover, by VLS method the doping is no easily controllable because of the segregation of the dopants at the NWs interface. Indeed, the possibility of obtaining light from silicon at room temperature under optical and electrical pumping is strategic for the communication technology.

  3. Multi-functional single electron device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chieu; Ong, Jason Kee Yang; Saraf, Ravi F.

    2014-03-01

    Smart designs of sub-wavelength structures enable observation of unusual properties of materials as in metamaterials. Typically, Coulomb blockade is observed in array of conducting particles at cryogenic temperature due to local charging of few particles by a single electron in the percolation path. We will report 1-D network of cemented Au nanoparticles in a multi-functional single electron device exhibiting Coulomb blockade at room temperature. The 1-D array is a self-assembled monolayer network spanning between electrodes 10-100 μm apart. It is formed by first bridging the negatively charged 10nm Au NPs with positive ions (Cd2+or Fe3+) followed by cementing with reactive gas to form a robust 2-D network. The network array cemented with CdS and Iron oxide exhibits robust single electron effect at room temperature with electroluminescence (EL) or ferromagnetism, respectively. The nature of EL in this symmetric structure is explained in term of field induced ionization. The EL is specular where the spots are independent of bias magnitude. The magnetic array exhibits ``spin-valve'' behavior with Barkhausen effect. These unique nano materials, fully self-assembled where, properties can be tailored by varying the cement chemistry, have potential applications in solid state lighting.

  4. Spin-valley caloritronics in silicene near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Gao, Wenwen; Cai, Xinlong; Fan, Ding; Yang, Zhihong; Meng, Lan

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional silicene, with an observable intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, has a great potential to perform fascinating physics and new types of applications in spintronics and valleytronics. By introducing an electromotive force from a temperature difference in ferromagnetic silicene, we discover that a longitudinal spin Seebeck effect can be driven even near room temperature, with spin-up and spin-down currents flowing in opposite directions, originating from the asymmetric electron-hole spin band structures. We further propose a silicene field-effect transistor constructed of two ferromagnetic electrodes and a central dual-gated region, and find that a valley Seebeck effect appears, with currents from two different valleys flowing in opposite directions. The forbidden transport channels are determined by either spin-valley dependent band gaps or spin mismatch. By tuning the electric field in the central region, the transport gaps depending on spin and valley vary correspondingly, and a transition from valley Seebeck effect to spin Seebeck effect is observed. These spin-valley caloritronic results near room temperature are robust against many real perturbations, and thus suggest silicene to be an excellent candidate for future energy-saving technologies and bidirectional information processing in solid-state circuits.

  5. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on wheat germ agglutinin labeled with 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch and prediction of diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Hui; Li, Fei-Ming; Shi, Xiu-Mei; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch (abbreviated as PMS-8-QBA. Thereinto, 8-QBA is 8-quinolineboronic acid, and PMS is phosphorescent molecular switch) was found for the first time. PMS-8-QBA, which was in the "off" state, could only emit weak room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). However, PMS-8-QBA turned "on" automatically for its changed structure, causing that the RTP of 8-QBA in the system increased, after PMS-8-QBA-WGA (WGA is wheat germ agglutinin) was formed by reaction between -OH of PMS-8-QBA and -COOH of WGA. More interesting is that the -NH(2) of PMS-8-QBA-WGA could react with the -COOH of alkaline phosphatase (AP) to form the affinity adsorption (AA) product WGA-AP-WGA-8-QBA-PMS (containing -NH-CO- bond), which caused RTP of the system to greatly increase. Thus, affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using PMS-8-QBA as labelling reagent (PMS-8-QBA-AA-SSRTP) for the determination of trace AP was established. The method had many advantages, such as high sensitivity (the detection limit (LD) was 2.5zgspot(-1). For sample volume of 0.40mulspot(-1), corresponding concentration was 6.2x10(-18)gml(-1)), good selectivity (the allowed concentration of coexisting material was higher, when the relative error was +/-5%), high accuracy (applied to detection of AP content in serum samples, the result was coincided with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay), which was suitable for the detection of trace AP content in serum samples and the forecast of human diseases. Meanwhile, the mechanism of PMS-8-QBA-AASSRTP was discussed. The new field of analytical application and clinic diagnosis technique of molecule switch are exploited, based on the phosphorescence characteristic of PMS-8-QBA, the AA reaction between WGA and AP, as well as the relation between AP content and human diseases. The research results promote the development and interpenetrate among molecule switch

  6. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on wheat germ agglutinin labeled with 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch and prediction of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Hui; Li, Fei-Ming; Shi, Xiu-Mei; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch (abbreviated as PMS-8-QBA. Thereinto, 8-QBA is 8-quinolineboronic acid, and PMS is phosphorescent molecular switch) was found for the first time. PMS-8-QBA, which was in the "off" state, could only emit weak room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). However, PMS-8-QBA turned "on" automatically for its changed structure, causing that the RTP of 8-QBA in the system increased, after PMS-8-QBA-WGA (WGA is wheat germ agglutinin) was formed by reaction between -OH of PMS-8-QBA and -COOH of WGA. More interesting is that the -NH 2 of PMS-8-QBA-WGA could react with the -COOH of alkaline phosphatase (AP) to form the affinity adsorption (AA) product WGA-AP-WGA-8-QBA-PMS (containing -NH-CO- bond), which caused RTP of the system to greatly increase. Thus, affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using PMS-8-QBA as labelling reagent (PMS-8-QBA-AA-SSRTP) for the determination of trace AP was established. The method had many advantages, such as high sensitivity (the detection limit (LD) was 2.5 zg spot -1. For sample volume of 0.40 μl spot -1, corresponding concentration was 6.2 × 10 -18 g ml -1), good selectivity (the allowed concentration of coexisting material was higher, when the relative error was ±5%), high accuracy (applied to detection of AP content in serum samples, the result was coincided with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay), which was suitable for the detection of trace AP content in serum samples and the forecast of human diseases. Meanwhile, the mechanism of PMS-8-QBA-AASSRTP was discussed. The new field of analytical application and clinic diagnosis technique of molecule switch are exploited, based on the phosphorescence characteristic of PMS-8-QBA, the AA reaction between WGA and AP, as well as the relation between AP content and human diseases. The research results promote the development and interpenetrate among molecule

  7. Room-temperature nanowire terahertz photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Lorenzo; Coquillant, Dominique; Viti, Leonardo; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Knap, Wojciech; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) represent an ideal building block for implementing rectifying diodes or plasma­ wave detectors that could operate well into the THz, thanks to the typical attofarad-order capacitance. Despite the strong effort in developing these nanostructures for a new generation of complementary metal-oxide semi­ conductors (CMOS), memory and photonic devices, their potential as radiation sensors into the Terahertz is just starting to be explored. We report on the development of NW-based field effect transistors operating as high sensitivity THz detectors in the 0.3 - 2.8 THz range. By feeding the radiation field of either an electronic THz source or a quantum cascade laser (QCL) at the gate-source electrodes by means of a wide band dipole antenna, we measured a photovoltage signal corresponding to responsivity values up to 100 V IW, with impressive noise equivalent power levels < 6 x 10-11W/Hz at room temperature and a > 300kHz modulation bandwidth. The potential scalability to even higher frequencies and the technological feasibility of realizing multi-pixel arrays coupled with QCL sources make the proposed technology highly competitive for a future generation of THz detection systems.

  8. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  9. Room-Temperature Spin Polariton Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Iorsh, Ivan; Frost, Thomas; Kavokin, Alexey; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2017-08-01

    A spin-polarized laser offers inherent control of the output circular polarization. We have investigated the output polarization characteristics of a bulk GaN-based microcavity polariton diode laser at room temperature with electrical injection of spin-polarized electrons via a FeCo /MgO spin injector. Polariton laser operation with a spin-polarized current is characterized by a threshold of ˜69 A / cm2 in the light-current characteristics, a significant reduction of the electroluminescence linewidth and blueshift of the emission peak. A degree of output circular polarization of ˜25 % is recorded under remanent magnetization. A second threshold, due to conventional photon lasing, is observed at an injection of ˜7.2 kA /cm2 . The variation of output circular and linear polarization with spin-polarized injection current has been analyzed with the carrier and exciton rate equations and the Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the condensate and there is good agreement between measured and calculated data.

  10. Room-Temperature Equation of State for CO2-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. P.; Kinney, T. W.; Frank, M. R.; Lin, J.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the room-temperature bulk modulus (K0T) and its pressure derivative (K') for solid carbon dioxide in its relatively low-pressure phase I (space group: Pa3; CO2-I) between 0.9 and 9 GPa. This pressure range closely matches the actual room-temperature stability field for this phase. The motivation for our investigation is to address an apparent discrepancy in two earlier publications and provide a complete and internally consistent set of equation of state (EoS) parameters for future investigators to conveniently predict the diffraction peak positions for CO2-I at elevated pressures. We note that there is much interest in the chemical reactivity of CO2 at elevated pressures and temperatures and anticipate that this will be a useful addition to the literature. Because the solid phase is unquenchable at room temperature, we used the estimated zero-pressure volume extrapolated to 300 K from lower temperatures by Olinger (1982) and held this value fixed: V0 = 197.9 Å3/unit cell. We performed fits with both the Vinet (K0T = 3.1 ± 0.1 GPa, K' = 9.1 ± 0.2) and Birch-Murnaghan (K0T = 2.5 ± 0.2 GPa, K' = 13.0 ± 0.9) EoS models. The observed difference is not surprising given the very high compressibility of this phase and the inherent covariance between K0T and K'. Although we note that both sets of EoS parameters produce acceptable fits to our data, we favor the Vinet values, especially in terms of determining a realistic value for K', because the phase is so compressible. However, many workers utilize software with built-in routines for calculating peak positions at high pressures, and these often assume a Birch Murnaghan EoS. To facilitate the usage of our results with such programs, we have also performed a Birch-Murnaghan fit for which the K' value from the Vinet fit was held fixed and K0T was the only fit parameter. Accordingly, we present the following EoS parameters for the convenient calculation of expected peak positions for CO2-I at high

  11. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  12. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  13. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  14. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-06-09

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  15. Determination of trace glucose and forecast of human diseases by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on Triticum valgaris lectin labeled with 4.0-generation dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Jiaming; Lu, Qiaomei; Yang, Minlan; Wu, Hong; Shi, Xiumei; Chen, Xinhua

    2007-08-01

    A new phosphorescence labeling reagent Triton-100X-4.0G-D (4.0G-D refers to 4.0-generation dendrimers) was found. Quantitative specific affinity adsorption (AA) reaction between Triton-100X-4.0G-D-WGA and glucose (G) was carried out on the surface of nitrocellulose membrane (NCM), and the Δ Ip of the product of AA reaction was linear correlation to the content of G. Based on the facts above, a new method for the determination of trace G was established by WGA labeled with Triton-100X-4.0G-D affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (Triton-100X-4.0G-D-WGA-AA-SS-RTP). This research showed that AA-SS-RTP for either direct method or sandwich method could combine very well the characteristics of both the high sensitivity of SS-RTP and the specificity of the AA reaction. Detection limits (LD) were 0.24 fg spot -1 for direct method and 0.18 fg spot -1 for sandwich method, indicating both of them were of high sensitivity. The method has been applied to the determination of the content of G in human serum, and the results were coincided with those obtained by glucose oxidize enzyme method. It can also be applied to forecast accurately some human diseases, such as primary hepatic carcinoma, cirrhosis, acute and chronic hepatitis, transfer hepatocellular, etc. Meanwhile, the mechanism for the determination of G with AA-SS-RTP was discussed.

  16. Determination of trace glucose and forecast of human diseases by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on Triticum valgaris lectin labeled with 4.0-generation dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Jiaming; Lu, Qiaomei; Yang, Minlan; Wu, Hong; Shi, Xiumei; Chen, Xinhua

    2007-08-01

    A new phosphorescence labeling reagent Triton-100X-4.0G-D (4.0G-D refers to 4.0-generation dendrimers) was found. Quantitative specific affinity adsorption (AA) reaction between Triton-100X-4.0G-D-WGA and glucose (G) was carried out on the surface of nitrocellulose membrane (NCM), and the DeltaI(p) of the product of AA reaction was linear correlation to the content of G. Based on the facts above, a new method for the determination of trace G was established by WGA labeled with Triton-100X-4.0G-D affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (Triton-100X-4.0G-D-WGA-AA-SS-RTP). This research showed that AA-SS-RTP for either direct method or sandwich method could combine very well the characteristics of both the high sensitivity of SS-RTP and the specificity of the AA reaction. Detection limits (LD) were 0.24 fg spot(-1) for direct method and 0.18 fg spot(-1) for sandwich method, indicating both of them were of high sensitivity. The method has been applied to the determination of the content of G in human serum, and the results were coincided with those obtained by glucose oxidize enzyme method. It can also be applied to forecast accurately some human diseases, such as primary hepatic carcinoma, cirrhosis, acute and chronic hepatitis, transfer hepatocellular, etc. Meanwhile, the mechanism for the determination of G with AA-SS-RTP was discussed.

  17. Efficient room-temperature nuclear spin hyperpolarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Puttisong, Y; Wang, X J; Buyanova, I A; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Ptak, A J; Tu, C W; Chen, W M

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization is essential to future solid-state quantum computation using nuclear spin qubits and in highly sensitive magnetic resonance imaging. Though efficient dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors has been demonstrated at low temperatures for decades, its realization at room temperature is largely lacking. Here we demonstrate that a combined effect of efficient spin-dependent recombination and hyperfine coupling can facilitate strong dynamic nuclear polarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor at room temperature. We provide direct evidence that a sizeable nuclear field (~150 Gauss) and nuclear spin polarization (~15%) sensed by conduction electrons in GaNAs originates from dynamic nuclear polarization of a Ga interstitial defect. We further show that the dynamic nuclear polarization process is remarkably fast and is completed in <5 μs at room temperature. The proposed new concept could pave a way to overcome a major obstacle in achieving strong dynamic nuclear polarization at room temperature, desirable for practical device applications.

  18. Optically Pumped Subwavelength Lasers Operated at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-06

    REPORT NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...28-Feb-2011 NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature Report Title

  19. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  20. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  1. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-12-19

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  2. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  3. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  4. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  5. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Baig, R B Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Varma, Rajender S

    2016-12-19

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  6. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; ...

    2016-12-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  7. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Baig, R. B. Nasir; Verma, Sanny; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N.; Varma, Rajender S.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. PMID:27991593

  8. A Promising New Method to Estimate Drug-Polymer Solubility at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Gannon, Natasha; Porsch, Ilona; Rask, Malte Bille; Olesen, Niels Erik; Langguth, Peter; Holm, René; Rades, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The established methods to predict drug-polymer solubility at room temperature either rely on extrapolation over a long temperature range or are limited by the availability of a liquid analogue of the polymer. To overcome these issues, this work investigated a new methodology where the drug-polymer solubility is estimated from the solubility of the drug in a solution of the polymer at room temperature using the shake-flask method. Thus, the new polymer in solution method does not rely on temperature extrapolations and only requires the polymer and a solvent, in which the polymer is soluble, that does not affect the molecular structure of the drug and polymer relative to that in the solid state. Consequently, as this method has the potential to provide fast and precise estimates of drug-polymer solubility at room temperature, we encourage the scientific community to further investigate this principle both fundamentally and practically.

  9. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is ‘dark’ with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  10. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-21

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

  11. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  12. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  13. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  14. A new class of room temperature molten salts for battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, J. S.; Levisky, J. A.; Landers, J. S.; Vaughn, R. L.; Hussey, C. L.; Floreani, D. A.; Stech, D. J.

    1981-10-01

    Salts that are liquid at room temperature would provide a completely ionic electrolyte for rechargeable batteries without the penalty of high operating temperatures. We have discovered and characterized a new class of molten salts that are liquids considerably below room temperature. The new materials are mixtures of dialkyimidazolium chlorides and aluminum chloride. The solid-liquid phase diagram of one member of the class shows that the material is liquid below room temperature over its entire composition range. A proof of concept battery cell using the new electrolyte was demonstrated. Electrochemical tests show that battery anodes and cathodes will operate in the new electrolytes. By varying the ratio of the components of the new melts, the chemical and physical properties can be changed over a very wide range.

  15. High temperature solid state storage cell

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Jesse R.; Kallianidis, Milton; Kelsey, G. Stephen

    1983-01-01

    A completely solid state high temperature storage cell comprised of a solid rechargeable cathode such as TiS.sub.2, a solid electrolyte which remains solid at the high temperature operating conditions of the cell and which exhibits high ionic conductivity at such elevated temperatures such as an electrolyte comprised of lithium iodide, and a solid lithium or other alkali metal alloy anode (such as a lithium-silicon alloy) with 5-50% by weight of said anode being comprised of said solid electrolyte.

  16. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing.

  17. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-02-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via -OH functionalization.

  18. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp(3) functionalized graphene.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-02-20

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp(3) coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp(2)-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp(3) matrix and superexchange interactions via -OH functionalization.

  19. Room temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Holá, Kateřina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Błoński, Piotr; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Ugolotti, Juri; Dubecký, Matúš; Karlický, František; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-01-01

    Materials based on metallic elements that have d orbitals and exhibit room temperature magnetism have been known for centuries and applied in a huge range of technologies. Development of room temperature carbon magnets containing exclusively sp orbitals is viewed as great challenge in chemistry, physics, spintronics and materials science. Here we describe a series of room temperature organic magnets prepared by a simple and controllable route based on the substitution of fluorine atoms in fluorographene with hydroxyl groups. Depending on the chemical composition (an F/OH ratio) and sp3 coverage, these new graphene derivatives show room temperature antiferromagnetic ordering, which has never been observed for any sp-based materials. Such 2D magnets undergo a transition to a ferromagnetic state at low temperatures, showing an extraordinarily high magnetic moment. The developed theoretical model addresses the origin of the room temperature magnetism in terms of sp2-conjugated diradical motifs embedded in an sp3 matrix and superexchange interactions via –OH functionalization. PMID:28216636

  20. Room temperature lithium polymer batteries based on ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, G. B.; Kim, G. T.; Montanino, M.; Alessandrini, F.; Passerini, S.

    In this manuscript are reported the results of an investigation performed on rechargeable, all-solid-state, solvent-free, Li/LiFePO 4 polymer batteries incorporating N-butyl- N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, PYR 14TFSI, ionic liquid (IL). The tests show clearly the beneficial effect due to the incorporation of ionic liquids on room temperature battery performance that, conversely, results extremely poor in IL-free lithium polymer batteries. The theoretical capacity is delivered at 30 °C whereas about 115 mA h g -1 are discharged at 20 °C with excellent capacity retention and high coulombic efficiency. At 40 °C large capacities (125 mA h g -1) are discharged even at medium rates (C/3). Impedance measurements revealed that the overall battery resistance is almost fully located (e.g., above 93%) at the lithium anode/polymer electrolyte interface, which plays a key role in determining the battery performance.

  1. Room-temperature bonding of thin plastic sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thin sheets of plastic are bonded together, without heat, by depositing metal films on plastic and applying light pressure. Films are pressed together at room temperature, technique which makes it possible to join organic material without high temperatures necessary for conventional adhesive bonding.

  2. Room Temperature Silicene Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinwande, Deji

    Silicene, a buckled Si analogue of graphene, holds significant promise for future electronics beyond traditional CMOS. In our predefined experiments via encapsulated delamination with native electrodes approach, silicene devices exhibit an ambipolar charge transport behavior, corroborating theories on Dirac band in Ag-free silicene. Monolayer silicene device has extracted field-effect mobility within the theoretical expectation and ON/OFF ratio greater than monolayer graphene, while multilayer silicene devices show decreased mobility and gate modulation. Air-stability of silicene devices depends on the number of layers of silicene and intrinsic material structure determined by growth temperature. Few or multi-layer silicene devices maintain their ambipolar behavior for days in contrast to minutes time scale for monolayer counterparts under similar conditions. Multilayer silicene grown at different temperatures below 300oC possess different intrinsic structures and yield different electrical property and air-stability. This work suggests a practical prospect to enable more air-stable silicene devices with layer and growth condition control, which can be leveraged for other air-sensitive 2D materials. In addition, we describe quantum and classical transistor device concepts based on silicene and related buckled materials that exploit the 2D topological insulating phenomenon. The transistor device physics offer the potential for ballistic transport that is robust against scattering and can be employed for both charge and spin transport. This work was supported by the ARO.

  3. Rapid and accurate estimation of densities of room-temperature ionic liquids and salts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chengfeng; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2007-03-01

    Volume parameters for room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and salts were developed. For 59 of the most common imidazolium, pyridinium, pyrrolidinium, tetralkylammonium, and phosphonium-based RTILs, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) of the densities is 0.007 g cm-3; for 35 imidazolium-based room-temperature salts, the MAD is 0.020 g cm-3; and for 150 energetic salts, the MAD is 0.035 g cm-3. The experimental density (Y) for an alkylated imidazolium or pyridinium-based room-temperature ionic liquid is approximately proportional to its calculated density (X) in the solid state: Y = 0.948X - 0.110 (correlation coefficient: R2 = 0.998, for BF4-, PF6-, NTf2- -containing ionic liquids); Y = 0.934X - 0.070 (correlation coefficient: R2 = 0.999, for OTf-, CF3CO2-, N(CN)2- -containing ionic liquids).

  4. Room Temperature Crystallization of Hydroxyapatite in Porous Silicon Structures.

    PubMed

    Santana, M; Estevez, J O; Agarwal, V; Herrera-Becerra, R

    2016-12-01

    Porous silicon (PS) substrates, with different pore sizes and morphology, have been used to crystallize hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-fibers by an easy and economical procedure using a co-precipitation method at room temperature. In situ formation of HA nanoparticles, within the meso- and macroporous silicon structure, resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized hydroxyapatite crystals on/within the porous structure. The X-ray diffraction technique was used to determine the tetragonal structure of the crystals. Analysis/characterization demonstrates that under certain synthesis conditions, growth and crystallization of hydroxyapatite layer on/inside PS can be achieved at room temperature. Such composite structures expand the possibility of designing a new bio-composite material based on the hydroxyapatite and silicon synthesized at room temperature.

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y W; Lu, Y H; Yi, J B; Feng, Y P; Herng, T S; Liu, X; Gao, D Q; Xue, D S; Xue, J M; Ouyang, J Y; Ding, J

    2012-03-06

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  6. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications.

  7. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-03

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed.

  8. Crystallization of bacteriorhodopsin from bicelle formulations at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Faham, Salem; Boulting, Gabriella L; Massey, Elizabeth A; Yohannan, Sarah; Yang, Dawn; Bowie, James U

    2005-03-01

    We showed previously that high-quality crystals of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) from Halobacterium salinarum can be obtained from bicelle-forming DMPC/CHAPSO mixtures at 37 degrees C. As many membrane proteins are not sufficiently stable for crystallization at this high temperature, we tested whether the bicelle method could be applied at a lower temperature. Here we show that bR can be crystallized at room temperature using two different bicelle-forming compositions: DMPC/CHAPSO and DTPC/CHAPSO. The DTPC/CHAPSO crystals grown at room temperature are essentially identical to the previous, twinned crystals: space group P21 with unit cell dimensions of a = 44.7 A, b = 108.7 A, c = 55.8 A, beta = 113.6 degrees . The room-temperature DMPC/CHAPSO crystals are untwinned, however, and belong to space group C222(1) with the following unit cell dimensions: a = 44.7 A, b = 102.5 A, c = 128.2 A. The bR protein packs into almost identical layers in the two crystal forms, but the layers stack differently. The new untwinned crystal form yielded clear density for a previously unresolved CHAPSO molecule inserted between protein subunits within the layers. The ability to grow crystals at room temperature significantly expands the applicability of bicelle crystallization.

  9. Ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Mahato, R N; Lülf, H; Siekman, M H; Kersten, S P; Bobbert, P A; de Jong, M P; De Cola, L; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-07-19

    Systems featuring large magnetoresistance (MR) at room temperature and in small magnetic fields are attractive owing to their potential for applications in magnetic field sensing and data storage. Usually, the magnetic properties of materials are exploited to achieve large MR effects. Here, we report on an exceptionally large (>2000%), room-temperature, small-field (a few millitesla) MR effect in one-dimensional, nonmagnetic systems formed by molecular wires embedded in a zeolite host crystal. This ultrahigh MR effect is ascribed to spin blockade in one-dimensional electron transport. Its generic nature offers very good perspectives to exploit the effect in a wide range of low-dimensional systems.

  10. Room Temperature Nanoimprint Technology Using Hydrogen Silsequioxane (HSQ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igaku, Yutaka; Matsui, Shinji; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ochiai, Yukinori; Namatsu, Hideo; Komuro, Masanori; Hiroshima, Hiroshi

    2002-06-01

    Room-temperature nanoimprint lithography (RT-NIL) technology has been developed to overcome critical dimensions and pattern placement error due to thermal expansion in the conventional nanoimprint lithography (NIL) process. We propose RT-NIL using hydrogen silsequioxane (HSQ) instead of PMMA used in conventional NIL, and demonstrate HSQ replicated patterns with 90 nm hole diameter and 50 nm linewidth realized by room-temperature replications. We performed step-and-repeat replications using HSQ on a 1.5 in. wafer and evaluated the uniformity of the imprinted HSQ patterns.

  11. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  12. Halide-stabilized LiBH4, a room-temperature lithium fast-ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hideki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Takamura, Hitoshi; Ando, Mariko; Noda, Yasuto; Karahashi, Taiki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-28

    Solid state lithium conductors are attracting much attention for their potential applications to solid-state batteries and supercapacitors of high energy density to overcome safety issues and irreversible capacity loss of the currently commercialized ones. Recently, we discovered a new class of lithium super ionic conductors based on lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)). LiBH(4) was found to have conductivity as high as 10(-2) Scm(-1) accompanied by orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition above 115 degrees C. Polarization to the lithium metal electrode was shown to be extremely low, providing a versatile anode interface for the battery application. However, the high transition temperature of the superionic phase has limited its applications. Here we show that a chemical modification of LiBH(4) can stabilize the superionic phase even below room temperature. By doping of lithium halides, high conductivity can be obtained at room temperature. Both XRD and NMR confirmed room-temperature stabilization of superionic phase for LiI-doped LiBH(4). The electrochemical measurements showed a great advantage of this material as an extremely lightweight lithium electrolyte for batteries of high energy density. This material will open alternative opportunities for the development of solid ionic conductors other than previously known lithium conductors.

  13. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-12-04

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  14. Room temperature manipulation of long lifetime spins in metallic-like carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Choucair, Mohammad; Dinse, Klaus-Peter; Forró, László

    2016-07-01

    The time-window for processing electron spin information (spintronics) in solid-state quantum electronic devices is determined by the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of electrons. Minimizing the effects of spin-orbit coupling and the local magnetic contributions of neighbouring atoms on spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times at room temperature remain substantial challenges to practical spintronics. Here we report conduction electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of 175 ns at 300 K in 37+/-7 nm carbon spheres, which is remarkably long for any conducting solid-state material of comparable size. Following the observation of spin polarization by electron spin resonance, we control the quantum state of the electron spin by applying short bursts of an oscillating magnetic field and observe coherent oscillations of the spin state. These results demonstrate the feasibility of operating electron spins in conducting carbon nanospheres as quantum bits at room temperature.

  15. Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase behavior observed at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uky Vivitasari, Pipit; Azuma, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) consists of source, drain, Coulomb island, and gate to modulate the number of electrons and control the current. For practical applications, it is important to operate a SET at room temperature. One proposal towards the ability to operate at room temperature is to decrease Coulomb island size down to a few nanometres. We investigate a SET using Sn-porphyrin (Sn-por) protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with 1.4 nm in core diameter as a Coulomb island. The fabrication method of nanogap electrodes uses the combination of a top-down technique by electron beam lithography (EBL) and a bottom-up process through electroless gold plating (ELGP) as our group have described before. The electrical measurement was conducted at room temperature (300 K). From current-voltage (I d-V d) characteristics, we obtained clear Coulomb blockade phenomena together with a Coulomb staircase due to a Sn-por protected gold NP as a Coulomb island. Experimental results of I d-V d characteristics agree with a theoretical curve based on using the orthodox model. Clear dI d/dV d peaks are observed in the Coulomb staircase at 9 K which suggest the electron transports through excited energy levels of Au NPs. These results are a big step for obtaining SETs that can operate at room temperature.

  16. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  17. Experimental epikeratophakia using tissue lathed at room temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Rostron, C. K.; Sandford-Smith, J. H.; Morton, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents for the first time the results of carrying out epikeratophakia with tissue lathed at room temperature. Using an experimental model of epikeratophakia in the rabbit, we evaluated tissue handling techniques for the preparation of donor lenticules. Details of the technique are described and the in-vivo and histopathological findings reported. Images PMID:3293653

  18. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  19. Amination of allylic alcohols in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2009-06-04

    The "trick" to carrying out regiocontrolled aminations of allylic alcohols in water as the only medium is use of a nanomicelle's interior as the organic reaction solvent. When HCO(2)Me is present, along with the proper base and source of catalytic Pd, allylic amines are cleanly formed at room temperature.

  20. Observation of anharmonicity for copper thin film near room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, D S

    2001-03-01

    The fluorescence EXAFS spectra for a copper thin film with a thickness of 3000A measured at 300K, 350K and 400K were analyzed by the regularization method to directly obtain the radial distribution. The pair distribution was almost symmetric for 300K but asymmetric for 350K and 400K. This indicates that the atoms in copper vibrate anharmonically near room temperatures. The anharmonicity and the skewness of the asymmetric distribu-tion increases as temperature increases.

  1. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  2. Magnetic antiskyrmions above room temperature in tetragonal Heusler materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Kumar, Vivek; Ma, Tianping; Werner, Peter; Pippel, Eckhard; Sahoo, Roshnee; Damay, Franoise; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically stable, vortex-like objects surrounded by chiral boundaries that separate a region of reversed magnetization from the surrounding magnetized material. They are closely related to nanoscopic chiral magnetic domain walls, which could be used as memory and logic elements for conventional and neuromorphic computing applications that go beyond Moore’s law. Of particular interest is ‘racetrack memory’, which is composed of vertical magnetic nanowires, each accommodating of the order of 100 domain walls, and that shows promise as a solid state, non-volatile memory with exceptional capacity and performance. Its performance is derived from the very high speeds (up to one kilometre per second) at which chiral domain walls can be moved with nanosecond current pulses in synthetic antiferromagnet racetracks. Because skyrmions are essentially composed of a pair of chiral domain walls closed in on themselves, but are, in principle, more stable to perturbations than the component domain walls themselves, they are attractive for use in spintronic applications, notably racetrack memory. Stabilization of skyrmions has generally been achieved in systems with broken inversion symmetry, in which the asymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction modifies the uniform magnetic state to a swirling state. Depending on the crystal symmetry, two distinct types of skyrmions have been observed experimentally, namely, Bloch and Néel skyrmions. Here we present the experimental manifestation of another type of skyrmion—the magnetic antiskyrmion—in acentric tetragonal Heusler compounds with D2d crystal symmetry. Antiskyrmions are characterized by boundary walls that have alternating Bloch and Néel type as one traces around the boundary. A spiral magnetic ground-state, which propagates in the tetragonal basal plane, is transformed into an antiskyrmion lattice state under magnetic fields applied along the tetragonal axis over a wide range of temperatures

  3. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  4. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  5. Micromachined room-temperature microbolometers for millimeter-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Arifur; de Lange, Gert; Hu, Qing

    1996-04-01

    We have combined silicon micromachining technology with planar circuits to fabricate room-temperature niobium microbolometers for millimeter-wave detection. In this type of detector, a thin niobium film, with a dimension much smaller than the wavelength and fabricated on a 1 μm thick Si3N4 membrane, acts both as a radiation absorber and temperature sensor. Incident radiation is coupled into the microbolometer by a 0.37λ dipole antenna of center frequency 95 GHz with a 3 dB bandwidth of 15%, which is impedance matched with the Nb film. An electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4.5×10-10 W/√Hz has been achieved. This is comparable to the best commercial room-temperature millimeter-wave detectors.

  6. Room-temperature chiral charge pumping in Dirac semimetals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Enze; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Shiheng; Liang, Sihang; Cao, Junzhi; Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Li, Qian; Zhou, Chao; Gu, Teng; Wu, Yizheng; Zou, Jin; Xiu, Faxian

    2017-01-01

    Chiral anomaly, a non-conservation of chiral charge pumped by the topological nontrivial gauge fields, has been predicted to exist in Weyl semimetals. However, until now, the experimental signature of this effect exclusively relies on the observation of negative longitudinal magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Here, we report the field-modulated chiral charge pumping process and valley diffusion in Cd3As2. Apart from the conventional negative magnetoresistance, we observe an unusual nonlocal response with negative field dependence up to room temperature, originating from the diffusion of valley polarization. Furthermore, a large magneto-optic Kerr effect generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields is detected. These new experimental approaches provide a quantitative analysis of the chiral anomaly phenomenon which was inaccessible previously. The ability to manipulate the valley polarization in topological semimetal at room temperature opens up a route towards understanding its fundamental properties and utilizing the chiral fermions. PMID:28067234

  7. Room-temperature chiral charge pumping in Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Enze; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Yanwen; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Shiheng; Liang, Sihang; Cao, Junzhi; Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Li, Qian; Zhou, Chao; Gu, Teng; Wu, Yizheng; Zou, Jin; Xiu, Faxian

    2017-01-01

    Chiral anomaly, a non-conservation of chiral charge pumped by the topological nontrivial gauge fields, has been predicted to exist in Weyl semimetals. However, until now, the experimental signature of this effect exclusively relies on the observation of negative longitudinal magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Here, we report the field-modulated chiral charge pumping process and valley diffusion in Cd3As2. Apart from the conventional negative magnetoresistance, we observe an unusual nonlocal response with negative field dependence up to room temperature, originating from the diffusion of valley polarization. Furthermore, a large magneto-optic Kerr effect generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields is detected. These new experimental approaches provide a quantitative analysis of the chiral anomaly phenomenon which was inaccessible previously. The ability to manipulate the valley polarization in topological semimetal at room temperature opens up a route towards understanding its fundamental properties and utilizing the chiral fermions.

  8. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  9. Room-temperature helimagnetism in FeGe thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S L; Stasinopoulos, I; Lancaster, T; Xiao, F; Bauer, A; Rucker, F; Baker, A A; Figueroa, A I; Salman, Z; Pratt, F L; Blundell, S J; Prokscha, T; Suter, A; Waizner, J; Garst, M; Grundler, D; van der Laan, G; Pfleiderer, C; Hesjedal, T

    2017-03-09

    Chiral magnets are promising materials for the realisation of high-density and low-power spintronic memory devices. For these future applications, a key requirement is the synthesis of appropriate materials in the form of thin films ordering well above room temperature. Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the cubic compound FeGe exhibits helimagnetism with a relatively high transition temperature of 278 K in bulk crystals. We demonstrate that this temperature can be enhanced significantly in thin films. Using x-ray scattering and ferromagnetic resonance techniques, we provide unambiguous experimental evidence for long-wavelength helimagnetic order at room temperature and magnetic properties similar to the bulk material. We obtain α intr = 0.0036 ± 0.0003 at 310 K for the intrinsic damping parameter. We probe the dynamics of the system by means of muon-spin rotation, indicating that the ground state is reached via a freezing out of slow dynamics. Our work paves the way towards the fabrication of thin films of chiral magnets that host certain spin whirls, so-called skyrmions, at room temperature and potentially offer integrability into modern electronics.

  10. One-Pot Synthesis of β-Acetamido Ketones Using Boric Acid at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products. PMID:22666168

  11. One-pot synthesis of β-acetamido ketones using boric acid at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products.

  12. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Zn,Cr)Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hidekazu

    2006-03-01

    Ferromagnetic diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) are the key material to developing semiconductor spintronic devices. One of the most characteristics physical phenomena in DMS is a strong interaction between sp-carriers and localized d-spins (sp-d exchange interaction) [1]. Confirmation of this interaction is essential to prove a synthesis of real DMS, and can be done directly by the magneto-optical studies such as a magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurement [2]. Here, we report room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism with the sp-d exchange interaction in Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) [3]. Zn1-xCrxTe films with x.3ex<=x 0.20 were grown on GaAs (001) substrates by a molecular beam epitaxy method. No sign of a secondary phase was detected in any films by the reflection high-energy electron and X-ray diffractions. MCD spectra were measured in a transmission mode. Magnetization (M) measurements were carried out using a SQUID. The M-H curves of Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) showed a ferromagnetic behavior up to about RT. Curie temperature TC was estimated to be 300±10 K by the Arrott plot analysis. A strong enhancement of the MCD signal at the optical transition energies of critical points of host ZnTe was observed in Zn1-xCrxTe, indicating a strong sp-d exchange interaction. The MCD spectra of Zn1-xCrxTe at any magnetic field could be superposed upon a single spectrum, indicating that the observed MCD signals come from a single material, that is, Zn1-xCrxTe. The magnetic field dependence of MCD intensity showed the ferromagnetic feature, which coincides with the M-H curves measured using a SQUID. Furthermore, the MCD data showed the same TC as that obtained from magnetization data. These results indicate that Zn1-xCrxTe (x=0.20) is an intrinsic DMS with RT ferromagnetism. References [1] J. K. Furdyna, J. Appl. Phys. 64, R29 (1988). [2] K. Ando, in Magneto-Optics, Springer Series in Solid-State Science, edited by S. Sugano and N. Kojima (Springer, Berlin, 2000), Vol.128, p. 211. [3

  14. Toward room temperature ferromagnetism of Ge:Mn systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, F.; Lucari, F.; Pinto, N.; Morresi, L.; Murri, R.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of Mn xGe 1- x/Ge(1 0 0) films. We show that the choice of growth temperature and Mn content is crucial for achieving optimal magnetic performance. With a substrate temperature of 160°C during film deposition, and Mn concentration between 2.7% and 4.4%, hysteresis is observed up to about 250 K. However, the magnetic loop maintains a saturating behaviour at high fields up to room temperature. For larger Mn concentrations the magnetic response is strongly suppressed, suggesting a possible segregation of manganese.

  15. Nanoscale structural modulation and enhanced room-temperature multiferroic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shujie; Huang, Yan; Wang, Guopeng; Wang, Jianlin; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran; Knize, Randy J.; Lu, Yalin

    2014-10-01

    Availability of a single-phase multiferroic material functional at room temperature poses a big challenge, although it is very important to both fundamental physics and application development. Recently, layered Aurivillius oxide materials, one of the most promising candidates, have attracted considerable interest. In this work, we investigated the nanoscale structural evolution of the six-layer Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 when substituting excessive Co. Nanoscale structural modulation (NSM) occurred at the boundaries when changing the material gradually from the originally designed six-layer nanoscale architecture down to five and then four, when increasing the Co content, inducing a previously unidentified analogous morphotropic transformation (AMT) effect. The AMT's net contribution to the enhanced intrinsic multiferroic properties at room temperature was confirmed by quantifying and deducting the contribution from the existing impurity phase using derivative thermo-magneto-gravimetry measurements (DTMG). Significantly, this new AMT effect may be caused by a possible coupling contribution from co-existing NSM phases, indicating a potential method for realizing multiferroic materials that function at room temperature.Availability of a single-phase multiferroic material functional at room temperature poses a big challenge, although it is very important to both fundamental physics and application development. Recently, layered Aurivillius oxide materials, one of the most promising candidates, have attracted considerable interest. In this work, we investigated the nanoscale structural evolution of the six-layer Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 when substituting excessive Co. Nanoscale structural modulation (NSM) occurred at the boundaries when changing the material gradually from the originally designed six-layer nanoscale architecture down to five and then four, when increasing the Co content, inducing a previously unidentified analogous morphotropic transformation (AMT) effect. The AMT

  16. Room temperature recrystallization of 99. 999 PCT aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Changhee Choi; Changseok, Oh; Dong Nyung Lee . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Jaehan Jeong )

    1994-02-01

    It has been known that recrystallization of metals can be accelerated by a combined effect of high purity and a heavy deformation. There is an increasing interest in deformation and recrystallization behaviors of high purity aluminum, because of the sensitivity of its recrystallization temperature to impurities. Room temperature recrystallization of high purity aluminum is a typical example of this sensitivity and has been found and displayed in an earlier work. This result has been thought to occur statically, because aluminum was only known to undergo dynamic recovery (DRV) as a restoration mechanism due to a high stacking fault energy. However, some recent studies suggested the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) in room temperature compression tests of 99.999 pct aluminum. Thus, the restoration mechanism of 99.999 pct aluminum during deformation is in dispute. The purpose of this study is to clarify whether or not DRX can occur in 99.999 pct aluminum that is subjected to plastic deformation at room temperature.

  17. Towards Room Temperature Spin Filtering in Oxide Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata-Harms, Jodi; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Spin filtering, in which the magnetic tunnel barrier preferentially filters spin-up and spin-down electrons from a nonmagnetic electrode, has been demonstrated in junction heterostructures. By incorporating two spin filtering barriers, double spin filter magnetic tunnel junctions (DSF-MTJs) were predicted to yield magnetoresistance (MR) values orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. Recently, DSF-MTJs have exhibited spin filtering with magnetic electrodes at room temperature and at low temperature with nonmagnetic electrodes in EuS-based devices [1,2]. We have fabricated DSF-MTJs with nonmagnetic SrRuO3 electrodes and room temperature ferrimagnets, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4, for spin filters in pursuit of room temperature functionality. Atomic force microscopy shows smooth films quantified by roughness values between 0.1--0.5nm. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals ferromagnetic Ni^2+ and Co^2+, and element-specific hysteresis loops indicate the independent switching of the two spin filters. Transport data reveals junction MR and non-linear I-V characteristics consistent with tunneling. [4pt] [1] M.G. Chapline et al., PRB, 74, 014418 (2006).[0pt] [2] G.- X. Miao et al., PRL, 102, 076601 (2009).

  18. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  19. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep

    1997-01-01

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  20. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  1. Room temperature current injection polariton light emitting diode with a hybrid microcavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tien-Chang; Chen, Jun-Rong; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Huang, Si-Wei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-07-13

    The strong light-matter interaction within a semiconductor high-Q microcavity has been used to produce half-matter/half-light quasiparticles, exciton-polaritons. The exciton-polaritons have very small effective mass and controllable energy-momentum dispersion relation. These unique properties of polaritons provide the possibility to investigate the fundamental physics including solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics, and dynamical Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Thus far the polariton BEC has been demonstrated using optical excitation. However, from a practical viewpoint, the current injection polariton devices operating at room temperature would be most desirable. Here we report the first realization of a current injection microcavity GaN exciton-polariton light emitting diode (LED) operating under room temperature. The exciton-polariton emission from the LED at photon energy 3.02 eV under strong coupling condition is confirmed through temperature-dependent and angle-resolved electroluminescence spectra.

  2. Giant electrocaloric effect in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Infante, Ingrid C.; Dkhil, Brahim; Lou, Xiaojie

    2014-02-24

    Room-temperature electrocaloric properties of Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are studied by using a multiscale thermodynamic model. It is found that there is a divergence in the adiabatic temperature change ΔT for the two opposite polarization orientations. This difference under a typical writing voltage of 3 V can reach over 1 K as the barrier thickness decreases. Thanks to the ultrahigh external stimulus, a giant electrocaloric effect (1.53 K/V) with ΔT being over 4.5 K can be achieved at room temperature, which demonstrates the perspective of FTJs as a promising solid-state refrigeration.

  3. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macro­molecular crystallography. PMID:22751666

  4. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  5. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  6. Broadband room temperature strong coupling between quantum dots and metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Indukuri, Chaitanya; Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Basu, J K

    2017-08-17

    Herein, we report the first demonstration of room temperature enhanced light-matter coupling in the visible regime for metamaterials using cooperative coupled quasi two dimensional quantum dot assemblies located at precise distances from the hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) templates. The non-monotonic variation of the magnitude of strong coupling, manifested in terms of strong splitting of the photoluminescence of quantum dots, can be explained in terms of enhanced LDOS near the surface of such metamaterials as well as the plasmon mediated super-radiance of closely spaced quantum dots (QDs). Our methodology of enhancing broadband, room temperature, light-matter coupling in the visible regime for metamaterials opens up new possibilities of utilising these materials for a wide range of applications including QD based thresholdless nanolasers and novel metamaterial based integrated photonic devices.

  7. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. F.; Dymek, C. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Three novel primary cells which use room temperature molten salt electrolytes are examined and found to have high open circuit potentials in the 1.75-2.19 V range, by comparison with the Al/AlCl3-MEICl concentration cell; their cathodes were of FeCl3-MEICl, WCl6-MEICl, and Br2/reticulated vitreous carbon together with Pt. Also, secondary electrochemical cell candidates were examined which combined the reversible Al/AlCl3-MEICl electrode with reversible zinc and cadmium molten salt electrodes to yield open circuit potentials of about 0.7 and 1.0 V, respectively. Room temperature molten salts' half-cell reduction potentials are given.

  8. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  9. Room temperature electrodeposition of actinides from ionic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Hatchett, David W.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Droessler, Janelle; Kinyanjui, John

    2017-04-25

    Uranic and transuranic metals and metal oxides are first dissolved in ozone compositions. The resulting solution in ozone can be further dissolved in ionic liquids to form a second solution. The metals in the second solution are then electrochemically deposited from the second solutions as room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), tri-methyl-n-butyl ammonium n-bis(trifluoromethansulfonylimide) [Me.sub.3N.sup.nBu][TFSI] providing an alternative non-aqueous system for the extraction and reclamation of actinides from reprocessed fuel materials. Deposition of U metal is achieved using TFSI complexes of U(III) and U(IV) containing the anion common to the RTIL. TFSI complexes of uranium were produced to ensure solubility of the species in the ionic liquid. The methods provide a first measure of the thermodynamic properties of U metal deposition using Uranium complexes with different oxidation states from RTIL solution at room temperature.

  10. Disorder-induced room temperature ferromagnetism in glassy chromites.

    PubMed

    Araujo, C Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R; Jayakumar, O D; Tyagi, A K; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K V

    2014-04-15

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect.

  11. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-04-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect.

  12. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  13. Irreconcilable room temperature magnetotransport properties of polypyrrole nanoparticles and nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman Sagar, Rizwan Ur; Stadler, Florian J.; Navale, Sachin T.; Mane, Rajaram S.; Nazir, Adnan; Nabi, Ghulam

    2017-09-01

    The morphology of nanostructures plays a vital role in determining the conductivity of specimens and, consequently, affects the efficiency of magnetoelectronic devices such as magnetic field sensors. Herein, nanoparticles (NPs) and nanorods (NRs) of conducting polymer polypyrrole have been synthesized at room temperature via the chemical oxidative polymerization method. The positive and negative magnetoresistance signatures are respectively obtained in NPs and NRs morphology, respectively. Both morphologies have conduction in the variable range-hopping regime with the average charge carrier hopping length being highly influenced by the sign of magnetoresistance. This morphology dependence is not only interesting for fundamental research but it also allows for tuning magnetic field sensor materials to be usable at room temperature for the desired characteristics.

  14. Quantum correlations from a room-temperature optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Grutter, K. E.; Srinivasan, K.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    The act of position measurement alters the motion of an object being measured. This quantum measurement backaction is typically much smaller than the thermal motion of a room-temperature object and thus difficult to observe. By shining laser light through a nanomechanical beam, we measure the beam’s thermally driven vibrations and perturb its motion with optical force fluctuations at a level dictated by the Heisenberg measurement-disturbance uncertainty relation. We demonstrate a cross-correlation technique to distinguish optically driven motion from thermally driven motion, observing this quantum backaction signature up to room temperature. We use the scale of the quantum correlations, which is determined by fundamental constants, to gauge the size of thermal motion, demonstrating a path toward absolute thermometry with quantum mechanically calibrated ticks.

  15. Room Temperature Source of Single Photons of Definite Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Bissel, L.J.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, Jr., C.R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2007-02-12

    A definite polarization in fluorescence from single emitters (dye molecules) at room temperature is demonstrated. A planar-aligned, nematic liquid-crystal host provides definite alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction. Well-defined polarized fluorescence from single-emitters (single photon source) is important for applications in photonic quantum information. Polarized single-photon sources based on single-emitters, for example, are key hardware elements both for absolutely secure quantum communication and quantum computation systems.

  16. A Room Temperature Low-Threshold Ultraviolet Plasmonic Nanolaser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-23

    Here we demonstrate the first strong room temperature ultraviolet (B370 nm) SP polariton laser with an extremely low threshold (B3.5MWcm 2). We find...localized surface plasmon and propagating surface plasmon polariton (SPP), has been demonstrated in metal nanosphere cavities6, metal-cladding...Quantum plasmonics. Nat. Phys. 9, 329–340 (2013). 4. Berini, P. & De Leon, I. Surface plasmon- polariton amplifiers and lasers. Nat. Photon. 6, 16–24 (2012

  17. Rapid Methods of Staining Bacterial Spores at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lechtman, M. D.; Bartholomew, J. W.; Phillips, A.; Russo, M.

    1965-01-01

    Lechtman, M. D. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles), J. W. Bartholomew, A. Phillips, and M. Russo. Rapid methods of staining bacterial spores at room temperature. J. Bacteriol. 89:848–854. 1965.—Spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger were stained in 2 min at room temperature, after suitable pretreatment, with a dye reagent composed of 2% crystal violet in 1% phenol and 26% ethanol. Pretreatments included heat fixation to 260 C, mechanical rupture, and hydrolysis at room temperature in 44 n H3PO4 for 5 min, 33.4 n H3PO4 for 10 min, 12 n HCl for 5 sec, 6 n HCl for 2 min, 12 n HNO3 for 5 sec, and 6 n HNO3 for 60 sec. Acid hydrolysis at 60 C enabled the lowering of both acid concentration and time: 33.4 n H3PO4 for 15 sec, 25.9 n H3PO4 for 60 sec, 2 n HCl for 30 sec, 1 n HCl for 30 sec, 2 n HNO3 for 15 sec, and 1 n HNO3 for 30 sec. After acid treatment, 1 n NaOH was used as a neutralization agent. The cytological manifestations of these pretreatments, examined in an electron microscope after replication, showed definite degradation of spore coats, which probably explains the increase in dye permeability. The pretreatments were evaluated for use in a differential staining procedure for spores and vegetative cells. They were found to be too drastic in that they resulted in replacement of the primary dye by the 0.25% safranine counter stain in both vegetative cells and endospores. Less drastic pretreatments, such as 6 n HNO3 for 10 sec at room temperature, gave good differential stains, but failed to stain some free spores. The staining techniques above were evaluated with six species of Bacillus and were found to apply to all. Images PMID:14273671

  18. Experimental observation of negative capacitance in ferroelectrics at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Daniel J R; Ponon, Nikhil K; Kwa, Kelvin S K; Zou, Bin; Petrov, Peter K; Wang, Tianle; Alford, Neil M; O'Neill, Anthony

    2014-07-09

    Effective negative capacitance has been postulated in ferroelectrics because there is a hysteresis in plots of polarization-electric field. Compelling experimental evidence of effective negative capacitance is presented here at room temperature in engineered devices, where it is stabilized by the presence of a paraelectric material. In future integrated circuits, the incorporation of such negative capacitance into MOSFET gate stacks would reduce the subthreshold slope, enabling low power operation and reduced self-heating.

  19. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  20. Silicon photodiodes with high photoconductive gain at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Carey, J E; Sickler, J W; Pralle, M U; Palsule, C; Vineis, C J

    2012-02-27

    Silicon photodiodes with high photoconductive gain are demonstrated. The photodiodes are fabricated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible process. The typical room temperature responsivity at 940 nm is >20 A/W and the dark current density is ≈ 100 nA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias, yielding a detectivity of ≈ 10(14) Jones. These photodiodes are good candidates for applications that require high detection sensitivity and low bias operation.

  1. Room Temperature Hydrosilylation of Silicon Nanocrystals with Bifunctional Terminal Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yixuan; Hessel, Colin M.; Bogart, Timothy; Panthani, Matthew G.; Rasch, Michael R.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    H-terminated Si nanocrystals undergo room temperature hydrosilylation with bifunctional alkenes with distal polar moieties—ethyl-, methyl-ester or carboxylic acids—without the aid of light or added catalyst. The passivated Si nanocrystals exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) and disperse in polar solvents, including water. We propose a reaction mechanism in which ester or carboxylic acid groups facilitate direct nucleophilic attack of the highly curved Si surface of the nanocrystals by the alkene. PMID:23312033

  2. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  3. Chemoselective reductions of nitroaromatics in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean M; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2014-01-03

    A robust and green protocol for the reduction of functionalized nitroarenes to the corresponding primary amines has been developed. It relies on inexpensive zinc dust in water containing nanomicelles derived from the commercially available designer surfactant TPGS-750-M. This mild process takes place at room temperature and tolerates a wide range of functionalities. Highly selective reductions can also be achieved in the presence of common protecting groups.

  4. Room-temperature direct alkynylation of arenes with copper acetylides.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Cédric; Evano, Gwilherm

    2014-09-05

    C-H bond in azoles and polyhalogenated arenes can be smoothly activated by copper acetylides to give the corresponding alkynylated (hetero)arenes by simple reaction at room temperature in the presence of phenanthroline and lithium tert-butoxide under an oxygen atmosphere. These stable, unreactive, and readily available polymers act as especially efficient and practical reagents for the introduction of an alkyne group to a wide number of arenes under remarkably mild conditions.

  5. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  6. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  7. Highly Directional Room-Temperature Single Photon Device.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Nitzan; Harats, Moshe G; Istrati, Daniel; Eisenberg, Hagai S; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-04-13

    One of the most important challenges in modern quantum optical applications is the demonstration of efficient, scalable, on-chip single photon sources, which can operate at room temperature. In this paper we demonstrate a room-temperature single photon source based on a single colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot positioned inside a circular bulls-eye shaped hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantenna. Experimental results show that 20% of the photons are emitted into a very low numerical aperture (NA < 0.25), a 20-fold improvement over a free-standing quantum dot, and with a probability of more than 70% for a single photon emission. With an NA = 0.65 more than 35% of the single photon emission is collected. The single photon purity is limited only by emission from the metal, an obstacle that can be bypassed with careful design and fabrication. The concept presented here can be extended to many other types of quantum emitters. Such a device paves a promising route for a high purity, high efficiency, on-chip single photon source operating at room temperature.

  8. Noninvasive liver iron measurements with a room-temperature susceptometer

    PubMed Central

    Avrin, W F; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements on the liver can quantify iron overload accurately and noninvasively. However, established susceptometer designs, using Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) that work in liquid helium, have been too expensive for widespread use. This paper presents a less expensive liver susceptometer that works at room temperature. This system uses oscillating magnetic fields, which are produced and detected by copper coils. The coil design cancels the signal from the applied field, eliminating noise from fluctuations of the source-coil current and sensor gain. The coil unit moves toward and away from the patient at 1 Hz, cancelling drifts due to thermal expansion of the coils. Measurements on a water phantom indicated instrumental errors less than 30 μg of iron per gram of wet liver tissue, which is small compared with other errors due to the response of the patient’s body. Liver iron measurements on eight thalassemia patients yielded a correlation coefficient r=0.98 between the room-temperature susceptometer and an existing SQUID. These results indicate that the fundamental accuracy limits of the room-temperature susceptometer are similar to those of the SQUID. PMID:17395991

  9. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Polymer and the Correlated Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinsong; Yang, Bin; Shield, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) has been observed in organic semiconductor devices where resistance can change in a relatively small external magnetic field at room temperature. Since a weak magnetic field is involved, the hyperfine interaction (HFI) is employed to explain OMAR in the reported literatures. None of these issues consider the magnetic properties of the organic semiconductors themselves. However, the we recently discovered that polymer semiconductors, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT, can have room temperature (RT) ferromagnetic properties in their crystalline phase and when mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Here, we will report the possible correlation between the ferromagnetic property of the P3HT:PCBM and anomalous OMAR phenomenon including the anisotropic and hysteretic OMAR behavior. The magnetic property of the polymer including the anisotropic and photo induced change of magnetism will be also discussed to explore the possible mechanism of the room temperature ferromagnetism.~ This work is partially supported by the NSF MRSEC program at University.

  10. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  11. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  12. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robin L. Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-06-15

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A{sub 2A} adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography.

  13. Electronic transition in solid Nb at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezenwa, Innocent C.; Secco, Richard A.

    2017-06-01

    The electrical resistivity of high purity solid Nb has been measured at fixed pressures up to 5 GPa in a large volume press and temperatures up to ˜1900 K. The expected resistivity decrease with pressure and increase with temperature were found. A transition was observed in the temperature dependence of resistivity at high temperature. The transition is discussed in terms of the effects of pressure and temperature on the electronic band structure of Nb causing a resistivity behavior characteristic of a change from the "minus group" to the "plus group." Extrapolation of the pressure dependence of the transition temperature suggests that Nb would show plus group behavior at room T at an estimated pressure of ˜27 ± 7 GPa. The electronic thermal conductivity was calculated using the Wiedemann-Franz law and was in very good agreement with 1 atm data. We show that the temperature dependence of the calculated electronic thermal conductivity increases with a steep slope from room temperature up to the electronic transition temperature for all fixed pressures. Above the transition temperature, the T-dependence of electronic thermal conductivity remained constant at 2 GPa and exhibited an increasingly negative slope at higher pressures. The isothermal pressure-dependence of electronic thermal conductivity is positive.

  14. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  15. Photoluminescence observation from zinc oxide formed by magnetron sputtering at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, D.; Babichev, A.; Nikitina, E.; Gudovskikh, A.; Kladko, P.

    2015-11-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of ZnO thin films grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature has been observed. The PL spectra were measured using an instrument from Accent Optical Technologies with a solid state UV laser (λ = 266 nm) as the pumping source and at the temperature of 300 K. Samples grown at sputtering power of 100-200 W show a strong photoluminescence (PL) at wavelength of 377 nm and its intensity shows non-linear dependence with magnetron power. At values of sputtering power less then 100 W PL signal was not observed. A correlation between PL, XRD intensity and ZnO grain size was shown.

  16. Controllable effects of quantum fluctuations on spin free-induction decay at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Pan, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations of local fields cause decoherence of quantum objects. Usually at high temperatures, thermal noises are much stronger than quantum fluctuations unless the thermal effects are suppressed by certain techniques such as spin echo. Here we report the discovery of strong quantum-fluctuation effects of nuclear spin baths on free-induction decay of single electron spins in solids at room temperature. We find that the competition between the quantum and thermal fluctuations is controllable by an external magnetic field. These findings are based on Ramsey interference measurement of single nitrogen-vacancy center spins in diamond and numerical simulation of the decoherence, which are in excellent agreement.

  17. Room-temperature superfluidity in a polariton condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerario, Giovanni; Fieramosca, Antonio; Barachati, Fábio; Ballarini, Dario; Daskalakis, Konstantinos S.; Dominici, Lorenzo; de Giorgi, Milena; Maier, Stefan A.; Gigli, Giuseppe; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    Superfluidity--the suppression of scattering in a quantum fluid at velocities below a critical value--is one of the most striking manifestations of the collective behaviour typical of Bose-Einstein condensates. This phenomenon, akin to superconductivity in metals, has until now been observed only at prohibitively low cryogenic temperatures. For atoms, this limit is imposed by the small thermal de Broglie wavelength, which is inversely related to the particle mass. Even in the case of ultralight quasiparticles such as exciton-polaritons, superfluidity has been demonstrated only at liquid helium temperatures. In this case, the limit is not imposed by the mass, but instead by the small binding energy of Wannier-Mott excitons, which sets the upper temperature limit. Here we demonstrate a transition from supersonic to superfluid flow in a polariton condensate under ambient conditions. This is achieved by using an organic microcavity supporting stable Frenkel exciton-polaritons at room temperature. This result paves the way not only for tabletop studies of quantum hydrodynamics, but also for room-temperature polariton devices that can be robustly protected from scattering.

  18. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  19. Room Temperature Chemical Oxidation of Delafossite-Type Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trari, M.; Töpfer, J.; Doumerc, J. P.; Pouchard, M.; Ammar, A.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1994-07-01

    Examination of the delafossite-type structure of CuLaO 2 and CuYO 2 suggests that there is room enough to accomodate intercalated oxide ions and the charge compensation resulting simply from the oxidation of an equivalent amount of Cu + into Cu 2+. Reaction with hypohalites in an aqueous solution leads to color change. Evidence of the formation of Cu 2+ is given by TGA, iodometric titration, and magnetic (static and EPR) measurements. The obtained La and Y compounds seem to behave in a different way: whereas CuLaO 2+ x appears as a single phase, CuYO 2+ x corresponds to a two-phase mixture, with respectively low and high x values, the latter being isostructural with the thermally oxidized compound recently reported by Cava et al. Comparison is stressed between the oxides obtained by oxidation at room and those obtained at higher temperatures.

  20. Electroluminescence from localized defects in zinc oxide: toward electrically driven single photon sources at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sumin; Berhane, Amanuel M; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-18

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography, and quantum communications. However, the majority of room temperature emitters to date are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically driven light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit in the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open possibilities for building new ZnO-based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

  1. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-09-07

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H)--a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.

  2. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction.

  3. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  4. Superionic glass-ceramic electrolytes for room-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akitoshi; Noi, Kousuke; Sakuda, Atsushi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2012-05-22

    Innovative rechargeable batteries that can effectively store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, urgently need to be developed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. All-solid-state batteries with inorganic solid electrolytes and electrodes are promising power sources for a wide range of applications because of their safety, long-cycle lives and versatile geometries. Rechargeable sodium batteries are more suitable than lithium-ion batteries, because they use abundant and ubiquitous sodium sources. Solid electrolytes are critical for realizing all-solid-state sodium batteries. Here we show that stabilization of a high-temperature phase by crystallization from the glassy state dramatically enhances the Na(+) ion conductivity. An ambient temperature conductivity of over 10(-4) S cm(-1) was obtained in a glass-ceramic electrolyte, in which a cubic Na(3)PS(4) crystal with superionic conductivity was first realized. All-solid-state sodium batteries, with a powder-compressed Na(3)PS(4) electrolyte, functioned as a rechargeable battery at room temperature.

  5. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P.; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-08-01

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  6. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  7. Above room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-ion implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, M.; Awo-Affouda, C.; Stollenwerk, A.; Huang, M. B.; Ramos, F. G.; Agnello, G.; Labella, V. P.

    2005-01-01

    Above room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is achieved in Si through Mn ion implantation. Three-hundred-keV Mn+ ions were implanted to 0.1% and 0.8% peak atomic concentrations, yielding a saturation magnetization of 0.3emu/g at 300K for the highest concentration as measured using a SQUID magnetometer. The saturation magnetization increased by ˜2× after annealing at 800°C for 5min . The Curie temperature for all samples was found to be greater than 400K . A significant difference in the temperature-dependent remnant magnetization between the implanted p-type and n-type Si is observed, giving strong evidence that a Si-based diluted magnetic semiconductor can be achieved.

  8. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  9. Large electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric polymers near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Neese, Bret; Chu, Baojin; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Wang, Yong; Furman, E; Zhang, Q M

    2008-08-08

    Applying an electrical field to a polar polymer may induce a large change in the dipolar ordering, and if the associated entropy changes are large, they can be explored in cooling applications. With the use of the Maxwell relation between the pyroelectric coefficient and the electrocaloric effect (ECE), it was determined that a large ECE can be realized in the ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] copolymer at temperatures above the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition (above 70 degrees C), where an isothermal entropy change of more than 55 joules per kilogram per kelvin degree and adiabatic temperature change of more than 12 degrees C were observed. We further showed that a similar level of ECE near room temperature can be achieved by working with the relaxor ferroelectric polymer of P(VDF-TrFE-chlorofluoroethylene).

  10. Large Electrocaloric Effect in Ferroelectric Polymers Near Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Bret; Chu, Baojin; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Wang, Yong; Furman, E.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2008-08-01

    Applying an electrical field to a polar polymer may induce a large change in the dipolar ordering, and if the associated entropy changes are large, they can be explored in cooling applications. With the use of the Maxwell relation between the pyroelectric coefficient and the electrocaloric effect (ECE), it was determined that a large ECE can be realized in the ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] copolymer at temperatures above the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition (above 70°C), where an isothermal entropy change of more than 55 joules per kilogram per kelvin degree and adiabatic temperature change of more than 12°C were observed. We further showed that a similar level of ECE near room temperature can be achieved by working with the relaxor ferroelectric polymer of P(VDF-TrFE-chlorofluoroethylene).

  11. Exhaled breath temperature in healthy children is influenced by room temperature and lung volume.

    PubMed

    Logie, Karla M; Kusel, Merci M H; Sly, Peter D; Hall, Graham L

    2011-11-01

    Exhaled breath temperature (EBT) has been proposed for the non-invasive assessment of airway inflammation. Previous studies have not examined the influence of room temperature or lung size on the EBT. This study aimed to address these issues in healthy children. We assessed the effects of room temperature and lung volume in 60 healthy children aged 9-11 years (mean age 10.3 years, 33 male). Static lung volumes were assessed using multiple breath nitrogen washout. Questionnaire and skin prick tests were also used to establish respiratory health in the children. We obtained the EBT parameters of slope, end plateau temperature (PLET) and normalized plateau temperature (nPLET; plateau temperature minus inspired air temperature), and ascertained physiological factors influencing EBT. End plateau temperature was shown to be proportionally affected by room temperature (r = 0.532, P < 0.001) whereas slope and nPLET decreased with increasing room temperature (r = -0.392 P < 0.02 and r = -0.507 P = 0.002). After adjusting for room temperature, height and age, the total lung capacity (r(2)  = 0.435, P = 0.006) and slow vital capacity (SVC; r(2)  = 0.44, P = 0.005) were found to be the strongest predictors of end PLET in healthy children. When all factors were included in a multiple regression model, SVC and room temperature were the only predictors of plateau and nPLET. Slope was only influenced by room temperature. Exhaled breath temperature measurements are highly feasible in children with a 95% success rate in this healthy population. Room temperature and SVC significantly influence EBT variables in healthy children. Further studies are required to investigate the ability of EBT to assess airway inflammation in children with respiratory disease. Pediatr. Pulmonol. 2011; 46:1062-1068. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. In vitro comparison of output fluid temperatures for room temperature and prewarmed fluids.

    PubMed

    Soto, N; Towle Millard, H A; Lee, R A; Weng, H Y

    2014-08-01

    To determine if prewarmed intravenous fluids produce superior fluid output temperatures compared with room temperature fluids at common anaesthetic fluid rates for small animal patients. A prospective, randomised, in vitro fluid line test-vein study was performed. Nine flow rates were analysed (10, 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, 260 and 300 mL/hour) for room temperature fluids (21°C) and for five prewarmed fluids (40, 45, 50, 55 and 60°C). For each flow rate tested, room temperature fluids never exceeded 25°C at any time point for each trial (range 18 to 25°C). For each flow rate tested, prewarmed fluids never exceeded 25 · 5°C at any time point for each trial (range 18 to 25 · 5°C). The mean output fluid temperature of prewarmed fluids was significantly warmer than room temperature fluids only at 300 mL/hour for 40°C (P = 0 · 0012), 45°C (P = 0 · 004), 50°C (P = 0 · 0002), 55°C (P = 0 · 0001) and 60°C (P < 0 · 0001). There was no thermodynamic benefit to utilising prewarmed intravenous fluids (up to 60°C) compared with room temperature intravenous fluids at common anaesthetic fluid rates for small animals. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Organic semiconducting single crystals as next generation of low-cost, room-temperature electrical X-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Fraboni, Beatrice; Ciavatti, Andrea; Merlo, Francesco; Pasquini, Luca; Cavallini, Anna; Quaranta, Alberto; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2012-05-02

    Direct, solid-state X-ray detectors based on organic single crystals are shown to operate at room temperature, in air, and at voltages as low as a few volts, delivering a stable and reproducible linear response to increasing X-ray dose rates, with notable radiation hardness and resistance to aging. All-organic and optically transparent devices are reported.

  14. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Elsaidi, Sameh K; Ongari, Daniele; Xu, Wenqian; Mohamed, Mona H; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2017-08-10

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas, but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycling from anesthetic gas mixtures can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low-temperature distillation to recover Xe; this method is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose a much simpler and more efficient system to recover and recycle Xe from exhaled anesthetic gas mixtures at room temperature using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity and Xe/O2 , Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in situ synchrotron measurements suggest that Xe is occupies the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Goodell, Jennifer; Molt, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ten types of ferritic and martensitic stainless steels have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K. The steel samples studied were in the annealed state as received from the manufacturer. Our room temperature measurements indicate significantly harder magnetic properties than those quoted in the ASM International Handbook, which studied fully annealed stainless steel samples. Despite having harder magnetic properties than fully annealed steels some of the as-received steels still display soft magnetic properties adequate for magnetic applications. The carbon content of the steels was found to affect the permeability and coercive force, with lower-carbon steels displaying significantly higher permeability and lower coercive force. The decrease in coercive force with reduced carbon content is attributed to fewer carbide inclusions which inhibit domain wall motion. Cooling to 77 K resulted in harder magnetic properties. Averaged over the ten steels tested the maximum permeability decreased by 8%, the coercive force increased by 14%, and the residual and saturation flux densities increased by 4% and 3%, respectively. The change in coercive force when cooled is comparable to the theoretical prediction for iron, based on a model of domain wall motion inhibited by inclusions. The modest changes of the magnetic properties indicate that the stainless steels can still be used in magnetic applications at very low temperatures.

  16. Magnetic refrigeration-towards room-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brück, E.; Tegus, O.; Li, X. W.; de Boer, F. R.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    2003-04-01

    Modern society relies very much on readily available cooling. Magnetic refrigeration based on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has become a promising competitive technology for the conventional gas-compression/expansion technique in use today. Recently, there have been two breakthroughs in magnetic-refrigeration research: one is that American scientists demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator; the other one is that we discovered a new class of magnetic refrigerant materials for room-temperature applications. The new materials are manganese-iron-phosphorus-arsenic (MnFe(P,As)) compounds. This new material has important advantages over existing magnetic coolants: it exhibits a huge MCE, which is larger than that of Gd metal; and its operating temperature can be tuned from about 150 to about 335 K by adjusting the P/As ratio. Here we report on further improvement of the materials by increasing the Mn content. The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. Addition of Mn reduces the thermal hysteresis, which is intrinsic to the first-order transition. This implies that already moderate applied magnetic fields of below 2 T may suffice.

  17. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Ongari, Daniele; Xu, Wenqian; Mohamed, Mona H.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2017-01-01

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/O2, Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  18. Conformation of protonated glutamic acid at room and cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Aude; Klyne, Johanna; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2017-05-03

    Recognition properties of biologically relevant molecules depend on their conformation. Herein, the conformation of protonated glutamic acid (H(+)Glu) isolated in quadruple ion traps is characterized by vibrational spectroscopy at room and cryogenic temperatures and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-D3/aug-cc-pVTZ level. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum recorded in the fingerprint range at room temperature using an IR free electron laser is attributed to the two most stable and nearly isoenergetic conformations (1-cc and 2-cc) with roughly equal population (ΔG298 = 0.0 kJ mol(-1)). Both have bridging C[double bond, length as m-dash]O(HNH)(+)O[double bond, length as m-dash]C ionic H-bonds of rather different strengths but cannot be distinguished by their similar IRMPD spectra. In contrast, the higher-resolution single-photon IRPD spectrum of H2-tagged H(+)Glu recorded in the conformation-sensitive X-H stretch range in a trap held at 10 K distinguishes both conformers. At low temperature, 1-cc is roughly twice more abundant than 2-cc, in line with its slightly lower calculated energy (ΔE0 = 0.5 kJ mol(-1)). This example illustrates the importance of cryogenic cooling, single-photon absorption conditions, and the consideration of the X-H stretch range for the identification of biomolecular conformations involving hydrogen bonds.

  19. Giant room temperature magnetoelectric response in strain controlled nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Herklotz, Andreas; Dörr, Kathrin; Manzoor, Sadia

    2017-05-01

    We report giant magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature in a self-assembled nanocomposite of BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 (BFO-CFO) grown on a BaTiO3 (BTO) crystal. The nanocomposite consisting of CFO nanopillars embedded in a BFO matrix exhibits weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to a small out-of-plane compression (˜0.3%) of the magnetostrictive (CFO) phase, enabling magnetization rotation under moderate in-plane compression. Temperature dependent magnetization measurements demonstrate strong magnetoelastic coupling between the BaTiO3 substrate and the nanocomposite film, which has been exploited to produce a large magnetoelectric response in the sample. The reorientation of ferroelectric domains in the BTO crystal upon the application of an electric field (E) alters the strain state of the nanocomposite film, thus enabling control of its magnetic anisotropy. The strain mediated magnetoelectric coupling coefficient α = μ o d M / d E calculated from remnant magnetization at room temperature is 2.6 × 10-7 s m-1 and 1.5 × 10-7 s m-1 for the out-of-plane and in-plane orientations, respectively.

  20. A room temperature low-threshold ultraviolet plasmonic nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Li, Guangyuan; Liu, Xinfeng; Qian, Fang; Li, Yat; Sum, Tze Chien; Lieber, Charles M; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-09-23

    Constrained by large ohmic and radiation losses, plasmonic nanolasers operated at visible regime are usually achieved either with a high threshold (10(2)-10(4) MW cm(-2)) or at cryogenic temperatures (4-120 K). Particularly, the bending-back effect of surface plasmon (SP) dispersion at high energy makes the SP lasing below 450 nm more challenging. Here we demonstrate the first strong room temperature ultraviolet (~370 nm) SP polariton laser with an extremely low threshold (~3.5 MW cm(-2)). We find that a closed-contact planar semiconductor-insulator-metal interface greatly lessens the scattering loss, and more importantly, efficiently promotes the exciton-SP energy transfer thus furnishes adequate optical gain to compensate the loss. An excitation polarization-dependent lasing action is observed and interpreted with a microscopic energy-transfer process from excitons to SPs. Our work advances the fundamental understanding of hybrid plasmonic waveguide laser and provides a solution of realizing room temperature UV nanolasers for biological applications and information technologies.

  1. A room temperature low-threshold ultraviolet plasmonic nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Li, Guangyuan; Liu, Xinfeng; Qian, Fang; Li, Yat; Sum, Tze Chien; Lieber, Charles M.; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-09-01

    Constrained by large ohmic and radiation losses, plasmonic nanolasers operated at visible regime are usually achieved either with a high threshold (102-104 MW cm-2) or at cryogenic temperatures (4-120 K). Particularly, the bending-back effect of surface plasmon (SP) dispersion at high energy makes the SP lasing below 450 nm more challenging. Here we demonstrate the first strong room temperature ultraviolet (~370 nm) SP polariton laser with an extremely low threshold (~3.5 MW cm-2). We find that a closed-contact planar semiconductor-insulator-metal interface greatly lessens the scattering loss, and more importantly, efficiently promotes the exciton-SP energy transfer thus furnishes adequate optical gain to compensate the loss. An excitation polarization-dependent lasing action is observed and interpreted with a microscopic energy-transfer process from excitons to SPs. Our work advances the fundamental understanding of hybrid plasmonic waveguide laser and provides a solution of realizing room temperature UV nanolasers for biological applications and information technologies.

  2. Directional molecular sliding at room temperature on a silicon runway.

    PubMed

    Bouju, Xavier; Chérioux, Frédéric; Coget, Sébastien; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Palmino, Frank

    2013-08-07

    The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations.

  3. Laser phosphoroscope and applications to room-temperature phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah J; Zhang, Guoqing; Demas, James N; Fraser, Cassandra L; Degraff, Ben A

    2011-11-01

    A simple phosphoroscope with no moving parts is described. In one scan the total luminescence, the long-lived phosphorescence, and the short-lived fluorescence can be determined. A 50% duty cycle excitation from a diode laser is used to excite the sample, and from the digitized waveform the phosphorescence is extracted from the off period, the total emission from the full cycle, and the fluorescence from the on period corrected for the phosphorescence contribution. The performance of the system is demonstrated using room-temperature phosphorescence of organic dyes in boric acid glasses, a multi-emissive boron-polymer dye, and a europium chelate.

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in alumina films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. L.; Zhen, C. M.; Wang, X. Q.; Ma, L.; Li, X. L.; Hou, D. L.

    2011-08-01

    We have prepared alumina thin films on Si substrates using a radio frequency (RF) sputtering method, and have observed room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in the thin films. When the thin films were annealed in vacuum, the saturation magnetization (Ms) increased, while annealing the sample in the air contributed to a decrease in the value of Ms. The Ms of the thin film also decreased as the thickness increased. We confirm that the unpaired electron spins responsible for ferromagnetism (FM) in Al 2O 3-δ thin films have their origin in the oxygen vacancies, especially at the interface of the Al 2O 3-δ thin film and the Si substrate.

  5. Room-temperature phonon boundary scattering below the Casimir limit

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhu, J; Sinha, S

    2011-09-26

    Thermal conductivity data for rough surface silicon nanowires suggest the breakdown of the Casimir limit which assumes completely diffuse phonon boundary scattering. We show that coherent effects in phonon transport at room temperature indeed lead to such breakdown. Correlated multiple scattering of phonons off the rough surface lead to a reduced thermal conductivity that is dependent not only on the roughness amplitude but more importantly on the roughness correlation length. A correlation length less than the diameter of the wire is typically necessary for lowering the thermal conductivity below the Casimir limit. Our model explains seeming anomalies in data reported for electrolessly etched and electron beam lithography defined nanowires.

  6. Development of bulk GaAs room temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.S.; Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eisen, Y. . Soreq Nuclear Research Center); Brake, R. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on GaAs, a wide band gap semiconductor with potential use as a room temperature radiation detector. Various configurations of Schottky diode detectors were fabricated with bulk crystals of liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) semi-insulating undoped GaAs material. Basic detector construction utilized one Ti/Au Schottky contact and one Au/Ge/Ni alloyed ohmic contact. Pulsed X-ray analysis indicated pulse decay times dependent on bias voltage. Pulse height analysis disclosed non-uniform electric field distributions across the detectors tentatively explained as a consequence of native deep level donors (EL2) in the crystal.

  7. Ultrafast excitonic room temperature nonlinearity in neutron irradiated quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ten, S.; Williams, J.G.; Guerreiro, P.T.; Khitrova, G.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1997-01-01

    Sharp room temperature exciton features and complete recovery of the excitonic absorption with 21 ps time constant are demonstrated in neutron irradiated (Ga,Al)As/GaAs multiple quantum wells. Carrier lifetime reduction is consistent with the EL2 midgap defect which is efficiently generated by fast neutrons. Influence of gamma rays accompanying neutron irradiation is discussed. Neutron irradiation provides a straightforward way to control carrier lifetime in semiconductor heterostructures with minor deterioration of their excitonic properties. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Room temperature peierls distortion in small diameter nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Connétable, D; Rignanese, G-M; Charlier, J-C; Blase, X

    2005-01-14

    By means of ab initio simulations, we investigate the phonon band structure and electron-phonon coupling in small 4-A diameter nanotubes. We show that both the C(5,0) and C(3,3) tubes undergo above room temperature a Peierls transition mediated by an acoustical long wavelength and an optical q=2k(F) phonon, respectively. In the armchair geometry, we verify that the electron-phonon coupling parameter lambda originates mainly from phonons at q=2k(F) and is strongly enhanced when the diameter decreases. These results question the origin of superconductivity in small diameter nanotubes.

  9. Mobile Neel skyrmions at room temperature: Status and future

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Wanjun; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; ...

    2016-03-07

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit many fascinating features. As compared to the well-studied cryogenic Bloch skyrmions in bulk materials, we focus on the room- temperature Néel skyrmions in thin-film systems with an interfacial broken inversion symmetry in this article. Specifically, we show the stabilization, the creation, and the implementation of Néel skyrmions that are enabled by the electrical current-induced spin-orbit torques. As a result, towards the nanoscale Néel skyrmions, we further discuss the challenges from both material optimization and imaging characterization perspectives.

  10. Anaerobic digestion in mesophilic and room temperature conditions: Digestion performance and soil-borne pathogen survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Le; Jian, Shanshan; Bi, Jinhua; Li, Yunlong; Chang, Zhizhou; He, Jian; Ye, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plant waste (TPW) was used as the feedstock of a batch anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion on Ralstonia solanacearum and Phytophthora capsici survival. Batch experiments were carried out for TS (total solid) concentrations of 2%, 4% and 6% respectively, at mesophilic (37±1°C) and room (20-25°C) temperatures. Results showed that higher digestion performance was achieved under mesophilic digestion temperature and lower TS concentration conditions. The biogas production ranged from 71 to 416L/kg VS (volatile solids). The inactivation of anaerobic digestion tended to increase as digestion performance improved. The maximum log copies reduction of R. solanacearum and P. capsici detected by quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) were 3.80 and 4.08 respectively in reactors with 4% TS concentration at mesophilic temperatures. However, both in mesophilic and room temperature conditions, the lowest reduction of R. solanacearum was found in the reactors with 6% TS concentration, which possessed the highest VFA (volatile fatty acid) concentration. These findings indicated that simple accumulation of VFAs failed to restrain R. solanacearum effectively, although the VFAs were considered poisonous. P. capsici was nearly completely dead under all conditions. Based on the digestion performance and the pathogen survival rate, a model was established to evaluate the digestate biosafety.

  11. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-06

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  13. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  14. Dynamics and structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-11-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are intrinsically interesting because they simultaneously have properties that are similar to organic liquids and liquid salts. In addition, RTILs are increasingly being considered for and used in technological applications. RTILs are usually composed of an organic cation and an inorganic anion. The organic cation, such as imidazolium, has alkyl chains of various lengths. The disorder in the liquid produced by the presence of the alkyl groups lowers the temperature for crystallization below room temperature and can also result in supercooling and glass formation rather than crystallization. The presence of the alkyl moieties also results in a segregation of the liquid into ionic and organic regions. In this article, experiments are presented that address the relationship between RTIL dynamics and structure. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements were employed to study the local environments in the organic and ionic regions of RTILs using a nonpolar chromophore that locates in the organic regions and an ionic chromophore that locates in the ionic regions. In the alkyl regions, the in plane and out of plane orientational friction coefficients change in different manners as the alkyl chains get longer. Both friction coefficients converge toward those of a long chain length hydrocarbon as the RTIL chains increase in length, which demonstrates that for sufficiently long alkyl chains the RTIL organic regions have properties similar to a hydrocarbon. However, putting Li+ in the ionic regions changes the friction coefficients in the alkyl regions, which demonstrates that changes of the ion structural organization influences the organization of the alkyl chains. Optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments were used to examine the orientational relaxation dynamics of RTILs over times scales of a hundred femtoseconds to a hundred nanoseconds. Detailed temperature dependent studies in the liquid and

  15. Airway narrowing measured by spirometry and impulse oscillometry following room temperature and cold temperature exercise.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tina M; Rundell, Kenneth W; Beck, Kenneth C; Levine, Alan M; Baumann, Jennifer M

    2005-10-01

    The efficacy of using impulse oscillometry (IOS) as an indirect measure of airflow obstruction compared to spirometry after exercise challenges in the evaluation of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has not been fully appreciated. The objective was to compare airway responses following room temperature and cold temperature exercise challenges, and to compare whether IOS variables relate to spirometry variables. Spirometry and IOS were performed at baseline and for 20 min after challenge at 5-min intervals. Two 6-min exercise challenges, inhaling either room temperature (22.0 degrees C) or cold temperature (- 1 degrees C) dry medical-grade bottled air. At least 48 h was observed between these randomly assigned challenges. Twenty-two physically active individuals (12 women and 10 men) with probable EIB. Subjects performed 6 min of stationary cycle ergometry while breathing either cold or room temperature medical-grade dry bottled air. Subjects were instructed to exercise at the highest intensity sustainable for the duration of the challenge. Heart rate and kilojoules of work performed were documented to verify exercise intensity. Strong correlations were observed within testing modalities for post-room temperature and post-cold temperature exercise spirometry and IOS values. Spirometry revealed no differences in postexercise peak falls in lung function between conditions; however, IOS identified significant differences in respiratory resistance (p < 0.05), with room temperature-inspired air being more potent than cold temperature-inspired air. Correlations were found between spirometric and IOS measures of change in airway function for both exercise challenges, indicating close equivalency of the methods. The challenges appeared to elicit the EIB response by a similar mechanism of water loss, and cold temperature did not have an additive effect. IOS detected a difference in degree of response between the temperatures, whereas spirometry indicated no

  16. Investigation of the room temperature annealing peak in ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, R.J.; Grady, B.P.; Cooper, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    A number of studies appearing in the literature have documented an endothermic peak in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) scans for ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymer ionomers which appears only upon annealing at room temperature. This peak has been attributed to either polyethylene crystallites, ionic crystallite, or water absorption. In a novel polyurethane cationomer with a quarternized amine contained in hard segment, the same phenomena has been found in DSC scans when the neutralizing anion is bromine or iodine. Since this material does not crystallize, the authors were able to conclusively eliminate crystallization as the cause of the endotherm. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of bromine has been measured to differentiate between water absorption and ionic crystallites. Spectra were collected above and below the temperature corresponding to the endothermic peak. The results of the EXAFS analysis will be presented.

  17. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  18. Airtight metallic sealing at room temperature under small mechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen

    2013-10-01

    Metallic seals can be resistant to air leakage, resistant to degradation under heat, and capable of carrying mechanical loads. Various technologies - such as organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes - need, at least benefit from, such metallic seals. However, these technologies involve polymeric materials and can tolerate neither the high-temperature nor the high-pressure processes of conventional metallic sealing. Recent progress in nanorod growth opens the door to metallic sealing for these technologies. Here, we report a process of metallic sealing using small well-separated Ag nanorods; the process is at room temperature, under a small mechanical pressure of 9.0 MPa, and also in ambient. The metallic seals have an air leak rate of 1.1 × 10-3 cm3atm/m2/day, and a mechanical shear strength higher than 8.9 MPa. This leak rate meets the requirements of organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes.

  19. Room-temperature metastability of multilayer graphene oxide films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suenne; Zhou, Si; Hu, Yike; Acik, Muge; Chabal, Yves J; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt; Bongiorno, Angelo; Riedo, Elisa

    2012-05-06

    Graphene oxide potentially has multiple applications. The chemistry of graphene oxide and its response to external stimuli such as temperature and light are not well understood and only approximately controlled. This understanding is crucial to enable future applications of this material. Here, a combined experimental and density functional theory study shows that multilayer graphene oxide produced by oxidizing epitaxial graphene through the Hummers method is a metastable material whose structure and chemistry evolve at room temperature with a characteristic relaxation time of about one month. At the quasi-equilibrium, graphene oxide reaches a nearly stable reduced O/C ratio, and exhibits a structure deprived of epoxide groups and enriched in hydroxyl groups. Our calculations show that the structural and chemical changes are driven by the availability of hydrogen in the oxidized graphitic sheets, which favours the reduction of epoxide groups and the formation of water molecules.

  20. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  1. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Z. Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  2. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  3. Cadmium selenide: a promising novel room temperature radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Shilo, I.

    1983-02-01

    Large single crystals of CdSe weighing about 30g were grown by the vertical unseeded vapor growth technique at a linear growth rate of 5mm/day and a temperature gradient of 10/sup 0/C/cm. Crystal perfection and homogeneity were evaluated by Laue X-ray diffraction, etch pit density, SEM and microprobe analysis methods. The dark resistivity of the as-grown and the heat treated crystal was about 1..cap omega..cm and 10/sup 12/..cap omega..cm respectively. Slices were used to fabricate room temperature detectors for nuclear radiation energy. The detectors showed high efficiency and stability as a function of time for radiation sources from 10KeV to 660KeV.

  4. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit.

    PubMed

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-20

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  5. Magnesium Electrorefining in Non-Aqueous Electrolyte at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Park, Jesik; Kusumah, Priyandi; Dilasari, Bonita; Kim, Hansu; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    Magnesium, of which application is often limited by its poor corrosion resistance, is more vulnerable to corrosion with existence of metal impurities such as Fe. Therefore, for the refining and recycling of magnesium, high temperature electrolysis using molten salts has been frequently adopted. In this report, the purification of magnesium scrap by electrolysis at room temperature is investigated with non-aqueous electrolytes. An aprotic solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) was used as a solvent of the electrolyte. Magnesium scrap was used as anode materials and ethyl magnesium bromide (EtMgBr) was dissolved in THF for magnesium source. The purified magnesium can be uniformly electrodeposited on copper electrode under potentiostatic conditions. The deposits were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  6. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A; Jaszczak, John A; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  7. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xuanyuan; Lu, Haidong; Yin, Yuewei; Ahmadi, Zahra; Costa, Paulo S.; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Cheng, Xuemei; DiChiara, Anthony D.; Gruverman, Alexei E-mail: a.enders@me.com Enders, Axel E-mail: a.enders@me.com Xu, Xiaoshan E-mail: a.enders@me.com

    2016-09-05

    Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50–100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

  8. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuanyuan; Lu, Haidong; Yin, Yuewei; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Ahmadi, Zahra; Costa, Paulo S.; DiChiara, Anthony D.; Cheng, Xuemei; Gruverman, Alexei; Enders, Axel; Xu, Xiaoshan

    2016-09-01

    Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50-100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

  9. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  10. Room-temperature Magnetic Ordering in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeongmin; Bekyarova, Elena; Liang, Ping; de Heer, Walt A.; Haddon, Robert C.; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    Despite theoretical predictions, the question of room-temperature magnetic order in graphene must be conclusively resolved before graphene can fully achieve its potential as a spintronic medium. Through scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and point I-V measurements, the current study reveals that unlike pristine samples, graphene nanostructures, when functionalized with aryl radicals, can sustain magnetic order. STM images show 1-D and 2-D periodic super-lattices originating from the functionalization of a single sub-lattice of the bipartite graphene structure. Field-dependent super-lattices in 3-nm wide “zigzag” nanoribbons indicate local moments with parallel and anti-parallel ordering along and across the edges, respectively. Anti-parallel ordering is observed in 2-D segments with sizes of over 20 nm. The field dependence of STM images and point I-V curves indicates a spin polarized local density of states (LDOS), an out-of-plane anisotropy field of less than 10 Oe, and an exchange coupling field of 100 Oe at room temperature. PMID:22953045

  11. [Preservation and stability of corn tortillas at room temperature].

    PubMed

    Higuera-Ciapara, I; Nieblas, J M

    1995-06-01

    Three treatments with chemical preservative (sodium propionate, potassium sorbate-methylparaben and hydrogen peroxidemethyl paraben) were tested to delay microbial spoilage and extend shelf-life of corn tortillas at room temperature (25 degrees C). The treatment with the best results was selected for further studies using two types of packaging: Paper and high density polyethylene. Quality of corn tortillas during storage was assessed by measuring water content, microbial analysis (Total Plate Count, molds and yeast) and throguh sensory evaluation. Results were analyzed by covariance analysis and slope contrast between packaging materials at p<0.05. Spoilage of tortilla without preservative occurred within 24 hours due to a large number of gram negative bacteria, molds and yeasts, which were responsible for offensive odors. Only the combination of hydrogen peroxide-methyl paraben had a significant effect on retarding bacterial yeast spoilage. In addition, hydrogen peroxide residues could not [correction of no] be chemically detected after 2 days of storage. Results from this study show that tortilla can be kept for up to six days at room temperature with acceptable sensory properties with proper preservative treatment and packaging.

  12. Experiments on room temperature optical fiber-fiber direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinping; Yan, Ping; Xiao, Qirong; Wang, Yaping; Gong, Mali

    2012-08-01

    High quality permanent connection between optical fibers is a significant issue in optics and communication. Studies on room temperature optical large diameter fiber-fiber direct bonding, which is essentially surface interactions of glass material, are presented here. Bonded fiber pairs are obtained for the first time through the bonding technics illustrated here. Two different kinds of bonding technics are provided-fresh surface (freshly grinded and polished) bonding and hydrophobic surface (activated by H2SO4 and HF) bonding. By means of fresh surface bonding, a bonded fiber pair with light transmitting efficiency of 98.1% and bond strength of 21.2 N is obtained. Besides, in the bonding process, chemical surface treatment of fibers' end surfaces is an important step. Therefore, various ways of surface treatment are analyzed and compared, based on atomic force microscopy force curves of differently disposed surfaces. According to the comparison, fresh surfaces are suggested as the prior choice in room temperature optical fiber-fiber bonding, owing to their larger adhesive force, attractive force, attractive distance, and adhesive range.

  13. Optically pumped room-temperature GaAs nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Dhruv; Mokkapati, Sudha; Parkinson, Patrick; Jiang, Nian; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared lasers are important for optical data communication, spectroscopy and medical diagnosis. Semiconductor nanowires offer the possibility of reducing the footprint of devices for three-dimensional device integration and hence are being extensively studied in the context of optoelectronic devices. Although visible and ultraviolet nanowire lasers have been demonstrated widely, progress towards room-temperature infrared nanowire lasers has been limited because of material quality issues and Auger recombination. (Al)GaAs is an important material system for infrared lasers that is extensively used for conventional lasers. GaAs has a very large surface recombination velocity, which is a serious issue for nanowire devices because of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature lasing in core-shell-cap GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires by properly designing the Fabry-Pérot cavity, optimizing the material quality and minimizing surface recombination. Our demonstration is a major step towards incorporating (Al)GaAs nanowire lasers into the design of nanoscale optoelectronic devices operating at near-infrared wavelengths.

  14. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  15. Identifying multiexcitons in Mo S2 monolayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-04-01

    One of the unique features of atomically thin two-dimensional materials is strong Coulomb interactions due to the reduced dielectric screening effect; this feature enables the study of many-body phenomena such as excitons, trions, and biexcitons. However, identification of biexcitons remains unresolved owing to their broad peak feature at room temperature. Here, we investigate multiexcitons in monolayer Mo S2 using both electrical and optical doping and identify the transition energies for each exciton. The binding energy of the assigned biexciton is twice that of the trion, in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The biexciton population is predominant under optical doping but negligible under electrical doping. The biexciton population is quadratically proportional to the exciton population, obeying the mass-action theory. Our results illustrate the stable formation of not only trions but also biexcitons due to strong Coulomb interaction even at room temperature; therefore, these results provide a deeper understanding of the complex excitonic behaviors in two-dimensional semiconductors.

  16. Self-transducing silicon nanowire electromechanical systems at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L; Yang, Peidong

    2008-06-01

    Electronic readout of the motions of genuinely nanoscale mechanical devices at room temperature imposes an important challenge for the integration and application of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we report the first experiments on piezoresistively transduced very high frequency Si nanowire (SiNW) resonators with on-chip electronic actuation at room temperature. We have demonstrated that, for very thin (~90 nm down to ~30 nm) SiNWs, their time-varying strain can be exploited for self-transducing the devices' resonant motions at frequencies as high as approximately 100 MHz. The strain of wire elongation, which is only second-order in doubly clamped structures, enables efficient displacement transducer because of the enhanced piezoresistance effect in these SiNWs. This intrinsically integrated transducer is uniquely suited for a class of very thin wires and beams where metallization and multilayer complex patterning on devices become impractical. The 30 nm thin SiNW NEMS offer exceptional mass sensitivities in the subzeptogram range. This demonstration makes it promising to advance toward NEMS sensors based on ultrathin and even molecular-scale SiNWs, and their monolithic integration with microelectronics on the same chip.

  17. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  18. The heat is on: room temperature affects laboratory equipment--an observational study.

    PubMed

    Butler, Julia M; Johnson, Jane E; Boone, William R

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of ambient room temperature on equipment typically used in in vitro fertilization (IVF). We set the control temperature of the room to 20 °C (+/-0.3) and used CIMScan probes to record temperatures of the following equipment: six microscope heating stages, four incubators, five slide warmers and three heating blocks. We then increased the room temperature to 26 °C (+/-0.3) or decreased it to 17 °C (+/-0.3) and monitored the same equipment again. We wanted to determine what role, if any, changing room temperature has on equipment temperature fluctuation. There was a direct relationship between room temperature and equipment temperature stability. When room temperature increased or decreased, equipment temperature reacted in a corresponding manner. Statistical differences between equipment were found when the room temperature changed. What is also noteworthy is that temperature of equipment responded within 5 min to a change in room temperature. Clearly, it is necessary to be aware of the affect of room temperature on equipment when performing assisted reproductive procedures. Room and equipment temperatures should be monitored faithfully and adjusted as frequently as needed, so that consistent culture conditions can be maintained. If more stringent temperature control can be achieved, human assisted reproduction success rates may improve.

  19. Room-temperature magnetic gradiometry with fiber-coupled nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond.

    PubMed

    Blakley, S M; Fedotov, I V; Kilin, S Ya; Zheltikov, A M

    2015-08-15

    Differential optical detection of a magnetic resonance induced in nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is shown to enable a high-spatial-resolution room-temperature magnetic-field gradiometry on a fiber platform. An ultracompact design of this fiber-based solid-state magnetic gradiometer is achieved by integrating an NV-diamond magnetic sensor with a two-fiber opto-microwave interface, which couples NV centers to microwave and optical fields, used to resonantly drive and interrogate the spin of NV centers.

  20. Stability and partial oligomerization of naphthalene under high pressure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Mimura, Koichi; Nishida, Tamihito; Inoue, Toru; Nakano, Satoshi; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The stability and pressure-induced chemical reactions of naphthalene were investigated at room temperature at pressures up to 23 GPa. In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that naphthalene retained its crystal structure up to ∼20 GPa, whereas a solid amorphous phase was observed in the recovered samples. Based on microanalysis of the recovered samples using Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS), naphthalene dimer and trimer isomers were observed at pressures exceeding 15 GPa. The dimers were classified as products of simple dimerization, naphthylation, and condensation, similar to the case of the pressure-induced dimerization of benzene, indicating a similar dimerization mechanism for naphthalene.

  1. Evidence for room temperature delignification of wood using hydrogen peroxide and manganese acetate as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marcel; Hanson, Susan K; Wagner, Gregory L; Kimball, David B; Rector, Kirk D

    2012-09-01

    Manganese acetate was found to catalyze the oxidative delignification of wood with hydrogen peroxide at room temperature. The delignification reaction was monitored by optical and Raman microscopy, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. When exposed to H(2)O(2) and Mn(OAc)(3) in aqueous solution, poplar wood sections were converted into a fine powder-like material which consisted of individual wood cells within 4 days at room temperature and without agitation. Optical and Raman microscopy provided the spatial distribution of cellulose and lignin in the wood structure, and showed the preferential oxidation of lignin-rich middle lamellae. Raman spectra from the solid residue revealed a delignified and cellulose-rich material. Glucose yields following enzymatic hydrolysis were 20-40% higher in poplar sawdust pretreated with Mn(OAc)(3) for 2, 4, and 7 days at room temperature than those in sawdust exposed to water only for identical durations, suggesting the viability of this mild, inexpensive method for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

  2. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors.

  3. AW-101 entrained solids - Solubility versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; RC Lettau; GF Piepel

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids entrained in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. BNFL requested Battelle to dilute the AW-1-1 sample using de-ionized water to mimic expected plant operating conditions. BNFL further requested Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids present in the diluted AW-101 sample versus temperature conditions of 30, 40, and 50 C. BNFL requested these tests to assess the composition of the LAW supernatant and solids versus expected plant-operating conditions. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-7, Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of LAW Entrained Solids. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan.

  4. Amorphous boron nanorod as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changjian; Lau, Miu Lun; Barkholtz, Heather M; Xu, Haiping; Parrish, Riley; Xu, Meiyue Olivia; Xu, Tao; Liu, Yuzi; Wang, Hao; Connell, Justin G; Smith, Kassiopeia A; Xiong, Hui

    2017-08-03

    We report an amorphous boron nanorod anode material for lithium-ion batteries prepared through smelting non-toxic boron oxide in liquid lithium. Boron in theory can provide capacity as high as 3099 mA h g(-1) by alloying with Li to form B4Li5. However, experimental studies of the boron anode have been rarely reported for room temperature lithium-ion batteries. Among the reported studies the electrochemical activity and cycling performance of the bulk crystalline boron anode material are poor at room temperature. In this work, we utilized an amorphous nanostructured one-dimensional (1D) boron material aiming at improving the electrochemical reactivity between boron and lithium ions at room temperature. The amorphous boron nanorod anode exhibited, at room temperature, a reversible capacity of 170 mA h g(-1) at a current rate of 10 mA g(-1) between 0.01 and 2 V. The anode also demonstrated good rate capability and cycling stability. The lithium storage mechanism was investigated by both sweep voltammetry measurements and galvanostatic intermittent titration techniques (GITTs). The sweep voltammetric analysis suggested that the contributions from lithium ion diffusion into boron and the capacitive process to the overall lithium charge storage are 57% and 43%, respectively. The results from GITT indicated that the discharge capacity at higher potentials (>∼0.2 V vs. Li/Li(+)) could be ascribed to a capacitive process and at lower potentials (<∼0.2 V vs. Li/Li(+)) to diffusion-controlled alloying reactions. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement further confirmed that the capacity is from electrochemical reactions between lithium ions and the amorphous boron nanorod. This work provides new insights into designing nanostructured boron materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Amorphous boron nanorod as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Changjian; Lau, Miu Lun; Barkholtz, Heather; ...

    2017-08-14

    We report an amorphous boron nanorod anode material for lithium ion batteries prepared through smelting non-toxic boron oxide in liquid lithium. Boron in theory can provide capacity as high as 3099 mAh g-1 by alloying with Li to form B4Li5. However, experimental studies of boron anode were rarely reported for room temperature lithium-ion batteries. Among the reported studies the electrochemical activity and cycling performance of bulk crystalline boron anode material are poor at room temperature. In this work, we developed amorphous nanostructured one-dimensional (1D) boron material aiming at improving lithium ion diffusion in boron at room temperature. The amorphous boronmore » nanorod anode exhibited, at room temperature, a reversible capacity of 170 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 10 mA g-1 between 0.01 and 2 V. The anode also demonstrated good rate capability and cycling stability. Lithium storage mechanism was investigated by both sweep voltammetry measurements and galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The sweep voltammetric analysis suggested that the contributions from lithium ions diffusion into boron as well as the capacitive process are 42.44% and 57.56%, respectively. Results from GITT indicated that the discharge capacity at higher potentials (> ~ 0.2 V vs, Li/Li+) could be ascribed to a capacitive process and at lower potentials (< ~0.2 V vs, Li/Li+) to diffusion control. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement further confirmed that the capacity is from electrochemical reactions between lithium ions and the amorphous boron nanorod.« less

  6. Effect of Temperature Cycling and Exposure to Extreme Temperatures on Reliability of Solid Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this work, results of multiple temperature cycling (TC) (up to 1,000 cycles) of different types of solid tantalum capacitors are analyzed and reported. Deformation of chip tantalum during temperature variations simulating reflow soldering conditions was measured to evaluate the possibility of the pop-corning effect in the parts. To simulate the effect of short-time exposures to solder reflow temperatures on the reliability of tantalum capacitors, several part types were subjected to multiple cycles (up to 100) between room temperature and 240 C with periodical measurements of electrical characteristics of the parts. Mechanisms of degradation caused by temperature cycling and exposure to high temperatures, and the requirements of MIL-PRF-55365 for assessment of the resistance of the parts to soldering heat are discussed.

  7. Room-temperature effects of UV radiation in KBr:? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Salas, R.; Meléndrez, R.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    1996-07-01

    Thermoluminescence and optical absorption measurements have been carried out in KBr:0953-8984/8/27/009/img9 crystals irradiated with monochromatic UV light (200 - 300 nm) and x-rays at room temperature. For UV- and x-irradiated crystals strong similarities between the thermoluminescence glow curves have been found, suggesting that the low-energy UV radiation produces the same defects as produced by x-irradiation in this material. The thermoluminescence glow curves are composed of six glow peaks located at 337, 383, 403, 435, 475 and 509 K. Thermal annealing experiments in previously irradiated crystals show clearly a correlation between the glow peak located at 383 K and the F-centre thermal bleaching process. Also, the excitation spectrum for each thermoluminescence glow peak has been investigated, showing that the low-energy radiation induces the formation of F centres.

  8. Quantum memory, entanglement and sensing with room temperature atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Wasilewski, W.; Krauter, H.; Fernholz, T.; Nielsen, B. M.; Petersen, J. M.; Renema, J. J.; Balabas, M. V.; Owari, M.; Plenio, M. B.; Serafini, A.; Wolf, M. M.; Muschik, C. A.; Cirac, J. I.; Müller, J. H.; Polzik, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Room temperature atomic ensembles in a spin-protected environment are useful systems both for quantum information science and metrology. Here we utilize a setup consisting of two atomic ensembles as a memory for quantum information initially encoded in the polarization state of two entangled light modes. We also use the ensembles as a radio frequency entanglement-assisted magnetometer with projection noise limited sensitivity below femtoTesla/. The performance of the quantum memory as well as the magnetometer was improved by spin-squeezed or entangled atomic states generated by quantum non demolition measurements. Finally, we present preliminary results of long lived entangled atomic states generated by dissipation. With the method presented, one should be able to generate an entangled steady state.

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  10. Pressure-responsive mesoscopic structures in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Russina, Olga; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Triolo, Alessandro

    2015-11-28

    Among the most spectacular peculiarities of room temperature ionic liquids, their mesoscopically segregated structural organization keeps on attracting attention, due to its major consequences for the bulk macroscopic properties. Herein we use molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nm-scale architecture in 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, as a function of pressure. This study reveals an intriguing new feature: the mesoscopic segregation in ionic liquids is characterized by a high level of pressure-responsiveness, which progressively vanishes upon application of high enough pressure. These results are in agreement with recent X-ray scattering data and are interpreted in terms of the microscopic organization. This new feature might lead to new methods of developing designer solvents for enhanced solvation capabilities and selectivity.

  11. Mesoscopic structural organization in triphilic room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Russina, Olga; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Di Michiel, Marco; Passerini, Stefano; Appetecchi, Giovanni Battista; Castiglione, Franca; Mele, Andrea; Caminiti, Ruggero; Triolo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids are one of the most exciting classes of materials in the last decade. The interest for these low melting, ionic compounds stems from both their technological impact and the stimulating plethora of structural and dynamic peculiarities in the mesoscopic space-time scales. It is nowadays well-established that they are characterised by an enhanced degree of mesoscopic order originating from their inherent amphiphilicity. In this contribution we highlight the existence of a further degree of mesoscopic complexity when dealing with RTILs bearing a medium length fluorous tail: such triphilic materials (they simultaneously contain polar, hydrophobic and fluorophilic moieties that mutually segregate from each other) turn out to be highly structurally compartmentalised at the mesoscopic level, thus paving the way to new smart applications for this new class of RTILs.

  12. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  13. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  14. Using room temperature current noise to characterize single molecular spectra.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Smitha; Ghosh, Avik W

    2014-03-25

    We propose a way to use room temperature random telegraph noise to characterize single molecules adsorbed on a backgated silicon field-effect transistor. The overlap of molecule and silicon electronic wave functions generates a set of trap levels that impose their unique scattering signatures on the voltage-dependent current noise spectrum. Our results are based on numerical modeling of the current noise, obtained by coupling a density functional treatment of the trap placement within the silicon band gap, a quantum kinetic treatment of the output current, and a Monte Carlo evaluation of the trap occupancy under resonance. As an illustrative example, we show how we can extract molecule-specific "fingerprints" of four benzene-based molecules directly from a frequency-voltage colormap of the noise statistics. We argue that such a colormap carries detailed information about the trap dynamics at the Fermi energy, including the presence of correlated interactions, observed experimentally in backgated carbon nanotubes.

  15. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e2/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  16. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  17. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  18. Room-temperature spin-photon interface for quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Fang-Yu; Fu, Jing-Li; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Zhi-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Although remarkable progress has been achieved recently, to construct an optical cavity where a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centre in diamond is coupled to an optical field in the strong coupling regime is rather difficult. We propose an architecture for a scalable quantum interface capable of interconverting photonic and NV spin qubits, which can work well without the strong coupling requirement. The dynamics of the interface applies an adiabatic passage to sufficiently reduce the decoherence from an excited state of a NV colour centre in diamond. This quantum interface can accomplish many quantum network operations like state transfer and entanglement distribution between qubits at distant nodes. Exact numerical simulations show that high-fidelity quantum interface operations can be achieved under room-temperature and realistic experimental conditions.

  19. Room-temperature magnetic properties of oxy- and carbonmonoxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Cerdonio, M.; Congiu-Castellano, A.; Calabrese, L.; Morante, S.; Pispisa, B.; Vitale, S.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility and the density of human oxy-(HbO2) and carbonmonoxyhemoglobin (HbCO) solutions of various concentrations have been measured at room temperature, with pure water used as a calibrant. Solutions of unstripped and stripped HbO2 at pH 7.2 in unbuffered water solvent were always found to be less diamagnetic than pure water, whereas solutions of HbCO in identical conditions were always found to be more diamagnetic than pure water. After correcting for concentration-dependent density changes and assuming the HbCO samples to be fully diamagnetic, the paramagnetic reduction of the diamagnetic susceptibility of HbO2 corresponds to a molar susceptibility per heme (χMheme) of 2460 ± 600 × 10-6 cgs/mol. PMID:16592578

  20. Dissolution of cellulose in room temperature ionic liquids: anion dependence.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Bejagam, Karteek K; Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-01-29

    The dissolution of cellulosic biomass in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is studied through free energy calculations of its monomer, viz., cellobiose, within a molecular dynamics simulation approach. The solvation free energy (SFE) of cellobiose in ionic liquids containing any of seven different anions has been calculated. The ranking of these liquids based on SFE compares well with experimental data on the solubility of cellulose. The dissolution is shown to be enthalpically dominated, which is correlated with the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between cellobiose and the anions of the IL. Large entropic changes upon solvation in [CF3SO3](-) and [OAc](-) based ionic liquids have been explained in terms of the solvent-aided conformational flexibility of cellobiose.

  1. Theory of room temperature ferromagnetism in Cr modified DNA nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruğ Duru, Izzet; Değer, Caner; Eldem, Vahap; Kalayci, Taner; Aktaş, Şahin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties of Cr3+ (J  <  0) ion-modified DNA (M-DNA) nanowire (1000 base) at room temperature under a uniform magnetic field (˜100 Oe) for different doping concentrations. A Monte Carlo simulation method-based Metropolis algorithm is used to figure out the thermodynamic quantities of nanowire formed by Cr M-DNA followed by analysing the dependency of the ferromagnetic behaviour of the M-DNA to dopant concentration. It is understood that ion density/base and ion density/helical of Cr3+ ions can be a tuning parameter, herewith the dopant ratio has an actual importance on the magnetic characterization of M-DNA nanowire (3%-20%). We propose the source of magnetism as an exchange interaction between Cr and DNA helical atoms indicated in the Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  2. A room-temperature refuelable lithium, iodine and air battery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kim Seng; Grimsdale, Andrew C; Yazami, Rachid

    2017-07-26

    We demonstrate a new refuelable lithium cell using lithium solvated electron solution (Li-SES) as anolyte and iodine solutions as catholyte. This cell shows a high OCV (~3 V). Unlike conventional rechargeable Li batteries, this kind of cell can be re-fueled in several minutes by replacing the spent liquids. We also show for the first time, that Li-SES/I2 cells which operate at room temperature, can be prepared in a fully discharged state (~0 V OCV) for safe handling, transportation and storage. Li-SES and iodine are then electrochemically generated during charge as is confirmed by UV-VIS and a qualitative test. We have also conducted proof-of-concept tests for an "indirect lithium-air" cell in which iodine is reduced at the cathode and subsequently is catalytically re-oxidized by oxygen dissolved in the catholyte.

  3. Oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by metal oxides at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yoshika

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is still a major indoor air pollutant in Japanese air-tight houses and is the subject of numerous complaints regarding health disorders. Authors have developed a passive-type air-cleaning material and an air cleaner using manganese oxide (77% MnO 2) as an active component and successfully reduced indoor HCHO concentrations in newly built multi-family houses. In this study, the reactivity between manganese oxide and HCHO was discussed. We tested the removal efficiencies of several metal oxides for HCHO in a static reaction vessel and found manganese oxide could react with HCHO and release carbon dioxide even at room temperature. The reactivity and mechanisms were discussed for the proposed chemical reactions. A mass balance study proved that a major product through the heterogeneous reaction between manganese oxide and HCHO was carbon dioxide. Harmful by-products (HCOOH and CO) were not found.

  4. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-11-25

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks.

  5. Experimental evidence for ice formation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jinesh, K B; Frenken, J W M

    2008-07-18

    The behavior of water under extreme confinement and, in particular, the lubrication properties under such conditions are subjects of long-standing controversy. Using a dedicated, high-resolution friction force microscope, scanning a sharp tungsten tip over a graphite surface, we demonstrate that water nucleating between the tip and the surface due to capillary condensation rapidly transforms into crystalline ice at room temperature. At ultralow scan speeds and modest relative humidities, we observe that the tip exhibits stick-slip motion with a period of 0.38+/-0.03 nm, very different from the graphite lattice. We interpret this as the consequence of the repeated sequence of shear-induced fracture and healing of the crystalline condensate. This phenomenon causes a significant increase of the friction force and introduces relaxation time scales of seconds for the rearrangements after shearing.

  6. Tailoring room temperature photoluminescence of antireflective silicon nanofacets

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Tanmoy; Kumar, M.; Ghatak, J.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, a fluence-dependent antireflection performance is presented from ion-beam fabricated nanofaceted-Si surfaces. It is also demonstrated that these nanofacets are capable of producing room temperature ultra-violet and blue photoluminescence which can be attributed to inter-band transitions of the localized excitonic states of different Si-O bonds at the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements further confirm defect-induced radiative emission from the surface of silicon nanofacets. It is observed that the spectral characteristics remain unchanged, except an enhancement in the photoluminescence intensity with increasing ion-fluence. The increase in photoluminescence intensity by orders of magnitude stronger than that of a planar Si substrate is due to higher absorption of incident photons by nanofaceted structures.

  7. Photo-activated oxygen sensitivity of graphene at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berholts, Artjom; Kahro, Tauno; Floren, Aare; Alles, Harry; Jaaniso, Raivo

    2014-10-01

    Photo-induced changes in the electrical conductivity and the sensitivity to oxygen gas of graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto Al2O3 and SiO2 thin film substrates were studied at ambient conditions. The pristine graphene sensors were initially completely insensitive to oxygen gas at room temperature but showed significant (up to 100%) response when illuminated with weak ultraviolet (300 nm or 365 nm) light. Oxygen response was governed by Langmuir law and its activation was insensitive to humidity. The mechanism of sensitization is analyzed together with other photo-induced effects—negative persistent photo-conduction and photo-induced hysteresis of field effect transistor characteristics. While the reduction of conductivity in air is persistent effect, the oxygen sensitization and enlargement of hysteresis take place only under the direct influence of light. It is concluded that the charge traps with differently adsorbed oxygen and water are involved in these phenomena.

  8. Room temperature photon number resolving detector for infared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Pomarico, Enrico; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Thew, Rob; Zbinden, Hugo

    2010-05-10

    In this paper we present a photon number resolving detector at infrared wavelengths, operating at room temperature and with a large dynamic range. It is based on the up-conversion of a signal at 1559 nm into visible wavelength and on its detection by a thermoelectrically cooled multi-pixel silicon avalanche photodiodode, also known as a Silicon Photon Multiplier. With the appropriate up-conversion this scheme can be implemented for arbitrary wavelengths above the visible spectral window. The preservation of the poissonian statistics when detecting coherent states is studied and the cross-talk effects on the detected signal can be easily estimated in order to calibrate the detector. This system is well suited for measuring very low intensities at infrared wavelengths and for analyzing multiphoton quantum states. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  9. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop. PMID:25551062

  10. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Marina; Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop.

  11. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  12. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  13. Room temperature magnesium electrorefining by using non-aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesik; Jung, Yeojin; Kusumah, Priyandi; Dilasari, Bonita; Ku, Heesuk; Kim, Hansu; Kwon, Kyungjung; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    The increasing usage of magnesium inevitably leads to a fast increase in magnesium scrap, and magnesium recycling appears extremely beneficial for cost reduction, preservation of natural resources and protection of the environment. Magnesium refining for the recovery of high purity magnesium from metal scrap alloy (AZ31B composed of magnesium, aluminum, zinc, manganese and copper) at room temperature is investigated with a non-aqueous electrolyte (tetrahydrofuran with ethyl magnesium bromide). A high purity (99.999%) of electrorefined magneisum with a smooth and dense surface is obtained after potentiostatic electrolysis with an applied voltage of 2 V. The selective dissolution of magnesium from magnesium alloy is possible by applying an adequate potential considering the tolerable impurity level in electrorefined magnesium and processing time. The purity estimation method suggested in this study can be useful in evaluating the maximum content of impurity elements.

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in pure ZnO nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bie, Xiaofei; Wang, Chunzhong; Ehrenberg, H.; Wei, Yingjin; Chen, Gang; Meng, Xing; Zou, Guangtian; Du, Fei

    2010-08-01

    ZnO nanoflowers are synthesized by hydrothermal method. The morphology of ZnO is captured by SEM, TEM and HRTEM, which is composed of closely packed nanorods of about 100 nm in diameter and 1 μm in length. The ZFC/FC curves show superparamagnetic features. The abnormal increase in magnetization curves below 14 K comes from the isolated vacancy clusters with no interaction. The magnetic hysteresis at 300 K displays saturation state and confirms room-temperature ferromagnetism. While the magnetic hysteresis at 5 K shows nonsaturation state due to the enhanced effects of vacancy clusters. The O 1s XPS results can be fitted to three Gaussian peaks. The existence of medium-binding energy located at 531.16 eV confirms the deficiency of O ions at the surface of ZnO nanoflowers.

  15. Imaging spin diffusion in germanium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, C.; Bottegoni, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Ciccacci, F.; Isella, G.; Ghirardini, L.; Celebrano, M.; Rortais, F.; Ferrari, A.; Marty, A.; Finazzi, M.; Jamet, M.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the nonlocal detection of optically oriented spins in lightly n -doped germanium at room temperature. Localized spin generation is achieved by scanning a circularly polarized laser beam (λ =1550 nm) on an array of lithographically defined Pt microstructures. The in-plane oriented spin generated at the edges of such microstructures, placed at different distances from a spin-detection element, allows for a direct imaging of spin diffusion in the semiconductor, leading to a measured spin diffusion length of about 10 μ m . Two different spin-detection blocks are employed, consisting of either a magnetic tunnel junction or a platinum stripe where the spin current is converted in an electrical signal by the inverse spin-Hall effect. The second solution represents the realization of a nonlocal spin-injection/detection scheme that is completely free from ferromagnetic functional blocks.

  16. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  17. Extraction of organic compounds with room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F; Poole, Salwa K

    2010-04-16

    Room temperature ionic liquids are novel solvents with a rather specific blend of physical and solution properties that makes them of interest for applications in separation science. They are good solvents for a wide range of compounds in which they behave as polar solvents. Their physical properties of note that distinguish them from conventional organic solvents are a negligible vapor pressure, high thermal stability, and relatively high viscosity. They can form biphasic systems with water or low polarity organic solvents and gases suitable for use in liquid-liquid and gas-liquid partition systems. An analysis of partition coefficients for varied compounds in these systems allows characterization of solvent selectivity using the solvation parameter model, which together with spectroscopic studies of solvent effects on probe substances, results in a detailed picture of solvent behavior. These studies indicate that the solution properties of ionic liquids are similar to those of polar organic solvents. Practical applications of ionic liquids in sample preparation include extractive distillation, aqueous biphasic systems, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, supported liquid membrane extraction, matrix solvents for headspace analysis, and micellar extraction. The specific advantages and limitations of ionic liquids in these studies is discussed with a view to defining future uses and the need not to neglect the identification of new room temperature ionic liquids with physical and solution properties tailored to the needs of specific sample preparation techniques. The defining feature of the special nature of ionic liquids is not their solution or physical properties viewed separately but their unique combinations when taken together compared with traditional organic solvents.

  18. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature.

  19. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature. PMID:27982127

  20. Tuning magnetic spirals beyond room temperature with chemical disorder.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mickaël; Canévet, Emmanuel; Raynaud, Adrien; Bartkowiak, Marek; Sheptyakov, Denis; Ban, Voraksmy; Kenzelmann, Michel; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina; Conder, Kazimierz; Medarde, Marisa

    2016-12-16

    In the past years, magnetism-driven ferroelectricity and gigantic magnetoelectric effects have been reported for a number of frustrated magnets featuring ordered spiral magnetic phases. Such materials are of high-current interest due to their potential for spintronics and low-power magnetoelectric devices. However, their low-magnetic ordering temperatures (typically <100 K) greatly restrict their fields of application. Here we demonstrate that the onset temperature of the spiral phase in the perovskite YBaCuFeO5 can be increased by more than 150 K through a controlled manipulation of the Fe/Cu chemical disorder. Moreover, we show that this novel mechanism can stabilize the magnetic spiral state of YBaCuFeO5 above the symbolic value of 25 °C at zero magnetic field. Our findings demonstrate that the properties of magnetic spirals, including its wavelength and stability range, can be engineered through the control of chemical disorder, offering a great potential for the design of materials with magnetoelectric properties beyond room temperature.

  1. Quasi-Solid Electrolytes for High Temperature Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kalaga, Kaushik; Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Babu, Ganguli; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-11-25

    Rechargeable batteries capable of operating at high temperatures have significant use in various targeted applications. Expanding the thermal stability of current lithium ion batteries requires replacing the electrolyte and separators with stable alternatives. Since solid-state electrolytes do not have a good electrode interface, we report here the development of a new class of quasi-solid-state electrolytes, which have the structural stability of a solid and the wettability of a liquid. Microflakes of clay particles drenched in a solution of lithiated room temperature ionic liquid forming a quasi-solid system has been demonstrated to have structural stability until 355 °C. With an ionic conductivity of ∼3.35 mS cm(-1), the composite electrolyte has been shown to deliver stable electrochemical performance at 120 °C, and a rechargeable lithium battery with Li4Ti5O12 electrode has been tested to deliver reliable capacity for over several cycles of charge-discharge.

  2. Visible room-temperature phosphorescence of pure organic crystals via a radical-ion-pair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Shinichi; Akeno, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Yuasa, Hideya

    2015-06-28

    The afterglow of phosphorescent compounds can be distinguished from background fluorescence and scattered light by a time-resolved observation, which is a beneficial property for bioimaging. Phosphorescence emission accompanies spin-forbidden transitions from an excited singlet state through an excited triplet state to a ground singlet state. Since these intersystem crossings are facilitated usually by the heavy-atom effect, metal-free organic solids are seldom phosphorescent, although these solids have recently been refurbished as low-cost, eco-friendly phosphorescent materials. Here, we show that crystalline isophthalic acid exhibits room-temperature phosphorescence with an afterglow that lasts several seconds through a nuclear spin magnetism-assisted spin exchange of a radical ion pair. The obvious afterglow that facilitates a time-resolved detection and the unusual phosphorescence mechanism that enables emission intensification by nuclear spin managements are promising for exploiting the phosphorescence materials in novel applications such as bioimaging.

  3. Increasing the Room-Temperature Electric Double Layer Retention Time in Two-Dimensional Crystal FETs.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Erich W; Fuller, Ashley; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua A; Fullerton-Shirey, Susan K

    2017-07-26

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and LiClO4, a solid polymer electrolyte with a glass transition temperature (Tg) of 80 °C, is used to electrostatically gate graphene field-effect transistors. The ions in PVA:LiClO4 are drifted into place by field-effect at T > Tg, providing n- or p-type doping, and when the device is cooled to room temperature, the polymer mobility and, hence ion mobility are arrested and the electric double layer (EDL) is "locked" into place in the absence of a gate bias. Unlike other electrolytes used to gate two-dimensional devices for which the Tg, and therefore the "locking" temperature, is well below room temperature, the electrolyte demonstrated in this work provides a route to achieve room-temperature EDL stability. Specifically, a 6 orders of magnitude increase in the room temperature EDL retention time is demonstrated over the commonly used electrolyte, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and LiClO4. Hall measurements confirm that large sheet carrier densities can be achieved with PVA:LiClO4 at top gate programming voltages of ±2 V (-6.3 ± 0.03 × 10(13) cm(-2) for electrons and 1.6 ± 0.3 × 10(14) cm(-2) for holes). Transient drain current measurements show that at least 75% of the EDL is retained after more than 4 h at room temperature. Unlike PEO-based electrolytes, PVA:LiClO4 is compatible with the chemicals used in standard photolithographic processes enabling the direct deposition of patterned, metal contacts on the surface of the electrolyte. A thermal instability in the electrolyte is detected by both I-V measurements and differential scanning calorimetry, and FTIR measurements suggest that thermally catalyzed cross-linking may be driving phase separation between the polymer and the salt. Nevertheless, this work highlights how the relationship between polymer and ion mobility can be exploited to tune the state retention time and the charge carrier density of a 2D crystal transistor.

  4. Integration of room temperature single electron transistor with CMOS subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheam, Daw Don

    The single electron transistor (SET) is a charge-based device that may complement the dominant metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology. As the cost of scaling MOSFET to smaller dimensions are rising and the the basic functionality of MOSFET is encountering numerous challenges at dimensions smaller than 10nm, the SET has shown the potential to become the next generation device which operates based on the tunneling of electrons. Since the electron transfer mechanism of a SET device is based on the non-dissipative electron tunneling effect, the power consumption of a SET device is extremely low, estimated to be on the order of 10--18 J. The objectives of this research are to demonstrate technologies that would enable the mass produce of SET devices that are operational at room temperature and to integrate these devices on top of an active complementary-MOSFET (CMOS) substrate. To achieve these goals, two fabrication techniques are considered in this work. The Focus Ion Beam (FIB) technique is used to fabricate the islands and the tunnel junctions of the SET device. A Ultra-Violet (UV) light based Nano-Imprint Lithography (NIL) call Step-and-Flash-Imprint Lithography (SFIL) is used to fabricate the interconnections of the SET devices. Combining these two techniques, a full array of SET devices are fabricated on a planar substrate. Test and characterization of the SET devices has shown consistent Coulomb blockade effect, an important single electron characteristic. To realize a room temperature operational SET device that function as a logic device to work along CMOS, it is important to know the device behavior at different temperatures. Based on the theory developed for a single island SET device, a thermal analysis is carried out on the multi-island SET device and the observation of changes in Coulomb blockade effect is presented. The results show that the multi-island SET device operation highly depends on temperature. The important

  5. Room temperature manipulation of long lifetime spins in metallic-like carbon nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Choucair, Mohammad; Dinse, Klaus-Peter; Forró, László

    2016-01-01

    The time-window for processing electron spin information (spintronics) in solid-state quantum electronic devices is determined by the spin–lattice and spin–spin relaxation times of electrons. Minimizing the effects of spin–orbit coupling and the local magnetic contributions of neighbouring atoms on spin–lattice and spin–spin relaxation times at room temperature remain substantial challenges to practical spintronics. Here we report conduction electron spin–lattice and spin–spin relaxation times of 175 ns at 300 K in 37±7 nm carbon spheres, which is remarkably long for any conducting solid-state material of comparable size. Following the observation of spin polarization by electron spin resonance, we control the quantum state of the electron spin by applying short bursts of an oscillating magnetic field and observe coherent oscillations of the spin state. These results demonstrate the feasibility of operating electron spins in conducting carbon nanospheres as quantum bits at room temperature. PMID:27426851

  6. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-01-01

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries. PMID:26634644

  7. Reversible oxygen scavenging at room temperature using electrochemically reduced titanium oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Thomas; Tulsyan, Gaurav; Diaz, Carlos A.; Weinstein, Steven J.; Richter, Christiaan

    2015-05-01

    A material capable of rapid, reversible molecular oxygen uptake at room temperature is desirable for gas separation and sensing, for technologies that require oxygen storage and oxygen splitting such as fuel cells (solid-oxide fuel cells in particular) and for catalytic applications that require reduced oxygen species (such as removal of organic pollutants in water and oil-spill remediation). To date, however, the lowest reported temperature for a reversible oxygen uptake material is in the range of 200-300 °C, achieved in the transition metal oxides SrCoOx (ref. 1) and LuFe2O4+x (ref. 2) via thermal cycling. Here, we report rapid and reversible oxygen scavenging by TiO2-x nanotubes at room temperature. The uptake and release of oxygen is accomplished by an electrochemical rather than a standard thermal approach. We measure an oxygen uptake rate as high as 14 mmol O2 g-1 min-1, ˜2,400 times greater than commercial, irreversible oxygen scavengers. Such a fast oxygen uptake at a remarkably low temperature suggests a non-typical mechanistic pathway for the re-oxidation of TiO2-x. Modelling the diffusion of oxygen, we show that a likely pathway involves ‘exceptionally mobile’ interstitial oxygen produced by the oxygen adsorption and decomposition dynamics, recently observed on the surface of anatase.

  8. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Iris D.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D.; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S.; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Vo Pham, Long; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A.; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T.; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M.; Glownia, James M.; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S.; Lane, Thomas J.; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E.; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Waterman, David G.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2016-11-21

    We report light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4), in which S1 is the dark-stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O–O bond formation and O2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O–O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL7 provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. Lastly, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O–O bond

  9. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Young, Iris D.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; ...

    2016-11-21

    We report light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4), in which S1 is the dark-stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O–O bond formation and O2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O–O bond formation mechanismmore » remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL7 provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. Lastly, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O–O bond formation mechanisms.« less

  10. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Vo Pham, Long; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4), in which S1 is the dark-stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  11. Engineering Room-temperature Superconductors Via ab-initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, Mamikon; Melkonyan, Gurgen; Gulian, Armen

    The BCS, or bosonic model of superconductivity, as Little and Ginzburg have first argued, can bring in superconductivity at room temperatures in the case of high-enough frequency of bosonic mode. It was further elucidated by Kirzhnitset al., that the condition for existence of high-temperature superconductivity is closely related to negative values of the real part of the dielectric function at finite values of the reciprocal lattice vectors. In view of these findings, the task is to calculate the dielectric function for real materials. Then the poles of this function will indicate the existence of bosonic excitations which can serve as a "glue" for Cooper pairing, and if the frequency is high enough, and the dielectric matrix is simultaneously negative, this material is a good candidate for very high-Tc superconductivity. Thus, our approach is to elaborate a methodology of ab-initio calculation of the dielectric function of various materials, and then point out appropriate candidates. We used the powerful codes (TDDF with the DP package in conjunction with ABINIT) for computing dielectric responses at finite values of the wave vectors in the reciprocal lattice space. Though our report is concerned with the particular problem of superconductivity, the application range of the data processing methodology is much wider. The ability to compute the dielectric function of existing and still non-existing (though being predicted!) materials will have many more repercussions not only in fundamental sciences but also in technology and industry.

  12. Dielectric Behavior of Biomaterials at Different Frequencies on Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, B. D.; Barde, Ravindra; Mishra, A.; Phadke, S.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in radiofrequency (RF) and microwave systems is described mathematically by Maxwell's equations with corresponding boundary conditions. Dielectric properties of lossless and lossy materials influence EM field distribution. For a better understanding of the physical processes associated with various RF and microwave devices, it is necessary to know the dielectric properties of media that interact with EM waves. For telecommunication and radar devices, variations of complex dielectric permittivity (referring to the dielectric property) over a wide frequency range are important. For RF and microwave applicators intended for thermal treatments of different materials at ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) frequencies, one needs to study temperature and moisture content dependencies of the Permittivity of the treated materials. Many techniques have been developed for the measurement of materials. In the present paper authors used Bones and scales of Fish taken from Narmada River (Rajghat Dist. Barwani) as biomaterials. Dielectric properties of Biomaterials with the frequency range from 1Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature with low water content were measured by in-situ performance dielectric kit. Analysis has been done by Alpha high performance impedance analyzer and LCR meters. The experimental work were carried out in Inter University Consortium UGC-DAE, CSR center Indore MP. Measured value indicates the dielectric constant (ɛ') dielectric loss (ɛ") decreases with increasing frequency while conductivity (σ) increases with frequency increased.

  13. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; ...

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  14. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  15. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  16. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  17. Room Temperature Dynamic Strain Aging in Ultrafine-Grained Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Felipe Perissé D.; Lu, Chia Hui; Zhao, Shiteng; Monteiro, Sergio N.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) in coarse-grained (CG) titanium is usually observed at intermediate to high temperatures 473 K to 973 K (200 °C to 700 °C) and is characterized by serrations in the stress vs strain curves. In the present work, despite the absence of apparent serrations, ultrafine-grained titanium (UFG Ti) undergoes DSA at room temperature, exhibited through an abnormal increase in the elastic limit and negative strain rate sensitivity. This effect is observed at 293 K (20 °C) in the strain rate interval of 10-4 to 10-2 s-1, and at 203 K (-70 °C) and 373 K (100 °C) in a distinct strain rate range. Based on a calculated activation energy of 17.3 kJ/mol and microstructural observations by transmission electron microscopy, it is proposed that the dominant mechanism for DSA in UFG Ti involves interstitial solutes interacting with dislocations emitted from grain boundaries. The interstitials migrate from the grain boundaries along dislocation lines bowing out as they are emitted from the boundaries, a mechanism with a low calculated activation energy which is comparable with the experimental measurements. The dislocation velocities and interstitial diffusion along the dislocation cores are consistent.

  18. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  19. Low cycle fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Nudurupati, Saibaba; Mahobia, G. S.; Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2013-10-01

    Fuel cladding and pressure tubes of Zircaloy-2 in pressurized light and heavy water nuclear reactors experience plastic strain cycles due to power fluctuations in the reactor, such strain cycles cause low cycle fatigue (LCF) and could be life limiting factor for them. Factors like strain rate, strain amplitude and temperature are known to have marked influence on LCF behavior. The effect of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 on LCF behavior of Zircaloy-2 was studied, at different strain amplitudes between ±0.50% and ±1.25% at room temperature. Fatigue life was decreased with lowering of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 at all the strain amplitudes studied. While there was cyclic softening at lower strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩽ ±0.60%) cyclic hardening was exhibited at higher strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩾ ±1.00%) at all the strain rates. Further, there was secondary cyclic hardening during the later stage of cycling at all the strain amplitudes and the strain rates. Cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loops at the lowest strain rate of 10-4 s-1 were found to be heavily serrated, resulting from dynamic strain aging (DSA). There was significant effect of strain rate on dislocation substructure. The results are discussed in terms of high concentration of point defects generated during cyclic straining and their role in enhancing interaction between solutes and dislocations.

  20. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  1. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N.; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Dowben, Peter A.; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  2. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  3. Room-temperature ballistic transport in III-nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Matioli, Elison; Palacios, Tomás

    2015-02-11

    Room-temperature (RT) ballistic transport of electrons is experimentally observed and theoretically investigated in III-nitrides. This has been largely investigated at low temperatures in low band gap III-V materials due to their high electron mobilities. However, their application to RT ballistic devices is limited by their low optical phonon energies, close to KT at 300 K. In addition, the short electron mean-free-path at RT requires nanoscale devices for which surface effects are a limitation in these materials. We explore the unique properties of wide band-gap III-nitride semiconductors to demonstrate RT ballistic devices. A theoretical model is proposed to corroborate experimentally their optical phonon energy of 92 meV, which is ∼4× larger than in other III-V semiconductors. This allows RT ballistic devices operating at larger voltages and currents. An additional model is described to determine experimentally a characteristic dimension for ballistic transport of 188 nm. Another remarkable property is their short carrier depletion at device sidewalls, down to 13 nm, which allows top-down nanofabrication of very narrow ballistic devices. These results open a wealth of new systems and basic transport studies possible at RT.

  4. Secondary calcium solid electrolyte high temperature battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammells, A. F.; Schumacher, B.

    1986-01-01

    The application of polycrystalline Ca(2+) conducting beta-double prime alumina solid electrolytes to a new type of high temperature battery is investigated, experimentally. The negative electrode in the battery consisted of a calcium-silicon alloy whose redox electrochemistry was mediated by the solid electrolyte via molten salt eutectic CaCl2 (51.4 m/o), and CaI2 (mp 550 C). The molten salt and the calcium alloy material were separated from the positive active material via the Ca2 Ca(2+) conducting polycrystalline electrolyte. The positive electrode consisted of a solid-state matrix having related crystallographic structure. The electrochemical reversibility of the cells was measured at 580 C. The charge-discharge characteristics of the cells are plotted vs. time in a graph.

  5. MTR, TRA603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE MASONRY. STAINLESS STEEL WORK BENCH, FLOOR COVING AND DRAINS. "WARM" FLOOR DRAIN. OVERHEAD SHOWER WITH CHAIN PULL. IDO MTR-603-IDO-4, 12/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-396-110468, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Pressure-induced two-color photoluminescence in MnF(2) at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Hernández, I; Rodríguez, Fernando; Hochheimer, H D

    2007-07-13

    A novel two-color photoluminescence (PL) is found in MnF(2) at room temperature under high pressure. Contrary to low-temperature PL, PL at room temperature is unusual in transition-metal concentrated materials like MnF(2), since the deexcitation process at room temperature is fully governed by energy transfer to nonradiative centers. We show that room-temperature PL in MnF(2) originates from two distinct Mn(2+) emissions in the high-pressure cotunnite phase. The electronic structure and the excited-state dynamics are investigated by time-resolved emission and excitation spectroscopy at high pressure.

  7. New layered metal oxides as positive electrode materials for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin-Qin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Quan

    2015-03-01

    In order to achieve better Na storage performance, most layered oxide positive electrode materials contain toxic and expensive transition metals Ni and/or Co, which are also widely used for lithium-ion batteries. Here we report a new quaternary layered oxide consisting of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ti transition metals with O3-type oxygen stacking as a positive electrode for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries. The material can be simply prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route and delivers a reversible capacity of 94 mAh/g with an average storage voltage of 3.2 V. This paves the way for cheaper and non-toxic batteries with high Na storage performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210 and 11234013) and the One Hundred Talent Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  9. Rapid room temperature solubilization and depolymerization of polymeric lignin at high loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Dutta, Tanmoy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Kim, Kwang Ho; Tolic, Nikola; Chu, Rosalie K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The relatively poor solubility of lignin in most pretreatment solvents remains one of the biggest challegnes in lignin valorization to improve overall biorefinery economics. In this work, rapid room temperature solubilization of lignin at high solid loadings (>30 wt%) can be easily achieved in a single step using ethylene glycol (EG). The solubilized lignin can be rapidly and quantitively recovered with the addtion of ethanol. The computational and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies confirm that strong hydrogen bond interactions between EG and the free hydroxyl groups present in lignin contribute to the lignin dissolution. In addition, hydrogen peroxide mediated depolymerization of dissolved lignin at low temperature (80 oC) was tested and the effect of EG molecules on depolymerization of ligin was also theoritically studied. The findings of this work provide mechanistic insights of hydrogen bond interactions in high lignin solubilization and valorization.

  10. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-07

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  11. Advances in crystal growth, device fabrication and characterization of thallium bromide detectors for room temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Moed, Demi; Becla, Piotr; Overholt, Matthew; Motakef, Shariar

    2016-10-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. However, several critical issues need to be addressed before deployment of this material for long-term field applications can be realized. In this paper, progress made towards solving some of these challenges is discussed. The most significant factors for achieving long-term performance stability for TlBr devices include residual stress as generated during crystal growth and fabrication processes, surface conditions, and the choice of contact metal. Modifications to the commonly used traveling molten zone growth technique for TlBr crystals can significantly minimize the stresses generated by large temperature gradients near the melt-solid interface of the growing crystal. Plasma processing techniques were introduced for the first time to modify the Br-etched TlBr surfaces, which resulted in improvements to the surface conditions, and consequently the spectroscopic response of the detectors. Palladium electrodes resulted a 20-fold improvement in the room-temperature device lifetime when compared to its Br-etched Pt counterpart.

  12. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.

  13. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGES

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; ...

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  14. LED side-pumped Nd3+:YVO4 laser at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, Adrien; Grardel, Hugo; Paul, Amandine; Blanchot, Jean-Philippe; Balembois, François; Druon, Frédéric; Georges, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The lighting market has recently improved LED performance by orders of magnitudes. In parallel, massive production decreases dramatically LED price. Those improvements triggered new interests for LED pumping of lasers which was first studied in the early 1980s on neodymium doped and ytterbium doped lasers at low temperature. Since the 2000's, several research teams started to revisit the concept of LED pumped lasers: polymer laser, fiber laser and semiconductors have recently demonstrated laser effect under visible LED pumping. However, no experimental results were reported on LED pumped bulk crystals. In this paper, we demonstrated for the first time a LED pumped Nd:YVO4 laser operating at room temperature. We investigated two pumping wavelengths: in the amber around 600 nm and in the near infrared around 850 nm. The laser operated in quasi-cw-pumping regime to increase the LED intensity. We performed a two-mirror cavity transversely pumped by 36 LEDs. Laser operation was achieved at room temperature for the both pump wavelengths: a maximum output energy of 40μJ for an emitted energy of 7.4 mJ with infrared pumping and an energy of 11.7 μJ for an emitted energy or 2.3 mJ with amber pumping. This works demonstrated that LED pumping has an interesting potential to realize ultra low cost solid state lasers operating in pulsed regime at kHz repetition rate and with energies in the mJ range.

  15. Giant tunnelling magnetoresistance at room temperature with MgO (100) tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Stuart S P; Kaiser, Christian; Panchula, Alex; Rice, Philip M; Hughes, Brian; Samant, Mahesh; Yang, See-Hun

    2004-12-01

    Magnetically engineered magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) show promise as non-volatile storage cells in high-performance solid-state magnetic random access memories (MRAM). The performance of these devices is currently limited by the modest (< approximately 70%) room-temperature tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) of technologically relevant MTJs. Much higher TMR values have been theoretically predicted for perfectly ordered (100) oriented single-crystalline Fe/MgO/Fe MTJs. Here we show that sputter-deposited polycrystalline MTJs grown on an amorphous underlayer, but with highly oriented (100) MgO tunnel barriers and CoFe electrodes, exhibit TMR values of up to approximately 220% at room temperature and approximately 300% at low temperatures. Consistent with these high TMR values, superconducting tunnelling spectroscopy experiments indicate that the tunnelling current has a very high spin polarization of approximately 85%, which rivals that previously observed only using half-metallic ferromagnets. Such high values of spin polarization and TMR in readily manufactureable and highly thermally stable devices (up to 400 degrees C) will accelerate the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  16. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; ...

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  17. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  18. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David L; Wetteland, Chris J; Duncan, Wanda S; Lakis, Rollin E; Schwartz, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  19. Proactive aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of room-temperature ionic liquids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulacki, K.J.; Chaloner, D.T.; Larson, J.H.; Costello, D.M.; Evans-White, M. A.; Docherty, K.M.; Bernot, R.J.; Brueseke, M.A.; Kulpa, C.F.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments are being contaminated with a myriad of anthropogenic chemicals, a problem likely to continue due to both unintentional and intentional releases. To protect valuable natural resources, novel chemicals should be shown to be environmentally safe prior to use and potential release into the environment. Such proactive assessment is currently being applied to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs). Because most ILs are water-soluble, their effects are likely to manifest in aquatic ecosystems. Information on the impacts of ILs on numerous aquatic organisms, focused primarily on acute LC50 and EC50 endpoints, is now available, and trends in toxicity are emerging. Cation structure tends to influence IL toxicity more so than anion structure, and within a cation class, the length of alkyl chain substituents is positively correlated with toxicity. While the effects of ILs on several aquatic organisms have been studied, the challenge for aquatic toxicology is now to predict the effects of ILs in complex natural environments that often include diverse mixtures of organisms, abiotic conditions, and additional stressors. To make robust predictions about ILs will require coupling of ecologically realistic laboratory and field experiments with standard toxicity bioassays and models. Such assessments would likely discourage the development of especially toxic ILs while shifting focus to those that are more environmentally benign. Understanding the broader ecological effects of emerging chemicals, incorporating that information into predictive models, and conveying the conclusions to those who develop, regulate, and use those chemicals, should help avoid future environmental degradation. ?? 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  20. All-Aluminum Thin Film Transistor Fabrication at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rihui; Zheng, Zeke; Zeng, Yong; Liu, Xianzhe; Ning, Honglong; Hu, Shiben; Tao, Ruiqiang; Chen, Jianqiu; Cai, Wei; Xu, Miao; Wang, Lei; Lan, Linfeng; Peng, Junbiao

    2017-02-23

    Bottom-gate all-aluminum thin film transistors with multi conductor/insulator nanometer heterojunction were investigated in this article. Alumina (Al₂O₃) insulating layer was deposited on the surface of aluminum doping zinc oxide (AZO) conductive layer, as one AZO/Al₂O₃ heterojunction unit. The measurements of transmittance electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) revealed the smooth interfaces between ~2.2-nm-thick Al₂O₃ layers and ~2.7-nm-thick AZO layers. The devices were entirely composited by aluminiferous materials, that is, their gate and source/drain electrodes were respectively fabricated by aluminum neodymium alloy (Al:Nd) and pure Al, with Al₂O₃/AZO multilayered channel and AlOx:Nd gate dielectric layer. As a result, the all-aluminum TFT with two Al₂O₃/AZO heterojunction units exhibited a mobility of 2.47 cm²/V·s and an Ion/Ioff ratio of 10⁶. All processes were carried out at room temperature, which created new possibilities for green displays industry by allowing for the devices fabricated on plastic-like substrates or papers, mainly using no toxic/rare materials.

  1. Towards force detected single electron spin resonance at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. C.; Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.

    2013-03-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy has shown that electron tunneling at or within silicon dioxide layers is strongly dependent on spin-selection rules. Also demonstrated is the detection of single electron tunneling events by electrostatic force with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. Here we propose to combine force detected single electron tunneling microscopy with EDMR to demonstrate a new kind of single spin force microscope. This approach has much better sensitivity than magnetic force based single spin microscopes, since electrostatic forces are much larger than corresponding magnetic forces. In this method, a paramagnetic state in an oxidized AFM probe tip is brought within tunneling range of a paramagnetic state in an oxide surface. Under appropriate energy conditions, one of the unpaired electrons can randomly tunnel between the two states causing a random telegraph signal (RTS) to appear on the AFM cantilever frequency. Simulations predict that if magnetic resonance conditions are achieved, a measurable change in the RTS signal is detectable at room temperature. The theory and a quantitative simulation of this atomic scale spin resonance measurement will be presented, along with experimentally observed random telegraph signals.

  2. Chemically reduced graphene oxide for ammonia detection at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ruma; Midya, Anupam; Santra, Sumita; Ray, Samit K; Guha, Prasanta K

    2013-08-14

    Chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has recently attracted growing interest in the area of chemical sensors because of its high electrical conductivity and chemically active defect sites. This paper reports the synthesis of chemically reduced GO using NaBH4 and its performance for ammonia detection at room temperature. The sensing layer was synthesized on a ceramic substrate containing platinum electrodes. The effect of the reduction time of graphene oxide (GO) was explored to optimize the response, recovery, and response time. The RGO film was characterized electrically and also with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor response was found to lie between 5.5% at 200 ppm (parts per million) and 23% at 2800 ppm of ammonia, and also resistance recovered quickly without any application of heat (for lower concentrations of ammonia). The sensor was exposed to different vapors and found to be selective toward ammonia. We believe such chemically reduced GO could potentially be used to manufacture a new generation of low-power portable ammonia sensors.

  3. All-Aluminum Thin Film Transistor Fabrication at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Rihui; Zheng, Zeke; Zeng, Yong; Liu, Xianzhe; Ning, Honglong; Hu, Shiben; Tao, Ruiqiang; Chen, Jianqiu; Cai, Wei; Xu, Miao; Wang, Lei; Lan, Linfeng; Peng, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    Bottom-gate all-aluminum thin film transistors with multi conductor/insulator nanometer heterojunction were investigated in this article. Alumina (Al2O3) insulating layer was deposited on the surface of aluminum doping zinc oxide (AZO) conductive layer, as one AZO/Al2O3 heterojunction unit. The measurements of transmittance electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) revealed the smooth interfaces between ~2.2-nm-thick Al2O3 layers and ~2.7-nm-thick AZO layers. The devices were entirely composited by aluminiferous materials, that is, their gate and source/drain electrodes were respectively fabricated by aluminum neodymium alloy (Al:Nd) and pure Al, with Al2O3/AZO multilayered channel and AlOx:Nd gate dielectric layer. As a result, the all-aluminum TFT with two Al2O3/AZO heterojunction units exhibited a mobility of 2.47 cm2/V·s and an Ion/Ioff ratio of 106. All processes were carried out at room temperature, which created new possibilities for green displays industry by allowing for the devices fabricated on plastic-like substrates or papers, mainly using no toxic/rare materials. PMID:28772579

  4. Self-segregated nanostructure in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pontoni, Diego; Haddad, Julia; Di Michiel, Marco; Deutsch, Moshe

    2017-10-04

    The nanosegregated bulk structure, and its evolution with the cation's alkyl length n, are studied by X-ray scattering for an unprecedentedly broad homologous series of a model room-temperature ionic liquid, [CnMIM][NTf2] (n = 4-22). A tri-periodic local structure is found, with the lateral periodicities, dII and dIII independent of n, and a longitudinal one, dI, linearly increasing with n. The results are consistent with a local structure comprising alternating layers of polar headgroups and apolar, interdigitated, partly overlapping, cations' alkyl tails, of an average macroscopic mass density close to that of liquid alkanes. A slope decrease in the linear dI(n) suggests a change from a lower to a higher rate of increase with n of chain overlap for n ≥ 12. The order decay lengths of the layering, and of the lateral chain packing, increase with n, as expected from the increasing van der Waals interaction's domination of the structure. The headgroups' lateral packing decay length decreases with n, due to increasing frustration between the longer lateral periodicity preferred by the headgroups, and the shorter lateral periodicity preferred by the chains. A comparison of the bulk and surface structures highlights the surface's ordering effect, which, however, does not induce here a surface phase different from the bulk, as it does in liquid crystals and liquid alkanes.

  5. Resonantly pumped room temperature Ho:LuVO₄ laser.

    PubMed

    Yao, B Q; Cui, Z; Duan, X M; Du, Y Q; Han, L; Shen, Y J

    2014-11-01

    Spectroscopic characterization of a Ho:LuVO4 crystal grown by the Czochralski method has been performed, including the absorption and emission spectra. We demonstrate a 2 μm room temperature Ho:LuVO4 laser, resonantly pumped by a 1.94 μm Tm:YAP laser. By use of an output coupler with T=10% transmission, the Ho:LuVO4 laser generated continuous-wave output power of 2.5 W at 2074.18 nm, with a beam quality factor of Mx2=My2=1.3, for a total incident pump power of 19.4 W. The slope efficiency with respect to the pump power was 17.6%, and the optical-to-optical efficiency was 12.9%. Moreover, we obtained a Ho:LuVO4 laser that operated at 2073.77 and 2055.27 nm, by using different output couplers with transmissions of T=15 and 30%.

  6. Room-temperature terahertz detection based on CVD graphene transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-Xin; Sun, Jian-Dong; Qin, Hua; Lv, Li; Su, Li-Na; Yan, Bo; Li, Xin-Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Peng; Fang, Jing-Yue

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a single-layer graphene field-effect terahertz detector, which is coupled with dipole-like antennas based on the self-mixing detector model. The graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition and then transferred onto an SiO2/Si substrate. We demonstrate room-temperature detection at 237 GHz. The detector could offer a voltage responsivity of 0.1 V/W and a noise equivalent power of 207 nW/Hz1/2. Our modeling indicates that the observed photovoltage in the p-type gated channel can be well fit by the self-mixing theory. A different photoresponse other than self-mixing may apply for the n-type gated channel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271157, 61401456, and 11403084), Jiangsu Provincial Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (Grant No. 1301054B), the Fund from Suzhou Industry Technology Bureau (Grant No. ZXG2012024), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M551678), the Graduate Student Innovation Program for Universities of Jiangsu Province (Grant No. CXLX12_0724), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. JUDCF 12032), and the Fund from National University of Defense Technology (Grant No. JC13-02-14).

  7. Room temperature molten salt as medium for lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. S.; Zhou, R. Q.

    Due to the wide electrochemical window and high ionic conductivity, the 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MeEtImCl) room temperature molten salt (RTMS) was investigated as the medium for lithium battery in the present work. The addition of C 6H 5SO 2Cl to the RTMS was shown to improve its chemical stability and the reversibility of the lithium electrode because of the removal of Al 2Cl 7- from the melt. Electrochemical reaction which occurred at the LiCoO 2 was studied and the carbon current collector was found to interact with the melt. Out of the various carbon materials studied, graphite was found to be the best material. A LiAl/LiCoO 2 battery using RTMS as the electrolyte was assembled for battery test. Satisfactory results were obtained in preliminary cycling, showing a cell voltage of 3.45 V with better than 90% coulombic efficiency and a discharging capacity of 112 mA h/g LiCoO 2 at current density of 1 mA/cm 2.

  8. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  9. Lead palladium titanate: A room-temperature multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradauskaite, Elzbieta; Gardner, Jonathan; Smith, Rebecca M.; Morrison, Finlay D.; Lee, Stephen L.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Scott, James F.

    2017-09-01

    There have been a large number of papers on bismuth ferrite (BiFe O3 ) over the past few years, trying to exploit its room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic properties. Although these are attractive, BiFe O3 is not the ideal multiferroic due to weak magnetization and the difficulty in limiting leakage currents. Thus there is an ongoing search for alternatives, including such materials as gallium ferrite (GaFe O3 ). In the present work we report a comprehensive study of the perovskite PbT i1 -xP dxO3 with 0

  10. Room temperature syntheses of entirely diverse substituted β-fluorofurans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wheeler, Kraig A; Dembinski, Roman

    2012-03-28

    Synthesis of highly substituted 3-fluorofurans is reported. The sequence began with preparation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl alk-1-en-3-yn-1-yl ethers from 1,4-disubstituted alk-3-yn-1-ones. Subsequent fluorination of alkenynyl silyl ethers with Selectfluor gave 2-fluoroalk-3-yn-1-ones in almost quantitative yield. Subsequent 5-endo-dig cyclizations using chlorotriphenylphosphine gold(I)/silver trifluoromethanesulfonate (5/5 mol%), N-bromo- or N-iodosuccinimide and gold(I) chloride/zinc bromide (5/20 mol%), all at room temperature, provided a facile method for the generation of substituted 3-fluoro-, 3-bromo-4-fluoro-, and 3-fluoro-4-iodofurans in good yields. Also, 2,2-difluoroalk-3-yn-1-ones were prepared by fluorination of alk-3-yn-1-ones under organocatalytic conditions. The structures of (Z)-tert-butyldimethylsilyl but-1-en-3-yn-1-yl ether, 3-bromo-4-fluorofuran, and 3-fluoro-4-(phenylethynyl)furan were confirmed by X-ray crystallography.

  11. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  12. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm−3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics. PMID:28262746

  13. A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, S.; Johnson, B. C.; Ivády, V.; Stavrias, N.; Umeda, T.; Gali, A.; Ohshima, T.

    2014-02-01

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules, quantum dots, diamond colour centres and others. The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics and measurement theory. An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing. Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2×106 counts s-1) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices.

  14. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  15. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm‑3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics.

  16. Laser desorption from a room temperature ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter Ronald

    We report laser desorption from a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid (RTIL) as a novel source for time of flight mass spectrometry. We use the 2nd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser to deposit intensities of 1-50 MW/cm2 via backside illumination onto our RTIL desorption sample. A microstructured metal grid situated on top of a glass microscope slide coated with RTIL serves as our desorption sample. The RTIL we use, 1-Butyl, 3-Methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate, remains liquid at pressures below 10-8 torr. The use of liquid desorption sample allows for improved surface conditions, homogeneity and sample life as compared to Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) techniques. Our desorption technique is also unique as it allows the study of both multiphoton and acoustic desorption processes within the same time of flight spectra. Our technique yields intrinsically high resolution, low noise data. We observe differences between ion species in their preference for desorption by a particular desorption method. Specifically, we observe desorption solely by acoustic means of an entire RTIL molecule adducted with an RTIL cation. Finally, we report the applicability of this technique for the desorption of biomolecules.

  17. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  18. Room-Temperature Spin-Mediated Coupling in Hybrid Magnetic, Organic, and Oxide Structures and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-07

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: During the full period of this project we have (1) demonstrated room -temperature effects of the remanent magnetization...the effects of traps and unpaired spins on room -temperature magnetoresistance, (4) developed a theory for spin diffusion in hopping transport due to...Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Room -Temperature Spin-Mediated Coupling in Hybrid Magnetic, Organic, and

  19. Room Temperature Erbium-Doped Yttrium Vanadate (Er:YVO4) Laser and Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    ARL-TR-7791 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Room Temperature Erbium-Doped Yttrium Vanadate (Er:YVO4) Laser and Amplifier...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7791 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Room Temperature Erbium-Doped...DD-MM-YYYY) September 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Room Temperature Erbium-Doped

  20. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold kit therefor

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.; Hupf, Homer B.; Wanek, Philip M.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free .sup.125 I.sup.- is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  1. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test... B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test day... Temperatures shall be controlled to ± 1 °C. ...

  2. The initial, thermal oxidation of zirconium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapin, A.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.; Graat, P. C. J.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    Angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry have been used to investigate the initial oxidation of polycrystalline zirconium at room temperature in the partial oxygen pressure range of 1.3×10-7-1.3×10-4Pa. Detailed quantitative analysis of the measured Zr3d ARXPS spectra of the oxidized metal allowed separation of the intrinsic and extrinsic metallic and oxidic contributions to the spectra. It was shown that, in addition to the metallic contribution from the substrate and the oxidic contribution from stoichiometric ZrO2, two additional suboxidic components are contained in the measured Zr3d spectra of the oxidized Zr metal. As evidenced by angle-resolved XPS and in situ ellipsometry, both of these components can be attributed to a gradient of Zr enrichment in the region of the oxide film adjacent to the metal/oxide interface (with the highest Zr enrichment at the metal/oxide interface). Investigation of the oxide-film growth kinetics at various pO2, as determined independently using both techniques, showed the occurrence of an initial regime of very fast, electric-field-controlled growth, followed by a much slower oxidation stage. As a result, an, on average, nonstoichiometric oxide film develops. The observed effect of the pO2 on the low-temperature oxidation of Zr has been discussed in terms of the relationship between the fraction of coverage of the surface with physi- and chemisorbed oxygen and the applied pO2.

  3. Phosphonium chloromercurate room temperature ionic liquids of variable composition.

    PubMed

    Metlen, Andreas; Mallick, Bert; Murphy, Richard W; Mudring, Anja-Verena; Rogers, Robin D

    2013-12-16

    The system trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium ([P66614]Cl)/mercury chloride (HgCl2) has been investigated by varying the stoichiometric ratios from 4:1 to 1:2 (25, 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200 mol % HgCl2). All investigated compositions turn out to give rise to ionic liquids (ILs) at room temperature. The prepared ionic liquids offer the possibility to study the structurally and compositionally versatile chloromercurates in a liquid state at low temperatures in the absence of solvents. [P66614]2[HgCl4] is a simple IL with one discrete type of anion, while [P66614]{HgCl3} (with {} indicating a polynuclear arrangement) is an ionic liquid with a variety of polyanionic species, with [Hg2Cl6](2-) apparently being the predominant building block. [P66614]2[Hg3Cl8] and [P66614][Hg2Cl5] appear to be ILs at ambient conditions but lose HgCl2 when heated in a vacuum. For the liquids with the compositions 4:1 and 4:3, more than two discrete ions can be evidenced, namely, [P66614](+), [HgCl4](2-), and Cl(-) and [P66614](+), [HgCl4](2-), and the polynuclear {HgCl3}(-), respectively. The different stoichiometric compositions were characterized by (199)Hg NMR, Raman- and UV-vis spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, among other techniques, and their densities and viscosities were determined. The [P66614]Cl/HgCl2 system shows similarities to the well-known chloroaluminate ILs (e.g., decrease in viscosity with increasing metal content after addition of more than 0.5 mol of HgCl2/mol [P66614]Cl, increasing density with increasing metal content, and the likely formation of polynuclear/polymeric/polyanionic species) but offer the advantage that they are air and water stable.

  4. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  5. Threshold analysis of pulsed lasers with application to a room-temperature Co:MgF2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James; Welford, David; Moulton, Peter F.

    1989-01-01

    Rate-equation calculations are used to model accurately the near-threshold behavior of a Co:MgF2 laser operating at room temperature. The results demonstrate the limitations of the conventional threshold analysis in cases of practical interest. This conclusion is applicable to pulsed solid-state lasers in general. The calculations, together with experimental data, are used to determine emission cross sections for the Co:MgF2 laser.

  6. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect of La-deficient bulk perovskite manganite La 0.7MnO 3- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Qingyu; Sun, Jingzhi; Pan, Jian; Zhang, He

    2011-04-01

    Room temperature magnetocaloric effect in La-deficient bulk perovskite manganite La 0.7MnO 3- δ prepared by conventional solid-state reaction has been reported. The maximum value of the magnetic entropy change (about-1.32 J/kg K) and the refrigerant capacity (approximately close to 37 J/kg) had been obtained at 290 K corresponding to a magnetic field variation of 1 T for La 0.7MnO 3- δ. It is the strong Jahn-Teller coupling that changes Mn-O bond length and Mn-O-Mn bond angles and then the canted spin arrangement and induces the strong double-exchange coupling to a comparatively high magnetic transition temperature. This Curie temperature near room temperature with easy fabrication and higher chemical stability makes La 0.7MnO 3- δ a potential candidate as a working substance in magnetic refrigeration technology.

  7. The design of an embedded system for controlling humidity and temperature room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Teguh, R.; Didik Eko, S.; Laksono, Pringgo D.; Jamaluddin, Anif

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the system is to design an embedded system for maintenance confortable room. The confortable room was design by controlling temperature (on range 18 - 34 °C) and humidity (on range 40% - 70%.) of room condition. Temperature and humidity of room were maintained using four variable such as lamp for warm, water pump for distributing water vapour, a fan for air circullation and an exhaust-fan for air cleaner. The system was constucted both hardware (humidity sensor, microcontroller, pump, lamp, fan) and software (arduino IDE). The result shows that the system was perfectly performed to control room condition.

  8. Synthesis of tin nanocrystals in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Le Vot, Steven; Dambournet, Damien; Groult, Henri; Ngo, Anh-tu; Petit, Christophe; Rizzi, Cécile; Salzemann, Caroline; Sirieix-Plenet, Juliette; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Gaillon, Laurent

    2014-12-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the synthesis of tin nanoparticles (NPs) or tin/carbon composites, in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), that could be used as structured anode materials for Li-ion batteries. An innovative route for the synthesis of Sn nanoparticles in such media is successfully developed. Compositions, structures, sizes and morphologies of NPs were characterized by high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Our findings indicated that (i) metallic tetragonal β-Sn was obtained and (ii) the particle size could be tailored by tuning the nature of the RTILs, leading to nano-sized spherical particles with a diameter ranging from 3 to 10 nm depending on synthesis conditions. In order to investigate carbon composite materials for Li-ion batteries, Sn nanoparticles were successfully deposited on the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Moreover, electrochemical properties have been studied in relation to a structural study of the nanocomposites. The poor electrochemical performances as a negative electrode in Li-ion batteries is due to a significant amount of RTIL trapped within the pores of the nanotubes as revealed by XPS investigations. This dramatically affected the gravimetric capacity of the composites and limited the diffusion of lithium. The findings of this work however offer valuable insights into the exciting possibilities for synthesis of novel nano-sized particles and/or alloys (e.g. Sn-Cu, Sn-Co, Sn-Ni, etc.) and the importance of carbon morphology in metal pulverization during the alloying/dealloying process as well as prevention of ionic liquid trapping.

  9. SQUID Microscopy: Magnetic Images of Room Temperature Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene

    1998-10-01

    We use a microscope based on a high-Tc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to study room temperature samples. The SQUID, which measures magnetic flux, is mounted on a sapphire rod and maintained at 77 K inside a vacuum chamber. A sample, separated from the vacuum chamber by a window, is placed above the SQUID, and the entire microscope is enclosed within a magnetic shield. The sample can be scanned over the SQUID to obtain a magnetic image. We have used the microscope to study magnetotactic bacteria, which have a permanent magnetic dipole moment of about 1.5 x 10-16 Am^2. The bacteria, suspended in an aqueous medium, are placed in a cell which is separated from the vacuum chamber by a 3 micron thick SiN membrane. The sample is brought as close as 15 micron to the SQUID, and the magnetic flux noise from the motion of the bacteria is measured. Data from non-motile cells, which undergo Brownian motion, give us information about the distribution of lengths of the bacteria. By applying a magnetic field, we can determine the average dipole moment. Noise measurements of the live bacteria give us the rates of flagellar rotation and body-roll, as well as the amplitudes of the vibrational and precessional motions. Another application of the microscope is non-destructive evaluation of steel. We have investigated the effects of both thermal and mechanical stresses on the remnant magnetization of steel. A third application of the microscope is in studying the properties of ferromagnetic nanocrystals of Co and Fe_3O_4.

  10. 2010 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference, and Room Temperature Semiconductor Detectors Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Nuclear Science Symposium (NSS) offers an outstanding opportunity for scientists and engineers interested or actively working in the fields of nuclear science, radiation instrumentation, software and their applications, to meet and discuss with colleagues from around the world. The program emphasizes the latest developments in technology and instrumentation and their implementation in experiments for space sciences, accelerators, other radiation environments, and homeland security. The Medical Imaging Conference (MIC) is the foremost international scientific meeting on the physics, engineering and mathematical aspects of nuclear medicine based imaging. As the field develops, multi-modality approaches are becoming more and more important. The content of the MIC reflects this, with a growing emphasis on the methodologies of X-ray, optical and MR imaging as they relate to nuclear imaging techniques. In addition, specialized topics will be addressed in the Short Courses and Workshops programs. The Workshop on Room-Temperature Semiconductor Detectors (RTSD) represents the largest forum of scientists and engineers developing new semiconductor radiation detectors and imaging arrays. Room-temperature solid-state radiation detectors for X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron radiation are finding increasing applications in such diverse fields as medicine, homeland security, astrophysics and environmental remediation. The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for discussion of the state of the art of material development for semiconductor, scintillator, and organic materials for detection, materials characterization, device fabrication and technology, electronics and applications.

  11. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  12. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-28

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  13. Pt@MOF-177: synthesis, room-temperature hydrogen storage and oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Proch, Sebastian; Herrmannsdörfer, Justus; Kempe, Rhett; Kern, Christoph; Jess, Andreas; Seyfarth, Lena; Senker, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The gas-phase loading of [Zn(4)O(btb)(2)](8) (MOF-177; H(3)btb=1,3,5-benzenetribenzoic acid) with the volatile platinum precursor [Me(3)PtCp'] (Cp'=methylcyclopentadienyl) was confirmed by solid state (13)C magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR spectroscopy. Subsequent reduction of the inclusion compound [Me(3)PtCp'](4)@MOF-177 by hydrogen at 100 bar and 100 degrees C for 24 h was carried out and gave rise to the formation of platinum nanoparticles in a size regime of 2-5 nm embedded in the unchanged MOF-177 host lattice as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The room-temperature hydrogen adsorption of Pt@MOF-177 has been followed in a gravimetric fashion (magnetic suspension balance) and shows almost 2.5 wt % in the first cycle, but is decreased down to 0.5 wt % in consecutive cycles. The catalytic activity of Pt@MOF-177 towards the solvent- and base-free room temperature oxidation of alcohols in air has been tested and shows Pt@MOF-177 to be an efficient catalyst in the oxidation of alcohols.

  14. Room temperature lasing in GeSn alloys: A path to CMOS-compatible infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zairui; Zhao, Yun; Gallagher, James; Menéndez, José; Kouvetakis, John; Agha, Imad; Mathews, Jay

    The semiconductor industry has been pushing silicon photonics development for many years, resulting in the realization of many CMOS-compatible optoelectronic devices. However, one challenge that has not been overcome is the development of Si-based lasers. Recently, GeSn alloys grown on Si have shown much promise in the field of infrared optoelectronics. These alloy films are compatible with CMOS processing, have band gaps in the infrared, and the band structure of GeSn can be tuned via Sn concentration to induce direct band gap emission. In this work, we report on room temperature lasing in optically-pumped waveguides fabricated from GeSn films grown epitaxially on Si(100) substrates. The waveguides were defined using standard UV photolithography and dry-etched in a Cl plasma. The end facets were mirror polished, and Al was deposited on one facet to enhance cavity quality. The waveguides were optically-pumped using a 976nm wavelength solid-state laser, and the corresponding emission was measured. The dependence of the emission power on the pump power shows a clear transition between spontaneous and stimulated emission, thereby demonstrating room temperature lasing.

  15. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3–BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3–BiMnO3–PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses. PMID:27677353

  16. Single molecule dynamics at a mechanically controllable break junction in solution at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Tatsuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Takase, Mai; Nagasawa, Fumika; Nabika, Hideki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Murakoshi, Kei

    2013-01-23

    The in situ observation of geometrical and electronic structural dynamics of a single molecule junction is critically important in order to further progress in molecular electronics. Observations of single molecular junctions are difficult, however, because of sensitivity limits. Here, we report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a single 4,4'-bipyridine molecule under conditions of in situ current flow in a nanogap, by using nano-fabricated, mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrodes. When adsorbed at room temperature on metal nanoelectrodes in solution to form a single molecule junction, statistical analysis showed that nontotally symmetric b(1) and b(2) modes of 4,4'-bipyridine were strongly enhanced relative to observations of the same modes in solid or aqueous solutions. Significant changes in SERS intensity, energy (wavenumber), and selectivity of Raman vibrational bands that are coincident with current fluctuations provide information on distinct states of electronic and geometrical structure of the single molecule junction, even under large thermal fluctuations occurring at room temperature. We observed the dynamics of 4,4'-bipyridine motion between vertical and tilting configurations in the Au nanogap via b(1) and b(2) mode switching. A slight increase in the tilting angle of the molecule was also observed by noting the increase in the energies of Raman modes and the decrease in conductance of the molecular junction.

  17. Room-temperature near-infrared high-Q perovskite whispering-gallery planar nanolasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Ha, Son Tung; Liu, Xinfeng; Sum, Tze Chien; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-10-08

    Near-infrared (NIR) solid-state micro/nanolasers are important building blocks for true integration of optoelectronic circuitry. Although significant progress has been made in III-V nanowire lasers with achieving NIR lasing at room temperature, challenges remain including low quantum efficiencies and high Auger losses. Importantly, the obstacles toward integrating one-dimensional nanowires on the planar ubiquitous Si platform need to be effectively tackled. Here we demonstrate a new family of planar room-temperature NIR nanolasers based on organic-inorganic perovskite CH3NH3PbI(3-a)X(a) (X = I, Br, Cl) nanoplatelets. Their large exciton binding energies, long diffusion lengths, and naturally formed high-quality planar whispering-gallery mode cavities ensure adequate gain and efficient optical feedback for low-threshold optically pumped in-plane lasing. We show that these remarkable wavelength tunable whispering-gallery nanolasers can be easily integrated onto conductive platforms (Si, Au, indium tin oxide, and so forth). Our findings open up a new class of wavelength tunable planar nanomaterials potentially suitable for on-chip integration.

  18. Towards a Room-Temperature Spin Quantum Bus in Diamond via Electron Photoionization, Transport, and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M. W.; Meriles, C. A.; Alkauskas, A.; Fedder, H.; Sellars, M. J.; Manson, N. B.

    2016-10-01

    Diamond is a proven solid-state platform for spin-based quantum technology. The nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond has been used to realize small-scale quantum information processing and quantum sensing under ambient conditions. A major barrier in the development of large-scale quantum information processing in diamond is the connection of nitrogen-vacancy spin registers by a quantum bus at room temperature. Given that diamond is expected to be an ideal spin transport material, the coherent transport of spin directly between the spin registers offers a potential solution. Yet, there has been no demonstration of spin transport in diamond due to difficulties in achieving spin injection and detection via conventional methods. Here, we exploit detailed knowledge of the paramagnetic defects in diamond to identify novel mechanisms to photoionize, transport, and capture spin-polarized electrons in diamond at room temperature. Having identified these mechanisms, we explore how they may be combined to realize an on-chip spin quantum bus.

  19. Effect of short-term room temperature storage on the microbial community in infant fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Li, Sheng-Hui; Kuang, Ya-Shu; He, Jian-Rong; Lu, Jin-Hua; Luo, Bei-Jun; Jiang, Feng-Ju; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Papasian, Christopher J.; Xia, Hui-Min; Deng, Hong-Wen; Qiu, Xiu

    2016-01-01

    Sample storage conditions are important for unbiased analysis of microbial communities in metagenomic studies. Specifically, for infant gut microbiota studies, stool specimens are often exposed to room temperature (RT) conditions prior to analysis. This could lead to variations in structural and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities. To estimate such effects of RT storage, we collected feces from 29 healthy infants (0–3 months) and partitioned each sample into 5 portions to be stored for different lengths of time at RT before freezing at −80 °C. Alpha diversity did not differ between samples with storage time from 0 to 2 hours. The UniFrac distances and microbial composition analysis showed significant differences by testing among individuals, but not by testing between different time points at RT. Changes in the relative abundance of some specific (less common, minor) taxa were still found during storage at room temperature. Our results support previous studies in children and adults, and provided useful information for accurate characterization of infant gut microbiomes. In particular, our study furnished a solid foundation and justification for using fecal samples exposed to RT for less than 2 hours for comparative analyses between various medical conditions. PMID:27226242

  20. Sliding friction and wear behavior of high entropy alloys at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, Dheyaa

    Structure-tribological property relations have been studied for five high entropy alloys (HEAs). Microhardness, room and elevated (100°C and 300°C) temperature sliding friction coefficients and wear rates were determined for five HEAs: Co0.5 Cr Cu0.5 Fe Ni1.5 Al Ti0.4; Co Cr Fe Ni Al0.25 Ti0.75; Ti V Nb Cr Al; Al0.3CoCrFeNi; and Al0.3CuCrFeNi2. Wear surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy to determine the wear mechanisms and tribochemical phases, respectively. It was determined that the two HEAs Co0.5 Cr Cu0.5 Fe Ni1.5 Al Ti0.4 and Ti V Nb Cr Al exhibit an excellent balance of high hardness, low friction coefficients and wear rates compared to 440C stainless steel, a currently used bearing steel. This was attributed to their more ductile body centered cubic (BCC) solid solution phase along with the formation of tribochemical Cr oxide and Nb oxide phases, respectively, in the wear surfaces. This study provides guidelines for fabricating novel, low-friction, and wear-resistant HEAs for potential use at room and elevated temperatures, which will help reduce energy and material losses in friction and wear applications.

  1. Thermomechanical analysis of Natural Rubber behaviour stressed at room temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caborgan, R.; Muracciole, J. M.; Wattrisse, B.; Chrysochoos, A.

    2010-06-01

    Owing to their high molecular mobility, stressed rubber chains can easily change their conformations and get orientated. This phenomena leads to so high reversible draw ratio that this behaviour is called rubber elasticity [1-3]. The analogy with ideal gases leads to an internal energy independent of elongation, the stress being attributed to a so-called configuration entropy. However, this analysis cannot take thermal expansion into account and moreover prohibits predicting standard thermo-elastic effect noticed at small elongations and the thermoelastic inversion effects [4]. This paper aims at : observing and quantifying dissipative and coupling effects associated with deformation energy, generated when Natural Rubber is stretched. re-examine the thermomechanical behaviour model of rubberlike materials, under the generalised standard material concept. From an experimental viewpoint, energy balance is created using infrared and quantitative imaging techniques. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) provides in-the-plane displacement fields and, after derivation, strain and strain-rate fields. We have used those techniques to evidence the thermoelastic inversion effect as shown on Figure 1 where different weights have been fixed to warmed specimen and we monitored the sample deformation while it recovers room temperature. But we have also used those techniques to perform energy balance : analysis of the mechanical equilibrium allows estimates of the stress pattern and computation of deformation energy rates under a plane stress hypothesis [5]. Infrared Thermography (IRT) gives the surface temperature of the sample. To estimate the distribution of heat sources, image processing with a local heat equation and a minimal set of approximation functions (image filtering) was used. The time courses of deformation energy and heat associated with cyclic process are plotted in

  2. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S.; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A.; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T.; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M.; Glownia, James M.; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S.; Lane, Thomas J.; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E.; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Waterman, David G.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment-protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction center with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) (Fig. 1a, Extended Data Fig. 1). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4)1, where S1 is the dark stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution2,3. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and elucidating the structures of the OEC in the different S-states, as well as the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site4-6, is a prerequisite for this purpose. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage free, room temperature (RT) structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å structure of PS II7 at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, RT measurements are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions8,9, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analog, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states10. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site10-13. Thus, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms. PMID:27871088

  3. A moment model for phonon transport at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Struchtrup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Heat transfer in solids is modeled by deriving the macroscopic equations for phonon transport from the phonon-Boltzmann equation. In these equations, the Callaway model with frequency-dependent relaxation time is considered to describe the Resistive and Normal processes in the phonon interactions. Also, the Brillouin zone is considered to be a sphere, and its diameter depends on the temperature of the system. A simple model to describe phonon interaction with crystal boundary is employed to obtain macroscopic boundary conditions, where the reflection kernel is the superposition of diffusive reflection, specular reflection and isotropic scattering. Macroscopic moments are defined using a polynomial of the frequency and wave vector of phonons. As an example, a system of moment equations, consisting of three directional and seven frequency moments, i.e., 63 moments in total, is used to study one-dimensional heat transfer, as well as Poiseuille flow of phonons. Our results show the importance of frequency dependency in relaxation times and macroscopic moments to predict rarefaction effects. Good agreement with data reported in the literature is obtained.

  4. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  5. Development of a room-temperature phosphorescence fiber-optic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Campiglia, A.D.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1996-05-01

    The design of a new fiber optic sensor based on solid-surface room temperature phosphorimetry is presented for the analyses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. Analytical figures of merit are given for several compounds of environmental importance. Limits of detection at the nanograms per milliliter level were estimated for pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, 1,2:3,4-dibenzanthracene, coronene, and 2,3-benzofluorene. The linearity of response of the phosphorescence sensor was evaluated, showing a fairly linear behavior for quantitative analysis. Finally, the feasibility of monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous media was illustrated by identifying pyrene in a contaminated ground water sample. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Graphene field-effect transistors as room-temperature terahertz detectors.

    PubMed

    Vicarelli, L; Vitiello, M S; Coquillat, D; Lombardo, A; Ferrari, A C; Knap, W; Polini, M; Pellegrini, V; Tredicucci, A

    2012-10-01

    The unique optoelectronic properties of graphene make it an ideal platform for a variety of photonic applications, including fast photodetectors, transparent electrodes in displays and photovoltaic modules, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, microcavities, and ultra-fast lasers. Owing to its high carrier mobility, gapless spectrum and frequency-independent absorption, graphene is a very promising material for the development of detectors and modulators operating in the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths in the hundreds of micrometres), still severely lacking in terms of solid-state devices. Here we demonstrate terahertz detectors based on antenna-coupled graphene field-effect transistors. These exploit the nonlinear response to the oscillating radiation field at the gate electrode, with contributions of thermoelectric and photoconductive origin. We demonstrate room temperature operation at 0.3 THz, showing that our devices can already be used in realistic settings, enabling large-area, fast imaging of macroscopic samples.

  7. Trapping of hydrogen atoms in X-irradiated salts at room temperature and the decay kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The salts (hypophosphites, formates, a phosphite, a phosphate, and an oxalate) were X-irradiated, whereby hydrogen formed chemically by a radiolytic process becomes trapped in the solid. By room temperature vacuum extraction, the kinetics for the evolution of this trapped hydrogen was studied mass spectrometrically. All salts except two exhibited second-order kinetics. The two exceptions (NaH2PO2(H2O) and K2HPO4) showed first-order kinetics. Based on experimental results, the escape of hydrogen involves three steps: the diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the bulk to the surface, association of these atoms on the surface (rate controlling step for second-order hydrogen evolution), and the desorption of molecular hydrogen from the surface. The hydrogen does not escape if the irradiated salt is stored in air, apparently because adsorbed air molecules occupy surface sites required in the escape mechanism.

  8. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel.

  9. Reversible mechanochromic luminescence at room temperature in cationic platinum(II) terpyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Han, Ali; Du, Pingwu; Sun, Zijun; Wu, Haotian; Jia, Hongxing; Zhang, Rui; Liang, Zhenning; Cao, Rui; Eisenberg, Richard

    2014-04-07

    Reversible mechanochromic luminescence in cationic platinum(II) terpyridyl complexes is described. The complexes [Pt(Nttpy)Cl]X2 (Nttpy = 4'-(p-nicotinamide-N-methylphenyl)-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine, X = PF6 (1), SbF6 (2), Cl (3), ClO4 (4), OTf (5), BF4 (6)) exhibit different colors under ambient light in the solid state, going from red to orange to yellow. All of these complexes are brightly luminescent at both room temperature and 77 K. Upon gentle grinding, the yellow complexes (4-6) turn orange and exhibit bright red luminescence. The red luminescence can be changed back to yellow by the addition of a few drops of acetonitrile to the sample. Crystallographic studies of the yellow and red forms of complex 5 suggest that the mechanochromic response is likely the result of a change in intermolecular Pt···Pt distances upon grinding.

  10. Thiocarboxylate Organic Electrodes for Ultrahigh Capacity Room Temperature Sodium Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyang; Wang, Jianwei; Zheng, Yuheng; Li, Ju; Han, Xiaogang; He, Gang; Du, Yaping

    2017-10-05

    Organic room temperature sodium ion battery electrodes with carboxylate and carbonyl groups have been widely studied. Herein, for the first time, we report a family of sodium ion battery electrodes with stepwise substitution of oxygen in carboxylate group with sulfur, which improves electron delocalization, electrical conductivity and sodium uptake capacity. The versatile strategy based on molecular engineering can greatly enhance the specific capacity of organic electrodes with the same carbon scaffold. By introducing two sulfur atoms to a single carboxylate scaffold, the molecular solid can reach a reversible capacity of 466 mAh g-1 at current density of 50 mA g-1, when four sulfur atoms are introduced, the capacity increases to 567 mAh g-1 at current density of 50 mA g-1, which is the highest capacity value among reported organic sodium ion battery anodes until now. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coherent control of single spins in silicon carbide at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Rendler, Torsten; Son, Nguyen Tien; Fedder, Helmut; Paik, Seoyoung; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Sen; Booker, Ian; Denisenko, Andrej; Jamali, Mohammad; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Gerhardt, Ilja; Ohshima, Takeshi; Gali, Adam; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Spins in solids are cornerstone elements of quantum spintronics. Leading contenders such as defects in diamond or individual phosphorus dopants in silicon have shown spectacular progress, but either lack established nanotechnology or an efficient spin/photon interface. Silicon carbide (SiC) combines the strength of both systems: it has a large bandgap with deep defects and benefits from mature fabrication techniques. Here, we report the characterization of photoluminescence and optical spin polarization from single silicon vacancies in SiC, and demonstrate that single spins can be addressed at room temperature. We show coherent control of a single defect spin and find long spin coherence times under ambient conditions. Our study provides evidence that SiC is a promising system for atomic-scale spintronics and quantum technology.

  12. How surface interactions freeze polymer molecules at room temperature: a single molecule approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F. L.; Valente, G. T.; Faria, R. M.; Guimarães, F. E. G.

    2015-11-01

    The planar conformation assumed by polyfluorenes is used as a model system to investigate how solid surfaces interact with an individual polymer chain as well as to access the effects of substrates and interchain interactions on the polymer conformation. We demonstrate that confocal fluorescence microscopy is very sensitive to characterize photophysical processes associated to conformation assumed by a single conjugated unit of poly (9,9 dioctylfluorene) or PFO. Emissions from interacting molecules have been resolved for the first time between the energies of the planar (β phase) and the non-planar (amorphous) phase that were associated to perturbations of the primary chain conformation. But we have found the planar conformation is assumed by single PFO molecules due to strong interactions with the hydrophilic quartz surfaces. This PFO conformation persists frozen even at room temperature, although emission lines are significantly broadened due to interactions with vibrating substrate atoms.

  13. Stability of headspace volatiles in a ‘Fallglo’ tangerine juice matrix system at room temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gas chromatography systems are usually equipped with autosamplers. Samples held in the autosampler tray can stay up to one day or longer at room temperature, if the tray is not equipped with a cooling mechanism. The objective of this research was to determine if holding samples at room temperature i...

  14. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  15. High Pressure Behavior of Zircon at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, H. J.; Rocholl, A.

    2016-12-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO4, is an ubiquitous mineral in the Earth's crust, forming under a wide range of metamorphic and igneous conditions. Its high content in certain trace elements (REE, Hf, Th, U) and due to its isotopic information, together with its chemical and physical robustness makes zircon an unique geochemical tool and geochronometer. Despite its geological importance there is a disagreement regarding the responds of zircon to elevated pressure, especially about the commencement of a pressure - induced structural phase transition. At elevated pressure zircon (I41/amd) undergoes a pressure induced phase transition to the scheelite structure (I41/a) . In the low pressure and high pressure phase, the (SiO4)4- tetrahedral units are present. However, the onset of the phase transition at room temperature is not well defined: zircon - scheelite transitions have been reported in a pressure regime ranging from 20 to 30 GPa (e.g. Ono et al., 2004). To clarify this issue, we performed Raman spectroscopy measurement up to 60 GPa on a non-metamict single crystal zircon sample (reference material 91500; Wiedenbeck et al., 1995; Wiedenbeck et al., 2004). A closer look at the external lattice modes at 201 cm-1 shows a decreasing of the wavenumbers with increasing pressure up to 21 GPa followed by a steep increase. The lattice modes at 213 and 224 cm-1 also exhibit a subtle kink in this pressure range. This pressure coincides with that one reported for the zircon - scheelite transition (van Westrenen et al., 2004). Another interesting issue is the behavior of the internal modes at higher pressures. The ν3 stretching modes at about 1000 cm-1show distinct discontinuities at 31 GPa accompanied by the emerging of new features in the Raman spectrum suggesting another, pressure triggered modification in the zircon structure. References: Ono, Funakoshi, Nakajima, Tange, and Katsura (2004) Contr. Mineral. Petrol., 147, 505-509. Van Westrenen, Frank, Hanchar, Fei, Finch, and Zha (2004

  16. Simple guanidinium salts revisited: room-temperature ferroelectricity in hydrogen-bonded supramolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Szafrański, Marek

    2011-07-14

    Dielectric, calorimetric, and X-ray diffraction methods have been employed to characterize the crystals of guanidinium tetrafluoroborate and guanidinium perchlorate, both built of two-dimensional honeycomb hydrogen-bonded sheets. The room-temperature ferroelectricity of these isosymmetric complexes (space group R3m) has been evidenced by the polarization switching in an external electric field and pyroelectric effect. The analysis of structural data as a function of temperature showed that the high values of spontaneous polarization of about 8.5 μC cm(-2) originate mainly from the ionic displacements, while the exceptional thermally induced increase of polarization is related with the apparent weakening of the N-H···F/N-H···O hydrogen bonds at elevated temperatures. An excellent correlation between the donor-acceptor distance and the relative displacement of the ions in the crystal lattice along the polar direction has been found. The huge entropy change at the two-closely spaced high-temperature phase transitions in guanidinium perchlorate, together with the large crystal polarization, suggest a large electrocaloric effect, the property strongly desired for solid-state cooling applications.

  17. Positronium bubble oscillation in room temperature ionic liquids-Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirade, T.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependent oscillation of the ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate was successfully observed for a room temperature ionic liquid (IL), N,N,N-trimethyl-N- propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI). The fundamental frequencies at 25C and 30C were 5.85GHz and 4.00GHz, respectively. The decay of the oscillation was faster at higher temperature, 30C. Moreover, the higher harmonic frequencies could explain the change of ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate successfully. The macroscopic viscosity of the IL could not explain the appearance of the oscillation. It indicated that the positron annihilation methods were very strong tools to study the properties of IL's in sub-nanometer scale that must be very different from the macroscopic properties.

  18. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  19. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a) a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt), (b) no additional substances and (c) garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing. PMID:21846338

  20. A STUDY ON ASH PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION CHARACTERISITICS OF CANDLE FILTER SURFACE REGENERATION AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, V.; Kang, B.S-J.; Johnson, E.K.

    2002-09-19

    Ceramic barrier filtration is a leading technology employed in hot gas filtration. Hot gases loaded with ash particle flow through the ceramic candle filters and deposit ash on their outer surface. The deposited ash is periodically removed using back pulse cleaning jet, known as surface regeneration. The cleaning done by this technique still leaves some residual ash on the filter surface, which over a period of time sinters, forms a solid cake and leads to mechanical failure of the candle filter. A room temperature testing facility (RTTF) was built to gain more insight into the surface regeneration process before testing commenced at high temperature. RTTF was instrumented to obtain pressure histories during the surface regeneration process and a high-resolution high-speed imaging system was integrated in order to obtain pictures of the surface regeneration process. The objective of this research has been to utilize the RTTF to study the surface regeneration process at the convenience of room temperature conditions. The face velocity of the fluidized gas, the regeneration pressure of the back pulse and the time to build up ash on the surface of the candle filter were identified as the important parameters to be studied. Two types of ceramic candle filters were used in the study. Each candle filter was subjected to several cycles of ash build-up followed by a thorough study of the surface regeneration process at different parametric conditions. The pressure histories in the chamber and filter system during build-up and regeneration were then analyzed. The size distribution and movement of the ash particles during the surface regeneration process was studied. Effect of each of the parameters on the performance of the regeneration process is presented. A comparative study between the two candle filters with different characteristics is presented.

  1. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA PS400 is a solid lubricant coating invented for high-temperature tribological applications. This plasma-sprayed coating is a variant of the previously patented PS304 coating, and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish, and better dimensional stability. This innovation is a new composite material that provides a means to reduce friction and wear in mechanical components. PS400 is a blend of a nickel-molybdenum binder, chrome oxide hardener, silver lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic lubricant that can either be sprayed or deposited by other means, such as powder metallurgy. The resulting composite material is then finished by grinding and polishing to produce a smooth, self-lubricating surface.

  2. Photoswitching of glass transition temperatures of azobenzene-containing polymers induces reversible solid-to-liquid transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xue, Changguo; Weis, Philipp; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Huang, Shilin; Koynov, Kaloian; Auernhammer, Günter K.; Berger, Rüdiger; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Wu, Si

    2016-10-01

    The development of polymers with switchable glass transition temperatures (Tg) can address scientific challenges such as the healing of cracks in high-Tg polymers and the processing of hard polymers at room temperature without using plasticizing solvents. Here, we demonstrate that light can switch the Tg of azobenzene-containing polymers (azopolymers) and induce reversible solid-to-liquid transitions of the polymers. The azobenzene groups in the polymers exhibit reversible cis-trans photoisomerization abilities. Trans azopolymers are solids with Tg above room temperature, whereas cis azopolymers are liquids with Tg below room temperature. Because of the photoinduced solid-to-liquid transitions of these polymers, light can reduce the surface roughness of azopolymer films by almost 600%, repeatedly heal cracks in azopolymers, and control the adhesion of azopolymers for transfer printing. The photoswitching of Tg provides a new strategy for designing healable polymers with high Tg and allows for control over the mechanical properties of polymers with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. The deformation and fracture characteristics of inconel X-750 at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. J.

    1980-06-01

    Electron fractographic and thin foil electron metallographic techniques were used to evaluate the deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at temperatures ranging from 24 to 816 °C. Operative dislocation mechanisms and fracture surface morphologies were related to the overall tensile response of this nickel-base superalloy. At room temperature, failure occurred primarily by an intergranular dimple rupture mechanism associated with microvoid coalescence along grain boundary denuded regions. A fairly high density of dislocations throughout the matrix resulted in relatively high ductility levels even though failure occurred by an intergranular mechanism. Under intermediate temperature conditions (316 to 427 °C), increased transgranular fracture coupled with extensive dislocation activity within the Inconel X-750 matrix caused a slight increase in ductility. At progressively higher temperatures, 538 to 704 °C, all dislocation activity was channeled through narrow slip bands which subsequently initiated localized separation and resulted in a very faceted fracture surface appearance. The absence of a homogeneous dislocation substructure in this temperature regime resulted in a severe degradation in ductility levels. At the highest test temperature (816 °C), a uniform dislocation network throughout the Inconel X-750 matrix coupled with intense dislocation activity in the grain boundary denuded zone resulted in a marked improvement in ductility. Furthermore, the extensive dislocation activity along grain boundary regions ultimately resulted in an intergranular fracture morphology.

  4. Substrate Temperature Effects on Room Temperature Sensing Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jonnala Rakesh; Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Shankar, Prabakaran; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using chemical spray pyrolysis technique at different substrate temperatures such as 523, 623 and 723 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of polycrystalline films with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and revealed the change in preferential orientation of the crystal planes. Scanning electron micrographs showed the formation of uniformly distributed spherical shaped grains at low deposition temperature and pebbles like structure at the higher temperature. Transmittance of 85% was observed for the film deposited at 723 K. The band gap of the films was found to be increased from 3.15 to 3.23 eV with a rise in deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films was found to be improved with an increase in substrate temperature. Surface of ZnO thin films deposited at 523 K, 623 K and 723 K were found to be hydrophobic with the contact angles of 92°, 105° and 128° respectively. The room temperature gas sensing characteristics of all the films were studied and found that the film deposited at 623 K showed a better response towards ammonia vapour.

  5. Nano-structured TiO(2) film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2008-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO(2) thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers.

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Magnetic control of large room-temperature polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, G. L.; Katiyar, R. S.; Pirc, R.; Blinc, R.; Scott, J. F.

    2009-09-01

    Numerous authors have referred to room-temperature magnetic switching of large electric polarizations as 'the Holy Grail' of magnetoelectricity. We report this long-sought effect, obtained using a new physical process of coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric nanoregions. Solid state solutions of PFW [Pb(Fe2/3W1/3)O3] and PZT [Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3] exhibit some bi-relaxor qualities, with both ferroelectric relaxor characteristics and magnetic relaxor phenomena. Near 20% PFW the ferroelectric relaxor state is nearly unstable at room temperature against long-range ferroelectricity. Here we report magnetic switching between the normal ferroelectric state and a magnetically quenched ferroelectric state that resembles relaxors. This gives both a new room-temperature, single-phase, multiferroic magnetoelectric, (PbFe0.67W0.33O3)0.2(PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3)0.8 ('0.2PFW/0.8PZT'), with polarization, loss (<1%), and resistivity (typically 108-109 Ω cm) equal to or superior to those of BiFeO3, and also a new and very large magnetoelectric effect: switching not from +Pr to -Pr with applied H, but from Pr to zero with applied H of less than a tesla. This switching of the polarization occurs not because of a conventional magnetically induced phase transition, but because of dynamic effects: increasing H lengthens the relaxation time by 500 × from<200 ns to>100 µs, and it strongly couples the polarization relaxation and spin relaxations. The diverging polarization relaxation time accurately fits a modified Vogel-Fulcher equation in which the freezing temperature Tf is replaced by a critical freezing field Hf that is 0.92 ± 0.07 T. This field dependence and the critical field Hc are derived analytically from the spherical random bond random field model with no adjustable parameters and an E2H2 coupling. This device permits three-state logic (+Pr,0,-Pr) and a condenser with >5000% magnetic field change in its capacitance; for H = 0 the coercive voltage is 1.4 V across 300 nm for

  7. Demonstration of a room temperature 2.48-2.75 THz coherent spectroscopy source.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John C; Drouin, Brian J; Maestrini, Alain; Mehdi, Imran; Ward, John; Lin, Robert H; Yu, Shanshan; Gill, John J; Thomas, Bertrand; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Maiwald, Frank W; Goldsmith, Paul F; Siegel, Peter

    2011-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of a continuous wave coherent source covering 2.48-2.75 THz, with greater than 10% instantaneous tuning bandwidth and having 1-14 μW of output power at room temperature. This source is based on a 91.8-101.8 GHz synthesizer followed by a power amplifier and three cascaded frequency triplers. It demonstrates for the first time that purely electronic solid-state sources can generate a useful amount of power in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum where lasers (solid state or gas) were previously the only available coherent sources. The bandwidth, agility, and operability of this THz source have enabled wideband, high resolution spectroscopic measurements of water, methanol, and carbon monoxide with a resolution and signal-to-noise ratio unmatched by any other existing system, providing new insight in the physics of these molecules. Furthermore, the power and optical beam quality are high enough to observe the Lamb-dip effect in water. The source frequency has an absolute accuracy better than 1 part in 10(12) and the spectrometer achieves sub-Doppler frequency resolution better than 1 part in 10(8). The harmonic purity is better than 25 dB. This source can serve as a coherent signal for absorption spectroscopy, a local oscillator for a variety of heterodyne systems and can be used as a method for precision control of more powerful but much less frequency agile quantum mechanical terahertz sources.

  8. A new class of room-temperature multiferroic thin films with bismuth-based supercell structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Zhou, Honghui; Bi, Zhenxing; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Zhiping; Bayraktaroglu, Adrian; Phillips, Jamie; Choi, Eun-Mi; Macmanus-Driscoll, Judith L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Narayan, Jagdish; Jia, Quanxi; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-02-20

    Intergrowth of two partially miscible phases of BiFeO(3) and BiMnO(3) gives a new class of room-temperature multiferroic phase, Bi(3) Fe(2) Mn(2) O(10+δ) , which has a unique supercell (SC) structure. The SC heterostructures exhibit simultaneously room-temperature ferrimagnetism and remanent polarization. These results open up a new avenue for exploring room-temperature single-phase multiferroic thin films by controlling the phase mixing of two perovskite BiRO(3) (R = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) materials.

  9. Room-Temperature Formation of Highly Crystalline Multication Perovskites for Efficient, Low-Cost Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Taisuke; Seo, Ji-Youn; Saliba, Michael; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2017-04-01

    A room-temperature perovskite material yielding a power conversion efficiency of 18.1% (stabilized at 17.7%) is demonstrated by judicious selection of cations. Both cesium and methylammonium are necessary for room-temperature formamidinium-based perovskite to obtain the photoactive crystalline perovskite phase and high-quality crystals. This room-temperature-made perovskite material shows great potential for low-cost, large-scale manufacturing such as roll-to-roll processing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Existence of the multiferroic property at room temperature in Ti doped CoFeO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, G. D.; Joshi, Amish G.; Kevin, H.; Shahi, P.; Kumar, A.; Ghosh, A. K.; Yang, H. D.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of ferroelectricity has been observed in magnetically ordered Co(Fe1-xTix)2O4 at room temperature. Magnetization and dielectric constant is found to increase with Ti doping. It is observed from an X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy study that Ti goes to the octahedral site with (+4) ionic state. An M-H hysteresis curve at room temperature shows the ferrimagnetic ordering and a P-E loop at room temperature clearly indicates the existence of ferroelectricity.

  11. The room-temperature shapes of four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear extension of classical lamination theory developed by Hyer (1981) for predicting the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates is reformulated using relaxed restrictions regarding the inplane strains. The inplane residual strains of unsymmetric laminates which have cooled from curing into a cylindrical room-temperature shape are examined numerically. Results show that the residual strains are compressive and practically independent of spatial location on the laminate. In addition, the room temperature shapes of the four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates are predicted, and it is shown that the temperature shapes are a strong function of their size and their stacking arrangement. It is demonstrated that, depending on the parameters selected, the room-temperature shape of a four-layer cross-ply unsymmetric laminate can be a unique saddle shape, a unique cylindrical shape, or a cylindrical shape that can be snapped through to another cylindrical shape.

  12. Measurement of damping in solid materials by means of a room acoustical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouis, Djamel

    1999-12-01

    A technique is presented here which helps predicting the presence of strength weakening defects in solid material elements. This technique is used in room acoustics to evaluate the Reverberation Time, RT, of rooms, a quantity that describes the rate of decay of the sound level, and which is inversely proportional to the amount of absorption in the room. However, as sound is caused by the vibration of air particles, the use of the notion of RT may then be extended to the study of any vibrating system. In fact, the physical properties of every solid material may be characterized by among others the modulus of elasticity, MOE, and studies from the dispersion curves of materials reveal that the dynamic MOE is not only frequency dependent but it is also related to the loss factor of the material. This latter gives a measure of the proportion of the vibrational energy that is dissipated during one cycle of vibration and, in analogy with a room, it gives an estimate of the amount of damping present in the material. Hence, interest is put in this study on the damping characteristics of the material in terms of the loss factor which is inversely proportional to the RT. The reverberation time may be assessed relatively easily and rapidly from the impulse response of the test specimen as measured with the help of a smart technique. The example of a wood beam-like specimen with artificial defects simulating the presence of rot is presented. The results of the experiments conducted in both the longitudinal and the bending modes of vibration confirm earlier findings on wood, namely that the damping increases whereas the value of the MOE decreases at the introduction of structural defects. Measurements are found to be more attractive in the longitudinal mode. This preliminary study is intended to open the possibilities for applications to materials with properties better behaved than those of wood.

  13. Light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting: searching room for improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Sergey Y.

    2016-03-01

    State-of-the art light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for solid-state lighting (SSL) are reviewed with the focus on their efficiency and ways for its improvement. Mechanisms of the LED efficiency losses are considered on the heterostructure, chip, and device levels, including high-current efficiency droop, recombination losses, "green gap", current crowding, Stokes losses, etc. Materials factors capable of lowering the LED efficiency, like composition fluctuations in InGaN alloys and plastic stress relaxation in device heterostructures, are also considered. Possible room for the efficiency improvement is discussed along with advanced schemes of color mixing and LED parameters optimal for generation of high-quality white light.

  14. Designing switchable polarization and magnetization at room temperature in an oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P.; Pitcher, M. J.; Alaria, J.; Niu, H.; Borisov, P.; Stamenov, P.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials exhibit long-range order of atomic-scale electric or magnetic dipoles that can be switched by applying an appropriate electric or magnetic field, respectively. Both switching phenomena form the basis of non-volatile random access memory, but in the ferroelectric case, this involves destructive electrical reading and in the magnetic case, a high writing energy is required. In principle, low-power and high-density information storage that combines fast electrical writing and magnetic reading can be realized with magnetoelectric multiferroic materials. These materials not only simultaneously display ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, but also enable magnetic moments to be induced by an external electric field, or electric polarization by a magnetic field. However, synthesizing bulk materials with both long-range orders at room temperature in a single crystalline structure is challenging because conventional ferroelectricity requires closed-shell d0 or s2 cations, whereas ferromagnetic order requires open-shell dn configurations with unpaired electrons. These opposing requirements pose considerable difficulties for atomic-scale design strategies such as magnetic ion substitution into ferroelectrics. One material that exhibits both ferroelectric and magnetic order is BiFeO3, but its cycloidal magnetic structure precludes bulk magnetization and linear magnetoelectric coupling. A solid solution of a ferroelectric and a spin-glass perovskite combines switchable polarization with glassy magnetization, although it lacks long-range magnetic order. Crystal engineering of a layered perovskite has recently resulted in room-temperature polar ferromagnets, but the electrical polarization has not been switchable. Here we combine ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism at room temperature in a bulk perovskite oxide, by constructing a percolating network of magnetic ions with strong superexchange interactions within a structural scaffold

  15. Non-contact temperature field measurement of solids by infrared multispectral thermotransmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradere, C.; Ryu, M.; Sommier, A.; Romano, M.; Kusiak, A.; Battaglia, J. L.; Batsale, J. C.; Morikawa, J.

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to achieve contactless absolute-temperature measurements of infrared-semi-transparent solids using an infrared thermal and spectroscopic imaging technique. The multispectral thermo-transmittance coefficient fields in the 3-5 μm wavelength range for Sapphire, KBr, and Silicon are determined to be 6 × 10-4 K-1, 4 × 10-4 K-1, and -3 × 10-3 K-1, respectively. The most interesting result is the high temperature-dependent transmittance coefficient in the middle wave infrared region. With these coefficients, the absolute temperature fields in a range from room temperature to 140 °C are shown.

  16. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; ...

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  17. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; Mays, Jimmy; Wang, Weiyu; White, Benjamin T.

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffine tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.

  18. Direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag for CO2 sequestration at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Rushendra Revathy, T D; Palanivelu, K; Ramachandran, A

    2016-04-01

    Rapid increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has forced the international community towards adopting actions to restrain from the impacts of climate change. Moreover, in India, the dependence on fossil fuels is projected to increase in the future, implying the necessity of capturing CO2 in a safe manner. Alkaline solid wastes can be utilized for CO2 sequestration by which its disposal issues in the country could also be met. The present work focuses to study direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag (SS) at room temperature and low-pressure conditions (<10 bar). Direct mineral carbonation of SS was carried out in a batch reactor with pure CO2 gas. The process parameters that may influence the carbonation of SS, namely, CO2 gas pressure, liquid to solid ratio (L/S) and reaction time were also studied. The results showed that maximum sequestration of SS was attained in the aqueous route with a capacity of 82 g of CO2/kg (6 bar, L/S ratio of 10 and 3 h). In the gas-solid route, maximum sequestration capacity of about 11.1 g of CO2/kg of SS (3 bar and 3 h) was achieved indicating that aqueous route is the better one under the conditions studied. These findings demonstrate that SS is a promising resource and this approach could be further developed and used for CO2 sequestration in the country. The carbonation process was evidenced using FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TG analysis.

  19. Room temperature operation of GaSb-based resonant tunneling diodes by prewell injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Knebl, Georg; Hartmann, Fabian; Weih, Robert; Bader, Andreas; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    We present room temperature resonant tunneling of GaSb/AlAsSb double barrier resonant tunneling diodes with pseudomorphically grown prewell emitter structures comprising the ternary compound semiconductors GaInSb and GaAsSb. At room temperature, resonant tunneling is absent for diode structures without prewell emitters. The incorporation of Ga0.84In0.16Sb and GaAs0.05Sb0.95 prewell emitters leads to room temperature resonant tunneling with peak-to-valley current ratios of 1.45 and 1.36 , respectively. The room temperature operation is attributed to the enhanced Γ-L-valley energy separation and consequently depopulation of L-valley states in the conduction band of the ternary compound emitter prewell with respect to bulk GaSb.

  20. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  1. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK AND TEMPLATE-FREE SYNTHESIS OF LEUCOEMARLDINE POLYANILINE NANOFIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe a simple strategy for the bulk and template-free synthesis of reduced leucoemarldine polyaniline nanofibers size ranging from as low as 10 nm to 50 nm without the use of any reducing agents at room temperature.

  2. Branched quaternary ammonium amphiphiles: nematic ionic liquid crystals near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Li, Bao; Zhang, Mingliang; Wu, Lixin

    2009-09-21

    Branched quaternary ammonium molecules were synthesized and characterized by calorimetric, optical and X-ray diffraction studies; two of the molecules exhibited interesting nematic liquid crystalline behavior close to room temperature.

  3. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK AND TEMPLATE-FREE SYNTHESIS OF LEUCOEMARLDINE POLYANILINE NANOFIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe a simple strategy for the bulk and template-free synthesis of reduced leucoemarldine polyaniline nanofibers size ranging from as low as 10 nm to 50 nm without the use of any reducing agents at room temperature.

  4. Red photoluminescence of living systems at the room temperature : measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, I. S.; Rud, V. Yu; Shpunt, V. Ch; Rud, Yu V.; Glinushkin, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Presents results of a study of the red luminescence of living plants at room temperature. The analysis of obtained results allows to conclude that the photoluminescence spectra for green leaves in all cases represent the two closely spaced bands.

  5. Copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalyzed ring-opening reaction of epoxides with alcohols at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Barluenga, José; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Ballesteros, Alfredo; González, José M

    2002-08-22

    [reaction: see text] Efficient ring opening of different epoxides by reaction with representative alcohols is presented. These processes were carried out at room temperature and rely on the usefulness of commercial copper tetrafluoroborate as catalyst.

  6. III-V compound semiconductor multi-junction solar cells fabricated by room-temperature wafer-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimochi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tomomasa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Tange, Takashi; Nomachi, Ichiro; Ikeda, Masao; Dai, Pan; He, Wei; Ji, Lian; Lu, Shulong; Yang, Hui; Uchida, Shiro

    2015-05-01

    We have developed III-V compound semiconductor multi-junction solar cells by a room-temperature wafer-bonding technique to avoid the formation of dislocations and voids due to lattice mismatch and thermal damage during a conventional high-temperature wafer-bonding process. First, we separately grew an (Al)GaAs top cell on a GaAs substrate and an InGaAs bottom cell on an InP substrate by metal solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Thereafter, we successfully bonded these sub-cells by the room-temperature wafer-bonding technique and fabricated (Al)GaAs ∥ InGaAs wafer-bonded solar cells. To the best of our knowledge, the obtained GaAs ∥ InGaAs and AlGaAs ∥ InGaAs wafer-bonded solar cells exhibited the lowest electrical and optical losses ever reported. The AlGaAs ∥ InGaAs solar cells reached the maximum efficiency of 27.7% at 120 suns. These results suggest that the room-temperature wafer-bonding technique has high potential for achieving higher conversion efficiencies.

  7. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.

  8. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; ...

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.« less

  9. Room-Temperature Plasticity in ZrC: Role of Crystal Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratsch, Christian; Kiani, S.; Minor, A. M.; Kodambaka, S.; Yang, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    NaCl structure Group IV and V transition-metal carbides are hard, stiff, and high-melting solids with excellent wear, abrasion, and corrosion resistances, and are commonly used in advanced high-temperature structural applications. In this talk, we report results obtained from in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies and density functional theory calculations of uniaxial compression of ZrC(100) and ZrC(111) single crystals. In situ TEM observations show that dislocation motion and tangling lead to plastic deformation in ZrC(111), while slip along {110}<1-10>is dominant in ZrC(100). We find that the yield strengths of ZrC crystals increase with decreasing size. Interestingly, yield strengths of uniaxially compressed ZrC(111) crystals are lower than those of ZrC(100), unexpected for NaCl-structured compounds. Based upon density-functional theory calculations, we attribute the orientation-dependent yield strengths to relatively lower energy barrier for shear along {001}<1-10>compared to {110}<1-10>. Our results provide important insights into the effects of crystal size and orientation on room-temperature plasticity. We expect that similar phenomena are likely to exist in other cubic-structured transition-metal carbides and nitrides.

  10. Colossal Room-Temperature Electrocaloric Effect in Ferroelectric Polymer Nanocomposites Using Nanostructured Barium Strontium Titanates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Tiannan; Li, Qi; Chen, Long-Qing; Jiang, Shenglin; Wang, Qing

    2015-07-28

    The electrocaloric effect (ECE) refers to conversion of thermal to electrical energy of polarizable materials and could form the basis for the next-generation refrigeration and power technologies that are highly efficient and environmentally friendly. Ferroelectric materials such as ceramic and polymer films exhibit large ECEs, but each of these monolithic materials has its own limitations for practical cooling applications. In this work, nanosized barium strontium titanates with systematically varied morphologies have been prepared to form polymer nanocomposites with the ferroelectric polymer matrix. The solution-processed polymer nanocomposites exhibit an extraordinary room-temperature ECE via the synergistic combination of the high breakdown strength of a ferroelectric polymer matrix and the large change of polarization with temperature of ceramic nanofillers. It is found that a sizable ECE can be generated under both modest and high electric fields, and further enhanced greatly by tailoring the morphology of the ferroelectric nanofillers such as increasing the aspect ratio of the nanoinclusions. The effect of the geometry of the nanofillers on the dielectric permittivity, polarization, breakdown strength, ECE and crystallinity of the ferroelectric polymer has been systematically investigated. Simulations based on the phase-field model have been carried out to substantiate the experimental results. With the remarkable cooling energy density and refrigerant capacity, the polymer nanocomposites are promising for solid-state cooling applications.

  11. [Temperature and humidity monitoring system of imaging equipment room based on wireless network].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuejun; Yu, Kaijun

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless temperature and humidity control system for hospital's video room. The system realizes one to multiple communication using wireless communication module CC1020 and SHT11 as sensors, and then sets up the communication between system and the central station with serial communication controller MSCOMM. The system uses VISUAL C++ programming to realize the video room temperature and humidity alarm control. It is wireless, efficacious and manpower-efficient.

  12. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  13. Exploiting fast detectors to enter a new dimension in room-temperature crystallography.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robin L; Paterson, Neil; Axford, Danny; Aishima, Jun; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2014-05-01

    A departure from a linear or an exponential intensity decay in the diffracting power of protein crystals as a function of absorbed dose is reported. The observation of a lag phase raises the possibility of collecting significantly more data from crystals held at room temperature before an intolerable intensity decay is reached. A simple model accounting for the form of the intensity decay is reintroduced and is applied for the first time to high frame-rate room-temperature data collection.

  14. Microemulsions with an ionic liquid surfactant and room temperature ionic liquids as polar pseudo-phase.

    PubMed

    Zech, Oliver; Thomaier, Stefan; Bauduin, Pierre; Rück, Thomas; Touraud, Didier; Kunz, Werner

    2009-01-15

    In this investigation we present for the first time microemulsions comprising an ionic liquid as surfactant and a room-temperature ionic liquid as polar pseudo-phase. Microemulsions containing the long- chain ionic liquid1-hexadecyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([C16mim][Cl]) as surfactant, decanol as cosurfactant, dodecaneas continuous phase and room temperature ionic liquids (ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim

  15. Qualification of room-temperature-curing structural adhesives for use on JPL spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Alain; O'Donnell, Tim

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the comparative advantages of numerous room temperature-cure structural primers and adhesives applicable to spacecraft structures. The EA 9394 adhesive and BR 127 primer were chosen for use in all primary structure bonding on the Galileo spacecraft, in virtue of adequate room-temperature lap shear and peel strengths and superior mechanical properties above 200 F. EA 9394 also offers superior work life, shelf-life, and storage properties, by comparison with the EA 934 alternative.

  16. Room-Temperature, Near IR Fluorescence of High Optical Quality KTP (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    AFRL-SN-WP-TP-2007-109 ROOM-TEMPERATURE, NEAR IR FLUORESCENCE OF HIGH OPTICAL QUALITY KTP (POSTPRINT) S.M. Hegde, K.L. Schepler, R.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ROOM-TEMPERATURE, NEAR IR FLUORESCENCE OF HIGH OPTICAL QUALITY KTP (POSTPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62204F 5d...the peak fluorescence near 800nm. In addition, all samples showed a weaker secondary fluorescence band peaking near 600nm. A low fluorescence sample

  17. Ultralow-Noise Room-Temperature Quantum Memory for Polarization Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-09-01

    Here, we show an ultralow-noise regime of operation in a simple quantum memory in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. By modeling the quantum dynamics of four-level room-temperature atoms, we achieve fidelities >90 % for single-photon-level polarization qubits, surpassing any classical strategies exploiting the nonunitary memory efficiency. Additionally, we show experimental techniques capable of producing fidelities close to unity. Our results demonstrate the potential of simple, resource-moderate experimental room-temperature quantum devices.

  18. Electron transfer kinetics in photosynthetic reaction centers embedded in trehalose glasses: trapping of conformational substates at room temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Gerardo; Mallardi, Antonia; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Cordone, Lorenzo; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    We report on room temperature electron transfer in the reaction center (RC) complex purified from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The protein was embedded in trehalose-water systems of different trehalose/water ratios. This enabled us to get new insights on the relationship between RC conformational dynamics and long-range electron transfer. In particular, we measured the kinetics of electron transfer from the primary reduced quinone acceptor (Q(A)(-)) to the primary photo oxidized donor (P(+)), by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy, as a function of the matrix composition. The composition was evaluated either by weighing (liquid samples) or by near infrared spectroscopy (highly viscous or solid glasses). Deconvolution of the observed, nonexponential kinetics required a continuous spectrum of rate constants. The average rate constant ( = 8.7 s(-1) in a 28% (w/w) trehalose solution) increases smoothly by increasing the trehalose/water ratio. In solid glasses, at trehalose/water ratios > or = 97%, an abrupt increase is observed ( = 26.6 s(-1) in the driest solid sample). A dramatic broadening of the rate distribution function parallels the above sudden increase. Both effects fully revert upon rehydration of the glass. We compared the kinetics observed at room temperature in extensively dried water-trehalose matrices with the ones measured in glycerol-water mixtures at cryogenic temperatures and conclude that, in solid trehalose-water glasses, the thermal fluctuations among conformational substates are inhibited. This was inferred from the large broadening of the rate constant distribution for electron transfer obtained in solid glasses, which was due to the free energy distribution barriers having become quasi static. Accordingly, the RC relaxation from dark-adapted to light-adapted conformation, which follows primary charge separation at room temperature, is progressively hindered over the time scale of P(+)Q(A)(-) charge recombination, upon decreasing the

  19. Fatigue mechanisms in graphite/SiC composites at room and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.L.; Cox, B.N.; Marshall, D.B.; Inman, R.V.; James, M.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Some deductions have been made from fractographic evidence about mechanisms of low-cycle mechanical fatigue in plain woven graphite/SiC composites at room and high temperature in vacuum. At both room temperature and 830 C, fatigue appears to be confined to the crack wake, where attrition reduces the efficacy of bridging fibers. It is inferred that the crack tip advances at some critical value of the crack tip stress intensity factor, as in monotonic growth, rather than by any intrinsic fatigue mechanism in the matrix. However, the manifestations of attrition are very different at room and high temperatures. At high temperature, wear is greatly accelerated by the action of SiC debris within the crack. This distinction is rationalized in terms of the temperature dependence expected in the opening displacement of a bridged crack. This argument leads in turn to plausible explanations of trends in load-life curves and the morphology of cracks as the temperature rises.

  20. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Kato, M; Saito, N; Tono, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%).

  1. Effects of ambient room temperature on cold air cooling during laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ramin; Rosenbach, Alan

    2007-09-01

    Forced air cooling is a well-established technique that protects the epidermis during laser heating of deeper structures, thereby allowing for increased laser fluences. The goal of this prospective study was to identify whether an elevation in ambient room temperature influences the efficacy of forced air cooling. Skin surface temperatures were measured on 24 sites (12 subjects) during cold air exposure in examination rooms with ambient temperatures of 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C) and 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C), respectively. Before cooling, mean skin surface temperature was 9 degrees F (5 degrees C) higher in the warmer room (P < 0.01). Immediately after exposure to forced air cooling (within 1 s), the skin surface temperature remained considerably higher (10.75 degrees F, or 5.8 degrees C, P < 0.01) in the warmer room. We conclude that forced air cooling in a room with an ambient temperature of 82 degrees F (27.8 degrees C) is not as effective as in a room that is at 72 degrees F (22.2 degrees C).

  2. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  3. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-04

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits.

  4. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  5. Room temperature synthesis and high temperature frictional study of silver vanadate nanorods.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Polychronopoulou, K; Rebholz, C; Aouadi, S M

    2010-08-13

    We report the room temperature (RT) synthesis of silver vanadate nanorods (consisting of mainly beta-AgV O(3)) by a simple wet chemical route and their frictional study at high temperatures (HT). The sudden mixing of ammonium vanadate with silver nitrate solution under constant magnetic stirring resulted in a pale yellow coloured precipitate. Structural/microstructural characterization of the precipitate through x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the high yield and homogeneous formation of silver vanadate nanorods. The length of the nanorods was 20-40 microm and the thickness 100-600 nm. The pH variation with respect to time was thoroughly studied to understand the formation mechanism of the silver vanadate nanorods. This synthesis process neither demands HT, surfactants nor long reaction time. The silver vanadate nanomaterial showed good lubrication behaviour at HT (700 degrees C) and the friction coefficient was between 0.2 and 0.3. HT-XRD revealed that AgV O(3) completely transformed into silver vanadium oxide (Ag(2)V(4)O(11)) and silver with an increase in temperature from RT to 700 degrees C.

  6. Cuprate High Temperature Superconductors and the Vision for Room Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newns, Dennis M.; Martyna, Glenn J.; Tsuei, Chang C.

    Superconducting transition temperatures of 164 K in cuprate high temperature superconductors (HTS) and recently 200 K in H3S under high pressure encourage us to believe that room temperature superconductivity (RTS) might be possible. In considering paths to RTS, we contrast conventional (BCS) SC, such as probably manifested by H3S, with the unconventional superconductivity (SC) in the cuprate HTS family. Turning to SC models, we show that in the presence of one or more van Hove singularities (vHs) near the Fermi level, SC mediated by classical phonons (kBTc>ℏ×phonon frequency) can occur. The phonon frequency in the standard Tc formula is replaced by an electronic cutoff, enabling a much higher Tc independent of phonon frequency. The resulting Tc and isotope shift plot versus doping strongly resembles that seen experimentally in HTS. A more detailed theory of HTS, which involves mediation by classical phonons, satisfactorily reproduces the chief anomalous features characteristic of these materials. We propose that, while a path to RTS through an H3S-like scenario via strongly-coupled ultra-high frequency phonons is attractive, features perhaps unavailable at ordinary pressures, a route involving SC mediated by classical phonons which can be low frequency may be found.

  7. Fast synthesis of high-quality reduced graphene oxide at room temperature under light exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some, Surajit; Kim, Sungjin; Samanta, Khokan; Kim, Youngmin; Yoon, Yeoheung; Park, Younghun; Lee, Sae Mi; Lee, Keunsik; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2014-09-01

    An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the rGOs were confirmed by XPS, XRD, IR, Raman spectroscopy, TGA, wettability, and sheet resistance measurements. High-quality rGO films on flexible substrates could be prepared by directly immersing the GO films in these solutions for several minutes.An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the r

  8. Spectroscopic Evidence for Room Temperature Interaction of Molecular Oxygen with Cobalt Porphyrin Linker Sites within a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Lahanas, Nicole; Kucheryavy, Pavel; Lockard, Jenny V

    2016-10-17

    Metalloporphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks offer a promising platform for developing solid-state porous materials with accessible, coordinatively unsaturated metal sites. Probing small-molecule interactions at the metalloporphyrin sites within these materials on a molecular level under ambient conditions is crucial for both understanding and ultimately harnessing this functionality for potential catalytic purposes. Co-PCN-222, a metal-organic framework based on cobalt(II) porphyrin linkers. is investigated using in situ UV-vis diffuse-reflectance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic evidence for the axial interaction of diatomic oxygen with the framework's open metalloporphyrin sites at room temperature is presented and discussed.

  9. A Fluorinated Ligand Enables Room-Temperature and Regioselective Pd-Catalyzed Fluorination of Aryl Triflates and Bromides.

    PubMed

    Sather, Aaron C; Lee, Hong Geun; De La Rosa, Valentina Y; Yang, Yang; Müller, Peter; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-21

    A new biaryl monophosphine ligand (AlPhos, L1) allows for the room-temperature Pd-catalyzed fluorination of a variety of activated (hetero)aryl triflates. Furthermore, aryl triflates and bromides that are prone to give mixtures of regioisomeric aryl fluorides with Pd-catalysis can now be converted to the desired aryl fluorides with high regioselectivity. Analysis of the solid-state structures of several Pd(II) complexes, as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, shed light on the origin of the enhanced reactivity observed with L1.

  10. A Fluorinated Ligand Enables Room-Temperature and Regioselective Pd-Catalyzed Fluorination of Aryl Triflates and Bromides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new biaryl monophosphine ligand (AlPhos, L1) allows for the room-temperature Pd-catalyzed fluorination of a variety of activated (hetero)aryl triflates. Furthermore, aryl triflates and bromides that are prone to give mixtures of regioisomeric aryl fluorides with Pd-catalysis can now be converted to the desired aryl fluorides with high regioselectivity. Analysis of the solid-state structures of several Pd(II) complexes, as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, shed light on the origin of the enhanced reactivity observed with L1. PMID:26413908

  11. Photon energy and carrier density dependence of spin dynamics in bulk CdTe crystal at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong; Jin, Zuanming; Ma, Guohong; Liu, Weiming; Hai Tang, Sing

    2009-06-01

    Excitation photon energy and carrier density dependence of spin dynamics in bulk CdTe crystal was studied by time resolved pump-probe reflectivity technique at room temperature. The results show that spin relaxation time decreases monotonously. While with increasing excitation carrier density, the time constants increases initially then decreases after reaching a maximum value. Our experimental results reveal that both D'yakonov-Perel' [M. I. D'yakonov and V. I. Perel', Sov. Phys. JETP 38, 177 (1974)] and Elliot-Yafet [R. J. Elliott, Phys. Rev. 96, 266 (1954); Y. Yafet, Solid State Phys. 14, 1 (1963)] mechanisms dominate the spin relaxation process in CdTe crystal.

  12. One-pot room-temperature conversion of cyclohexane to adipic acid by ozone and UV light.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kuo Chu; Sagadevan, Arunachalam

    2014-12-19

    Nitric acid oxidation of cyclohexane accounts for ~95% of the worldwide adipic acid production and is also responsible for ~5 to 8% of the annual worldwide anthropogenic emission of the ozone-depleting greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we report a N2O-free process for adipic acid synthesis. Treatment of neat cyclohexane, cyclohexanol, or cyclohexanone with ozone at room temperature and 1 atmosphere of pressure affords adipic acid as a solid precipitate. Addition of acidic water or exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation (or a combination of both) dramatically enhances the oxidative conversion of cyclohexane to adipic acid.

  13. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  14. Model predictive control of room temperature with disturbance compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilla, Jozef; Hubinský, Peter

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with temperature control of multivariable system of office building. The system is simplified to several single input-single output systems by decoupling their mutual linkages, which are separately controlled by regulator based on generalized model predictive control. Main part of this paper focuses on the accuracy of the office temperature with respect to occupancy profile and effect of disturbance. Shifting of desired temperature and changing of weighting coefficients are used to achieve the desired accuracy of regulation. The final structure of regulation joins advantages of distributed computing power and possibility to use network communication between individual controllers to consider the constraints. The advantage of using decoupled MPC controllers compared to conventional PID regulators is demonstrated in a simulation study.

  15. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectra of zinc(II) bis-(N,N'-diethyldithiocarbamate) in solid state and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N.; Kellner, R.

    The IR spectra of zinc(II) bis-(N,N'-diethyldithiocarbamate) in the solid state (at 20, 80 and 120°C) as well as in solution (20°C) have been recorded and discussed as to the changes in the zinc coordination sphere that may occur upon heating and dissolution. The decreased number of bands in the high-temperature and in the solution specta as compared with the room temperature solid state spectra has been explained by removal of the intermolecular contacts upon dissolution or thermal averaging in the high temperature solid state.

  16. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation. PMID:28195181

  17. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-02-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation.

  18. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite.

  19. Room-temperature quantum bit storage exceeding 39 minutes using ionized donors in silicon-28.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Kamyar; Simmons, Stephanie; Salvail, Jeff Z; Dluhy, Phillip; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J L; Thewalt, Mike L W

    2013-11-15

    Quantum memories capable of storing and retrieving coherent information for extended times at room temperature would enable a host of new technologies. Electron and nuclear spin qubits using shallow neutral donors in semiconductors have been studied extensively but are limited to low temperatures (≲10 kelvin); however, the nuclear spins of ionized donors have the potential for high-temperature operation. We used optical methods and dynamical decoupling to realize this potential for an ensemble of phosphorous-31 donors in isotopically purified silicon-28 and observed a room-temperature coherence time of over 39 minutes. We further showed that a coherent spin superposition can be cycled from 4.2 kelvin to room temperature and back, and we report a cryogenic coherence time of 3 hours in the same system.

  20. Low threshold interband cascade lasers operating above room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, B.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Mid-IR type-II interband cascade lasers were demonstrated in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 325 K and in continuous mode up to 200 K. At 80 K, the threshold current density was 8.9 A/cm2 and a cw outpout power of 140 mW/facet was obtained.