Science.gov

Sample records for root surface radiated

  1. The removal of root surface deposits.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Kieser, J B; Davies, R M

    1985-02-01

    The importance of adequate root surface instrumentation has received increasing emphasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which root planning could produce surfaces free of stainable deposits. Initial laboratory investigations on extracted, periodontally involved roots demonstrated that after meticulous root preparation, totally non-stainable surfaces could be obtained. These surfaces were shown to consist of either thin cementum or dentine. The efficacy of instrumenting periodontally involved buccal root surfaces on the anterior teeth of 33 patients, undergoing routine periodontal flap surgery was then evaluated. Root surfaces were instrumented either before or after the reflection of surgical flaps. Remaining bacterial deposits were disclosed with a gentian violet solution and the root surfaces then photographed. Further root planing, disclosure and photography were then carried out. These photographic slides were analysed for stainable deposits on the root surfaces using an image analysis system, based on densitometric principles, to measure the areas of stainable root surface deposits. The findings revealed that root planning under direct vision at the time of surgery was more effective than blind instrumentation. However, in no instance was any root surface found to be completely free of stainable deposits.

  2. Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) data sets contain global 3-hourly, daily and monthly averages of surface longwave and shortwave radiative properties, cloud amount, and meteorological properties computed using models. The main input data for these models include cloud information, top-of-atmosphere radiances and profiles of atmospheric water vapor and temperature. Some of the input data include Earth Radiation Budget Energy (ERBE) top-of-atmosphere clear-sky albedo and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) radiances and cloud amount. SRB parameters derived for the renewable energy community are also available from the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set. Other SRB data are available from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). [Mission Objectives] The objective of the SRB Project is to produce and archive a global data set of shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) surface and top of the atmosphere parameters. The data generated in the SRB project may be used in conjunction with other data sets to facilitate the development of renewable energy resources and increase understanding of radiative properties within the meteorological community. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=2005-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  3. Scaling of root surfaces with lasers: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, Martin; Frentzen, Matthias; Kosina, A.; Koort, Hans J.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of root preparation with different laser types in order to replace hand-held instruments in periodontal surgery. The advantage should be a more selective and atraumatic technique promoting periodontal regeneration. The root surfaces of extracted human teeth were irradiated with pulsed laser radiation of IR lasers (CO2, Ho:YAG and Tm:YAG laser) and excimer lasers (ArF* and XeCl* laser). For the light microscopic investigation the specimen were cut into undecalcified sections of 10 micrometers thickness and stained with Toluidine-blue.

  4. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  5. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  6. Surface modification of tooth root canal after application of an X-ray opaque waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, T.; Jelínková, H.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Bartoňová, M.; Radina, P.; Miyagi, M.; Shi, Y.-W.; Matsuura, Y.

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems has been increasing. With the development of thin and flexible delivery systems for various wavelengths, laser applications in endodontics may become even more desirable. The aim of this study is to check the X-ray opacity of a hollow waveguide and to observe the results after laser root canal treatment. The root canal systems of 10 molars were treated endodontically by laser. For the laser radiation source, an Er:YAG laser system generating a wavelength of 2940 nm and an Alexandrite laser system generating a wavelength of 375 nm were used. The hollow waveguide used was checked under X-ray . A root canal surface treated by laser radiation was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The special hollow glass waveguide used was visible in the root canal system under X-ray imaging. Surface modification of the root canal after laser treatment was not found. After conventional treatment the root canal was enlarged. The surface was covered with a smear layer. After application of both laser systems, the smear layer was removed. The resulting canal surface was found to be clean and smooth. Under SEM observation open dentinal tubules were visible. No cracks were present, nor were surface modifications observed.

  7. Root canal surface after application of an x-ray opaque waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Bartonova, Marie; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-05-01

    The success of endodontic treatment depends on the methods used for shaping, cleaning, disinfecting, and sealing of a root canal. In the last few decades, big progress has been achieved in the application of the following methods: manual instrumentation, sonic and ultrasonic devices, and rotary instruments. The procedures used in the root canal system preparation result in a smear layer creation. The aim of this study was to give more precision to the smear layer removal using laser radiation. The root canal systems of 20 human teeth were treated endodontically. As laser radiation sources, Er:YAG laser system generating a wavelength of 2940 nm (rep. rate 1.5 Hz, spot size diameter 320 um, number of pulses 55, energy 100 mJ) and Alexandrite laser system generating a wavelength of 375 nm (rep. rate 1 Hz, spot size diameter 320 um, number of pulses 200, energy 1 mJ) were used. As a delivery system, a hollow glass waveguide with the special X-ray contrast cover was used. The flexible waveguide was moved via root canal and the laser radiation cleaned the wall surface. After application of Er:YAG laser radiation, the smear layer was fully removed, the surface was clean and smooth, and in the SEM investigation the open dentinal tubules were visible. No cracks were determined. The surface modifications were also not observed after endodontic preparation as well as Alexandrite laser radiation therapy. The whole treatment can be checked by X-ray machine.

  8. Root Surface Association in Relation to Nodulation of Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, Henri Jansen; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1982-01-01

    Nine strains of Rhizobium meliloti, ranging in competitive ability on Medicago sativa from excellent to poor in autoclaved soils, were paired in 29 combinations and used to inoculate M. sativa in a liquid rooting medium. A positive correlation (r = 0.545) between strain ratios in nodules after 28 days and root surface cell ratios after 7 days was determined. Two cell fractions from the root surface, representing loosely and firmly adhering cells, were investigated. Infectivity was linked to the more firmly adhering cells. A significant relationship was established between the cell ratios of competing strains in the two fractions. In another experiment, adherence of cells of both infective and noninfective Rhizobium strains to roots of M. sativa and Trifolium repens was demonstrated; the ratios of loosely to firmly adhering cells on the root surface were significantly narrower with the infective combinations than with noninfective strain-legume associations. PMID:16346071

  9. The isolation of Actinomyces naeslundii from sound root surfaces and root carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Brailsford, S R; Lynch, E; Beighton, D

    1998-01-01

    The isolation of Actinomyces naeslundii from sound, exposed root surfaces (n = 56) and soft and leathery root carious lesions (n = 71) was investigated. Root carious lesions were sampled after the removal of overlying plaque. Supragingival plaque or carious dentine was sampled using a sterile excavator, the samples were disaggregated and cultured on both selective and non-selective media. A. naeslundii isolates were identified to the genospecies using specific antisera. Significantly greater numbers and proportions of A. naeslundii genospecies 2 than A. naeslundii genospecies 1 were isolated from all sites sampled. There was no significant difference between the numbers and proportions of the two genospecies isolated from leathery and soft lesions. The relationship between the presence of A. naeslundii genospecies and aciduric and acidogenic organisms was investigated. Those sound exposed root surfaces from which A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and/or 2 were isolated yielded significantly lower numbers of lactobacilli and yeasts than the surfaces from which A. naeslundii were not isolated. This difference was also found in leathery lesions but not soft root carious lesions. The microflora of soft root carious lesions was found to comprise primarily gram-positive pleomorphic rods which formed 70+/-7.8% of the flora, while in plaque from exposed root surfaces and in infected dentine from leathery lesions the gram-positive pleomorphic rods represented only 35% of the flora.

  10. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  11. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  12. The periosteum eversion technique for coverage of denuded root surface

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Kiran, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    The periosteum is highly cellular connective tissue with rich vascularity and regenerative potential, which make it suitable autogenous graft. The periosteum eversion technique utilized periosteum for coverage of denuded root surface. The purpose of this case report was to evaluate the periosteum eversion technique that involves a single surgical site, in terms of root coverage, gingival height, and probing depth. A patient with Miller class I gingival recession of 3.0 mm, gingival height of 2.0 mm and probing depth of 2.0 mm was treated by the periosteum eversion technique. Root conditioning was done with 24% ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid. In this technique, marginal periosteum was used as a pedicle graft. At the end of 6 months, 100% root surface was covered successfully with 5.0 mm of gingival height and 1.0 mm of probing depth. The periosteum eversion technique can be used for the treatment of gingival recession defect successfully. PMID:26392699

  13. Surface radiation budget for climate applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T. (Editor); Ohring, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) consists of the upwelling and downwelling radiation fluxes at the surface, separately determined for the broadband shortwave (SW) (0 to 5 micron) and longwave (LW) (greater than 5 microns) spectral regions plus certain key parameters that control these fluxes, specifically, SW albedo, LW emissivity, and surface temperature. The uses and requirements for SRB data, critical assessment of current capabilities for producing these data, and directions for future research are presented.

  14. Effect of diode laser radiation in root canal wall dentine: a microbiological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, Norbert; Conrads, Georg; Apel, Christian; Schubert, Claus; Lampert, Friedrich

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effect of a diode laser in deep root canal dentine. The microbial colonization of root canal dentine can lead to failures in conventional endodontic treatment if only an inadequate bacterial reduction is achieved through canal treatment and chemical disinfection. 100 micrometer, 300 micrometer and 500 micrometer bovine dentine slices obtained by longitudinal sections were sterilized and inoculated on one side with an Enterococcus faecalis suspension. Laser radiation was performed on the opposite side with the diode laser, emits light at 810 nm and operates in the continuous wave mode (cw). Radiation was performed using a 400 micrometer tapered fiber tip at an angle of approx. 5 degrees to the surface over a period of 30 s. The output power at the distal end of the tip was 0.6 watt. The bacteria were then eluted through vibration and cultured on blood agar plates. The colony count reflected the antibacterial effect of laser radiation as a function of the layer thickness. A mean bacterial reduction of 74% was achieved even with a 500 micrometer thick slice. This investigation indicates that the diode laser can support the bacterial reduction in endodontic treatment.

  15. First global WCRP shortwave surface radiation budget dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Charlock, T. P.; Staylor, W. F.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.; Ohmura, A.; Gilgen, H.; Konzelman, T.; Dipasquale, R. C.; Moats, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    Shortwave radiative fluxes that reach the earth's surface are key factors that influence atmospheric and oceanic circulations as well as surface climate. Yet, information on these fluxes is meager. Surface site data are generally available from only a limited number of observing stations over land. Much less is known about the large-scale variability of the shortwave radiative fluxes over the oceans, which cover most of the globe. Recognizing the need to produce global-scale fields of such fluxes for use in climate research, the World Climate Research Program has initiated activities that led to the establishment of the Surface Radiation Budget Climatology Project with the ultimate goal to determine various components of the surface radiation budget from satellite data. In this paper, the first global products that resulted from this activity are described. Monthly and daily data on a 280-km grid scale are available. Samples of climate parameters obtainable from the dataset are presented. Emphasis is given to validation and limitations of the results. For most of the globe, satellite estimates have bias values between +/- 20 W/sq m and root mean square (rms) values are around 25 W/sq m. There are specific regions with much larger uncertainties however.

  16. Scaling and root planing effectiveness: the effect of root surface access and operator experience.

    PubMed

    Brayer, W K; Mellonig, J T; Dunlap, R M; Marinak, K W; Carson, R E

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated two variables associated with scaling and planning (S&RP): operator experience level and root surface access. One hundred and fourteen periodontally involved, single-rooted teeth designated for extraction were randomly distributed among four operators of various experience levels for either an open or closed session of S&RP. Immediately after treatment, the teeth were extracted, washed, and scored for residual calculus in a blind manner. Results showed that there was no difference in S&RP effectiveness for experience level or type of procedure in shallow (1-3 mm) pockets. However, in moderate (4-6 mm) and deep (greater than 6 mm) periodontal pockets, S&RP combined with an open flap procedure was more effective than S&RP alone for both experience levels. Also, the more experienced operators produced a significantly greater number of calculus-free root surfaces than the less experienced operators in periodontal pockets with moderate and deep probing depths. Clinical application of these results suggests that surgical access is associated with thorough surface debridement in periodontal pockets with moderate-to-advanced probing depths. However, more experienced operators could be expected to render more effective soft surface debridement.

  17. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  18. Parametric Study of Variable Emissivity Radiator Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grob, Lisa M.; Swanson, Theodore D.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of spacecraft thermal design is to accommodate a high function satellite in a low weight and real estate package. The extreme environments that the satellite is exposed during its orbit are handled using passive and active control techniques. Heritage passive heat rejection designs are sized for the hot conditions and augmented for the cold end with heaters. The active heat rejection designs to date are heavy, expensive and/or complex. Incorporating an active radiator into the design that is lighter, cheaper and more simplistic will allow designers to meet the previously stated goal of thermal spacecraft design Varying the radiator's surface properties without changing the radiating area (as with VCHP), or changing the radiators' views (traditional louvers) is the objective of the variable emissivity (vary-e) radiator technologies. A parametric evaluation of the thermal performance of three such technologies is documented in this paper. Comparisons of the Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), Electrochromics, and Electrophoretics radiators to conventional radiators, both passive and active are quantified herein. With some noted limitations, the vary-e radiator surfaces provide significant advantages over traditional radiators and a promising alternative design technique for future spacecraft thermal systems.

  19. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  20. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  1. Europa Surface Radiation Environment for Lander Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The Jovian magnetospheric particle environment at Europa's surface is critical to assessment of landed astrobiological experiments in three respects: (1) the landing site must be chosen for the best prospects for detectable organic or inorganic signs of Life, e.g. regions of freshly emergent flows from the subsurface; (2) lander systems must reach the surface through the Jovian magnetospheric environment and operate long enough on the surface to return useful data; (3) lander instrumentation must be capable of detecting signs of life in the context of the local environmental radiation and associated chemistry. The Galileo, Voyager, and Pioneer missions have provided a wealth of data on energetic particle intensities throughout the Jovian magnetosphere including from many flybys of Europa. cumulative radiation dosages for spacecraft enroute to Europa can be well characterized, but knowledge of the surface radiation environment is very limited. Energetic electrons should primarily impact the trailing hemisphere with decreasing intensity towards the center of the leading hemisphere and are the most significant radiation component down to meter depths in the surface regolith due to secondary interactions. Observed surface distribution for sulfates is suggestive of electron irradiation but may have alternative interpretations. Having much-larger magnetic gyroradii than electrons, energetic protons and heavier ions irradiate more of the global surface. The particular orientations of electron, proton, and ion gyromotion would project into corresponding directional (e.g., east-west) anisotropies of particle flu into the surface. Particular topographic features at the landing site may therefore offer shielding from part of the incident radiation.

  2. Ultraviolet Radiation on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, D. C.; Cockell, C. S.; McKay, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    An evaluation of the ultraviolet (UV) flux incident on the Martian surface is important for a number of issues. UV-induced photolysis of water changes the chemistry of the soil and atmosphere, inducing its oxidizing nature. Alternatively, UV may directly affect surface chemistry by generating silicate defects. UV also rapidly degrades organic material delivered by meteoritic infall. Consequently, UV affects the overall chemistry of the Martian surface and atmosphere. The extent of UV breakdown of organic molecules is also relevant to concerns regarding contaminants on lander or rover surfaces that could interfere with life-detection experiments causing "false positives". The radiation flux at a point on the surface of Mars depends on factors such as cloud cover, atmospheric dust loading, season, local time, and latitude. Previously, the UV spectrum incident on the surface of Mars has been calculated from a simple radiative transfer model. Limitations of this earlier model include no accounting for the effect of dust, which may be a perennial constituent of the atmosphere, and also the use of gas absorption data measured at room temperature that overestimate absorption for lower Martian temperatures. We present an updated model for UV radiation (200-400 nm) that incorporates dust and more recent data for the solar spectrum, gas absorption, and UV surface albedo. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. [Participation of azospirillium polysaccharides in interaction with wheat root surface].

    PubMed

    Fedonenko, Iu P; Egorenkova, I V; Konnova, S A; Ignatov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to comparatively investigate the attachment capacities of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and its lipopolysaccharide-defective Omegon-Km mutants KM018 and KM252, as well as their activities with respect to the alteration of the morphology of wheat seedling root hairs. The adsorption dynamics of the parent Sp245 and mutant KM252 strains of azospirilla on the seedling roots of the soft spring wheat cv. Saratovskaya 29 were similar; however, the attachment capacity of the mutant KM252 was lower than that of the parent strain throughout the incubation period (15 min to 48 h). The mutation led to a considerable decrease in the hydrophobicity of the Azospirillum cell surface. The lipopolysaccharides extracted from the outer membrane of A. brasilense Sp245 and mutant cells with hot phenol and purified by chromatographic methods were found to induce the deformation of the wheat seedling root hairs, the lipopolysaccharide of the parent strain being the most active in this respect. The role of the carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharides in the interaction of Azospirillum cells with plants is discussed.

  4. Predicting root zone soil moisture using surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfreda, S.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Melone, F.; Sheffield, J.; Fiorentino, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, much effort has been given to monitoring of soil moisture from satellite remote sensing. These tools represent an extraordinary source of information for hydrological applications, but they only provide information on near-surface soil moisture. In the present work, we developed a new formulation for the estimation of the soil moisture in the root zone based on the measured value of soil moisture at the surface. The method derives from a simplified form of the soil water balance equation and for this reason all parameters adopted are physically consistent. The formulation provides a closed form of the relationship between the root zone soil moisture and the surface soil moisture with a limited number of parameters, such as: the ratio between the depth of the surface layer and the deeper layer, the water loss coefficient, and the field capacity. The method has been tested using modeled soil moisture obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). The NLDAS is a multi-institution partnership aimed at developing a retrospective data set, using available atmospheric and land surface meteorological observations to compute the land surface hydrological budget. The NLDAS database was extremely useful for the scope of the present research since it provides simulated data over an extended area with different climatic and physical condition and moreover it provides soil moisture data averaged over different depths. In particular, we used values in the top 10 cm and 100 cm layers. One year of simulation was used to test the ability of the developed method to describe soil moisture fluctuation in the 100cm layer over the entire NLDAS domain. The method was adopted by calibrating one of its three parameters and defining the remaining two based on physical characteristics of the site (using the potential evapotranspiration and ratio between the first and the second soil layer depth). In general, the method performed better than

  5. Profilometric analysis of root surfaces after using various polishing agents

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Anjan; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Pal, Tamal Kanti; Datta, Someswar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polishing is an important step in oral prophylaxis procedure which retards further accumulation of plaque on the root surfaces. Though polishing was done with various abrasive particles with different sizes over a long period of time, it was never been highlighted to evaluate the ideal polishing material and the particle size that would produce the ideal surface smoothness (Ra <0.2 μm). Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out on 70 periodontally involved, caries-free extracted human teeth from 42 patients. All the teeth were collected from the region of incisors, canines, and premolars. In vitro scaling and root planing were performed by piezoelectric scaler and Gracey's area specific curettes, respectively. All the teeth were grouped at random into control and experimental. The collections of abrasive materials were done directly from the market, and the different particle sizes were prepared in the laboratory. Experimentation: The polishing was done at a constant speed of 200 rpm with cylindrical nylon bristle brush followed by rubber prophy cup. Each group belonging to control and experimental was subjected to profilometric study for evaluation of surface roughness. Results: Regular polishing abrasives are not able to produce the surface smoothness of our desire level (i.e., Ra <0.2 μm), which can be achieved only by submicron-sized particles. Conclusion: Regular size polishing particles available in the market (>5 μm) are not able to produce the surface smoothness <0.2 μm. Only, submicron sized particles are able to produce the desired smoothness. PMID:27041833

  6. Space station thermal control surfaces. [space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, C. R.; Millard, J. M.; Jeffery, J. A.; Scott, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Mission planning documents were used to analyze the radiator design and thermal control surface requirements for both space station and 25-kW power module, to analyze the missions, and to determine the thermal control technology needed to satisfy both sets of requirements. Parameters such as thermal control coating degradation, vehicle attitude, self eclipsing, variation in solar constant, albedo, and Earth emission are considered. Four computer programs were developed which provide a preliminary design and evaluation tool for active radiator systems in LEO and GEO. Two programs were developed as general programs for space station analysis. Both types of programs find the radiator-flow solution and evaluate external heat loads in the same way. Fortran listings are included.

  7. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Niebergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW) and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW), radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  8. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls

    PubMed Central

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2016-01-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3–3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0–1.5g cm−3). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm−3 soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm−3). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm−3 soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. PMID:26798027

  9. Surface radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing from pan-Arctic Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. J.; Long, C. N.; Crepinsek, S.; Maturilli, M.; McComiskey, A. C.; Miller, N.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kustov, V. Y.; Shupe, M.; Steffen, K.; Stanitski, D.; Starkweather, S.; Stone, R. S.; Uttal, T.; Walden, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring and forecasting of the seasonal melt of snow and ice in the Arctic is a priority need as Arctic climate changes and the number of stakeholders increases. Seasonal snow and ice melt represent the largest annual perturbation to the surface net radiation budget. Radiative interactions between clouds, the surface and the atmosphere play an important role on scales of minutes to decades, but models insufficiently represent cloud properties. Furthermore, the surface radiation budget is not directly observed from satellite platforms. Direct observations from the surface must therefore be used to document the physical and correlative relationships between variables, and to provide a baseline target for data sets with more comprehensive spatial representation. High-quality, continuous, long-term observations of radiative fluxes are collected from land stations surrounding the Arctic Basin as part of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) facilitates international collaboration amongst station scientists and other topic experts for the purposes of streamlining pan-Arctic synthesis studies. The IASOA Radiation Working Group is currently analyzing the data acquired from Barrow, Alaska (1993-2015), Alert, Canada (2004-2014), Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (1993-2015), Eureka, Canada (2007-2015), and Tiksi, Russia (2011-2015). The measurements include upwelling and downwelling longwave and shortwave fluxes, as well as direct and diffuse shortwave flux components, and surface meteorology. The observations are post-processed using the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA) method, which, in addition to basic quality control, provides value-added metrics such as cloud radiative forcing (CRF), optical depth, and fractional sky cover. Here, we present a spatial and temporal analysis of the surface radiation budget and calculated variables from the pan-Arctic BSRN stations. Particular attention is given to inter

  10. Biophysical characterization and surface radiation balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Blad, Blaine L.; Mesarch, Mark A.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Starks, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    The Kursk 1991 Experiment (KUREX-91) was conducted as one of a suite of international studies to develop capabilities to monitor global change. The studies were designed specifically to understand the earth's land-surface vegetation and atmospheric boundary layer interaction. An intensive field campaign was conducted at a site near Kursk, Russia during the month of July in 1991 by a team of international scientists to aid in the understanding of land-surface-atmosphere interactions in an agricultural/grassland setting. We were one of several teams of scientists participating at KUREX-91 at the Streletskaya Steppe Researve near Kursk, Russia. The main goals of our research were to: (1) characterize biophysical properties of the prairie vegetation; and (2) to characterize radiation regime through measurements and from estimates derived from canopy bidirectional reflectance data. Four objectives were defined to achieve these goals: (1) determine dependence of leaf optical properties on leaf water potential of some dominant species in discrete wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, and mid-infrared (spanning 0.4-2.3 microns range); (2) characterize the effective leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution of prairie vegetation; (3) characterize the radiation regime of the prairie vegetation through measures of the radiation balance components; and (4) examine, develop, and test methods for estimating albedo, APAR, and LAI from canopy bidirectional reflectance data. Papers which were the result of the research efforts are included.

  11. Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Pamela E.; Smith, G. Louis; Wilber, Anne C.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the Earth s surface are investigated by use of the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Data Set. Because of the immense difference between the heat capacity of land and ocean, the surface of Earth is partitioned into these two categories. Principal component analysis is used to quantify the annual cycles. Over land, the first principal component describes over 95% of the variance of the annual cycle of the upward and downward longwave fluxes. Over ocean the first term describes more than 87% of these annual cycles. Empirical orthogonal functions show the corresponding geographical distributions of these cycles. Phase plane diagrams of the annual cycles of upward longwave fluxes as a function of net shortwave flux show the thermal inertia of land and ocean.

  12. Regional Climatology and Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The climatology and surface radiation budget (SRB) of a region are intimately related. This paper presents a brief examination of this relationship. An 8-year surface radiation budget data set has been developed based on satellite measurements. In that data set and in this paper a region is defined as a quasi-square 2.5o in latitude and approximately the same physical distance in longitude. A pilot study by Wilber et al. (1998) showed a variety of behaviors of the annual cycles for selected regions. Selected desert regions form a loop in a specific part of the plot, with large NLW and large NSW. Tropical wet regions form much smaller loops in a different part of the plot, with small NLW and large NSW. For regions selected in high latitude the annual cycles form nearly linear figures in another part of the plot. The question arises as to whether these trajectories are characteristic of the climatology of the region or simply the behavior of the few regions selected from the set of 6596 regions. In order to address this question, it is necessary to classify the climatology of the each region, e.g. as classified by Koeppen (1936) or Trenwarthe and Horne (1980). This paper presents a method of classifying climate of the regions on the basis of the surface radiation behavior such that the results are very similar to the classification of Trenwarthe and Horne. The characteristics of the annual cycle of SRB components can then be investigated further, based on the climate classification of each region.

  13. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; ...

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010more » both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.« less

  14. Er:YAG and alexandrite laser radiation propagation in the root canal and its effect on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shoji, Shigeru; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal

    1999-05-01

    The goal of the study was to verify differences between the alexandrite and Er:YAG laser energy distribution in the root canal and in the surrounding dentin and bone tissues. For the experiment, two lasers were prepared: the Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) with a delivery system fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide ended by a special sapphire tip and the alexandrite laser (λ=0.75 μm) with a silicon fiber. The Er:YAG laser was operated in a free-running mode, the length of the generated pulses was 250 μsec and the output energy ranged from 100 to 350 mJ. The pulse length of the free- running alexandrite laser was 70 μsec and the output energy was ranged from 80 up to 200 mJ. For the experiment prepared root canals of molars were used. It was ascertained that the radiation of the alexandrite laser passes through the root canal and hits the surrounding tissue. Nocardia asteroids, Filaments, Micrococcus albus, Lactobacillus sp and Streptococcus sanguis colonies were treated by the Er:YAG or alexandrite laser radiation. The surface was checked by scanning electron microscopy. From the result it follows that the Er:YAG laser destroyed microbial colonies but the differences is in the depth of the affected area.

  15. Radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2012-09-01

    The episodic deposition of dust and carbonaceous particles to snow decreases snow surface albedo and enhances absorption of solar radiation, leading to accelerated snowmelt, negative glacier mass balance, and the snow-albedo feedback. Until now, no remote sensing retrieval has captured the spatial and temporal variability of this forcing. Here we present the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) model that retrieves surface radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. Validation of MODDRFS with a 7-year record of in situ measurements indicates the radiative forcing retrieval has positive bias at lower values and slight negative bias above 200 W m-2, subject to mixed pixel uncertainties. With bias-correction, MODDRFS has a root mean squared error of 32 W m-2 and mean absolute error of 25 W m-2. We demonstrate MODDRFS in the Upper Colorado River Basin and Hindu Kush-Himalaya.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana sku mutant seedlings show exaggerated surface-dependent alteration in root growth vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in the Wassilewskija (WS) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotypes often grow aslant on vertical agar surfaces. Slanted root growth always occurs to the right of the gravity vector when the root is viewed through the agar surface, and is not observed in the Columbia ecotype. Right-slanted root growth is surface-dependent and does not result directly from directional environmental stimuli or gradients in the plane of skewing. We have isolated two partially dominant mutations in WS (sku1 and sku2) that show an exaggerated right-slanting root-growth phenotype on agar surfaces. The right-slanting root-growth phenotype of wild-type and mutant roots is not the result of diagravitropism or of an alteration in root gravitropism. It is accompanied by a left-handed rotation of the root about its axis within the elongation zone, the rate of which positively correlates with the degree of right-slanted curvature. Our data suggest that the right-slanting root growth phenotype results from an endogenous structural asymmetry that expresses itself by a directional root-tip rotation.

  17. Validation and Spatiotemporal Analysis of CERES Surface Net Radiation Product

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Aolin; Jiang, Bo; Liang, Shunlin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Ma, Han

    2016-01-23

    The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) generates one of the few global satellite radiation products. The CERES ARM Validation Experiment (CAVE) has been providing long-term in situ observations for the validation of the CERES products. However, the number of these sites is low and their distribution is globally sparse, and particularly the surface net radiation product has not been rigorously validated yet. Therefore, additional validation efforts are highly required to determine the accuracy of the CERES radiation products. In this study, global land surface measurements were comprehensively collected for use in the validation of the CERES net radiation (Rn) product on a daily (340 sites) and a monthly (260 sites) basis, respectively. The validation results demonstrated that the CERES Rn product was, overall, highly accurate. The daily validations had a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of 3.43 W·m−2, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 33.56 W·m−2, and R2 of 0.79, and the monthly validations had an MBE of 3.40 W·m−2, RMSE of 25.57 W·m−2, and R2 of 0.84. The accuracy was slightly lower for the high latitudes. Following the validation, the monthly CERES Rn product, from March 2000 to July 2014, was used for a further analysis. We analysed the global spatiotemporal variation of the Rn, which occurred during the measurement period. In addition, two hot spot regions, the southern Great Plains and south-central Africa, were then selected for use in determining the driving factors or attribution of the Rn variation. We determined that Rn over the southern Great Plains decreased by −0.33 W·m−2 per year, which was mainly driven by changes in surface green vegetation and precipitation. In south-central Africa, Rn decreased at a rate of −0.63 W·m−2 per year, the major driving factor of

  18. Validation and Spatiotemporal Analysis of CERES Surface Net Radiation Product

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Aolin; Jiang, Bo; Liang, Shunlin; ...

    2016-01-23

    The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) generates one of the few global satellite radiation products. The CERES ARM Validation Experiment (CAVE) has been providing long-term in situ observations for the validation of the CERES products. However, the number of these sites is low and their distribution is globally sparse, and particularly the surface net radiation product has not been rigorously validated yet. Therefore, additional validation efforts are highly required to determine the accuracy of the CERES radiation products. In this study, global land surface measurements were comprehensively collected for use in the validation of the CERES netmore » radiation (Rn) product on a daily (340 sites) and a monthly (260 sites) basis, respectively. The validation results demonstrated that the CERES Rn product was, overall, highly accurate. The daily validations had a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of 3.43 W·m−2, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 33.56 W·m−2, and R2 of 0.79, and the monthly validations had an MBE of 3.40 W·m−2, RMSE of 25.57 W·m−2, and R2 of 0.84. The accuracy was slightly lower for the high latitudes. Following the validation, the monthly CERES Rn product, from March 2000 to July 2014, was used for a further analysis. We analysed the global spatiotemporal variation of the Rn, which occurred during the measurement period. In addition, two hot spot regions, the southern Great Plains and south-central Africa, were then selected for use in determining the driving factors or attribution of the Rn variation. We determined that Rn over the southern Great Plains decreased by −0.33 W·m−2 per year, which was mainly driven by changes in surface green vegetation and precipitation. In south-central Africa, Rn decreased at a rate of −0.63 W·m−2 per year, the major driving factor of which was surface green vegetation.« less

  19. How and why do root apices sense light under the soil surface?

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Mei; Yokawa, Ken; Wan, Yinglang; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    Light can penetrate several centimeters below the soil surface. Growth, development and behavior of plant roots are markedly affected by light despite their underground lifestyle. Early studies provided contrasting information on the spatial and temporal distribution of light-sensing cells in the apical region of root apex and discussed the physiological roles of plant hormones in root responses to light. Recent biological and microscopic advances have improved our understanding of the processes involved in the sensing and transduction of light signals, resulting in subsequent physiological and behavioral responses in growing root apices. Here, we review current knowledge of cellular distributions of photoreceptors and their signal transduction pathways in diverse root tissues and root apex zones. We are discussing also the roles of auxin transporters in roots exposed to light, as well as interactions of light signal perceptions with sensing of other environmental factors relevant to plant roots. PMID:26442084

  20. Radiation guiding with surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhanghua; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic (EM) modes propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, in which surface collective excitations of free electrons in the metal are coupled to evanescent EM fields in the dielectric. Various SPP modes can be supported by flat and curved, single and multiple surfaces, exhibiting remarkable properties, including the possibility of concentrating EM fields beyond the diffraction limit, i.e. on the nanoscale, while enhancing local field strengths by several orders of magnitude. This unique feature of SPP modes, along with the ever-increasing demands for miniaturization of photonic components and circuits, generates an exponentially growing interest in SPP-mediated radiation guiding and SPP-based waveguide components. Here we review the current status of this rapidly developing field, starting with a brief presentation of the main planar SPP modes along with the techniques employed for their excitation and manipulation by sets of nanoparticles. We then describe in detail various SPP-based waveguide configurations that ensure two-dimensional mode confinement in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction and compare their characteristics. Excitation of SPP waveguide modes and recent progress in the development of SPP-based waveguide components are also discussed, concluding with our outlook on challenges and possible future developments in this field.

  1. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-07-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to these seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought fro earth should be less than 1000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield.

  2. Enzyme and root activities in surface-flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling; Wang, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Li-Na; Chen, Zhang-He

    2009-07-01

    Sixteen small-scale wetlands planted with four plant species were constructed for domestic wastewater purification. The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between contaminant removal and soil enzyme activity, root activity, and growth in the constructed wetlands. The results indicated that correlations between contaminant removal efficiency and enzyme activity varied depending on the contaminants. The removal efficiency of NH4+ was significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity in all wetlands, and the removal of total phosphorus and soluble reactive phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity in most wetlands, while the removal of total nitrogen, NO3(-) , and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was significantly correlated with enzyme activity only in a few instances. Correlations between soil enzyme activity and root activity varied among species. Activities of all enzymes were significantly correlated with root activity in Vetiveria zizanioides and Phragmites australis wetlands, but not in Hymenocallis littoralis wetlands. Significant correlations between enzyme activity and root biomass and between enzyme activity and root growth were found mainly in Cyperus flabelliformis wetlands. Root activity was significantly correlated with removal efficiencies of all contaminants except NO3(-) and COD in V. zizanioides wetlands. Enzyme activities and root activity showed single-peak seasonal patterns. Activities of phosphatase, urease, and cellulase were significantly higher in the top layer of the substrate than in the deeper layers, and there were generally no significant differences between the deeper layers (deeper than 15 cm).

  3. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Derivation of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona from Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made in the retrieval of surface shortwave radiation from satellite measurements for the Earth's energy budget as well as solar energy applications. We present a new algorithm to derive the downwelling surface shortwave radiation for the Southwestern US using geostationary satellite products. A look-up table generated by the Goddard Space Flight Center Radiative Transfer Model is employed to derive the shortwave radiation at the ground by comparing observed and modeled top of atmosphere shortwave albedo. The algorithm was compared to ground observation stations at three locations, such as the University of Arizona, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Desert Rock, NV. For all sky conditions, the average values of root-mean-square error between the instantaneous estimates and in situ measurements ranged from 84.2 to 89.4 W m-2 and were 30 W m-2 when evaluated on daily time scales. The error statistics were considerably better for clear sky than for cloudy sky. The average values of instantaneous root-mean-square error for the clear-sky conditions range from 39.4 to 43.7 W m-2, while average root-mean-square error for the cloudy-sky conditions is between 137.0 and 141.2 W m-2.

  4. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xiao, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010 both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.

  5. Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seol, Yang-Jo; Park, Jang-Ryul; Park, Yoon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface. Methods Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent. Results SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel. Conclusions These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads. PMID:21246015

  6. Effect of dentin thickness on root surface temperature of teeth undergoing ultrasonic removal of posts.

    PubMed

    Horan, Brooks B; Tordik, Patricia A; Imamura, Glen; Goodell, Gary G

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure root surface temperature changes on thin-rooted and thick-rooted teeth undergoing ultrasonic vibration of cemented posts, with and without irrigation. Twenty-four single canal teeth were decoronated, length standardized, instrumented, obturated, and cemented with prefabricated posts. The teeth were divided into thin-rooted or thick-rooted groups. Thermocouples were cemented to the external proximal root surfaces adjacent the post ends. The roots were then mounted in standardized plaster molds and placed in a temperature-controlled water bath. Posts were ultrasonically vibrated with and without irrigation, and external root temperatures were recorded from an initial 37 degrees C baseline for a period of 4 minutes. The data were analyzed with the Student t test at alpha = .05. No significant differences were found in temperature change between the thin-rooted and thick-rooted groups, with or without irrigation. Linear regression and correlation analysis revealed no relationship between dentin thickness and temperature change.

  7. Measurement of solar radiation at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of solar energy arriving at the surface of the Earth are defined and the history of solar measurements in the United States presented. Radiation and meteorological measurements being made at solar energy meteorological research and training sites and calibration procedures used there are outlined. Data illustrating the annual variation in daily solar radiation at Ann Arbor, Michigan and the diurnal variation in radiation at Albuquerque, New Mexico are presented. Direct normal solar radiation received at Albuquerque is contrasted with that received at Maynard, Massachusetts. Average measured global radiation for a period of one year for four locations under clear skies, 50% cloud cover, and 100% cloud cover is given and compared with the solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The May distribution of mean daily direct solar radiation and mean daily global solar radiation over the United States is presented. The effects of turbidity on the direct and circumsolar radiation are shown.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of root canal surface roughness after filing with adaptive reciprocating and continuous rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Sakhaei Manesh, Vahid; Giacomin, Paul; Stoll, Richard

    2017-01-31

    Obtaining clean and smooth root canal walls is the ideal clinical outcome of the cleaning and shaping stage in root canal treatment. This study compares the surface roughness of root canal surfaces instrumented with a NiTi filing system with either adaptive reciprocating (AR) or continuous rotation (CR). Root canal cleaning and shaping was carried out on the mesial canals of 24 extracted first molars roots with either AR or CR. Roots were split in half and the surface roughness of their canals was evaluated in 12 three dimensional roughness reconstructions using a scanning electron microscope. Rz (nm) values were calculated in three areas of each reconstruction and analyzed (α = 0.05). Mann-Whitney tests showed that surface roughness was significantly higher overall in the AR group (Rz = 967 ± 250 nm) compared with the CR group (Rz = 739 ± 239 nm; p = 0.044). The roughness values generally increased from apical towards the coronal third in both groups. A less aggressive finishing file or a continuous rotary system to end the cleaning and shaping stage may be beneficial to reduce roughness of the root canal surface.

  9. Status of the Space Radiation Monte Carlos Simulation Based on FLUKA and ROOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Victor; Carminati, Federico; Empl, Anton; Ferrari, Alfredo; Pinsky, Lawrence; Sala, Paola; Wilson, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA-funded project reported on at the first IWSSRR in Arona to develop a Monte-Carlo simulation program for use in simulating the space radiation environment based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes is well into its second year of development, and considerable progress has been made. The general tasks required to achieve the final goals include the addition of heavy-ion interactions into the FLUKA code and the provision of a ROOT-based interface to FLUKA. The most significant progress to date includes the incorporation of the DPMJET event generator code within FLUKA to handle heavy-ion interactions for incident projectile energies greater than 3GeV/A. The ongoing effort intends to extend the treatment of these interactions down to 10 MeV, and at present two alternative approaches are being explored. The ROOT interface is being pursued in conjunction with the CERN LHC ALICE software team through an adaptation of their existing AliROOT software. As a check on the validity of the code, a simulation of the recent data taken by the ATIC experiment is underway.

  10. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  11. Protection offered by root-surface restorative materials against biofilm challenge.

    PubMed

    Yip, H K; Guo, J; Wong, W H S

    2007-05-01

    The prevalence of root-surface caries is increasing. We hypothesized that some restorative materials are protective against cariogenic challenge on root surfaces. Our goal was to study the effects of different restorative materials on root surfaces incubated with an oral biofilm generated in an artificial mouth. A biofilm of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Actinomyces naeslundii was co-cultured for 21 days on 24 glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, or resin-composite-restored root surfaces. These surfaces were then examined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Only glass-ionomer restorations showed a significant increase in log calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (P < 0.01), and a significantly lower log amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio on the root surface after incubation in the artificial mouth. Glass-ionomer restoratives conferred a preventive effect on the root surfaces against initial cariogenic challenge with a mixed-species oral biofilm without therapeutic intervention.

  12. The surface of root canal irradiated by Nd:YAG laser with TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Anjo, Tomoo; Takeda, Atsushi; Suda, Hideaki

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the appropriateness of Nd:YAG laser irradiation for root canal preparation. Tooth crowns were removed from single-rooted human teeth and a quartz optical fiber (diameter 400 μm) was inserted into the root canal orifice towards the apical foramen. The length of the fiber within the root canal was measured, and the irradiating length determined. Root canals were then filled with 3% TiO2 emulsion solution (a photosensitizer) and irradiated using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 600 mJ/pulse (pulse frequency; 5 or 10 pps). During laser irradiation, the fiber was moved coronally from the apical region towards the canal orifice at a rate of 1 mm/s. Contact microradiographs (CMR) were taken before and after laser irradiation. Each root was then halved longitudinally, and the root canal surface observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The CMR images of the tooth revealed that the root canal was slightly enlarged as a result of treatment. Carbonization of the root canal dentin was not seen, but a smear layer and melted dentin were observed by SEM. Nd:YAG laser irradiation using TiO2 emulsion solution appears to be a useful tool for root canal preparation.

  13. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  14. Sorption of fibronectin to human root surfaces in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Mendieta, C.; Caravana, C.; Fine, D.H. )

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the conditions that favor the sorption and retention of human plasma fibronectin to cementum. Rectangular root segments prepared from teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were mounted on a capillary pipette and immersed in solutions of {sup 125}I fibronectin for assay of cementum sorption under various conditions. Kinetic studies showed sorption to be rapid, with 77% of the maximum fibronectin sorption occurring within 1 minute. Fibronectin sorption was reduced when added in conjunction with serum and was inhibited by monovalent ions (such as sodium), but enhanced in the presence of divalent cations (such as calcium). Exposure of cementum to serum partially blocked subsequent sorption of fibronectin, while cementum bound fibronectin was eluted by subsequent exposure to serum. Treatment of cementum with citric acid pH 1.1 (4 minutes) followed by 5% sodium hypochlorite (5 minutes) caused a significant increase in fibronectin sorption with maximum retention upon subsequent exposure to serum (P less than 0.05). Fibronectin sorption to cementum was: rapid, electrostatic in nature, competitive, reversible, Ca+(+)-facilitated, and maximized by prior treatment of the root with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite. It is concluded that sorption of fibronectin to cementum can be achieved for clinical gain; however, conditions of application can significantly influence both accumulation and subsequent release of root sorbed material.

  15. Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-09-01

    Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

  16. The assessment of ultrasonic root surface debridement by determination of residual endotoxin levels.

    PubMed

    Smart, G J; Wilson, M; Davies, E H; Kieser, J B

    1990-03-01

    Recent demonstrations of the superficial nature and ease of removal of root-surface-associated cytotoxic materials suggest that extensive root-surface instrumentation is not warranted clinically. This in vitro investigation determined the detoxifying effects of a conservative regime of ultrasonic root debridement, using the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an indication of the presence or absence of cytotoxic materials. 20 extracted periodontally-involved single-rooted teeth, with no clinically detectable calculus deposits, were debrided with a Cavitron TF-10 tip. Light pressure, resulting from a force application of approximately 50 g, lasting for 0.8 s/mm2 of root surface was used and complete overlapping instrumentation ensured. The finding of LPS levels of less than 2.5 ng per root in 19 out of 20 teeth after such debridement was comparable to LPS levels found on healthy, uninvolved control teeth, and thus endorses the growing belief that root surface cleanliness can be readily achieved.

  17. A new method to estimate average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Soupir, Michelle L.

    2012-10-01

    A new model, Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surface (GSRHS), was developed to estimate the average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surfaces (Gh). The GSRHS model uses the transmission function (Tf,ij), which was developed to control hourly global solar radiation, for predicting solar radiation. The inputs of the model were: hour of day, day (Julian) of year, optimized parameter values, solar constant (H0), latitude, and longitude of the location of interest. The parameter values used in the model were optimized at a location (Albuquerque, NM), and these values were applied into the model for predicting average hourly global solar radiations at four different locations (Austin, TX; El Paso, TX; Desert Rock, NV; Seattle, WA) of the United States. The model performance was assessed using correlation coefficient (r), Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and coefficient of determinations (R2). The sensitivities of parameter to prediction were estimated. Results show that the model performed very well. The correlation coefficients (r) range from 0.96 to 0.99, while coefficients of determination (R2) range from 0.92 to 0.98. For daily and monthly prediction, error percentages (i.e. MABE and RMSE) were less than 20%. The approach we proposed here can be potentially useful for predicting average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface for different locations, with the use of readily available data (i.e. latitude and longitude of the location) as inputs.

  18. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ved Parkash; Singh, Harminder Pal; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 microW cm(-2); 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at > or =2 h), and radicle and plumule growths (> or =1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H(2)O(2) accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  19. Evaluation of arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Nievergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2011-08-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  20. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  1. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Riddhi

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers root extract (TCRE) in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as “normal” and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of “irradiated control” were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Group 4 (experimental) were administered optimum dosage of TCRE with prior exposure to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Follicle cell counts were scored at autopsy intervals of 24 hrs, 3 days, 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days after gamma irradiation. To understand the mechanism of radioprotection, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels were also measured in all groups. TCRE supplementation rendered significant protection to ovaries by restoring follicle counts; it also reduced LPO levels and increased GSH levels in ovaries. It implies that TCRE administration protects ovaries against radiation exposure. PMID:26357520

  2. Comparison of Root Surface Roughness Produced By Hand Instruments and Ultrasonic Scalers: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swarga Jyoti; Sonowal, Saindhya Tora; Chawla, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Instrumentation on tooth surface for debridement of hard and soft debris forms the basis of periodontal therapy. This involves periodic removal of accumulated material using different methods of instrumentation. An ideal instrument should eliminate all the deposits from the root surfaces with no or minimal alteration of the natural morphology. Aim To compare the root surface roughness after root planing performed with gracey curette and by ultrasonic scalers (Satelec P-5 Booster) set at different power modes. Materials and Methods The root surface roughness and its surface microtopography resulting from the use of Gracey curette, ultrasonic instrument at low, medium and high power setting on 35 healthy premolars extracted for orthodontic treatment purpose were examined using Optical Profilometer and the surface topography was assessed using Field Emission Microscope. Statistical Analysis Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to observe the variance in a particular variable is partitioned into components attributable to different sources of variation. Duncan multiple range tests were used to determine whether three or more means differ significantly. Results and Conclusion The mean roughness was found to be the highest in group where Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) was performed using ultrasonic scaler at low power mode (3.03±1.54 μm) whereas the lowest surface roughness was seen on the samples where SRP was performed using ultrasonic scaler at medium power mode. The surface roughness in group where SRP was performed with ultrasonic scaler at high power mode (2.22±0.74μm) was found to be similar to that of group in which root planing was carried out using curette (2.24±1.71μm). PMID:26675445

  3. Comparing the effects of manual and ultrasonic instrumentation on root surface mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study is to analyze the surface profiles of healthy and periodontal-treated roots. In addition, manual and ultrasonic instrumentation methods have been compared in terms of surface mechanical properties of root surfaces including surface roughness, hardness, and elastic modulus. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using extracted teeth that were randomly divided into two study groups (1 and 2). Root planing was performed using either Gracey curettes (Group 1) or ultrasonic scaler (Group 2). The noncontact profilometer was used to analyze surface roughness before and after root planing. A nanoindenter was used to analyze the surface mechanical properties. Results: The root planing treatment reduced the peak and valley heights hence decreasing the surface roughness. The average maximum height of peaks (Sp) and average maximum height of valleys (Sv) for control groups remain 83.08 ± 18.47 μm and 117.58 ± 18.02 μm. The Sp was reduced to 32.86 ± 7.99 μm and 62.11 ± 16.07 μm for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The Sv was reduced to 49.32 ± 29.51 μm for Group 1 and 80.87 ± 17.99 μm Group 2. The nanohardness and modulus of elasticity for cementum of the control group remain 0.28 ± 0.13 GPa and 5.09 ± 2.67 GPa, respectively. Conclusions: Gracey curettes and ultrasonic scalers are capable of significantly reducing the roughness following root planing. Although Gracey curettes produced smoother surfaces than ultrasonic scalers, there was no significant difference. PMID:28042268

  4. Waving and skewing: how gravity and the surface of growth media affect root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Michele; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings growing on inclined agar surfaces exhibit characteristic root behaviours called 'waving' and 'skewing': the former consists of a series of undulations, whereas the latter is a deviation from the direction of gravity. Even though the precise basis of these growth patterns is not well understood, both gravity and the contact between the medium and the root are considered to be the major players that result in these processes. The influence of these forces on root surface-dependent behaviours can be verified by growing seedlings at different gel pitches: plants growing on vertical plates present roots with slight waving and skewing when compared with seedlings grown on plates held at minor angles of < 90 degrees . However, other factors are thought to modulate root growth on agar; for instance, it has been demonstrated that the presence and concentration of certain compounds in the medium (such as sucrose) and of drugs able to modify the plant cell cytoskeleton also affect skewing and waving. The recent discovery of an active role of ethylene on surface-dependent root behaviour, and the finding of new mutants showing anomalous growth, pave the way for a more detailed description of these phenomena.

  5. Annual Cycle of Cloud Forcing of Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    2006-01-01

    The climate of the Earth is determined by its balance of radiation. The incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes are strongly modulated by clouds, which are not well understood. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986) provided data from which the effects of clouds on radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) could be computed (Ramanathan, 1987). At TOA, clouds increase the reflected solar radiation, tending to cool the planet, and decrease the OLR, causing the planet to retain its heat (Ramanathan et al., 1989; Harrison et al., 1990). The effects of clouds on radiation fluxes are denoted cloud forcing. These shortwave and longwave forcings counter each other to various degrees, so that in the tropics the result is a near balance. Over mid and polar latitude oceans, cloud forcing at TOA results in large net loss of radiation. Here, there are large areas of stratus clouds and cloud systems associated with storms. These systems are sensitive to surface temperatures and vary strongly with the annual cycle. During winter, anticyclones form over the continents and move to the oceans during summer. This movement of major cloud systems causes large changes of surface radiation, which in turn drives the surface temperature and sensible and latent heat released to the atmosphere.

  6. Can the KTP laser change the cementum surface of healthy and diseased teeth providing an acceptable root surface for fibroblast attachment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, Jason M.; Garnick, Jerry J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of our research is to determine the effects of KTP laser on root cementum and fibroblast attachment. Initial work has been completed in testing the effect of different energy levels on root surfaces. From these studies optimal energy levels were determined. In subsequent studies the working distance and exposure time required to obtain significant fibroblast attachment to healthy cementum surfaces were investigated. Results showed that lased cemental surfaces exhibited changes in surface topography which ranged from a melted surface to an apparent slight fusion of the surface of the covering smear layer. When the optimal energy level was used, fibroblasts demonstrate attachment on the specimens, resulting in the presence of a monolayer of cells on the control surfaces as well as on the surfaces lased with this energy level. The present study investigates the treatment of pathological root surfaces and calculus with a KTP laser utilizing these optimal parameters determine previously. Thirty single rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease and ten healthy teeth were obtained, crowns were sectioned and roots split longitudinally. Forty test specimens were assigned into 1 of 4 groups; pathologic root--not lased, pathologic root--lased, root planed root and health root planed root. Human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on specimens and cultured for 24 hours. Specimens were processed for SEM. The findings suggest that with the KTP laser using a predetermined energy level applied to pathological root surfaces, the lased surfaces provided an unacceptable surface for fibroblast attachment. However, the procedural control using healthy root planed surfaces did demonstrate fibroblast attachment.

  7. The Remote Sensing of Surface Radiative Temperature over Barbados.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    remote sensing of surface radiative temperature over Barbados was undertaken using a PRT-5 attached to a light aircraft. Traverses across the centre of the island, over the rugged east coast area, and the urban area of Bridgetown were undertaken at different times of day and night in the last week of June and the first week of December, 1969. These traverses show that surface variations in long-wave radiation emission lie within plus or minus 5% of the observations over grass at a representative site. The quick response of the surface to sunset and sunrise was

  8. Effect of two storage solutions on surface topography of two root-end fillings.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Parirokh, Masoud; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2009-12-01

    The effect of different storage solutions on surface topography of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and new experimental cement (NEC) as root-end fillings was investigated. Twenty-four single-rooted teeth were cleaned, shaped and obturated in a same manner. After root-end resection, 3-mm deep root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared. Samples were randomly divided into four test groups (A1-A2-B1-B2, n = 6). Root-end cavities in groups A and B were filled with MTA and NEC, respectively, and were then stored in 100% humidity for 24 h. The samples of groups 1 and 2 were, respectively, immersed in normal saline (NS) and phosphate buffer saline solutions for 1 week. The samples were imaged under stereomicroscope before and after immersion and were then investigated and analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). Results showed significant difference among studied groups. Surface topography of all samples was altered by crystal formation and precipitation on root-end fillings except for group A1 (MTA-NS). SEM and EDXA results showed that the composition and structure of precipitated crystals were comparable with that of standard hydroxyapatite. It was concluded that biocompatibility, sealing ability, and cementogenic activity of MTA and probably NEC may be attributed to this fundamental bioactive reaction.

  9. Human Histologic Repair and Regeneration After Biologic Preparation of Diseased Root Surfaces,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    six to eight cells thick, but with some rete extensions into the connective tissue , was attached to the root surface to a point about 0.7 mm coronal to... cell and the nick the connective tissue fibers and flattened fibroblasts were oriented parallel to the root surface (Fig. 5). 7. Patient "B". Control...lymphocytes subjacent to the epithelium. From the apical Junctional epithelial cell to the nick, a distance of about 0.5 as, there was connective tissue (Fig

  10. Radiation exposure for manned Mars surface missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The Langley cosmic ray transport code and the Langley nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are used to quantify the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar proton flares through the Martian atmosphere. Surface doses are estimated using both a low density and a high density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere which, in the vertical direction, provides a total of 16 g/sq cm and 22 g/sq cm of protection, respectively. At the Mars surface during the solar minimum cycle, a blood-forming organ (BFO) dose equivalent of 10.5 to 12 rem/yr due to galactic cosmic ray transport and attenuation is calculated. Estimates of the BFO dose equivalents which would have been incurred from the three large solar flare events of August 1972, November 1960, and February 1956 are also calculated at the surface. Results indicate surface BFO dose equivalents of approximately 2 to 5, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10 rem per event, respectively. Doses are also estimated at altitudes up to 12 km above the Martian surface where the atmosphere will provide less total protection.

  11. Topographic Slope, Solar Radiation and Land Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosor, A. L.; Hahmann, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    The Earth's surface is composed of non-uniform terrain, which partially controls the amount of incident radiation available at the surface and in turn controls its regional vegetation cover and its hydrological and ecological processes. A complete treatment of the physical mechanisms that determine a region's climate should include a detailed description of its land surface processes. The processes associated with net solar radiation and surface water movements are sensitive to the degree to which the surface slope and aspect are approximated. Therefore, a careful representation of land surface-atmosphere transfer interactions requires the terrain to be viewed as separate homogenous sub-regions of different slope and aspect, particularly over complex terrain. This study describes a mathematical representation of the surface topography developed to provide an aggregated measure of the radiative effects on inclined terrain. We have obtained a "radiative equivalent" topography (i.e., elevation, slope, and aspect), for use as boundary conditions to a fine-mesh land model coupled to the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3). Using the data sets developed at the U.S Geological Survey Data Center (at 1 km resolution), we have derived aggregated slopes and aspects at the 0.5 o x 0.5 o fine-mesh resolution. The aggregated slopes and aspects are used in an off-line test using BATS for the Arizona region. This test indicates considerable differences in the latent and sensible heat fluxes between the "flat" terrain simulation and that where slopes and azimuths are considered in the computation of the incident solar radiation. This poster will present the results of a more complete test of the effects of incorporating the effective incident solar radiation of inclined surfaces on the climate. In particular, the effects on snow hydrology over the Western United States will be explored.

  12. Combined effects of Lanthanum(III) and elevated Ultraviolet-B radiation on root nitrogen nutrient in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrong; Wang, Lihong; Sun, Zhaoguo; Li, Xiaodong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Rare earth element pollution and elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation occur simultaneously in some regions, but the combined effects of these two factors on plants have not attracted enough attention. Nitrogen nutrient is vital to plant growth. In this study, the combined effects of lanthanum(III) and elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots were investigated. Treatment with 0.08 mmol L(-1) La(III) did not change the effects of elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), nitrate, ammonium, amino acids, or soluble protein in the roots. Treatment with 0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation synergistically decreased the NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities as well as the nitrate, amino acid, and soluble protein levels, except for the GDH activity and ammonium content. Combined treatment with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation produced severely deleterious effects on all test indices, and these effects were stronger than those induced by La(III) or elevated UV-B radiation treatment alone. Following the withdrawal of La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation, all test indices for the combined treatments with 0.08/0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation recovered to a certain extent, but they could not recover for treatments with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation. In summary, combined treatment with La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation seriously affected nitrogen nutrition in soybean roots through the inhibition of nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation.

  13. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  14. Root surface acid phosphatases and their role in phosphorus assimilation by Eriophorum vaginatum

    SciTech Connect

    Kroehler, C.J.; Linkins, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eriophorum vaginatum is a dominant plant in much of the arctic tundra ecosystem where phosphorus is frequently a limiting nutrient. The mineralization of this organic phosphorus was thought to be principally controlled by microbial respiration, however, more recent work shows that extracellular soil phosphatases are the principal regulators. The existence of plant root and mycorrhizal surface phosphatases which are capable of hydrolyzing organic phosphorus compounds, suggests that soil organic phosphorus may be directly utilized by plants. Since E. vaginatum is a tussock forming sedge with a very dense annually produced rooting system which can exploit most of the tussock soil volume, its surface phosphatases may play a dominant role in organic phosphorus hydrolysis into inorganic phosphorus. Of equal significance would be the potential for this activity to contribute to the phosphorus nutrition through the coupling of phosphorus hydrolysis on the root and root uptake of the resultant inorganic phosphorus. Phosphatase activity was investigated and found to be uniformly distributed along the surface of the root. Kinetic analysis of the enzyme gave estimates of 9.23 mM for the apparent Km and 1.61 * 10/sup -3/ ..mu..moles mm-2 hr/sup -1/ for the apparent Vmax. Saturation values for E. vaginatum phosphatases are about 3 times higher than average soil solution organic phosphorus concentrations. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A novel method for sampling bacteria on plant root and soil surfaces at the microhabitat scale.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Paul G; Miller, Anthony J; Clark, Ian M; Taylor, Richard G; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Hirsch, Penny R

    2008-09-01

    This study reports the first method for sampling bacteria at a spatial scale approximating a microhabitat. At the core of this method is the use of tungsten rods with laser-cut tips of known surface area (0.013 mm(2)). Exposed plant root or soil surfaces were viewed with a dissecting microscope and micro-sampling rods were guided to sample sites using a micro-manipulator. Bacteria that adhered to the sampling tips were then recovered for microbiological analyses. The efficiency of this method for removing bacteria from root surfaces was similar to that with which bacteria are recovered from dissected root segments using the conventional technique of washing. However, as the surface area of the micro-sampling tips was known, the new method has the advantage of eliminating inaccuracy in estimates of bacterial densities due to inaccurate estimation of the root or soil surface sampled. When used to investigate spatial distributions of rhizoplane bacteria, the new technique revealed trends that were consistent with those reported with existing methods, while providing access to additional information about community structure at a much smaller spatial scale. The spatial scale of this new method is ca. 1000-times smaller than other sampling methods involving swabbing. This novel technique represents an important methodological step facilitating microbial ecological investigations at a microhabitat scale.

  16. Holmium:YAG laser: effect on pulpal tissues and root surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of the Holmium:YAG irradiation on the pulpal tissues and surface topography on root surface dentin in human teeth in vivo were studied. The exposed root surfaces of seventeen pre-immediate denture patients were scaled and root planed with a Gracey 3 - 4 curette apical to the dentinoenamel junction until smooth and hard. The prepared root surfaces of two teeth per patient were exposed with Holmium:YAG laser energy after an application of nonfilled resin/fluoride mixture. The laser exposed areas were below the dentinoenamel junction around one-half of each root surface. The opposing sides of each of the teeth received resin/fluoride but no laser energy. A third tooth was identified as a nontreated control. The HO:YAG at 2.12 microns wavelength with a defocused beam size of 3 mm was used. The amount of laser energy delivered per 3 X 5 mm area was 0.450 (+/- .05) joules with a fluence of 2.66 - 3.30 J/cm2. The teeth were extracted after periods of 45 - 120 days. The specimens were fixed in formalin and prepared for histological examination using hematoxylin and eosin stains. Microscopic evaluation of room surfaces showed increased smoothness on the laser treated sites compared to their opposing non-lased sides. Histological examination of the pulpal tissues exhibited no abnormal changes. No clinical symptoms of pulpal pathology were produced. HO:YAG laser energy proved safe for treating room surfaces of human teeth in vivo under conditions presented in this study.

  17. Trends in Surface Radiation Budgets at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Zhang, B.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For assessment of variability and trends in the Earth Radiation Balance, information is needed at climatic time scales. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of radiative balance at global scale, however, the length of available satellite records is limited due to the frequent changes in the observing systems. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize satellite observations from independent sources to estimates shortwave and longwave surface radiative fluxes at climatic time scales and use them to learn about their variability and trends at global scale with a focus on the tropics. An attempt will be made to learn from the comparison about possible causes of observed trends. The radiative fluxes were derived in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; they are evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention is given to updated knowledge on radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  18. Strong emission of terahertz radiation from nanostructured Ge surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chul; Maeng, Inhee; Kee, Chul-Sik; Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su; Kim, Tae Heon; Lee, Jong Seok

    2015-06-29

    Indirect band gap semiconductors are not efficient emitters of terahertz radiation. Here, we report strong emission of terahertz radiation from germanium wafers with nanostructured surfaces. The amplitude of THz radiation from an array of nano-bullets (nano-cones) is more than five (three) times larger than that from a bare-Ge wafer. The power of the terahertz radiation from a Ge wafer with an array of nano-bullets is comparable to that from n-GaAs wafers, which have been widely used as a terahertz source. We find that the THz radiation from Ge wafers with the nano-bullets is even more powerful than that from n-GaAs for frequencies below 0.6 THz. Our results suggest that introducing properly designed nanostructures on indirect band gap semiconductor wafers is a simple and cheap method to improve the terahertz emission efficiency of the wafers significantly.

  19. Thermophotovoltaic generation with selective radiators based on tungsten surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Hitoshi; Yugami, Hiroo

    2004-10-01

    Two-dimensional surface-relief gratings with a period of 1.0-0.2μm composed of rectangular microcavities were fabricated on single crystalline W substrates to develop spectrally selective radiators for thermophotovoltaic generation. The radiators displayed strong emission in the near-infrared region where narrow-band-gap photovoltaic cells could convert photons into electricity. The enhancement of thermal emission was attributed to the microcavity effect. Power generation tests were carried out and the W gratings showed more than two times higher generation efficiency, compared to a SiC radiator. The results showed that the microstructured W radiators behave as good selective radiator, with both high efficiency and high power density.

  20. Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    transfer, reflectance, rough surface, BRDF, Kramers- Kronig , penetration depth, fill factor, infrared, LWIR, MWIR, absorption coefficient, scattering...can be obtained from the absorption coefficient via Equation 6 (below) and the real part may be obtained via Kramers- Kronig (KK) analysis,18 n = KK(k...expanded reference library with more than one reference spectrum per material. Kramers- Kronig Relations: The Kramers- Kronig relationship is a

  1. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  2. A Study of Surface Temperatures, Clouds and Net Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans

    1996-01-01

    This study focused on the seasonal relationships and interactions of climate parameters such as the surface temperatures, net radiation, long wave flux, short wave flux, and clouds on a global basis. Five years of observations (December 1984 to November 1989) from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program (ISCCP) were used to study both seasonal variations and interannual variations by use of a basic radiation budget equation. In addition, the study was extended to include an analysis of the cloud forcing due El-Nino's impact on the ERBE parameters.

  3. The Radiative Decay of Plasma Oscillations on Nonplanar Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John William, Jr.

    We have studied the radiation resulting from electron bombardment of extremely small silver particles and of silver films containing closely-spaced, periodic surface structure. Thin silver films which were heated to a temperature slightly below the bulk-silver melting point were found to break into collections of particles with approximately ellipsoidal cross sections. Electron microscopy and shadow -casting techniques were used to characterize the samples as to the distributions of particle sizes and particle shapes. The wavelength, polarization, and angular intensity characteristics of the radiation emitted by these samples were compared with the predictions of a theoretical model for the radiative decay of surface plasmons on nonspherical particles. The results indicated that two distinct modes of charge density oscillation contributed to the radiation. Very closely-spaced periodic surface modulations were produced in silver films by using the technique of electron beam lithography. Radiation resulting from the electron bombardment of these films showed evidence of structure that has been predicted theoretically. However, this structure was not well resolved. We have made suggestions which should be useful in future studies of the origin of this radiation.

  4. Observed instantaneous cirrus radiative effect on surface-level shortwave and longwave irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial

    2008-11-01

    Data collected at the SIRTA Observatory, 20 km south of Paris, are analyzed to determine the instantaneous surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) induced by cirrus clouds. CRE is here defined as the difference between overcast-sky and clear-sky surface radiative fluxes obtained by ground-based measurement of broadband fluxes and clear-sky parametric models, respectively. Clear-sky periods detected by a double threshold based on lidar and radiative fluxes analysis show a root mean square error for clear-sky models smaller than 6.5 W m-2 for shortwave flux and 4 W m-2 for longwave flux. Over 100 h in 2003-2006 characterized by homogeneous overcast cirrus clouds are analyzed. Fifty percent of this cirrus population is subvisible and semitransparent, that is, with optical thickness less than 0.3. The mean surface shortwave cirrus cloud radiative effect (CRESW) is found near -50 W m-2. We establish the relationship between CRESW and cirrus optical thickness (COT) to be about -90 W m-2 per unit of COT. This SW sensitivity ranges from -80 W m-2 COT-1 to -100 W m-2 COT-1 for turbid to pristine atmospheres, respectively. We also establish the relationship between surface longwave cloud radiative effect (CRELW) and the irradiance emitted by the cirrus cloud derived from cloud infrared emissivity and cloud temperature. The average surface CRELW is about +5 W m-2. CRELW is found to be about 10% of the cloud irradiance. This LW effect ranges from 5 to 15% of the cirrus irradiance depending on atmospheric humidity for the wet and dry atmosphere, respectively.

  5. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture data assimilation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Crow, W. T.; Kimball, J. S.; Koster, R. D.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, knowledge of root zone soil moisture (defined here nominally as soil moisture in the top 1 m of the soil column) is needed. The SMAP mission will therefore provide a value-added Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product with the two key objectives: (i) to provide estimates of root zone soil moisture based on SMAP observations, and (ii) to provide a global surface and root zone soil moisture product that is spatially and temporally complete. The L4_SM algorithm uses an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to merge SMAP observations with soil moisture estimates from the NASA GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. The model describes the vertical transfer of soil moisture between the surface and root zone reservoirs and will be driven with observation-based surface meteorological forcing data, including precipitation, on a global 9 km Earth-fixed grid. The presentation provides an overview of the SMAP L4_SM algorithm and pre-launch validation. Specifically, an L4_SM prototype product based on the assimilation of observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was validated using in situ measurements from SMAP core validation sites (densely instrumented watersheds) and from more than 100 single-profile sensors scattered across the United States. The validation results indicate that the prototype soil moisture product satisfies the formal RMSE requirement for the L4_SM product of 0.04 m3/m3 (after removal of the long-term mean bias). An examination of the observation-minus-forecast residuals from the L4_SM system suggests where the system could be improved further.

  6. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1990-01-01

    A future goal of the U.S. space program is a commitment to the manned exploration and habitation of Mars. An important consideration of such missions is the exposure of crew members to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation from high-energy galactic cosmic ray fluxes and solar proton flares. The crew will encounter the most harmful radiation environment in transit to Mars from which they must be adequately protected. However, once on the planet's surface, the Martian environment should provide a significant amount of protection from free-space radiative fluxes. In current Mars scenario descriptions, the crew flight time to Mars is estimated to be anywhere from 7 months to over a year each way, with stay times on the surface ranging from 20 days to 2 years. To maintain dose levels below established astronaut limits, dose estimates need to be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations on the surface anticipated, the characterization of the Mars radiation environment is important in assessing all radiation protection requirements. This synopsis focuses on the probable doses incurred by surface inhabitants from the transport of galactic cosmic rays and solar protons through the Mars atmosphere.

  7. First global WCRP shortwave surface radiation budget dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Charlock, T. P.; Staylor, W. F.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.; Ohmura, A.; Gilgen, H.; Konzelman, T.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Moats, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    Shortwave radiative fluxes that reach the Earth's surface are key factors that influence atmospheric and oceanic circulations as well as surface climate. Yet, information on these fluxes is meager. Surface site data are generally available from only a limited number of observing stations over land. Much less is known about the large-scale variability of the shortwave radiative fluxes over the oceans, which cover most of the globe. Recognizing the need to produce global-scale fields of such fluxes for use in climate research, the World Climate Research Program has initiated activities that led to the establishment of the Surface Radiation Budget Climatology Project with the ultimate goal to determine various components of the surface radiation budget from satellite data. In this paper, the first global products that resulted from this activity are described. Monthly and daily data on a 280-km grid scale are available. Samples of climate parameters obtainable from the dataset are presented. Emphasis is given to validation and limitations of the results. For most of the globe, satellite estimates have bias values between +/- 20 W/sq m and rms values are around 25 W/sq m. There are specific regions with much larger uncertainties however.

  8. Visualization of thermally fluctuating surface structure in noncontact atomic-force microscopy and tip effects on fluctuation: theoretical study of Si(111)-(square root[3] x square root[3])-Ag surface.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naruo; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tsukada, Masaru

    2002-01-28

    We investigated noncontact atomic-force microscopy (NC-AFM) images of a thermally fluctuating surface structure together with tip effects based on the first-principles electronic state calculation. As an example the Si(111)-(square root[3] x square root[3])-Ag (square root[3]-Ag) surface is studied. We have succeeded in theoretically visualizing the thermal fluctuation of the square root[3]-Ag surface at room temperature, and in reproducing the observed NC-AFM image for the first time. Further, the pinning effect of the thermal fluctuation of the square root[3]-Ag surface by the tip is clarified, which shows a novel ability of NC-AFM to modify the surface structure.

  9. Exposure to 915 MHz radiation induces micronuclei in Vicia faba root tips.

    PubMed

    Gustavino, Bianca; Carboni, Giovanni; Petrillo, Roberto; Paoluzzi, Giovanni; Santovetti, Emanuele; Rizzoni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones and wireless networks raised a great debate about the real carcinogenic potential of radiofrequency-electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure associated with these devices. Conflicting results are reported by the great majority of in vivo and in vitro studies on the capability of RF-EMF exposure to induce DNA damage and mutations in mammalian systems. Aimed at understanding whether less ambiguous responses to RF-EMF exposure might be evidenced in plant systems with respect to mammalian ones, in the present work the mutagenic effect of RF-EMF has been studied through the micronucleus (MN) test in secondary roots of Vicia faba seedlings exposed to mobile phone transmission in controlled conditions, inside a transverse electro magnetic (TEM) cell. Exposure of roots was carried out for 72h using a continuous wave (CW) of 915 MHz radiation at three values of equivalent plane wave power densities (23, 35 and 46W/m(2)). The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured with a calorimetric method and the corresponding values were found to fall in the range of 0.4-1.5W/kg. Results of three independent experiments show the induction of a significant increase of MN frequency after exposure, ranging from a 2.3-fold increase above the sham value, at the lowest SAR level, up to a 7-fold increase at the highest SAR. These findings are in agreement with the limited number of data on cytogenetic effects detected in other plant systems exposed to mobile phone RF-EMF frequencies and clearly show the capability of radiofrequency exposure to induce DNA damage in this eukaryotic cell system.

  10. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER)

    DOEpatents

    Stockman, Mark I.; Bergman, David J.

    2009-08-04

    A nanostructure is used to generate a highly localized nanoscale optical field. The field is excited using surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER). The SPASER radiation consists of surface plasmons that undergo stimulated emission, but in contrast to photons can be localized within a nanoscale region. A SPASER can incorporate an active medium formed by two-level emitters, excited by an energy source, such as an optical, electrical, or chemical energy source. The active medium may be quantum dots, which transfer excitation energy by radiationless transitions to a resonant nanosystem that can play the same role as a laser cavity in a conventional laser. The transitions are stimulated by the surface plasmons in the nanostructure, causing the buildup of a macroscopic number of surface plasmons in a single mode.

  11. Effect of UV-C radiation and vapor released from a water hyacinth root absorbent containing bergamot oil to control mold on storage of brown rice.

    PubMed

    Songsamoe, Sumethee; Matan, Narumol; Matan, Nirundorn

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to develop absorbent material from a water hyacinth root containing bergamot oil and to improve its antifungal activity by using ultraviolet C (UV-C) against the growth of A. flavus on the brown rice. Process optimization was studied by the immersion of a water hyacinth root into a water and bergamot oil (300, 500 and 700 μl ml(-1)). The root (absorbent material) was dried at 50, 70, and 90 °C for 10 min. Then, ultraviolet C (UV-C) was used for enhancing the antifungal activity of bergamot oil for 10, 15, and 20 min. The shelf-life of the brown rice with the absorbent after incubation at 25 ° C with 100 % RH for 12 weeks was also investigated. A microscope and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to find out possible mode of action. Results indicated that the absorbent material produced from the water hyacinth root containing bergamot oil at 500 μl ml(-1) in the water solution, dried at 70 ° C and UV for 15 min showed the highest antifungal activity in a vapor phase against A. flavus on the brown rice. A microscopy investigation confirmed that the water hyacinth root could absorb bergamot oil from an outside water solution into root cells. Limonene in vapor phase was shown to be a stronger inhibitor than essential oil after UV-C radiation and should be the key factor in boosting bergamot oil antifungal activity. A vapor phase of bergamot oil could be released and inhibit natural mold on the surface of the brown rice for up to 12 weeks; without the absorbent, mold covered the brown rice in only 4 weeks.

  12. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Min; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Wang, Peng; Hao, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM) surface’s electrical potential (ψ0). The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+) to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+) and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−). Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0) than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b) (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z). Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf). Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments. PMID:25493475

  13. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  14. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1:13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2:17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  15. Evaluation of surface energy and radiation balance systems for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritschen, Leo J.; Qian, Ping

    1988-01-01

    The energy balance and radiation balance components were determined at six sites during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) conducted south of Manhattan, Kansas during the summer of 1987. The objectives were: to determine the effect of slope and aspect, throughout a growing season, on the magnitude of the surface energy balance fluxes as determined by the Energy Balance Method (EBM); to investigate the calculation of the soil heat flux density at the surface as calculated from the heat capacity and the thermal conductivity equations; and to evaluate the performance of the Surface Energy and Radiation Balance System (SERBS). A total of 17 variables were monitored at each site. They included net, solar (up and down), total hemispherical (up and down), and diffuse radiation, soil temperature and heat flux density, air and wet bulb temperature gradients, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. A preliminary analysis of the data, for the season, indicate that variables including net radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed were quite similar at the sites even though the sites were as much as 16 km apart and represented four cardinal slopes and the top of a ridge.

  16. Mapping and control of atomic force on Si(1 1 1)square root(3) x square root(3)-Ag surface using noncontact atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Morita, S; Sugawara, Y

    2002-05-01

    We demonstrated the possibility of measuring the three-dimensional force-related map with true atomic resolution between an Si tip and Si(1 1 1)square root(3) x square root(3)-Ag sample surface by measuring the tip-sample distance dependence of noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) image, i.e. atomically resolved atomic force spectroscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrated the possibility of controlling the interaction force between the atom on the tip apex and a sample atom of Si(1 1 1)square root(3) x square root(3)-Ag surface on an atomic scale by placing an Ag atom on the Si tip apex instead of Si atom.

  17. Surface Solar Radiation in North America: Observations, Reanalyses, Satellite and Derived Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of daily surface solar/shortwave radiation data from over 4000 stations have been gathered, covering much of the lower 48 continental states of the US as well as portions of Alberta and British Columbia, Canada. The quantity of data increases almost linearly from 1998 when only several hundred stations had data. A quality control procedure utilizing threshold values along with computing the clear sky radiation envelope for individual stations was implemented to both screen bad data and rescue informative data. Over two thirds of the observations are seen as acceptable. Fifteen different surface solar radiation products are assessed relative to observations, including reanalyses (20thC, CFSRR, ERAI, JRA-55, MERRA, NARR, NCEP), derived products (CRU_NCEP, DAYMET, GLDAS, GSWP3, MsTMIP, NLDAS) and two satellite products (CERES and GOES). All except the CERES product are daily or finer in temporal resolution. The root mean square error of spatial biases is greater than 18Wm-2 for 13 of the 15 products over the summer season (June, July, August). None of the daily resolution products fulfill all three desirable criteria of low (<5%) annual or seasonal bias, high correlation with observed cloudiness and correct distribution of clear sky radiation. Some products display vestiges of underlying algorithm issues (e.g. from MTCLIM ver4.3) or bias correction methods. A new bias correction method is introduced that preserves clear sky radiation values and better replicates cloudiness statistics. The current quantity of data over the continental US suggests a solar radiation product based on, or enhanced with, observations is feasible.

  18. Effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain and apical microcracks.

    PubMed

    Jamleh, Ahmed; Adorno, Carlos G; Ebihara, Arata; Suda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain generated and apical microcracks caused during canal shaping. Thirty-three mandibular incisors were distributed into LightSpeed X, FlexMaster and a control group. A strain gauge was fixed apically on the proximal root surface to determine the maximum strain during canal shaping. Except for the control group, all root canals were enlarged to size 50. Images were taken after removing the apical 1 and 2 mm of the root end. Mean maximum strain values and presence of microcracks were statistically compared using the t-test and chi-square test, respectively. During canal shaping, the strain increased cumulatively with mean maximum strains of 808.2 ± 228.8 and 525.1 ± 168.9 microstrain in LightSpeed X and FlexMaster, respectively (P = 0.004). Both systems caused comparable microcracks. Although LightSpeed X produced higher maximum strain, no difference in microcrack development was found between both systems.

  19. Factors affecting temperature rise on the external root surface during ultrasonic retrieval of intracanal separated files.

    PubMed

    Madarati, Ahmad A; Qualtrough, Alison J; Watts, David C

    2008-09-01

    Temperature rise (TR) on the external root surface during ultrasonic removal of separated files (SFs) from 50 lower incisors roots of 10-mm length was investigated. CPR ultrasonic tips (Obtura-Spartan, Fenton, MO) were used dry to retrieve F2 ProTaper (Dentsply, Surrey, UK) segments fractured 2.5 mm from the coronal access in five groups: CPR2, CPR5, and CPR6 at power setting 1 and CPR5 at power settings 2.5 and 5. Temperature changes were inspected at 30-second intervals up to 120 seconds at three different sites: two at mesiodistal and buccolingual surfaces adjacent to the most coronal aspect of the SF and the third adjacent to the most apical aspect. Overall, the highest mean TR was at the buccolingual root surface followed by that at the mesiodistal and the more apical site surfaces. At power setting 1, CPR6 produced a significantly lower TR than CPR5, and both can be used for 120 and 60 seconds, respectively. Power setting 5 is not recommended for the removal of SF because this induces a hazardous TR.

  20. Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Alteration of Martian Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    The nature and origin of martian surface materials cannot be fully characterized without addressing the unusual reactivity of the soil and the effects of exposure to the unique martian environment. Our laboratory experiments show that ultraviolet radiation at the martian surface can result in the oxidation of metal atoms and the creation of reactive oxygen species on grain surfaces. This process is important in understanding the nature and evolution of martian soils. It can explain the reactivity discovered by the Viking Landers and possibly the origin of the ferric component of the soil.

  1. Simulation and Comparison of Martian Surface Ionization Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of energetic particle radiation and corresponding doses at the surface of Mars is being characterized by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), one of ten science instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover. The time series of dose rate for the first 300 Sols after landing on Mars on August 6, 2012 is presented here. For the comparison to RAD measurements of dose rate, Martian surface ionization radiation is simulated by utilizing observed space quantities. The GCR primary radiation spectrum is calculated by using the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) model, which has been developed by utilizing all balloon and satellite GCR measurements since 1955 and the newer 1997-2012 Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. In the BO11 model, solar modulation of the GCR primary radiation spectrum is described in terms of the international smoothed sunspot number and a time delay function. For the transport of the impingent GCR primary radiation through Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of atmospheric thickness at each elevation is calculated using the vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and pressure made by Mars Global Surveyor measurements. At Gale Crater in the southern hemisphere, the seasonal variation of atmospheric thickness is accounted for the daily atmospheric pressure measurements of the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) by using low- and high-density models for cool- and warm-season, respectively. The spherically distributed atmospheric distance is traced along the slant path, and the resultant directional shielding by Martian atmosphere is coupled with Curiosity vehicle for dose estimates. We present predictions of dose rate and comparison to the RAD measurements. The simulation agrees to within +/- 20% with the RAD measurements showing clearly the variation of dose rate by heliospheric conditions, and presenting the sensitivity of dose rate by atmospheric pressure

  2. Numerical simulation of the radiation environment on Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that on earth. Existing observation and studies reveal that the radiation environment on the Martian surface is highly variable regarding to both short- and long-term time scales. For example, its dose rate presents diurnal and seasonal variations associated with atmospheric pressure changes. Moreover, dose rate is also strongly influenced by the modulation from GCR flux. Numerical simulation and theoretical explanations are required to understand the mechanisms behind these features, and to predict the time variation of radiation environment on the Martian surface if aircraft is supposed to land on it in near future. The high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which are ubiquitous throughout the solar system are highly penetrating and extremely difficult to shield against beyond the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere. The goal of this article is to evaluate the long term radiation risk on the Martian surface. Therefore, we need to develop a realistic time-dependent GCR model, which will be integrated with Geant4 transport code subsequently to reproduce the observed variation of surface dose rate associated with the changing heliospheric conditions. In general, the propagation of cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium can be described by a Fokker-Planck equation (or Parker equation). In last decade,we witnessed a fast development of GCR transport models within the heliosphere based on accurate gas-dynamic and MHD backgrounds from global models of the heliosphere. The global MHD simulation produces a more realistic pattern of the 3-D heliospheric structure, as well as the interface between the solar system and the surrounding interstellar space. As a consequence, integrating plasma background obtained from global-dependent 3-D MHD simulation and stochastic Parker transport simulation, we expect to produce an accurate global physical-based GCR modulation model. Combined

  3. Mechanical touch responses of Arabidopsis TCH1-3 mutant roots on inclined hard-agar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guodong; Wang, Bochu; Liu, Junyu; Yan, Jie; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Xingyan

    2016-01-01

    The gravity-induced mechanical touch stimulus can affect plant root architecture. Mechanical touch responses of plant roots are an important aspect of plant root growth and development. Previous studies have reported that Arabidopsis TCH1-3 genes are involved in mechano-related events, how-ever, the physiological functions of TCH1-3 genes in Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses remain unclear. In the present study, we applied an inclined hard agar plate method to produce mechanical touch stimulus, and provided evidence that altered mechanical environment could influence root growth. Furthermore, tch1-3 Arabidopsis mutants were investigated on inclined agar surfaces to explore the functions of TCH1-3 genes on Arabidopsis root mechanoresponses. The results showed that two tch2 mutants, cml24-2 and cml24-4, exhibited significantly reduced root length, biased skewing, and decreased density of lateral root. In addition, primary root length and density of lateral root of tch3 (cml12-2) was significantly decreased on inclined agar surfaces. This study indicates that the tch2 and tch3 mutants are hypersensitive to mechanical touch stimulus, and TCH2 (CML24-2 and CML24-4) and TCH3 (CML12-2) genes may participate in the mechanical touch response of Arabidopsis roots.

  4. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy of Plant Roots Growing on the Surface of a Gel

    PubMed Central

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Hauschild, Robert; Friml, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    One of the key questions in understanding plant development is how single cells behave in a larger context of the tissue. Therefore, it requires the observation of the whole organ with a high spatial- as well as temporal resolution over prolonged periods of time, which may cause photo-toxic effects. This protocol shows a plant sample preparation method for light-sheet microscopy, which is characterized by mounting the plant vertically on the surface of a gel. The plant is mounted in such a way that the roots are submerged in a liquid medium while the leaves remain in the air. In order to ensure photosynthetic activity of the plant, a custom-made lighting system illuminates the leaves. To keep the roots in darkness the water surface is covered with sheets of black plastic foil. This method allows long-term imaging of plant organ development in standardized conditions. PMID:28190052

  5. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.

    1994-09-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured copper and niobium-one percent-zirconium, and ion beam textured graphite and carbon-carbon composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It has been found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10-20 percent degradation, and with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} a 20-40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured copper and Nb-1%Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5{degrees} test samples.

  6. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hotes, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent-Zr and ion beam textured graphite and C-C composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It was found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al2O3 there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10 to 20 percent degradation, and with Fe2O3 a 20 to 40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or C-C composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5 deg test samples.

  7. Shortwave Spectral Radiative Forcing of Cumulus Clouds from Surface Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Long, Charles N.; Flynn, Connor J.

    2011-04-02

    The spectral changes of the total cloud radiative forcing (CRF) and its diffuse and direct components are examined by using spectrally resolved (visible spectral range) all-sky surface irradiances measured by Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. We demonstrate: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and can be applied for estimation of the shortwave total CRF.

  8. SALTS AND RADIATION PRODUCTS ON THE SURFACE OF EUROPA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Hand, K. P.

    2013-04-15

    The surface of Europa could contain the compositional imprint of an underlying interior ocean, but competing hypotheses differ over whether spectral observations from the Galileo spacecraft show the signature of ocean evaporates or simply surface radiation products unrelated to the interior. Using adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of most of the disk of Europa at a spectral resolution {approx}40 times higher than seen by the Galileo spacecraft. These spectra show a previously undetected distinct signature of magnesium sulfate salts on Europa, but the magnesium sulfate is confined to the trailing hemisphere and spatially correlated with the presence of radiation products like sulfuric acid and SO{sub 2}. On the leading, less irradiated, hemisphere, our observations rule out the presence of many of the proposed sulfate salts, but do show the presence of distorted water ice bands. Based on the association of the potential MgSO{sub 4} detection on the trailing side with other radiation products, we conclude that MgSO{sub 4} is also a radiation product, rather than a constituent of a Europa ocean brine. Based on ocean chemistry models, we hypothesize that, prior to irradiation, magnesium is primarily in the form of MgCl{sub 2}, and we predict that NaCl and KCl are even more abundant, and, in fact, dominate the non-ice component of the leading hemisphere. We propose observational tests of this new hypothesis.

  9. Martian sub-surface ionising radiation: biosignatures and geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, L. R.; Desorgher, L.; Ward, J. M.; Coates, A. J.

    2007-02-01

    The surface of Mars, unshielded by thick atmosphere or global magnetic field, is exposed to high levels of cosmic radiation. This ionizing radiation field is deleterious to the survival of dormant cells or spores and the persistence of molecular biomarkers in the subsurface, and so its characterisation is of prime astrobiological interest. Previous research has attempted to address the question of biomarker persistence by inappropriately using dose profiles weighted specifically for cellular survival. Here, we present modelling results of the unmodified physically absorbed radiation dose as a function of depth through the Martian subsurface. A second major implementation of this dose accumulation rate data is in application of the optically stimulated luminescence technique for dating Martian sediments. We present calculations of the dose-depth profile from galactic cosmic rays in the Martian subsurface for various scenarios: variations of surface composition (dry regolith, ice, layered permafrost), solar minimum and maximum conditions, locations of different elevation (Olympus Mons, Hellas basin, datum altitude), and increasing atmospheric thickness over geological history. We also model the changing composition of the subsurface radiation field with depth compared between Martian locations with different shielding material, determine the relative dose contributions from primaries of different energies, and briefly treat particle deflection by the crustal magnetic fields.

  10. Mars Surface Ionizing Radiation Environment: Need for Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, R. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Suggs, R.

    1999-01-01

    Protection against the hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation remains an unresolved issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise [1]. The major uncertainty is the lack of data on biological response to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures but even a full understanding of the physical interaction of GCR with shielding and body tissues is not yet available and has a potentially large impact on mission costs. "The general opinion is that the initial flights should be short-stay missions performed as fast as possible (so-called 'Sprint' missions) to minimize crew exposure to the zero-g and space radiation environment, to ease requirements on system reliability, and to enhance the probability of mission success." The short-stay missions tend to have long transit times and may not be the best option due to the relatively long exposure to zero-g and ionizing radiation. On the other hand the short-transit missions tend to have long stays on the surface requiring an adequate knowledge of the surface radiation environment to estimate risks and to design shield configurations. Our knowledge of the surface environment is theoretically based and suffers from an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions of GCR with the Martian atmosphere, Martian surface, and intervening shield materials. An important component of Mars surface robotic exploration is the opportunity to test our understanding of the Mars surface environment. The Mars surface environment is generated by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPEs) with the Mars atmosphere and Mars surface materials. In these interactions, multiple charged ions are reduced in size and secondary particles are generated, including neutrons. Upon impact with the Martian surface, the character of the interactions changes as a result of the differing nuclear constituents of the surface materials. Among the surface environment are many neutrons diffusing from

  11. Clouds, surface temperature, and the tropical and subtropical radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy drives both the Earth's climate and biosphere, but the absorbed energy is unevenly distributed over the Earth. The tropical regions receive excess energy which is then transported by atmospheric and ocean currents to the higher latitudes. All regions at a given latitude receive the same top of the atmosphere solar irradiance (insolation). However, the net radiation received from the Sun in the tropics and subtropics varies greatly from one region to another depending on local conditions. Over land, variations in surface albedo are important. Over both land and ocean, surface temperature, cloud amount, and cloud type are also important. The Nimbus-7 cloud and Earth radiation budget (ERB) data sets are used to examine the affect of these parameters.

  12. Effect of Mulch Surface Color on Root-knot of Tomato Grown in Simulated Planting Beds.

    PubMed

    Fortnum, B A; Kasperbauer, M J; Decoteau, D R

    2000-03-01

    The effect of different-colored polyethylene mulches on quantity and spectra of reflected light, plant morphology, and root-knot disease was studied in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown in simulated planting beds. Tomato plants were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita at initial populations (Pi) of 0, 1,000, 10,000, or 50,000 eggs/plant, and grown in a greenhouse for 50 days over white, red, or black mulch. Soil temperature was kept constant among the mulch treatments by placing an insulation barrier between the colored mulch and the soil surface. Soil temperature varied less than 0.5 degrees C between soil chambers at solar noon. Tomatoes grown over white mulch received more reflected photosynthetic light and had greater shoot weights (27%), root weights (32%), and leaf area (20%) than plants grown over black mulch. Plants grown over red mulch received a higher far-red-to-red ratio in the reflected light. Mulch color altered the plant's response to root-knot nematode infection by changing the distribution of mass in axillary shoots. At high Pi, axillary leaf area and leaf weight were greater in tomato grown over white mulch than when grown over red mulch. The root-gall index was lower for plants grown over white mulch than similar plants grown over red mulch.

  13. Radiation shielding in transit to Mars and on the surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the current understanding of the space radiation environment and the primary considerations of spacecrew exposure effects and limits. By using a two-solar particle event scenario for a 'sprint' mission to Mars, estimates are developed for the requisite shielding of the transfer vehicle and Martian surface habitat. Many uncertainties, however, are noted to have gone into these mission dose estimates; the combination of these uncertainties into an error-bar on shield mass lies beyond current capabilities.

  14. Estimating root zone soil water content using limited soils information and surface soil moisture data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathman, Gary Claude

    2001-10-01

    The various hydrologic processes of infiltration, redistribution, drainage, evaporation, and water uptake by plants are strongly interdependent, as they occur sequentially or simultaneously. An important state variable that strongly influences the magnitude to which these rate processes occur is the amount of water present within the root zone, and in particular, the top few centimeters near the soil surface. Traditionally, measurements of soil moisture have been limited to point measurements made in the field. In general, averages of point measurements are used to characterize the soil moisture of an area, but these averages seldom yield information that is adequate to characterize large scale hydrologic processes. Recent advancements in remote sensing now make it possible to obtain areal estimates of surface soil moisture. The use of remotely sensed data to estimate surface soil moisture, combined with soil water and hydrologic modeling, provides a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of hydrologic processes at a much larger scale. Standard techniques for measuring soil moisture have been well documented, with commercial instrumentation being widely available. Various computer models have been developed to estimate soil moisture in the root and vadose zone, although their application over large scales is limited due to varying spatial and temporal field conditions. It is the combination of ground-based data (in-situ measurements), near-surface soil moisture data, and modeling that form the basis for this research. The interactive use of field research, remote sensing ground truth data, and integrated systems modeling is used to describe surface and profile soil moisture conditions at several locations within a large watershed. Successful application of this approach should improve our capabilities for estimating soil hydraulic properties and to better estimate water and chemical transport in the root zone, thus enhancing water use efficiency and plant

  15. Morphological Changes Of The Root Surface And Fracture Resistance After Treatment Of Root Fracture By CO2 Laser And Glass Ionomer Or Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Y. A.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.; Ghaith, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluates the morphological changes of the root surface and fracture resistance after treatment of root cracks by CO2 laser and glass Ionomer or mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA). Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth with similar dimension were selected. Crowns were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction, and the lengths of the roots were adjusted to 13 mm. A longitudinal groove with a dimension of 1×5 mm2 and a depth of 1.5 mm was prepared by a high speed fissure bur on the labial surface of the root. The roots were divided into 5 groups: the 10 root grooves in group 1 were remained unfilled and were used as a control group. The 10 root grooves in group 2 were filled with glass Ionomer, 10 root grooves in group 3 were filled with MTA, the 10 root grooves in group 4 were filled with glass Ionomer and irradiated by CO2 laser and the 10 root grooves in group 5 were filled with MTA and irradiated with CO2 laser. Scanning electron microscopy was performed for two samples in each group. Tests for fracture strength were performed using a universal testing machine and a round tip of a diameter of 4 mm. The force was applied vertically with a constant speed of 1 mm min 1. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. Results were evaluated statistically with ANOVA and Turkey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) tests. SEM micrographs revealed that the melted masses and the plate-like crystals formed a tight Chemical bond between the cementum and glass Ionomer and melted masses and globular like structure between cementum and MTA. The mean fracture resistance was the maximum fracture resistance in group 5 (810.8 N). Glass Ionomer and MTA with the help of CO2 laser can be an alternative to the treatment of tooth crack or fracture. CO2 laser increase the resistance of the teeth to fracture.

  16. Changes in Surface Radiation and Associated Effects on Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.

    2005-12-01

    Variations in solar and thermal radiation incident at the Earth's surface profoundly affect the human environment. Increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere enhance the greenhouse effect at the surface manifest as a gradual increase of thermal radiation from the atmosphere down to the surface. Recent analyses of observational records confirm this expectation. Yet not only the thermal fluxes, but also solar fluxes are currently undergoing major changes. A decline of solar radiation at the land surface has become apparent in many observational records prior to 1990, a phenomenon now popularly known as "global dimming." Dimming of solar radiation was probably caused by increased air pollution, and associated levels of aerosol, as well as increasing cloud amounts. The dimming of solar radiation may also be the cause of reduced evaporation between 1960 and 1990 measured worldwide with evaporation pans, documenting the potential influence of solar dimming on the global hydrological cycle. Newly available surface observations from 1990 to present show, however, that the solar dimming did not persist into the 1990s. Instead, a widespread brightening has been observed since the mid-1980s. The brightening is consistent with reduction in cloudiness and an atmosphere which has recently become more transparent for sunlight. This has been favored by reduced aerosol loadings related to enhanced air pollution control and the economic breakdown in formerly communist countries in the late 1980s. The transition towards more sunlight at the Earth's surface since the late 1980s after decades of decline may have significantly affected surface climate and the global hydrological cycle. While from the 1960s to the 1980s the dimming of sunlight might have been able to counterbalance and mask to some extent the increasing greenhouse effect, leading to only moderate global temperature changes observed in this period, this has no longer been the case after the mid 1980s. The

  17. Assessment of non-carious root surface defects in areas of gingival recession: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Caroline-Annette; Nainar, Deepavalli-Arumuga

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this descriptive study was to observe the distribution of four different classes of non-carious cervical root surface discrepancies in teeth with gingival recession. Additionally to explore the different treatment modalities in the literature for each of these defects. Material and Methods A total of 150 subjects with at least one labial gingival recession were included in the study. 1400 teeth were evaluated using 2.5 X magnification loupes and UNC -15 probe for the presence of the cemento-enamel junction and step like defects according to Pini-Prato’s classification: A-, identifiable CEJ without defect; A+, identifiable CEJ with defect; B-, unidentifiable CEJ without defect, B+, unidentifiable CEJ with defect. Further a comprehensive electronic and hand search of pubmed indexed journals was performed to identify appropriate treatment modalities for these defects and their predictability following restorative/surgical or combination of both. Results A total of 1400 teeth with exposed root surfaces were examined (793 Maxillary; 607 mandibular). 499 teeth were A-, 405 were A+, 322 were B+ and 174 were B-. The distribution of these defects in different teeth was: 36% premolars, 32% molars, 21% incisors and 11% canines, collectively 68% in the aesthetic zone. Conclusions Majority of these lesions are in the maxillary aesthetic zone. Hence the presence of the CEJ and the defect must be taken into account while managing these defects surgically. Key words:Cervical abrasion, gingival recession, magnification loupes, root coverage, step defects. PMID:27703607

  18. Comparison of Different Global Information Sources Used in Surface Radiative Flux Calculation: Radiative Properties of the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuanchong; Rossow, William B.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Direct estimates of surface radiative fluxes that resolve regional and weather-scale variabilty over the whole globe with reasonable accuracy have only become possible with the advent of extensive global, mostly satellite, datasets within the past couple of decades. The accuracy of these fluxes, estimated to be about 10-15 W per square meter is largely limited by the accuracy of the input datasets. The leading uncertainties in the surface fluxes are no longer predominantly induced by clouds but are now as much associated with uncertainties in the surface and near-surface atmospheric properties. This study presents a fuller, more quantitative evaluation of the uncertainties for the surface albedo and emissivity and surface skin temperatures by comparing the main available global datasets from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project, NOAA Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Image project. The datasets are, in practice, treated as an ensemble of realizations of the actual climate such that their differences represent an estimate of the uncertainty in their measurements because we do not possess global truth datasets for these quantities. The results are globally representative and may be taken as a generalization of our previous ISCCP-based uncertainty estimates for the input datasets. Surface properties have the primary role in determining the surface upward shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) flux. From this study, the following conclusions are obtained

  19. Radiative-convective-land surface equilibria: An idealized modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.; McFadden, L.; Ellwein, A.

    2007-12-01

    The concept of radiative-convective equilibrium has been a cornerstone in our understanding of the climate of the Tropical oceans for decades. Our hypothesis is that there are analagous equilibrium states over semi-arid continental regions during summer that link groundwater, plant ecosystems, geomorphology, and the atmosphere. We test this hypothesis using an idealized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) coupled to the NOAH Land Surface Model. A control simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean yields results that are similar to other studies and is used for comparison to two idealized land surface configurations. Both configurations represent a mixed shrubland-grassland environment, but the first is characterized by a relatively high vegetation fraction and a sandy clay loam soil, while the second configuration consists of a much lower vegetation fraction and sandy soil. In this presentation, we will describe the nature of the equilibrium states attained in the model in terms of daily rain rates, surface energy fluxes, and groundwater storage and we will show the impact of changing land surface conditions on those equilibrium states. This modeling approach may thus be a useful framework for evaluating feedbacks between ecosystems and climate change in semi-arid regions.

  20. Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, R.H. ); Pick, M.E. . Berkeley Nuclear Labs.); Roofthooft, R. , Linkebeek ); van Melsen, C. )

    1991-11-01

    Test coupons of typical PWR materials of construction were prepared using a number of pretreatments to minimize radiation buildup. The coupons were then exposed to primary coolant at the Doel-2 PWR in Belgium. The exposure periods for the coupons ranged from one to three fuel cycles. After removal from the primary system, doserate and gamma spectroscopy measurements were made to determine the radioactivity levels on the coupons. Varying levels of success were achieved for the preconditioning techniques tested. Electropolishing alone provided some degree of resistance to radiation buildup on the treated surface and electropolishing plus passivation was shown to be even better. Radiation buildup resistance of the palladium-coated coupons was poor; radiation levels on these coupons were even higher than on the untreated reference coupons. The poor performance of the palladium-coated coupons was possibly due to the method used to apply the coating. In contrast to palladium coating, very encouraging results were achieved with chromium plating plus passivation. Preliminary results show that this technique can inhibit activity deposition by as much as a factor of ten. 4 refs., 64 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

    2011-01-08

    Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

  2. Radiative interactions with micromachined surfaces: Spectral polarized emittance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, J.N.

    1995-05-01

    This report covers work aimed at obtaining additional information on the electromagnetic emissions from heated, microstructured surface. Earlier work had established that thermal emission was a useful means for obtaining broad band information on the electromagnetic properties of these surfaces. Among the earlier results obtained was a demonstration that there was an increased amount of coherent radiation emitted from these structures. Also found was that the nature of the emission was dependent on the carrier concentration of the emitting material as well as the details of the geometry of surface structures. Described in this report is the normal polarized emissivity of undoped silicon gratings of different dimensions measured with a new emissometer. Deep grating fabrication, formation of a titanium silicide layer, and wafer cutting is described.

  3. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  4. Effect of lipid/polysaccharide ratio on surface activity of model root mucilage in its solid and liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fengxian; Arye, Gilboa

    2016-04-01

    The rhizosphere can be defined as the volume of soil around living roots, which is influenced by root activity. The biological, chemical and physical conditions that prevail in the rhizosphere are significantly different from those of the bulk soil. Plant roots can release diverse organic materials in the rhizosphere which may have different effects on its bio-chemo-physical activity. Among these exudates is the root mucilage which can play a role on the maintenance of root-soil contact, lubrication of the root tip, protection of roots from desiccation and disease, stabilization of soil micro-aggregates and the selective absorption and storage of ions. The surface activity of the root mucilage at the liquid-air interface deduced from its surface tension depression relative to water, implying on its amphiphilic nature. Consequently as the rhizosphere dry out, hydrophobic functional groups may exhibit orientation at the solid-air interface and thus, the wettability of the rhizosphere may temporarily decrease. The major fraction of the root mucilage comprise of polysaccharides and to a much lesser extent, amino acids, organic acids, and phospholipids. The most frequent polysaccharide and phospholipids detected in root mucilage are polygalacturonic acid (PGA) and Phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. The latter, is thought to be main cause for the surface active nature of root mucilage. Nevertheless, the role and function of root mucilage in the rhizosphere is commonly studied based on model root mucilage that comprise of only one component, where the most frequent ones are PGA or PC (or lecithin). The main objective of this study was to quantify the effect of concentration and PGA/PC ratios on the wettability of a model rhizosphere soil and the surface tension of the model root mucilage at the liquid-air interface. The PGA/PC mixtures were measured for their equilibrium and dynamic surface tension using the Wilhelmy-Plate method. Quartz sand or glass slides were

  5. Decadal Variability of Surface Incident Solar Radiation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun

    2015-04-01

    Observations have reported a widespread dimming of surface incident solar radiation (Rs) from the 1950s to the 1980s and a brightening afterwards. However, none of the state-of-the-art earth system models, including those from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), could successfully reproduce the dimming/brightening rates over China. This study provides metadata and reference data to investigate the observed variability of Rs in China. From 1958 to 1990, diffuse solar radiation (Rsdif) and direct solar radiation (Rsdir) was measured separately in China, from which Rs was calculated a sum. However, pyranometers used to measure Rsdif had a strong sensitivity drift problem, which introduced a spurious decreasing trend to Rsdif and Rs measurements. The observed Rsdir did not suffer from such sensitivity drift problem. From 1990 to 1993, the old instruments were replaced and measuring stations were relocated in China, which introduced an abrupt increase in the observed Rs. After 1993, Rs was measured by solid black thermopile pyranometers. Comprehensive comparisons between observation-based and model-based Rs performed in this research have shown that sunshine duration (SunDu)-derived Rs is of high quality and provide accurate estimate of decadal variability of Rs over China. SunDu-derived Rs averaged over 105 stations in China decreased at -2.9 W m-2 per decade from 1961 to 1990 and remained stable afterward. This decadal variability has been confirmed by the observed Rsdir, independent studies on aerosols and diurnal temperature range, and can be reproduced by certain high-quality earth system models. However, neither satellite retrievals (the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Project Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX SRB)) nor reanalyses (ERA-Interim and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA)) can accurately reproduce such decadal variability of Rs over China for their exclusion of annual variability of tropospheric

  6. A microscopic analysis of the effects of root surface scaling with different power parameters of Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes; Cominotte, Mariana Aline; Beraldo, Tamara Pádua Pereira; Sampaio, José Eduardo Cezar; Marcantonio, Rosemary Adriana Chiérici

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different power parameters of an Erbium, Cromium: Yttrium, Scandium, Gallium, Garnet laser (Er,Cr:YSGG laser) on the morphology, attachment of blood components (ABC), roughness, and wear on irradiated root surfaces. Sixty-five incisive bovine teeth were used in this study, 35 of which were used for the analysis of root surface morphology and ABC. The remaining 30 teeth were used for roughness and root wear analysis. The samples were randomly allocated into seven groups: G1: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 0.5 W; G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 1.0 W; G3: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 1.5 W; G4: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 2.0 W; G5: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 2.5 W; G6: Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 3.0 W; G7: scaling and root planning (SRP) with manual curettes. The root surfaces irradiated by Er,Cr:YSGG at 1.0 W and scaling with manual curettes presented the highest degrees of ABC. The samples irradiated by the Er,Cr:YSGG laser were rougher than the samples treated by the manual curette, and increasing the laser power parameters caused more root wear and greater roughness on the root surface. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser is safe to use for periodontal treatment, but it is not appropriate to use irradiation greater than 1.0 W for this purpose.

  7. Observed decadal variations in surface solar radiation and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2009-05-01

    Long-term variations of global solar irradiance at the Earth's surface from the beginning of the observations to 2005 are analyzed for more than 400 sites. Further, likely causes for the variations, an estimation of the magnitudes of aerosol direct and indirect effects, and the temperature sensitivity of the climate system due to radiation changes are evaluated. The record of observed global radiation begins with an increasing phase from 1920s to late 1940s/early 1960s. This brightening period (first brightening phase) is followed by the decreasing trend lasting to late 1980s, known as the global dimming, which finally translates into the second brightening phase in many regions of the world. These decadal variations are to great extent caused by aerosol and cloud fluctuations. The total aerosol effect as well as its direct and indirect effects were evaluated mainly on the basis of the observations. To meet this goal, simultaneous observations of global solar radiation and zenith transmittance are necessary. Five such regions/sites in Europe and Japan satisfy these conditions. By using the 20-year dimming phase from 1960 to 1980 and the 15-year brightening phase from 1990 to 2005, it was found that the aerosol direct and indirect effects played about an equal weight in changing global solar radiation. The temperature sensitivity due to radiation change is estimated at 0.05 to 0.06 K/(W m-2). The first brightening phase lasting to 1940s/early 1960s does not show a compatibility with the variation of transmittance of the atmosphere and originated probably from a different cause.

  8. Global Surface Ultraviolet Radiation Climatology from TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop a method for calculating the distribution of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) over most of the earth's surface using NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data, and to use this method to develop a UVR climatology that is useful in the context of the global ozone depletion issue. The research carried out with this support has resulted the following accomplishments: (1) a radioactive transfer method. based on the delta-Eddington approximation, was successfully developed; (2) the method was applied to the five years of overlapping TOMS and ERBE Monthly-Hourly data to examine the impact of global variability in cloud cover on trends in surface UVR; (3) a presentation was made on effects of stratospheric ozone depletion; (4) the radioactive transfer model was finally applied to all daylight hours to make a through study of the global effect of cloud cover;and (6) a five-year global climatology of surface UVR based on all of the research has been prepared for general distribution.

  9. Proximity of the mandibular molar root apex from the buccal bone surface: a cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dokyung; Jin, Myoung-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proximity of the mandibular molar apex to the buccal bone surface in order to provide anatomic information for apical surgery. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 127 mandibular first molars and 153 mandibular second molars were analyzed from 160 patients' records. The distance was measured from the buccal bone surface to the root apex and the apical 3.0 mm on the cross-sectional view of CBCT. Results The second molar apex and apical 3 mm were located significantly deeper relative to the buccal bone surface compared with the first molar (p < 0.01). For the mandibular second molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the root apex was significantly shorter in patients over 70 years of age (p < 0.05). Furthermore, this distance was significantly shorter when the first molar was missing compared to nonmissing cases (p < 0.05). For the mandibular first molars, the distance to the distal root apex of one distal-rooted tooth was significantly greater than the distance to the disto-buccal root apex (p < 0.01). In mandibular second molar, the distance to the apex of C-shaped roots was significantly greater than the distance to the mesial root apex of non-C-shaped roots (p < 0.01). Conclusions For apical surgery in mandibular molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the apex and apical 3 mm is significantly affected by the location, patient age, an adjacent missing anterior tooth, and root configuration. PMID:27508159

  10. Comparison of root water uptake modules using either the surface energy balance or potential transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braud, Isabelle; Varado, Noémie; Olioso, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Numerical models simulating changes in soil water content with time rely on accurate estimation of root water uptake. This paper considers two root water uptake modules that have a compensation mechanism allowing for increased root uptake under conditions of water stress. These modules, proposed by Lai and Katul and Li et al. [Adv. Water Resour. 23 (2000) 427 and J. Hydrol. 252 (2001) 189] use potential transpiration weighted, for each soil layer, by a water stress and a compensation function in order to estimate actual transpiration. The first objective of the paper was to assess the accuracy of the proposed root extraction modules against two existing data sets, acquired under dry conditions for a winter wheat and a soybean crop. In order to perform a fair comparison, both modules were included as possible root water extraction modules within the Simple Soil Plant Atmosphere Transfer (SiSPAT) model. In this first set of simulations, actual transpiration was calculated using the solution of the surface energy budget as implemented in the SiSPAT model. Under such conditions, both root extraction modules were able to reproduce accurately the time evolution of soil moisture at various depths, soil water storage and daily evaporation. Results were generally improved when we activated the compensation mechanisms. However, we showed that Lai and Katul [Adv. Water Resour. 23 (2000) 427] module was sensitive to soil hydraulic properties through its water stress function, whereas the Li et al. [J. Hydrol. 252 (2001) 189] module was not very sensitive to the specification of its parameter. The latter module is therefore recommended for inclusion into a larger scale hydrological model, due to its robustness. When water balance models are run at larger scales or on areas with scarce data, actual transpiration is often calculated using models based on potential transpiration without solving the surface energy balance. The second objective of the paper was to assess the loss of

  11. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  12. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  13. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  14. Variability of surface solar radiation in unforced CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We examine the natural variability of surface solar radiation (SSR) under pre-industrial conditions with time-invariant forcing in control runs in global climate simulations of the latest coupled model intercomparison project, CMIP5. We consider global and regional scales, as well as annual and seasonal data. Special emphasis is given to the likelihood of spurious SSR trends. To address this question, we determine for each model the range of linear SSR trends as function of the number of years over which the trend is taken. We discuss our findings with regard to potential aerosol induced dimming and its detectability in the second half of the 20th century.

  15. Large Scale Surface Radiation Budget from Satellite Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinker, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    During the current reporting period, the focus of our work was on preparing and testing an improved version of our Surface Radiation Budget algorithm for processing the ISCCP D1 data routinely at the SRB Satellite Data Analysis Center (SDAC) at NASA Langley Research Center. The major issues addressed are related to gap filling and to testing whether observations made from ERBE could be used to improve current procedures of converting narrowband observations, as available from ISCCP, into broadband observations at the TOA. The criteria for selecting the optimal version are to be based on results of intercomparison with ground truth.

  16. Impact of buildings on surface solar radiation over urban Beijing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu; He, Cenlin; Lee, Wee-Liang; Chang, Xing; Li, Qinbin; Wang, Shuxiao; Tseng, Hsien-Liang R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hao, Jiming

    2016-05-12

    The rugged surface of an urban area due to varying buildings can interact with solar beams and affect both the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of surface solar fluxes. Here we systematically examine the impact of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes over urban Beijing by using a 3-D radiation parameterization that accounts for 3-D building structures vs. the conventional plane-parallel scheme. We find that the resulting downward surface solar flux deviations between the 3-D and the plane-parallel schemes are generally ±1–10 W m-2 at 800 m grid resolution and within ±1 W m-2 at 4 km resolution. Pairs of positive–negative flux deviations on different sides of buildings are resolved at 800 m resolution, while they offset each other at 4 km resolution. Flux deviations from the unobstructed horizontal surface at 4 km resolution are positive around noon but negative in the early morning and late afternoon. The corresponding deviations at 800 m resolution, in contrast, show diurnal variations that are strongly dependent on the location of the grids relative to the buildings. Both the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of flux deviations are largely dominated by the direct flux. Furthermore, we find that flux deviations can potentially be an order of magnitude larger by using a finer grid resolution. Atmospheric aerosols can reduce the magnitude of downward surface solar flux deviations by 10–65 %, while the surface albedo generally has a rather moderate impact on flux deviations. The results imply that the effect of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes may not be critically significant in mesoscale atmospheric models with a grid resolution of 4 km or coarser. However, the effect can play a crucial role in meso-urban atmospheric models as well as microscale urban dispersion models with resolutions of 1 m to 1 km.

  17. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Richard L; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasad, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have contributed to delineating regional and temporal differences due to aerosols, clouds, and ozone. Improvements in radiative transfer modelling capability now enable more accurate characterization of clouds, snow-cover, and topographical effects. A standardized scale for reporting UV to the public has gained wide acceptance. There has been increased use of satellite data to estimate geographic variability and trends in UV. Progress has been made in assessing the utility of satellite retrievals of UV radiation by comparison with measurements at the Earth's surface. Global climatologies of UV radiation are now available on the Internet. Anthropogenic aerosols play a more important role in attenuating UV irradiances than has been assumed previously, and this will have implications for the accuracy of UV retrievals from satellite data. Progress has been made inferring historical levels of UV radiation using measurements of ozone (from satellites or from ground-based networks) in conjunction with measurements of total solar radiation obtained from extensive meteorological networks. We cannot yet be sure whether global ozone has reached a minimum. Atmospheric chlorine concentrations are beginning to decrease. However, bromine concentrations are still increasing. While these halogen concentrations remain high, the ozone layer remains vulnerable to further depletion from events such as volcanic eruptions that inject material into the stratosphere. Interactions between global warming and

  18. Quantum-radiative cooling for solar cells with textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Boris; Ivanov, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Efficient technique of Quantum Radiative Cooling (QRC) of textured Solar Cells and Modules is described that is capable of Solar Module (SM) temperature reduction by 5-20C, resulting in 3-10% efficiency increase. Novel methods are based on the quantum assisted IR emission from the surface covered by either multi-layer coatings made of Si-nitride, SiO or Si oxy-nitride films or specifically designed insulating sun-transparent chamber (QRC zone) that contains Selective Emissive (SE) gas or gas mix. QRC zone is mounted on the top of Solar Module replacing existing lamination coatings. To enhance the efficiency of QRC some specific methods and fabrication procedures are proposed to form an electricly charged textured surface that provide a high Electric Field at the surface thus enhancing IR emissivity from the surface. Such procedure can be also used to form the field Induced Surface Barriers in the Si-based Solar Cells that can substitute the existing diffused Emitters resulting in significant reduction of the Cycle Time as well as prospective Fabrication Cost.

  19. Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 can colonize and improve P uptake of Plantago lanceolata after exposure to ionizing gamma radiation in root organ culture.

    PubMed

    Kothamasi, David; Wannijn, Jean; van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; van Gompel, Axel; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie; Declerck, Stéphane; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2016-04-01

    Long-lived radionuclides such as (90)Sr and (137)Cs can be naturally or accidentally deposited in the upper soil layers where they emit β/γ radiation. Previous studies have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can accumulate and transfer radionuclides from soil to plant, but there have been no studies on the direct impact of ionizing radiation on AMF. In this study, root organ cultures of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 were exposed to 15.37, 30.35, and 113.03 Gy gamma radiation from a (137)Cs source. Exposed spores were subsequently inoculated to Plantago lanceolata seedlings in pots, and root colonization and P uptake evaluated. P. lanceolata seedlings inoculated with non-irradiated AMF spores or with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation had similar levels of root colonization. Spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation failed to colonize P. lanceolata roots. P content of plants inoculated with non-irradiated spores or of plants inoculated with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation was higher than in non-mycorrhizal plants or plants inoculated with spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation. These results demonstrate that spores of R. irregularis MUCL 41833 are tolerant to chronic ionizing radiation at high doses.

  20. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation) at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindfors, A. V.; Kouremeti, N.; Arola, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Bais, A. F.; Laaksonen, A.

    2013-04-01

    Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR) are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD) using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, was developed and tested using recent data from Thessaloniki, Greece. The effective AOD calculated using this method was found to agree well with co-located AERONET measurements, exhibiting a correlation coefficient of 0.9 with 2/3 of the data found within ±20% or ±0.05 of the AERONET AOD. This is similar to the performance of current satellite aerosol methods. Differences in the AOD as compared to AERONET can be explained by variations in the aerosol properties of the atmosphere that are not accounted for in the idealized settings used in the radiative transfer simulations, such as variations in the single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent. Furthermore, the method is sensitive to calibration offsets between the radiative transfer simulations and the pyranometer SSR. The method provides an opportunity of extending our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol load to locations and times not covered by dedicated aerosol measurements.

  1. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation) at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindfors, A. V.; Kouremeti, N.; Arola, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Bais, A. F.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR) are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD) using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, was developed and tested using recent data from Thessaloniki, Greece. The effective AOD calculated using this method was found to agree well with co-located AERONET measurements, exhibiting a correlation coefficient of 0.9 with 2/3 of the data found within ±20% or ±0.05 of the AERONET AOD. This is similar to the performance of current satellite aerosol methods. Differences in the AOD as compared to AERONET can be explained by variations in the aerosol properties of the atmosphere that are not accounted for in the idealized settings used in the radiative transfer simulations, such as variations in the single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent. Furthermore, the method is sensitive to calibration offsets between the radiative transfer simulations and the pyranometer SSR. The method provides an opportunity of extending our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol load to locations and times not covered by dedicated aerosol measurements.

  2. Isolated true surface wave in a radiative band on a surface of a stressed auxetic.

    PubMed

    Trzupek, D; Zieliński, P

    2009-08-14

    We demonstrate that a surface resonance (pseudosurface wave) may transform into a true surface wave, i.e., acquire an infinite lifetime, at a single isolated point within a bulk band (radiative region) in a model of a stressed auxetic material. In contrast with the secluded supersonic elastic surface waves, the one found here does not belong to a dispersion line of true surface waves. Therefore we propose to call it an isolated true surface wave (ITSW). The ITSW manifests itself by a deltalike peak in the local density of states and by anomalies in reflection coefficients. The phenomenon may be useful in redirecting energy and/or information from the bulk to the surface in devices supporting guided acoustic waves.

  3. Surface Radiation Budget Variability at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2014-12-01

    Information on Earth Radiation Balance is needed at climatic time scales for enabling assessment of variability and trends in the forcing functions of the climate system. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of such balance at global scale; yet, the length of available records does not meet climatic needs. Major issues hindering such efforts are related to the frequent changes in satellite observing systems, including the specification of the satellite instruments, and changes in the quality of atmospheric inputs that drive the inference schemes. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize estimates of shortwave, longwave and spectral surface radiative fluxes by fusing observations from numerous satellite platforms that include MODIS observations. This information was obtained in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; it will be evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention will be given to updates on our knowledge on the radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  4. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Comparison of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona Derived from Satellite with the Gridded Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-08-01

    The downwelling surface shortwave radiation derived from geostationary satellite imagery was compared with the available datasets for the Southwestern United States. The averaged root mean square errors for our instantaneous estimates ranged from 95.0 to 122.7 W m-2, which is lower than those derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products were used to compare the hourly mean solar insolation. The three hourly mean downwelling surface shortwave radiation was evaluated by comparing the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. Our estimates show the better performance than MERRA, NARR and CERES datasets because of coarse resolution that limits determining the solar dimming due to small clouds.

  5. The role of surface albedo in the parameterization of the relationship between system and surface absorbed solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Major, G.

    1994-12-31

    The radiation budget of the atmosphere, its layers and the surface is one of the basic forces in the climate and weather processes. A surface solar radiation budget database could be derived from satellite measurements using different parameterization between the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface solar radiation budget values. The proposed parameterizations suggest that the role of surface albedo is not significant; therefore it should not be taken into account. In this paper an empirical validation is made of the proposed model-based parameterizations using Nimbus-7 and ERBE satellites and the corresponding surface data. It is shown that the role of surface albedo cannot be neglected.

  6. Surface reconstruction from structured-light images for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Olesya; Anand, Christopher K.; Terlaky, Tamás

    2005-09-01

    To design and deliver proper radiation treatment for cancer patients, knowledge of the body's surface in the affected area is required. Currently, surface information is obtained by using a manually operated tracer. The drawbacks of this contact method include slow operation, and errors in repositioning the patient in an x-ray machine. Utilization of MRI or CT is also possible but expensive. We propose a non-contact, quick, inexpensive method to reconstruct the surface. In our non-contact method, a mask with transparent circular coloured spots and a black background, and an incoherent light source are used to create structured-light images. Colour coding is necessary to establish the correspondence between the projected and the observed patterns, which is essential for surface reconstruction. The deformed light pattern is photographed by an offset camera and analyzed. First, noise reduction is performed because images are noisy due to the low-light conditions and low sensitivity of an off-the-shelf camera. Then, pattern elements (light elliptical spots) are found in the image. We use an inverse polynomial to model the intensity of a light spot, which results in a non-convex, least-squares optimization problem. Next, spots are assigned to a grid according to their colours and location, and errors are corrected using the relative position of the spots. Finally, spatial coordinates of the surface points are computed and surface reconstruction is performed. The described algorithms are implemented as a MATLAB package, which converts the acquired images into a three-dimensional surface. The developed system is inexpensive, and it can easily be mounted on an x-ray machine. The software package can run on any standard PC.

  7. Urban Surface Radiative Energy Budgets Determined Using Aircraft Scanner Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.; Estes, Maury G.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    the surface energy budget. Knowledge of it is important in any attempt to describe the radiative and mass fluxes which occur at the surface. Use of energy terms in modeling surface energy budgets allows the direct comparison of various land surfaces encountered in a urban landscape, from vegetated (forest and herbaceous) to non-vegetated (bare soil, roads, and buildings). These terms are also easily measured using remote sensing from aircraft or satellite platforms allowing one to examine the spacial variability. The partitioning of energy budget terms depends on the surface type. In natural landscapes, the partitioning is dependent on canopy biomass, leaf area index, aerodynamic roughness, and moisture status, all of which are influenced by the development stage of the ecosystem. In urban landscapes, coverage by man-made materials substantially alters the surface face energy budget. The remotely sensed data obtained from aircraft and satellites, when properly calibrated allows the measurement of important terms in the radiative surface energy budget a urban landscape scale.

  8. Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) quality control of solar radiation data on the Gangneung-Wonju National University radiation station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Kim, Bu-Yo; Lee, Kyu-Tae

    2017-02-01

    Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) radiation station has been collecting data on global, direct, and diffuse solar radiation since 2011. We conducted a quality control (QC) assessment of GWNU data collected between 2012 and 2014, using procedures outlined by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The QC process involved the comparison of observations, the correction of observational equipment, the examination of physically possible limits, and the comparative testing of observations and model calculations. Furthermore, we performed a shading check of the observational environment around the GWNU solar station. For each solar radiation element (observed every minute), we performed a QC check and investigated any flagged problems. 98.31% of the data were classified as good quality, while the remaining 1.69% were flagged as bad quality based on the shading check and comparison tests. We then compared the good-quality data to the global solar radiation data observed at the Gangwon Regional Office of Meteorology (GROM). After performing this comparison, the determination coefficient (R2; 0.98) and standard deviation (SD; 0.92 MJ m-2) increased compared to those computed before the QC check (0.97 and 1.09 MJ m-2). Even considering the geographical differences and weather effects between the two stations, these results are statistically significant. However, we also confirmed that the quality of the GROM data deteriorated in relation to weather conditions because of poor maintenance. Hence, we conclude that good-quality observational data rely on the maintenance of both observational equipment and the surrounding environment under optimal conditions.

  9. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bokrantz, Rasmus E-mail: rasmus.bokrantz@raysearchlabs.com; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. Methods: The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose–volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. Results: The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose–volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. Conclusions: There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan.

  10. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  11. Computer-based video digitizer analysis of surface extension in maize roots: kinetics of growth rate changes during gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    We used a video digitizer system to measure surface extension and curvature in gravistimulated primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.). Downward curvature began about 25 +/- 7 min after gravistimulation and resulted from a combination of enhanced growth along the upper surface and reduced growth along the lower surface relative to growth in vertically oriented controls. The roots curved at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.5 degrees min-1 but the pattern of curvature varied somewhat. In about 35% of the samples the roots curved steadily downward and the rate of curvature slowed as the root neared 90 degrees. A final angle of about 90 degrees was reached 110 +/- 35 min after the start of gravistimulation. In about 65% of the samples there was a period of backward curvature (partial reversal of curvature) during the response. In some cases (about 15% of those showing a period of reverse bending) this period of backward curvature occurred before the root reached 90 degrees. Following transient backward curvature, downward curvature resumed and the root approached a final angle of about 90 degrees. In about 65% of the roots showing a period of reverse curvature, the roots curved steadily past the vertical, reaching maximum curvature about 205 +/- 65 min after gravistimulation. The direction of curvature then reversed back toward the vertical. After one or two oscillations about the vertical the roots obtained a vertical orientation and the distribution of growth within the root tip became the same as that prior to gravistimulation. The period of transient backward curvature coincided with and was evidently caused by enhancement of growth along the concave and inhibition of growth along the convex side of the curve, a pattern opposite to that prevailing in the earlier stages of downward curvature. There were periods during the gravitropic response when the normally unimodal growth-rate distribution within the elongation zone became bimodal with two peaks of rapid elongation separated by

  12. The influence of root surface distance to alveolar bone and periodontal ligament on periodontal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this animal study was to perform a 3-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis in order to investigate the influence of root surface distance to the alveolar bone and the periodontal ligament on periodontal wound healing after a guided tissue regeneration (GTR) procedure. Methods Three adult Sus scrofa domesticus specimens were used. The study sample included 6 teeth, corresponding to 2 third mandibular incisors from each animal. After coronectomy, a circumferential bone defect was created in each tooth by means of calibrated piezoelectric inserts. The experimental defects had depths of 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 9 mm, and 11 mm, with a constant width of 2 mm. One tooth with no defect was used as a control. The defects were covered with a bioresorbable membrane and protected with a flap. After 6 months, the animals were euthanised and tissue blocks were harvested and preserved for micro-CT analysis. Results New alveolar bone was consistently present in all experimental defects. Signs of root resorption were observed in all samples, with the extent of resorption directly correlated to the vertical extent of the defect; the medial third of the root was the most commonly affected area. Signs of ankylosis were recorded in the defects that were 3 mm and 7 mm in depth. Density and other indicators of bone quality decreased with increasing defect depth. Conclusions After a GTR procedure, the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone appeared to compete in periodontal wound healing. Moreover, the observed decrease in bone quality indicators suggests that intrabony defects beyond a critical size cannot be regenerated. This finding may be relevant for the clinical application of periodontal regeneration, since it implies that GTR has a dimensional limit. PMID:27800213

  13. Root Surface Roughness After Scaling and Root Planing with Er:YAG Laser Compared to Hand and Ultrasonic Instruments by Profilometry

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Naghsh, Narges; Attaei, Elaheh; Birang, Reza; Birang, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Scaling and root planing (SRP) is one of the most commonly used procedures during periodontal treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root surface roughness after SRP with erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser compared to ultrasonic and hand instruments. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 56 extracted sound single-rooted teeth with moderate level of calculus were selected and randomly divided into four groups: SRP was performed with Er:YAG laser (100 mJ pulse, 1W, 10Hz, VSP and contact mode, with 50% water and air) in group one, hand instrument in group two and ultrasonic tool in group three. Group four was considered as the control group. After SRP, all samples were cut by Servocut cutting machine into pieces with 3×3×2mm dimensions. The samples were mounted in acrylic resin. The surface roughness of the samples was evaluated with profilometry, and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test in SPSS software. Results: Surface roughness was higher in laser and lower in ultrasonic group compared to other groups. There was a significant difference in surface roughness between laser and ultrasonic groups (P=0.043), but there was no significant difference in surface roughness among other groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that surface roughness after SRP with Er:YAG laser was not higher than that after manual SRP, but the former value was higher than that after SRP with ultrasonic instrument. PMID:27559349

  14. Formation of micron and submicron structures on a zirconium oxide surface exposed to nanosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganin, D V; Mikolutskiy, S I; Khomich, V Yu; Yamshchikov, V A; Tokarev, V N; Shmakov, V A

    2014-04-28

    Possibility of forming quasi-periodic structures of micron and submicron dimensions on a surface of zirconium dioxide under the action of eximer ArF laser radiation is shown experimentally and theoretically. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Estimation of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Moreau, Louis; Cihlar, Josef

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a validation and application of an algorithm by Li and Moreau [1996] for retrieving photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed at the surface (APARSFC). APARSFC is a key input to estimating PAR absorbed by the green canopy during photosynthesis. Extensive ground-based and space-borne observations collected during the BOREAS experiment in 1994 were processed, colocated, and analyzed. They include downwelling and upwelling PAR observed at three flux towers, aerosol optical depth from ground-based photometers, and satellite reflectance measurements at the top of the atmosphere. The effects of three-dimensional clouds, aerosols, and bidirectional dependence on the retrieval of APARSFC were examined. While the algorithm is simple and has only three input parameters, the comparison between observed and estimated APARSFC shows a small bias error (<10 W m-2) and moderate random error (36 W m-2 for clear, 61 W m-2 for cloudy). Temporal and/or spatial mismatch between satellite and surface observations is a major cause of the random error, especially when broken clouds are present. The algorithm was subsequently employed to map the distribution of monthly mean APARSFC over the 1000×1000 km2 BOREAS region. Considerable spatial variation is found due to variable cloudiness, forest fires, and nonuniform surface albedo.

  16. Intracanal Antibiotic Medication for Sustained Root Surface Disinfection–A Laboratory Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zaruba, Markus Tobias Winfried; Filli, Tilla; Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Thurnheer, Thomas; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick Roger

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the release of an antibiotic mixture of ciprofloxacin, cerfuroxim and metronidazole (TreVitaMix, TVM) through human dentine and to assess the growth inhibition of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Material and Methods: Twenty-four extracted human incisors were scaled and endodontically treated. Root canals were either filled with antibiotic tri-mixture (TVM) or with the carrier material alone (propylene glycol, PG) and were coronally and apically sealed with a flowable composite. Transradicular medicament release was spectrophotometrically measured at 277 nm in simulated body fluid for up to 21 days. In a second part, an agar diffusion assay (F. nucleatum) with representative TVM concentrations as determined in the first part was performed to study the growth inhibition. Samples were anaerobical incubated for 48 h and inhibition zones were measured. Results: TVM was spectrophotometrically detectable in the immersion solution and released in decreasing concentrations up to 21 days (222.5 ± 65.2 mg/ml at day 1 and 35.1 ± 15.6 mg/ml at day 21). In addition, inhibition zones were shown in the agar diffusion assay at representative TVM concentrations. The carrier material showed no antibacterial effect. Conlusion: TVM showed the potential to penetrate through dentine and to inhibit bacterial growth. Therefore, it might have the potential to disinfect the outer root surface in perio-endo lesions, but further research is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:26966464

  17. Measurement of Bremsstrahlung radiation for in vivo monitoring of 14C tracer distribution between fruit and roots of kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta) cuttings.

    PubMed

    Black, Marykate Z; Minchin, Peter E H; Gould, Nick; Patterson, Kevin J; Clearwater, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    In vivo measurements of (14)C tracer distribution have usually involved monitoring the β(-) particles produced as (14)C decays. These particles are only detectable over short distances, limiting the use of this technique to thin plant material. In the present experiments, X-ray detectors were used to monitor the Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted since β(-) particles were absorbed in plant tissues. Bremsstrahlung radiation is detectable through larger tissue depths. The aim of these experiments was to demonstrate the Bremsstrahlung method by monitoring in vivo tracer-labelled photosynthate partitioning in small kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch. ex Miq.) plants in response to root pruning. A source shoot, consisting of four leaves, was pulse labelled with (14)CO(2). Detectors monitored import into a fruit and the root system, and export from a source leaf. Repeat pulse labelling enabled the comparison of pre- and post-treatment observations within an individual plant. Diurnal trends were observed in the distribution of tracer, with leaf export reduced at night. Tracer accumulated in the roots declined after approximately 48 h, which may have resulted from export of (14)C from the roots in carbon skeletons. Cutting off half the roots did not affect tracer distribution to the remaining half. Tracer distribution to the fruit was increased after root pruning, demonstrating the higher competitive strength of the fruit than the roots for carbohydrate supply. Increased partitioning to the fruit following root pruning has also been demonstrated in kiwifruit field trials.

  18. Comparison of Surface Radiation Budget Satellite algorithms for downwelled shortwave irradiance with Wisconsin Fire/SRB surface-truth data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Staylor, W. F.; Darnell, W. L.; Chou, M. D.; Dedieu, G.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Ellis, J.; Gautier, C.; Frouin, R.; Rossow, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    Surface radiation instruments were operated at various locations during the Wisconsin First ISSCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) and Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) experiment in October 1986. Satellite data were distributed to scientists who had previously developed satellite algorithms to estimate downwelled shortwave irradiance. Results of intercomparison of ground-truth values with the satellite-derived estimates are described.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis on Radiation Error of Surface Air Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qing-Quan; Ding, Ren-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Due to solar radiation effect, current air temperature sensors inside a naturally ventilated radiation shield may produce a measurement error that is 0.8 K or higher. To improve air temperature observation accuracy and correct historical temperature of weather stations, a radiation error correction method is proposed. The correction method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and a genetic algorithm (GA) method. The CFD method is implemented to obtain the radiation error of the naturally ventilated radiation shield under various environmental conditions. Then, a radiation error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using the GA method. To verify the performance of the correction equation, the naturally ventilated radiation shield and an aspirated temperature measurement platform are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The aspirated temperature measurement platform serves as an air temperature reference. The mean radiation error given by the intercomparison experiments is 0.23 K, and the mean radiation error given by the correction equation is 0.2 K. This radiation error correction method allows the radiation error to be reduced by approximately 87 %. The mean absolute error and the root mean square error between the radiation errors given by the correction equation and the radiation errors given by the experiments are 0.036 K and 0.045 K, respectively.

  20. Cloud Radiative Feedback and Zonal Surface Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, J.; Peltier, W. R.; Hu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Two fully coupled atmosphere--ocean general circulation models, CCSM3 and CCSM4 are employed to investigate the response of the mean climate state of the tropics to a sequence of CO2 concentrations (pCO2) from 17.5 to 4576 ppmv. Analyses based upon both of thes models demonstrate that the zonal surface temperature gradient across the equatorial Pacific is a monotonic function of pCO2, decreasing as pCO2 is increased. It is found that increased pCO2 enhances both the strength of convection and the area of the western and central Pacific over which it occurs thereby leading to increased cloudiness, an increase in shortwave reflection, and therefore a diminution of surface temperature in the region. The opposite tendencies are realized in response to deacreasing pCO2. This study demonstrates that cloud radiative feedback promotes a weakening (strengthening) of the zonal surface temperature gradient as greenhouse gas concentrations increase (decrease), which has important implications for future climate change and also for the understanding of past warm and cold climates. Long-term mean sea surface temperature and and zonal SST gradient along the equatorial Pacific in CCSM3 (a and c) and CCSM4 (b and d). The CO2 level in CCSM3 is between 35 and 4576 ppmv while in CCSM4 it is between 17.5 and 2288 ppmv. The zonal SST gradient is defined by the maximum minus the minimum (red dots), or the area-averaged value of 145E--165E minus that of 120W--100W (blue squares).

  1. Multiwavelength pyrometry for nongray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A NASA developed multiwavelength pyrometry technique for nongray surfaces was extended to also measure surface temperature in the presence of interfering radiation. This radiation is produced by heat lamps used to raise the temperature of the surface. The necessary instruments are a spectral radiometer, an auxiliary radiation source, and a computer. Four radiation spectra are recorded: (1) the unobstructed spectrum characterizing an auxiliary radiation source; (2) the unobstructed spectrum characterizing the interfering radiation; (3) the radiation spectrum consisting of surface emission plus the interfering radiation; and (4) a spectrum consisting of the radiations of (3) plus the reflected radiation due to the incidence of the auxiliary radiation source on this surface. With these spectra, application of two variable, nonlinear, least squares, curve fitting computer software determines the surface temperature and the spectral emissivity. Use of the method to measure the surface temperature of silicon carbide under a simulated interference condition is shown at a low temperature just above ambient. The instrumentation necessary to extend the method to elevated temperatures is discussed.

  2. Tunable surface plasmon instability leading to emission of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Huang, Danhong; Pan, Wei

    2015-08-07

    We propose a new approach for energy conversion from a dc electric field to tunable terahertz emission based on hybrid semiconductors by combining two-dimensional (2D) crystalline layers and a thick conducting material with possible applications for chemical analysis, security scanning, medical (single-molecule) imaging, and telecommunications. The hybrid nano-structure may consist of a single or pair of sheets of graphene, silicene, or a 2D electron gas. When an electric current is passed through a 2D layer, we discover that two low-energy plasmon branches exhibit a characteristic loop in their dispersion before they merge into an unstable region beyond a critical wave vector q{sub c}. This finite q{sub c} gives rise to a wavenumber cutoff in the emission dispersion of the surface plasmon induced instability and emission of radiation (spiler). However, there is no instability for a single driven layer far from the conductor, and the instability of an isolated pair of 2D layers occurs without a wavenumber cutoff. The wavenumber cutoff is found to depend on the conductor electron density, layer separation, distances of layers from the conductor surface, and the driving-current strength.

  3. Estimating photosynthetically available radiation at the ocean surface from GOCI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert; McPherson, John

    2012-09-01

    A technique is presented to estimate photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) at the ocean surface from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data. The sensor is adapted to the problem, since it measures at visible wavelengths and does not saturate over clouds, and the hourly data provides adequate temporal sampling to describe diurnal variability of clouds. Instantaneous surface PAR is computed as the difference between the solar irradiance incident at the top of the atmosphere (known) and the solar irradiance reflected back to space (derived from GOCI radiance), taking into account absorption and scattering by the clear atmosphere (modeled). Knowledge of pixel composition is not required. Apart from planetary albedo and sun zenith angle, the model parameters are fixed at their climatological values. The instantaneous PAR estimates at hourly intervals are integrated over time to provide daily values. The technique is applied to GOCI imagery acquired on 5 April 2011, and the GOCI daily PAR estimates are compared with those obtained from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data. Agreement is good between the two types of estimates, with a coefficient of determination ( r 2) of 0.778, a bias of 0.23 Em-2d-1 (0.5% with higher GOCI values), and a root-mean-squared difference of 5.00 Em-2d-1 (11.2%). Differences in cloudy conditions are attributed to daily cloudiness changes not captured by the MODIS observations. The comparison statistics indicate that GOCI PAR estimates have acceptable accuracy for regional studies of aquatic photosynthesis.

  4. Overcoming deep roots, fast rates, and short internodes to resolve the ancient rapid radiation of eupolypod II ferns.

    PubMed

    Rothfels, Carl J; Larsson, Anders; Kuo, Li-Yaung; Korall, Petra; Chiou, Wen-Liang; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2012-05-01

    Backbone relationships within the large eupolypod II clade, which includes nearly a third of extant fern species, have resisted elucidation by both molecular and morphological data. Earlier studies suggest that much of the phylogenetic intractability of this group is due to three factors: (i) a long root that reduces apparent levels of support in the ingroup; (ii) long ingroup branches subtended by a series of very short backbone internodes (the "ancient rapid radiation" model); and (iii) significantly heterogeneous lineage-specific rates of substitution. To resolve the eupolypod II phylogeny, with a particular emphasis on the backbone internodes, we assembled a data set of five plastid loci (atpA, atpB, matK, rbcL, and trnG-R) from a sample of 81 accessions selected to capture the deepest divergences in the clade. We then evaluated our phylogenetic hypothesis against potential confounding factors, including those induced by rooting, ancient rapid radiation, rate heterogeneity, and the Bayesian star-tree paradox artifact. While the strong support we inferred for the backbone relationships proved robust to these potential problems, their investigation revealed unexpected model-mediated impacts of outgroup composition, divergent effects of methods for countering the star-tree paradox artifact, and gave no support to concerns about the applicability of the unrooted model to data sets with heterogeneous lineage-specific rates of substitution. This study is among few to investigate these factors with empirical data, and the first to compare the performance of the two primary methods for overcoming the Bayesian star-tree paradox artifact. Among the significant phylogenetic results is the near-complete support along the eupolypod II backbone, the demonstrated paraphyly of Woodsiaceae as currently circumscribed, and the well-supported placement of the enigmatic genera Homalosorus, Diplaziopsis, and Woodsia.

  5. The Organic LED Surface:. a Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Tun-Wen; Yu, T. C.

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinolato) aluminum (Alq3), a prototypical molecule for organic light-emitting devices, has been studied via synchrotron radiation photoemission to investigate (1) the surface electronic structure of the molecules at room temperature and at elevated temperatures, (2) adsorption onto the inorganic Si(001)-2×1 surface, and (3) doping with the alkaline metal Mg. For case (1), three chemical environments of carbon are resolved. Moreover, the shake-up satellite structures are detected in all the N 1s, C 1s, O 1s, and Al 2p core-level spectra, but with different magnitudes. Annealing allows for a charge redistribution within Alq3 itself. As to case (2), the organic molecules not only passivate the dangling bonds, but also rupture the dimer bonds. The wave function of the surface dangling bonds and of the pyridyl side of an 8-quinolinol ligand overlaps greatly so that charge is polarized towards, the organic adlayer. However, the polarization diminishes at greater coverage. With regard to case (3), the N 1s core-level spectra appear as an Mg-induced charge-transfer component with a binding energy lower than the original component. This new component grows gradually in intensity with increasing concentration of the dopant. Moreover, Mg also affects the O 1s core, as manifested by a component lying at a +1.09 eV higher binding energy than the original component. The Mg 2p core-level spectra, although rather broad, exhibit a shift toward a lower binding energy with increasing Mg vapor. Upon examining all these experimental results, we propose that Mg in the surface Alq3 molecules forms clusters. Each cluster attaches to a pyridyl ring, affecting not only the nitrogen atom at that ring, but also the oxygen atom in the adjacent phenoxide ring. The depleted charge in the affected oxygen then flows about its adherent ligand and resides on the pyridyl ring at that ligand, resulting in a high Alq3 anion state.

  6. Improving satellite-retrieved surface radiative fluxes in polar regions using a smart sampling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-10-01

    The surface energy budget (SEB) of polar regions is key to understanding the polar amplification of global climate change and its worldwide consequences. However, despite a growing network of ground-based automatic weather stations that measure the radiative components of the SEB, extensive areas remain where no ground-based observations are available. Satellite remote sensing has emerged as a potential solution to retrieve components of the SEB over remote areas, with radar and lidar aboard the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites among the first to enable estimates of surface radiative long-wave (LW) and short-wave (SW) fluxes based on active cloud observations. However, due to the small swath footprints, combined with a return cycle of 16 days, questions arise as to how CloudSat and CALIPSO observations should be optimally sampled in order to retrieve representative fluxes for a given location. Here we present a smart sampling approach to retrieve downwelling surface radiative fluxes from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations for any given land-based point-of-interest (POI) in polar regions. The method comprises a spatial correction that allows the distance between the satellite footprint and the POI to be increased in order to raise the satellite sampling frequency. Sampling frequency is enhanced on average from only two unique satellite overpasses each month for limited-distance sampling < 10 km from the POI, to 35 satellite overpasses for the smart sampling approach. This reduces the root-mean-square errors on monthly mean flux estimates compared to ground-based measurements from 23 to 10 W m-2 (LW) and from 43 to 14 W m-2 (SW). The added value of the smart sampling approach is shown to be largest on finer temporal resolutions, where limited-distance sampling suffers from severely limited sampling frequencies. Finally, the methodology is illustrated for Pine Island Glacier (Antarctica) and the Greenland northern interior. Although few ground-based observations are

  7. Trends of surface solar radiation in unforced CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Dallafior, T. N.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Wild, M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider decadal scale trends of annual mean all-sky surface solar radiation (SSR) that occur solely because of internal variability of the climate system. We give statistical estimates of their magnitude and probability of occurrence. The estimates are based on 43 preindustrial control (piControl) experiments of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). Trends are found to depend strongly on geographical region and on whether they are quantified in absolute units or relative to the long-term mean SSR. We find it to be sufficient to provide one map for absolute and one for relative trends, as approximate analytical relations are shown to hold between trends of different length and likelihood and the standard deviation of the underlying SSR time series. We estimate that a positive trend over 30 years and with 25% chance of occurrence (75th percentile of all possible trends) has a magnitude between 0.15 and 1.7 W/m2/decade or 0.11 and 1.4% of long-term mean SSR per decade, depending on geographical location. Comparison with present-day observations and intermodel spread suggests an average uncertainty of these estimates of about 30%. Intermodel spread suggests that regional uncertainties can be up to about 3 times larger or smaller. We give examples of how these results may be used to obtain statistical estimates of how (un)likely it is that observed SSR trends or part thereof are due to internal variability alone.

  8. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  9. The Effects of Landcover Pattern on Urban Surface Net Radiation Retrieved by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Taking Xiamen city as the study area, this research retrieved surface net radiation using meteorological data and Landsat 5 TM images of the four seasons in the year 2009. Meanwhile the 65 different landscape metrics of each analysis unit were acquired using landscape analysis method. Then the most effective landscape metrics affecting surface net radiation were determined by correlation analysis, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression method, etc. At both class and landscape levels, this paper comprehensively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of the surface net radiation as well as the effects of land cover pattern on it in Xiamen from a multi-seasonal perspective. The results showed that: Xiamen's surface net radiation is the maximum in summer, followed by spring, autumn. The surface net radiation in winter is the minimum. Net radiation flux is higher for water and forestland and is lower for built-up land and bare land, etc. The spatial composition of land cover pattern shows significant influence on surface net radiation. The proportion of bare land and the proportion of forest land are effective and important factors which affect the changes of surface net radiation all the year round. But the spatial allocation of land cover pattern has no significant influence on surface net radiation. Moreover, the proportion of forest land is more capable for explaining surface net radiation than the proportion of bare land. Its total annual explanatory ability is better than the latter. So the proportion of forest land is the most important and continuously effective factor which affects and explains the cross-seasonal differences of surface net radiation. This study is helpful in exploring the formation and evolution mechanism of urban heat island. It also gave theoretical hints and realistic guidance for urban planning and sustainable development.

  10. Effect of Citric Acid and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid on the Surface Morphology of Young and Old Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam Zaccaro; de Noronha, Fernando; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; Maurício, Marcos; Gallito, Marco Antonio; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 10% citric acid and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) irrigating solutions on the surface morphology of young and old root dentin by determining the number and diameter of dentinal tubules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Fifty healthy human teeth collected from young (≤30 years) and old (≥60 years) individuals (n=25) were first prepared with a Largo bur #2 to produce smear layer on the root canal surface. Subsequently, the crowns and the root middle and apical thirds were sectioned and removed, and the cervical thirds were sectioned vertically in the buccal-lingual direction into two equal halves. The obtained samples were then immersed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and randomly separated into two treatment groups for each age group. In each age group, ten samples were selected as controls and did not receive any type of treatment. The rest of the specimens were then rinsed, dried and treated for 4 min with 10% citric acid or 17% EDTA. The samples were then assessed with SEM regarding the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. All data were assessed using Student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of treatment, no significant differences were observed in the number of open tubules between the young and old root dentin (P>0.05). Nonetheless, the diameter of the tubules in the old root dentin was larger when 17% EDTA was used (P<0.05). Both, young and old root dentin did not differ with the 10% citric acid treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that 17% EDTA treatment induced a significant demineralization in old root dentin. PMID:27471529

  11. The Clinical Effectiveness of Subgingival Scaling and Root Planning in vivo, Direct versus Indirect Root Surface Debridement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-03

    remove surface plaque, calculus can still exert a toxic effect on tissue cells . Therefore, if calculus is detrimental to the integrity of the... periodontium , its thorough removal would be mandatory for the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease. An understanding of calculus attachment to the...method of calculus attachment. Cemental separations are a frequent observation in human periodontal tissues . These cemental separations are often the site

  12. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  13. Satellite estimates of shortwave surface radiation and atmospheric meteorology for the BOREAS experiment region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moats, C. D.; Whitlock, C. H.; Lecroy, S. R.; Dipasquale, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides background data for the Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) sites, including daily, seasonal, interannual, and spatial variability of shortwave (SW) radiation at the Earth's surface. This background data, from the Version 1.1 SW data set, was provided by the Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Climatology Project established by the World Climate Research Program (WCRP).

  14. Synergistic Effects of a Calcium Phosphate/Fibronectin Coating on the Adhesion of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Onto Decellularized Dental Root Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Park, So-Yon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jung, Jae-Suk; Lee, Jong-Bin; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance the attachment of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) onto the decellularized dental root surface using surface coating with fibronectin and/or calcium phosphate (CaP) and to evaluate the activity of PDLSCs attached to a coated dental root surface following tooth replantation. PDLSCs were isolated from five dogs, and the other dental roots were used as a scaffold for carrying PDLSCs and then assigned to one of four groups according to whether their surface was coated with CaP, fibronectin, CaP/fibronectin, or left uncoated (control). Fibronectin increased the adhesion of PDLSCs onto dental root surfaces compared to both the control and CaP-coated groups, and simultaneous surface coating with CaP and fibronectin significantly accelerated and increased PDLSC adhesion compared to the fibronectin-only group. On in vivo tooth replantation, functionally oriented periodontal new attachment was observed on the CaP/fibronectin-coated dental roots to which autologous PDLSCs had adhered, while in the control condition, dental root replantation was associated only with root resorption and ankylosis along the entire root length. CaP and fibronectin synergistically enhanced the attachment of PDLSCs onto dental root surfaces, and autologous PDLSCs could produce de novo periodontal new attachment in an experimental in vivo model.

  15. Effect of gaseous ozone and light-activated disinfection on the surface hardness of resin-based root canal sealers.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Öznur; Er, Özgür; Demirbuga, Sezer; Zorba, Yahya Orçun; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Although root canal instruments remove most of the content from the main root canal space, disinfection or irrigation plays an indispensable role in all areas of the root canal system, especially in parts that are inaccessible by instruments. The originality of this study was to investigate the effect of two novel disinfection techniques on the surface hardness of resin-based endodontic sealers using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Forty extracted single-rooted maxillary central human teeth were prepared and divided into four groups according to treatment methods. The first group was irrigated with saline and served as a control, other groups irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO); gaseous ozone; and light-activated disinfection (LAD). The groups were divided into two subgroups, according to the obturation method used: subgroup A: gutta-percha and AH plus; and subgroup B: EndoREZ/resin-coated cones. After obturation, atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement was performed to analyze the surface hardness of the sealers. There was a significant difference between group 1A and group 3A (p < 0.05). Group 3B had the highest surface hardness values that were statistically different (p < 0.05). When disregarding the sealers, the ozone possessed statistically higher surface hardness values than the other groups in all root thirds (p < 0.05). The use of ozone and LAD may alter the surface hardness of resin-based sealers. The use of AFM can be considered an alternative hardness test techonology for sealing material.

  16. Radiation and surface waves of a microstrip antenna covered with a dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoorfar, Ahmad; Gupta, K. C.; Chang, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a thick cover layer on the radiation characteristics of a microstrip patch antenna are investigated. A magnetic line source model has been used to derive explicit expressions for the far field, radiated power, directivity, and surface wave of the antenna. Numerical results are presented to show the effects of a lossless as well as a lossy dielectric cover layer on the surface waves and the radiated power.

  17. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p<0.01). New bone formation by osteoconduction initiated at day 14 in the test and control group. At day 21, the orientation of supra-alveolar and PDL fibers established, and new cementum formation observed in both groups. At day 28, although regenerated cementum was cellular in all of the roots in the control samples, an

  18. Effects of ozone and aerosol on surface UV radiation variability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jhoon; Cho, Hi-Ku; Mok, Jungbin; Yoo, Hee Dong; Cho, Nayeong

    2013-02-05

    Global (direct+diffuse) spectral ultraviolet (UV, 290-363nm) and total ozone measurements made on the roof of the Main Science Building, Yonsei University at Seoul (37.57°, 128.98°E) were analyzed to quantify the effects of ozone and aerosol on the variability of surface erythemal UV (EUV) irradiance. The measurements have been made with a Brewer Spectrophotometer MKIV (SCI-TEC#148) and a Dobson Ozone Spectrophotometer (Beck#123), respectively, during 2004-2008. The overall mean radiation amplification factor, RAF(AOD, SZA) [23,24] due to total ozone (O(3)) (hereafter O(3) RAF) shows that 1% decrease in total ozone results in an increase of 1.18±0.02% in the EUV irradiance with the range of 0.67-1.74% depending on solar zenith angles (SZAs) (40-70°) and on aerosol optical depths (AODs) (<4.0), under both clear (cloud cover<25%) and all sky conditions. For the mean AOD, the O(3) RAFs(SZA) for both sky conditions increased as SZA increased from 40° to 60°, and then decreased for higher SZA 70°, where the patterns are consistent with results of the previous studies [2,10]. A similar analysis of the RAF(O(3), SZA) due to AOD (hereafter AOD RAF) under clear and all-sky conditions shows that on average, a 1% increase in AOD forces a decrease of 0.29±0.06% in the EUV irradiance with the maximum range 0.18-0.63% depending on SZAs and O(3). Thus, overall sensitivity of UV to ozone (O(3), RAF) was estimated to be about four times higher than to the aerosol (AOD RAF). At the mean O(3), the AOD RAFs(SZA) for both skies appears to be almost independent of SZAs. It is shown that the O(3) RAFs are nearly independent of the sky conditions, whereas the AOD RAFs depend distinctly on the sky conditions with the larger values for all skies. Under cloud free conditions, the overall mean ratio for measured-to-modeled O(3), RAF(AOD, SZA) is 1.13, whereas the ratio for AOD RAF(O(3), SZA) shows 0.82 in the EUV irradiance. Overall, the RAF measurements are corroborated by radiative

  19. Changes in Surface Radiation Flux Associated with Cloud Variability over Land during the Past 40+ Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds have a large impact on the surface energy budget over land, but it has been difficult to accurately quantify variability in cloud radiative effect at multidecadal time scales. One reason for this is that the longest satellite cloud records are inhomogeneous. Another reason is that surface visual records, available for a longer time period than satellite data, do not provide quantitative radiative information. The present study describes empirical methods for removing artifacts from satellite-derived surface radiation flux data and for quantifying the surface radiative impact of variability in visually-observed cloud cover. Changes in surface radiation flux associated with cloud variability during the past 40+ years are examined for multiple land regions.

  20. Development of a Space Radiation Monte-Carlo Computer Simulation Based on the FLUKE and Root Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.; Wilson, T. L.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, Paola; Carminati, F.; Brun, R.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment in space is a complex problem to model. Trying to extrapolate the projections of that environment into all areas of the internal spacecraft geometry is even more daunting. With the support of our CERN colleagues, our research group in Houston is embarking on a project to develop a radiation transport tool that is tailored to the problem of taking the external radiation flux incident on any particular spacecraft and simulating the evolution of that flux through a geometrically accurate model of the spacecraft material. The output will be a prediction of the detailed nature of the resulting internal radiation environment within the spacecraft as well as its secondary albedo. Beyond doing the physics transport of the incident flux, the software tool we are developing will provide a self-contained stand-alone object-oriented analysis and visualization infrastructure. It will also include a graphical user interface and a set of input tools to facilitate the simulation of space missions in terms of nominal radiation models and mission trajectory profiles. The goal of this project is to produce a code that is considerably more accurate and user-friendly than existing Monte-Carlo-based tools for the evaluation of the space radiation environment. Furthermore, the code will be an essential complement to the currently existing analytic codes in the BRYNTRN/HZETRN family for the evaluation of radiation shielding. The code will be directly applicable to the simulation of environments in low earth orbit, on the lunar surface, on planetary surfaces (including the Earth) and in the interplanetary medium such as on a transit to Mars (and even in the interstellar medium). The software will include modules whose underlying physics base can continue to be enhanced and updated for physics content, as future data become available beyond the timeframe of the initial development now foreseen. This future maintenance will be available from the authors of FLUKA as

  1. Filimonas endophytica sp. nov., isolated from surface-sterilized root of Cosmos bipinnatus.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Hye; Kim, Tae-Su; Joung, Yochan; Kim, Seung Bum

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, yellow, motile by gliding, filamentous bacterium, designated SR 2-06T, was isolated from surface-sterilized root of garden cosmos. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that SR 2-06T was related most closely to Filimonas lacunae YT21T of the family Chitinophagaceae at a sequence similarity of 96.90 %, while levels of similarity to other related taxa were less than 93.08 %. Strain SR 2-06T exhibited similar features to F. lacunae in that it contained MK-7 as the major respiratory quinone, and iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0 and a summed feature consisting of C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c as the major fatty acids. However, strain SR 2-06T was distinguished from F. lacunae using a combination of physiological and biochemical properties. The cellular polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminophospholipids, unknown aminolipids, an unknown phospholipid and unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 46.0 mol%. The phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence clearly indicates that strain SR 2-06T represents a novel species of the genus Filimonas, for which the name Filimonas endophytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SR 2-06T ( = KCTC 42060T = JCM 19844T).

  2. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system. PMID:26413504

  3. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  4. Radiation effects on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Carlson, R. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Moore, M. H.; Wong, M. C.

    Early observations and results; Charged particle bombardment, variability; Dose vs.depth: radiation and regolith formation, trapping and escape; Radiation effects: irradiation of ice, irradiation of SO2 and sulfur - pure and in ice, irradiation of CO2 and carbon species in ice, irradiation of salts and acids, adsorption; Summary of satellite irradiation effects: Metis, Amalthea and Thebe, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto.

  5. Evaluation of surface energy and radiation balance systems on the Konza Prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritschen, Leo J.

    1987-01-01

    Four Surface Energy and Radiation Balance Systems (SERBS) were installed and operated for two weeks in Kansas during July of 1986. Surface energy and radiation balances were investigated on six sites on the Konza Prairie about 3 km south of Manhattan, Kansas. Measurements were made to allow the computation of these radiation components: total solar and diffuse radiation, reflected solar radiation, net radiation, and longwave radiation upward and downward. Measurements were made to allow the computation of the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio method using differential psychrometers on automatic exchange mechanisms. The report includes a description of the experimental sites, data acquisition systems and sensors, data acquisitions system operating instructions, and software used for data acquisition and analysis. In addition, data listings and plots of the energy balance components for all days and systems are given.

  6. Diffraction radiation based on an anti-symmetry structure of spoof surface-plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun Jun; Jiang, Xing; Zhang, Hao Chi; Wang, Jiafu; Qu, Shaobo; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface-plasmon (SP) modes can be excited efficiently and propagate along the surface of double-layer corrugated metallic strips with anti-symmetry. Here, we propose a spoof SP structure with diffraction radiation, which is achieved by introducing phase-reversal geometry into the SP waveguide structure with a π-phase shift for adjacently reversed units. At the junction between two adjacent units, the discontinuity of the periodic structure can be viewed as a perturbation to generate space harmonics, thereby enabling efficient conversion of SP modes into free-space radiation modes. We demonstrate experimentally that the resultant radiation is analogous to Cherenkov radiation wakes, which occurs in the form of a radiation cone. The vast majority of the energy based on the surface wave is emitted into the free space. We expect that the proposed method could be an alternative to transforming the spoof SP modes into the radiation modes.

  7. An In-Situ Root-Imaging System in the Context of Surface Detection of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, M. E.; Prince, J. B.; Bradley, A. R.; Zhou, X.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Male, E. J.; Pickles, W.; Thordsen, J. J.; Dobeck, L.; Cunningham, A.; Spangler, L.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon sequestration is a valuable method of spatially confining CO2 belowground. The Zero Emissions Research Technology, (ZERT), site is an experimental facility in a former agricultural field on the Montana State University campus in Bozeman, Montana, where CO2 was experimentally released at a rate of 200kg/day in 2009 into a 100 meter underground injection well running parallel to the ground surface. This injection well, or pipe, has deliberate leaks at intervals, and CO2 travels from these leaks upward to the surface of the ground. The ZERT site is a model system designed with the purpose of testing methods of surface detection of CO2. One important aspect of surface detection is the determination of the effects of CO2 on the above and belowground portions of plants growing above sequestration fields. At ZERT, these plants consist of a pre-existing mixture of herbaceous species present at the agricultural field. Species growing at the ZERT site include several grasses, Dactylis glomerata (Orchard Grass), Poa pratensis (Kentucky Bluegrass), and Bromus japonicus (Japanese Brome); the nitrogen-fixing legumes Medicago sativa, (Alfalfa), and Lotus corniculatus, (Birdsfoot trefoil); and an abundance of Taraxacum officinale, (Dandelion). Although the aboveground parts of the plants at high CO2 are stressed, as indicated by changes in hyperspectral plant signatures, leaf fluorescence and leaf chlorophyll content, we are interested in determining whether the roots are also stressed. To do so, we are combining measurements of soil conductivity and soil moisture with root imaging. We are using an in-situ root-imaging system manufactured by CID, Inc. (Camas, WA), along with image analysis software (Image-J) to analyze morphometric parameters in the images and to determine what effects, if any, the presence of leaking and subsequently upwelling CO2 has on the phenology of root growth, growth and turnover of individual fine and coarse roots, branching patterns, and root

  8. Simultaneous decay of contact-angle and surface-tension during the rehydration of air-dried root mucilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Chen, Fengxian

    2016-04-01

    Plants can extract or exude water and solutes at their root surface. Among the root exudates, the mucilage exhibits a surfactant like properties - depressing the surface-tension (ST, mN/m) at the water-air interface. The amphipathic nature of some of the mucilage molecules (e.g. lipids) is thought to be the reason for its surfactant like behavior. As the rhizosphere dries out, re-orientation and/or re-configuration of amphipathic molecules at the solid-air interface, may impart hydrophobic nature to the rhizosphere. Our current knowledge on the ST of natural and/or model root mucilage is based on measurements of the equilibrium ST. However, adsorption of amphipathic molecules at the water-air interface is not reached instantaneously. The hydrophobic nature of the rhizosphere was deduced from the initial advancing CA, commonly calculated from the first few milliseconds up to few seconds (depending on the method employed). We hypothesized that during the rehydration of the root mucilage; both quantities are dynamic. Processes such as water absorbance and dissolution, may vary the interfacial tensions as a function of time. Consequently, simultaneous reduction of both CA and ST as a function of time can be expected. The main objective of this study was to characterize and quantify the extent, persistency and dynamic of the CA and ST during rehydration of air-dried root mucilage. The study was involved with measurements of dynamic and equilibrium ST using the pedant drop or Wilhelmy plate method, respectively. Glass slides were coated with naturally occurring or model root mucilage and the CA of a sessile drop was measured optically, as a function of time. The results were analyzed based on the Young-Dupré and Young-Laplace equations, from which the simultaneous decay of CA and ST was deduced. The implication for the wettability and water flow in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  9. SCATTERING AND REFLECTION OF LASER RADIATION: Laser location of glitter points on a moving random surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, P. V.; Lomonosov, A. M.; Mikhalevich, Vladislav G.

    1998-05-01

    Coherent scattering of laser radiation by a moving random surface was investigated. Fluctuations of the scattered-radiation power were recorded in field experiments and were used to calculate the velocity of extremal points of the random surface. It was found that the distribution of velocities of these extremal points was close to a direction isotropic relative to the average velocity vector. The results obtained were compared with theoretical estimates for a Gaussian model of the surface.

  10. [Effect of iron plaque formation of root surface on as uptake by rice seedlings grown on different types of soils].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Lin, Xian-yong; Cheng, Wang-da

    2010-02-01

    The objective of study was to investigate the effect of the amount of iron plaque of root surface on As uptake by rice seedlings grown on 14 types of soils. These results indicated that there were significant differences in the amounts of iron plaque (1.15-61.97 mg/g) formed on rice root surface among different soils. The amount of non-crystalloid Fe oxide in different submerged soils is one of main influencing factors. There was a significant positive correlation between As concentrations in iron plaque (0-1376 mg/kg) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.85, n=14, p < 0.05), but no significant correlation with the extractable As concentration of 14 types of soils. There were also significant positive correlation between As concentrations in shoot (0.400-12.98 mg/kg) and root (3.860-576.2 mg/kg) and the amounts of iron plaque respectively but not significant correlation with the extractable As concentrations of 14 types of soils (r = 0.88, n=14, p < 0.05; r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between specific arsenic uptake (0.005-0.670 mg/g) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between shoot-As% and the amount of iron plaque. These results showed that the iron plaque on root surface was the pool of As in rhizosphere and increased As uptake but did not affect As transportation from rice root to shoot.

  11. Relationship Between Landcover Pattern and Surface Net Radiation in AN Coastal City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.; Zhao, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Taking Xiamen city as the study area this research first retrieved surface net radiation using meteorological data and Landsat 5 TM images of the four seasons in the year 2009. Meanwhile the 65 different landscape metrics of each analysis unit were acquired using landscape analysis method. Then the most effective landscape metrics affecting surface net radiation were determined by correlation analysis, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression method, etc. At both class and landscape levels, this paper comprehensively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of the surface net radiation as well as the effects of land cover pattern on it in Xiamen from a multi-seasonal perspective. The results showed that the spatial composition of land cover pattern shows significant influence on surface net radiation while the spatial allocation of land cover pattern does not. The proportions of bare land and forest land are effective and important factors which affect the changes of surface net radiation all the year round. Moreover, the proportion of forest land is more capable for explaining surface net radiation than the proportion of bare land. So the proportion of forest land is the most important and continuously effective factor which affects and explains the cross-seasonal differences of surface net radiation. This study is helpful in exploring the formation and evolution mechanism of urban heat island. It also gave theoretical hints and realistic guidance for urban planning and sustainable development.

  12. Clear-sky radiation trends derived from ground-based observations of surface solar radiation over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartók, Blanka; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Trends in clear-sky radiation reflect the changes in the radiatively active components of the atmosphere without considering the effect of clouds. In this way analyzing the long term changes in clear-sky radiation gives a better overview over the changes in aerosol content in the atmosphere, having significant direct radiative effect on surface solar radiation but no long term records of direct aerosol measurements exist. In this study, the linear trends of clear-sky radiation records over Europe are analyzed based on daily observations from 26 stations for the period of 1964-2013, which have been obtained from the Word Radiation Data Center (WRDC). The daily data has been checked for temporal homogeneity by applying the MASH method (Szentimrey, 2003). The separation of clear-sky situation is elaborated using three approaches. In the first approach the clear-sky situations are detected based on a clearness index, namely the ratio of the surface solar radiation to the extraterrestrial solar irradiation. In the second approach the observed values of surface solar radiation are compared to the climatology of clear-sky surface solar radiation calculated by the MAGIC radiation code (Muller et al. 2009). In the third approach clear-sky days are detected based on synoptic cloudiness observations. Overall, in all approaches the trends of clear-sky radiation may also depend on the thresholds of clear-sky days. Consequently, in order to eliminate this methodological error in all cases different thresholds are chosen and the sensitivity of clear-sky radiation trends with respect to the thresholds is quantified. In order to verify the reliability of the empirical thresholds, a verification of clear-sky detection is envisaged through a comparison with the values obtained by a high time resolution clear-sky detection and interpolation algorithm (Long and Ackermann, 2000) making use of the high quality data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN).The trends of clear

  13. Changes in the size of the apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the rye roots by low pH and the presence of aluminium ions induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatanik-Kloc, Alicja

    2016-07-01

    The plant reactions on Al-stress include i.a. change of the surface area of the roots, which in the physicochemistry of plants characterizes the transport of water and ions through the root. The object of this study is the specific surface area of the roots of plants which are tolerant to aluminium, such as rye. Plants of rye were grown in a nutrient solution for 14 days at pH 4.5 in the presence of Al3+ ions of concentration 10, 20, and 40 mg dm-3. The control plants were grown continuously at pH 7 or pH 4.5 without Al3+. The apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the plants roots were determined from water vapour adsorption - desorption data. The apparent surface area of roots growing in the aluminium was (with respect to control) statistically significantly lower. There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent surface area of the roots which grew in pH 7, pH 4.5 without Al3+. The average water vapour adsorption energy of the root surface, under stress conditions decreased. In the roots grown in the presence of Al+3, there was a slight decrease in high energy adsorption centres and an increase in the amount of low-energy centres.

  14. The WCRP/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project Release 2: First Results at 1 Degree Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Cox, Stephen J.; Gupta, Shashi K.; DiPasquale, Roberta C.; Brown, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    The earth s surface radiative budget in the solar wavelengths (i.e., shortwave) and thermal infrared wavelengths (i.e., longwave) is an important component of Earth s global energy balance and climate. As such, it was identified as a priority need by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and thus a program was instituted at NASA to estimate the radiative flux quantities at the surface from space observations. The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project was created and later included as a component of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the auspices of the WCRP.

  15. WCRP surface radiation budget shortwave data product description, version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Charlock, T. P.; Staylor, W. F.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.; Dipasquale, R. C.; Ritchey, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    Shortwave radiative fluxes which reach the Earth's surface are key elements that influence both atmospheric and oceanic circulation. The World Climate Research Program has established the Surface Radiation Budget climatology project with the ultimate goal of determining the various components of the surface radiation budget from satellite data on a global scale. This report describes the first global product that is being produced and archived as part of that effort. The interested user can obtain the monthly global data sets free of charge using e-mail procedures.

  16. Uncertainties of parameterized surface downward clear-sky shortwave and all-sky longwave radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, S.; Gruber, S.; Purves, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    As many environmental models rely on simulating the energy balance at the Earth's surface based on parameterized radiative fluxes, knowledge of the inherent model uncertainties is important. In this study we evaluate one parameterization of clear-sky direct, diffuse and global shortwave downward radiation (SDR) and diverse parameterizations of clear-sky and all-sky longwave downward radiation (LDR). In a first step, SDR is estimated based on measured input variables and estimated atmospheric parameters for hourly time steps during the years 1996 to 2008. Model behaviour is validated using the high quality measurements of six Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB) stations in Switzerland covering different elevations, and measurements of the Swiss Alpine Climate Radiation Monitoring network (SACRaM) in Payerne. In a next step, twelve clear-sky LDR parameterizations are calibrated using the ASRB measurements. One of the best performing parameterizations is elected to estimate all-sky LDR, where cloud transmissivity is estimated using measured and modeled global SDR during daytime. In a last step, the performance of several interpolation methods is evaluated to determine the cloud transmissivity in the night. We show that clear-sky direct, diffuse and global SDR is adequately represented by the model when using measurements of the atmospheric parameters precipitable water and aerosol content at Payerne. If the atmospheric parameters are estimated and used as a fix value, the relative mean bias deviance (MBD) and the relative root mean squared deviance (RMSD) of the clear-sky global SDR scatter between between -2 and 5%, and 7 and 13% within the six locations. The small errors in clear-sky global SDR can be attributed to compensating effects of modeled direct and diffuse SDR since an overestimation of aerosol content in the atmosphere results in underestimating the direct, but overestimating the diffuse SDR. Calibration of LDR parameterizations to local conditions

  17. Energy and radiation balance components for three grass surfaces near Kursk, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritschen, Leo J.

    1992-01-01

    The energy and radiation balance components were determined over three grass surfaces, located on the Streletskaya steppe during July 1991. The Bowen ratio energy balance method was used to determine the sensible and latent heat flux densities using six computer controlled systems. A total of 126 variables were sampled, including global, diffuse, and reflected solar radiation, long wave radiation (up and down), net radiation, photosynthetically active radiation above and below the vegetation, infrared surface temperatues, soil temperature and heat flow, air temperature and vapor pressure at two levels, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. The ranking of the sites from greatest to smallest for net radiation and latent heat flux density were preserve, mowed in 1990, and mowed in 1991. The ranking of the sites from greatest to smallest for sensible heat flux density were mowed in 1990, mowed in 1991, and preserve.

  18. Ultraviolet Radiation-Elicited Enhancement of Isoflavonoid Accumulation, Biosynthetic Gene Expression, and Antioxidant Activity in Astragalus membranaceus Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Gu, Cheng-Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-23

    In this work, Astragalus membranaceus hairy root cultures (AMHRCs) were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) for promoting isoflavonoid accumulation. The optimum enhancement for isoflavonoid production was achieved in 34-day-old AMHRCs elicited by 86.4 kJ/m(2) of UV-B. The resulting isoflavonoid yield was 533.54 ± 13.61 μg/g dry weight (DW), which was 2.29-fold higher relative to control (232.93 ± 3.08 μg/g DW). UV-B up-regulated the transcriptional expressions of all investigated genes involved in isoflavonoid biosynthetic pathway. PAL and C4H were found to be two potential key genes that controlled isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Moreover, a significant increase was noted in antioxidant activity of extracts from UV-B-elicited AMHRCs (IC50 values = 0.85 and 1.08 mg/mL) in comparison with control (1.38 and 1.71 mg/mL). Overall, this study offered a feasible elicitation strategy to enhance isoflavonoid accumulation in AMHRCs and also provided a basis for metabolic engineering of isoflavonoid biosynthesis in the future.

  19. SU-E-J-217: Accuracy Comparison Between Surface and Volumetric Registrations for Patient Setup of Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y; Li, R; Na, Y; Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatment CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)

  20. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  1. Neutron radiative capture methods for surface elemental analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombka, J.I.; Senftle, F.; Schmadebeck, R.

    1970-01-01

    Both an accelerator and a 252Cf neutron source have been used to induce characteristic gamma radiation from extended soil samples. To demonstrate the method, measurements of the neutron-induced radiative capture and activation gamma rays have been made with both Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) detectors, Because of the possible application to space flight geochemical analysis, it is believed that NaI(Tl) detectors must be used. Analytical procedures have been developed to obtain both qualitative and semiquantitative results from an interpretation of the measured NaI(Tl) pulse-height spectrum. Experiment results and the analytic procedure are presented. ?? 1970.

  2. Role of surface plasmon polaritons and other waves in the radiation of resonant optical dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongwei; Liu, Haitao; Zhong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The radiation of an electric dipole emitter can be drastically enhanced if the emitter is placed in the nano-gap of a metallic dipole antenna. By assuming that only surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are excited on the antenna, we build up an intuitive pure-SPP model that is able to comprehensively predict the electromagnetic features of the antenna radiation, such as the total or radiative emission rate and the far-field radiation pattern. With the model we can distinguish the respective contributions from SPPs and from other surface waves to the antenna radiation. It is found that for antennas with long arms that support higher-order resonances, SPPs provide a dominant contribution to the antenna radiation, while for other cases, the contribution of surface waves other than SPPs should be considered. The model reveals an intuitive picture that the enhancement of the antenna radiation is due to surface waves that are resonantly excited on the two antenna arms and that are further coupled into the nano-gap or scattered into free space. From the model we can derive a phase-matching condition that predicts the antenna resonance and the resultant enhanced radiation. The model is helpful for a physical understanding and intuitive design of antenna devices. PMID:25678191

  3. Influence of Clouds On The Surface Radiative Balance For Two Mediterranean Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, D.; Costa, M. J.; Nardino, M.

    Clouds strongly affect the Earth's climate influencing the surface radiative balance by reducing the incident solar radiation and increasing the downward longwave flux. Al- though the quantitative impact of clouds on the surface radiative balance is necessarily associated with great uncertainties due to the complexity and variation of the under- lying parameters, cloud radiative forcing is one of the main regulating factors of the Earth's climate. The present work aims at determining the effect of cloud coverage on the surface radiative balance, in order to contribute for a better understanding of local variations in the Mediterranean climate. Measurements of the cloud cover index (CCI) require the presence of an observer capable of quantifying cloud amounts in the sky in sight above the measurements' site. Since such measurements are not always available the cloud cover index is re- trieved using two different methodologies. On one hand the CCI is computed from the surface radiometer measurements throughout a parameterisation. On the other it is retrieved using a bi-spectral algorithm based on the METEOSAT satellite measure- ments from the visible and infrared spectral regions. Results of the CCI are compared with co-located observations to perform a general check against the available "ground truth". At the same time the CCI values obtained from both methodologies are inter- compared. Results of the CCI and their implications on the surface radiative balance are presented for the two Mediterranean sites selected, one located in Italy and the other in the south of Portugal. The cloud radiative forcing calculations show a cooling effect of the surface in presence of clouds for both sites. Moreover, a seasonal dependence is obtained, with a stronger cooling effect during summer. Acknowledgements: The work was supported by Instituto de Cooperação Científica e Tecnológica Internacional (ICCTI) - Portugal and Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) - Italy

  4. Nuttall's Abelian integral on the Riemann surface of the cube root of a polynomial of degree 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptekarev, A. I.; Tulyakov, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    We study the field of orthogonal trajectories of a quadratic differential on the three-sheeted Riemann surface of the cube root of a polynomial of degree 3. These trajectories coincide globally with the level lines of the velocity potential of an incompressible fluid flowing to the surface through the infinitely remote point on one sheet and flowing out through the infinitely remote point on another. The statement of the problem is motivated by the task of finding the distribution of the poles of the Hermite– Padé approximants for two analytic functions with three common branch points, which is in its turn related to Nuttall's general conjecture.

  5. Estimation of net surface shortwave radiation over the tropical Indian Ocean using geostationary satellite observations: Algorithm and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Naveen R.; Thapliyal, Pradeep K.; Sharma, Rashmi; Pal, Pradip K.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology to estimate the net surface shortwave radiation (SWR) over tropical oceans using half-hourly geostationary satellite estimates of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). The collocated data set of SWR measured at 13 buoy locations over the Indian Ocean and a Meteosat-derived OLR for the period of 2002-2009 have been used to derive an empirical relationship. The information from the solar zenith angle that determines the amount of solar radiation received at a particular location is used to normalize the SWR to nadir observation in order to make the empirical relationship location independent. As the relationship between SWR and OLR is valid mostly over the warm-pool regions, the present study restricts SWR estimation in the tropical Indian Ocean domain (30°E-110°E, 30°S-30°N). The SWR estimates are validated with an independent collocated data set and subsequently compared with the SWR estimates from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment-Surface Radiation Budget V3.0 (GEWEX-SRB), International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project-Flux Data (ISCCP-FD), and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the year 2007. The present algorithm provides significantly better accuracy of SWR estimates, with a root-mean-square error of 27.3 W m-2 as compared with the values of 32.7, 37.5, and 59.6 W m-2 obtained from GEWEX-SRB, ISCCP-FD, and NCEP, respectively. The present algorithm also provides consistently better SWR compared with other available products under different sky conditions and seasons over Indian Ocean warm-pool regions.

  6. The time course of long-distance signaling in radiation-induced bystander effect in vivo in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated using root micro-grafting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Li, Fanghua; Xu, Shuyan; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2011-08-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect has been demonstrated in whole organisms as well as in multicellular tissues in vitro and single-cell culture systems in vitro. However, the time course of bystander signaling, especially in whole organisms, is not clear. Long-distance bystander/abscopal effects in vivo in plants have been demonstrated by our group. Plant grafting is a useful experimental tool for studying the root-shoot signaling of plants. In the present study, we developed a root micro-grafting technique with young seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana in which the bystander signaling communication of root-to-shoot could easily be stopped or started at specific times after root irradiation. Using this methodology, we demonstrated the time course of long-distance signaling in radiation-induced bystander effects at the level of the organism using the expression level of the AtRAD54 gene as a biological end point. Briefly, an 8-h accumulation of damage signals in bystander parts after irradiation was essential for eliciting a bystander response. The protraction of signal accumulation was not related to the transmission speed of signaling molecules in plants and did not result from the delayed initiation of bystander signals in targeted root cells. It was suggested that the bystander effect might be induced jointly by multiple bystander signals initiated at different stages after irradiation. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were shown to be implicated in the response process of bystander cells to radiation damage signals rather than in the generation of bystander signals in targeted cells.

  7. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  8. From Dimming to Brightening: Decadal Changes in Solar Radiation at Earth's Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Martin F.; Gilgen, Hans; Roesch, Andreas; Ohmura, Atsumu; Long, Charles N.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Forgan, B. W.; Kallis, A.; Russak, V.; Tsvetkov, Anatoly

    2005-05-06

    Variations in solar radiation incident at Earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment. A decline in solar radiation at land surfaces has become apparent in many observational records up to 1990, a phenomenon known as global dimming. Newly available surface observations from 1990 to the present, primarily from the Northern Hemisphere, show that the dimming did not persist into the 1990s. Instead, a widespread brightening has been observed since the late 1980s. This reversal is reconcilable with changes in cloudiness and atmospheric transmission and may substantially affect surface climate, the hydrological cycle, glaciers, and ecosystems.

  9. From dimming to brightening: decadal changes in solar radiation at Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    Wild, Martin; Gilgen, Hans; Roesch, Andreas; Ohmura, Atsumu; Long, Charles N; Dutton, Ellsworth G; Forgan, Bruce; Kallis, Ain; Russak, Viivi; Tsvetkov, Anatoly

    2005-05-06

    Variations in solar radiation incident at Earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment. A decline in solar radiation at land surfaces has become apparent in many observational records up to 1990, a phenomenon known as global dimming. Newly available surface observations from 1990 to the present, primarily from the Northern Hemisphere, show that the dimming did not persist into the 1990s. Instead, a widespread brightening has been observed since the late 1980s. This reversal is reconcilable with changes in cloudiness and atmospheric transmission and may substantially affect surface climate, the hydrological cycle, glaciers, and ecosystems.

  10. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasar, C.; Prostean, O.; Prostean, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models.

  11. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  12. Near-surface silica does not increase radiative heat dissipation from plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olof Björn, Lars; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-07-01

    It has been suggested that plants are able to increase radiative heat dissipation from their leaves by depositing near-surface silica, in this way increasing emissivity of infrared radiation and lowering leaf temperature. In order to test this theory, we have compared emissivity and radiative dissipation over the mid-infrared range 2.5-22.3 μm of leaves of plants that accumulate silica and plants that do not. Our data do not support the theory that accumulation of silica increases radiative heat dissipation by plant leaves.

  13. Absorption of Nickel, Chromium, and Iron by the Root Surface of Primary Molars Covered with Stainless Steel Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, David; Mass, Eliyahu; Zilberman, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), was analyzed. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) was used for chemical analysis. Results. Higher amounts of nickel, chromium, and iron (5-6 times) were found in the cementum of molars covered with stainless-steel crowns compared to intact molars. The differences between groups were highly significant (P < .001). Significance. Stainless-steel crowns release nickel, chromium, and iron in oral environment, and the ions are absorbed by the primary molars roots. The additional burden of allergenic metals should be reduced if possible. PMID:21274429

  14. Smart Surfaces: New Coatings & Paints with Radiation Detection Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-03-12

    Paints are being developed and tested that might ultimately be able to detect radiological agents in the environment by incorporating special pigments into an organic polymeric binder that can be applied as a paint or coatings. These paints detect radioactive sources and contaminants with inorganic or organic scintillation or thermo-luminescent pigments, which are selected based upon the radiation ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} or n) to be detected, and are shown in Figure 1.

  15. Characteristics of surface solar radiation in Sino-Singapore Eco-city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Huang, H.; Shen, Y. F.; Yao, W.; Wang, G. S.; Bu, Q. J.; Shan, X. L.; Chang, C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Using solar observation and meteorological data of the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city from August 14th 2014 to August 12th 2015, characteristics of solar radiation of the eco-city and characteristics of solar radiation on a tilted surface under different weather conditions were analyzed and assessed. And the accuracy and error sources of isotropic and anisotropic calculation model for solar radiation on a tilted surface were studied. The results show that observed radiation on a horizontal and tilted surface is quite different at monthly, seasonal and annual time scales, so the estimated photovoltaic power generation based on the solar radiation on a horizontal surface is not accurate. Diurnal cycle of solar radiation is affected by different weather conditions and the power stations need to adjust generation strategies according to weather conditions. Accuracy of the two kinds of tilted radiation calculation models is similar and the overall calculation effect is reasonable. The uncertainty of the direct portion segment calculation function is the main cause of calculated errors.

  16. Molecular and morphological surface analysis: effect of filling pastes and cleaning agents on root dentin

    PubMed Central

    DAINEZI, Vanessa Benetello; IWAMOTO, Alexsandra Shizue; MARTIN, Airton Abrahão; SOARES, Luís Eduardo Silva; HOSOYA, Yumiko; PASCON, Fernanda Miori; PUPPIN-RONTANI, Regina Maria

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The quality of the dentin root is the most important factor for restoration resin sealing and drives the outcome of endodontic treatment. Objective This study evaluated the effect of different filling pastes and cleaning agents on the root dentin of primary teeth using Fourier-transformed Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Material and Methods Eighty roots of primary teeth were endodontically prepared and distributed into 4 groups and filled according to the following filling pastes: Control-no filling (CP), Calen®+zinc oxide (CZ), Calcipex II® (CII), Vitapex® (V). After seven days, filling paste groups were distributed to 4 subgroups according to cleaning agents (n=5): Control-no cleaning (C), Ethanol (E), Tergenform® (T), 35% Phosphoric acid (PA). Then, the roots were sectioned and the dentin root sections were internally evaluated by FT-Raman, µ-EDXRF and SEM. Data was submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results Regarding filling pastes, there was no significant difference in organic content. CP provided the lowest calcium values and, calcium/phosphoric ratio (Ca/P), and the highest phosphoric values. For cleaning agents there was no difference in organic content when compared to the C; however, T showed significantly higher calcium and Ca/P than PA. All groups showed similar results for phosphorus. The dentin smear layer was present after use of the cleaning agents, except PA. Conclusion The filling pastes changed the inorganic content, however they did not change the organic content. Cleaning agents did not alter the inorganic and organic content. PA cleaned and opened dentin tubules. PMID:28198982

  17. Solar radiation transmitted to the ground through cloud in relation to surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Brian G.

    1987-04-01

    The global solar radiation received at the earth's surface in the presence of cloud depends not only on the optical depth of the cloud and its other physical properties, but also on the albedo of the underlying surface. Multiple reflection of radiation between the cloud and a snow-covered surface, mainly in the visible spectrum, can increase the measured global solar radiation by a factor of 2 or more in overcast conditions. A quantitative account of this effect is required, applicable to any cloud conditions, if climatological records of solar radiation at high latitudes are to provide adequate figures, even for monthly means, at locations where the surface albedo differs appreciably from that of the observing station. Measurements made at an Antarctic offshore station (65°S, 64°W) are compared during two periods of extreme surface albedo (open water and fast ice surrounding the island station) and demonstrate that the effect increases, in amplitude and variability, with increasing cloud cover. The extreme cases are reconciled by a relatively simple numerical model, of general applicability, in which partial cloud cover is parameterized by sunshine duration. Absorption in the cloud and the effect of local land surfaces are taken into account. The model is applied predictively to sunshine and visual sea ice data throughout a 2-year period and successfully simulates the measured values of global solar radiation over a wide range of cloud and sea ice cover, enabling the irradiance for any value of surface albedo to be inferred.

  18. Transient Heat Transfer in a Semitransparent Radiating Layer with Boundary Convection and Surface Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Surface convection and refractive index are examined during transient radiative heating or cooling of a grey semitransparent layer with internal absorption, emission and conduction. Each side of the layer is exposed to hot or cold radiative surroundings, while each boundary is heated or cooled by convection. Emission within the layer and internal reflections depend on the layer refractive index. The reflected energy and heat conduction distribute energy across the layer and partially equalize the transient temperature distributions. Solutions are given to demonstrate the effect of radiative heating for layers with various optical thicknesses, the behavior of the layer heated by radiation on one side and convectively cooled on the other, and a layer heated by convection while being cooled by radiation. The numerical method is an implicit finite difference procedure with non-uniform space and time increments. The basic method developed in earlier work is expanded to include external convection and incident radiation.

  19. Hypothetical Protein Avin_16040 as the S-Layer Protein of Azotobacter vinelandii and Its Involvement in Plant Root Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Jong, Bor Chyan

    2015-01-01

    A proteomic analysis of a soil-dwelling, plant growth-promoting Azotobacter vinelandii strain showed the presence of a protein encoded by the hypothetical Avin_16040 gene when the bacterial cells were attached to the Oryza sativa root surface. An Avin_16040 deletion mutant demonstrated reduced cellular adherence to the root surface, surface hydrophobicity, and biofilm formation compared to those of the wild type. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the cell surface topography, the deletion mutant displayed a cell surface architectural pattern that was different from that of the wild type. Escherichia coli transformed with the wild-type Avin_16040 gene displayed on its cell surface organized motifs which looked like the S-layer monomers of A. vinelandii. The recombinant E. coli also demonstrated enhanced adhesion to the root surface. PMID:26276116

  20. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on methane emission in a paddy field and rice root exudation of low-molecular-weight organic acids.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmei; Zhan, Fangdong; Li, Yuan; Xu, Weiwei; Zu, Yanqun; Yue, Ming

    2016-06-08

    A local rice variety, "Baijiaolaojing", was grown in a paddy field in the Yuanyang rice terraces under ambient and supplemental levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-315 nm) radiation. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation (5 and 10 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) on methane emissions in the paddy field were evaluated using a closed-chamber gas chromatography-based system, and the contents of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) in root exudates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Peaks in methane emissions in the paddy field were detected at 60, 80 and 100 days after rice transplantation. The highest level of cumulative methane emissions occurred at the tillering stage, followed by the jointing-booting and maturity stages. The lowest level was found at the flowering stage. The enhanced UV-B radiation did not change the seasonal variation in methane emissions in the paddy field; however, it induced a significant increase in the flux of methane emissions at the jointing-booting and maturity stages, as well as a significant increase in the cumulative flux of methane emissions throughout the growth period. In addition, the enhanced UV-B radiation caused an increase in the contents of oxalic acid and succinic acid and a decrease in the contents of tartaric acid and malic acid in rice root exudates. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.725, p < 0.01) was found between the content of oxalic acid and the methane emissions in the paddy field. The results indicated that enhanced UV-B radiation promoted methane emissions in the paddy field, which was closely associated with its impact on the exudation of LMWOAs by rice roots.

  1. Surface solar ultraviolet radiation for paleoatmospheric levels of oxygen and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Many investigators have concluded that the level of solar ultraviolet radiation (200-300 nm) reaching the surface was a key parameter in the origin and evolution of life on earth. The level of solar ultraviolet radiation between 200 and 300 nm is controlled primarily by molecular absorption by ozone, whose presence is strongly coupled to the level of molecular oxygen. In this paper, a series of calculations is presented of the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface for oxygen levels ranging from 0.0001 the present atmospheric level to the present level. The solar spectrum between 200 and 300 nm has been divided into 34 spectral intervals. For each spectral interval, the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface has been calculated by considering the attenuation of the incoming beam due to ozone and oxygen absorption. A one-dimensional photochemical model of the atmosphere was used for these calculations.

  2. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  3. Solution of the equation of radiative transfer for remote sensing over nonuniform surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere is a necessity for the remote sensing of surface reflectivity from satellites and aircraft. The range of the adjacency effect, which represents the effect of bright areas on the radiance above dark areas, is the main parameter that distinguishes atmospheric radiative transfer over a nonuniform surface from that over a uniform one. A radiative transfer model which expresses this range correctly is, therefore, critical for developing remote sensing methods for the case of an atmosphere over a nonuniform surface. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a new approximate solution of the radiative transfer (RT) equation. The solution is not limited to nonabsorbing atmospheres, but it will still be limited to nadir observations. The results compare favorably with Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  5. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  6. Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. H. Y.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S. C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böttcher, S. I.; Boehm, E.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Reitz, G.; Posner, A.

    2014-12-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to

  7. Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Erik

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to

  8. Potential of a New Lunar Surface Radiator Concept for Hot Lunar Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Dustin A.; Vogel, Matthew R.; Trevino, Luis A.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    The optimum radiator configuration in hot lunar thermal environments is one in which the radiator is parallel to the ground and has no view to the hot lunar surface. However, typical spacecraft configurations have limited real estate available for top-mounted radiators, resulting in a desire to use the spacecraft s vertically oriented sides. Vertically oriented, flat panel radiators will have a large view factor to the lunar surface, and thus will be subjected to significant incident lunar infrared heat. Consequently, radiator fluid temperatures will need to exceed approx.325 K (assuming standard spacecraft radiator optical properties) in order to provide positive heat rejection at lunar noon. Such temperatures are too high for crewed spacecraft applications in which a heat pump is to be avoided. A recent study of vertically oriented radiator configurations subjected to lunar noon thermal environments led to the discovery of a novel radiator concept that yielded positive heat rejection at lower fluid temperatures. This radiator configuration, called the Upright Lunar Terrain Radiator Assembly (ULTRA), has exhibited superior performance to all previously analyzed concepts in terms of heat rejection in the lunar noon thermal environment. A key benefit of the ULTRA is the absence of louvers or other moving parts and its simple geometry. Analysis of the ULTRA for a lunar extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support system (PLSS) is shown to provide moderate heat rejection, on average, at all solar incident angles assuming an average radiator temperature of 294 K, whereas prior concepts exhibited insignificant heat rejection or heat absorption at higher incident angles. The performance of the ULTRA for a lunar lander is also discussed and compared to the performance of a vertically oriented, flat panel radiator at various lunar latitudes.

  9. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Limongi, Tania; Marinaro, Giovanni; Riekel, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  10. UV radiation induced surface modulation time evolution in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, I.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Iordache, I.; Hurduc, N.; Sava, I.; Sacarescu, L.; Stoica, I.

    2010-11-01

    The reorganization processes at submicron level of the polymeric materials have been investigated because of their applications in optoelectronics and bio-science. We have obtained surface relief modulation in single step processing on the photo resist and polysiloxane films. But for technical applications the time evolution and stability of the induced surface structure is an important parameter and is a problem to be discussed. In case of single step surface relief formation on polymeric materials the process is connected with the photochromic behavior of the materials. As it is known the UV light induced effects on the material structure are reversible under the action of visible light, but with different speeds. In this report is analyzed the time evolution of the surface modulation obtained under the action of the UV light for azopolymers with different structures.

  11. Effect of exposure to radio frequency radiation emitted by cell phone on the developing dorsal root ganglion of chick embryo: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ingole, I V; Ghosh, S K

    2012-12-01

    With an ever increasing number of cell phone users since late twentieth [corrected] century, magnitude of the problem of exposure to radiation emitted by cell phone is self evident. Extensive research had been devoted to incriminate or absolve it as a health hazard. Radiofrequency radiation emitted by cell phone had been stated to be a potent carcinogen, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and neurobehavioral teratogen. Its effect on the brain had been a subject of extensive research evidently due to its proximity to the user's brain. While considering the biological effects of radiofrequency radiation, its intensity, frequency and the duration of exposure are important determinants. Nevertheless the results of these different studies have not been unequivocal. Considering the contradictory reports, the present work was undertaken to study the effect of such an exposure on the developing neural tissue of chick embryo. The processes of cell division and differentiation are fundamental to the development of any living being and are a sensitive index of any insult sustained at this stage. Neurons of dorsal root ganglion were selected for the present study as these ganglia were fully differentiated as early as fourth day of embryonic life. By varying duration of exposure, the embryos were exposed to different doses of radiation, sacrificed at different periods of incubation and subjected to histological processing. On light microscopic study it was observed that developing neurons of dorsal root ganglion suffered a damage which was dose dependent and persisted in spite of giving the exposure-free period between two exposures.

  12. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulation of plasma formed on a surface by a megagauss field.

    PubMed

    Esaulov, A A; Bauer, B S; Makhin, V; Siemon, R E; Lindemuth, I R; Awe, T J; Reinovsky, R E; Struve, K W; Desjarlais, M P; Mehlhorn, T A

    2008-03-01

    Radiation magnetohydrodynamic modeling is used to study the plasma formed on the surface of a cylindrical metallic load, driven by megagauss magnetic field at the 1MA Zebra generator (University of Nevada, Reno). An ionized aluminum plasma is used to represent the "core-corona" behavior in which a heterogeneous Z-pinch consists of a hot low-density corona surrounding a dense low-temperature core. The radiation dynamics model included simultaneously a self-consistent treatment of both the opaque and transparent plasma regions in a corona. For the parameters of this experiment, the boundary of the opaque plasma region emits the major radiation power with Planckian black-body spectrum in the extreme ultraviolet corresponding to an equilibrium temperature of 16 eV. The radiation heat transport significantly exceeds the electron and ion kinetic heat transport in the outer layers of the opaque plasma. Electromagnetic field energy is partly radiated (13%) and partly deposited into inner corona and core regions (87%). Surface temperature estimates are sensitive to the radiation effects, but the surface motion in response to pressure and magnetic forces is not. The general results of the present investigation are applicable to the liner compression experiments at multi-MA long-pulse current accelerators such as Atlas and Shiva Star. Also the radiation magnetohydrodynamic model discussed in the paper may be useful for understanding key effects of wire array implosion dynamics.

  13. Effect of instrumentation using curettes, piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler and Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the morphology and adhesion of blood components on root surfaces: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Jackeline do Nascimento; Souto, Bráulio Henrique Marques; Oliveira, Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes de; Sampaio, José Eduardo Cézar; Marcantonio Júnior, Elcio; Marcantonio, Rosemary Adriana Chiérici

    2011-01-01

    This study used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the morphology and adhesion of blood components on root surfaces instrumented by curettes, piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler and Er,Cr:YSGG laser. One hundred samples from 25 teeth were divided into 5 groups: 1) Curettes; 2) Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler; 3) Curettes plus piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler; 4) Er,Cr:YSGG laser; 5) Curettes plus Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Ten samples from each group were used for analysis of root morphology and the other 10 were used for analysis of adhesion of blood components on root surface. The results were analyzed statistically by the Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests with a significance level of 5%. The group treated with curettes showed smoother surfaces when compared to the groups were instrumented with piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler and the Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The surfaces instrumented with piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler and Er,Cr:YSGG laser, alone or in combination with hand scaling and root planing, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) among themselves. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) among groups were found as to the adhesion of blood components on root surface. Ultrasonic instrumentation and Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation produced rougher root surfaces than the use of curettes, but there were no differences among treatments with respect to the adhesion of blood components.

  14. Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) are presented. Topics covered include: radiative transfer model validation; calibration of VISSR and AVHRR solar channels; development and refinement of algorithms to estimate downward solar and terrestrial irradiances at the surface, including photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and surface albedo; verification of these algorithms using in situ measurements; production of maps of shortwave irradiance, surface albedo, and related products; analysis of the temporal variability of shortwave irradiance over the FIFE site; development of a spectroscopy technique to estimate atmospheric total water vapor amount; and study of optimum linear combinations of visible and near-infrared reflectances for estimating the fraction of PAR absorbed by plants.

  15. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  16. Formation of caries-like lesions in vitro on the root surfaces of human teeth in solutions simulating plaque fluid.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R P

    2010-01-01

    Lesion formation on root surfaces of human posterior teeth was studied in acetate/lactate buffers with a background electrolyte composition based on plaque fluid analyses. Lesion depth after 28 days at 37 degrees C was measured in relation to: the presence or absence of cementum; the concentration of undissociated buffer; the presence or absence of magnesium ions at plaque fluid concentration. Each factor was evaluated at several values of -log(ion activity product for hydroxyapatite): pI(HA). Solutions were formulated to minimize variation in pH, which varied by < or =0.03 for a given comparison (individual pI(HA)) and by 0.42-0.82 over the range of pI(HA) within experiments. Lesions on surfaces from which cementum had been ground were significantly deeper than on intact surfaces, but this is considered to be due to subsurface mechanical damage and not to a solubility difference. Neither the concentration of undissociated buffer nor the presence of magnesium ions significantly affected lesion depth. Lesion depth was strongly influenced by the correlated variations in pI(HA) and pH. At pI(HA) 54 and 55, only extremely shallow lesions formed. From pI(HA) 56, lesion depth increased with increasing pI(HA). The results confirm that the solubility of the mineral of root tissues is higher than that of hydroxyapatite, but indicate that it is probably lower than suggested by Hoppenbrouwers et al. [Arch Oral Biol 1987;32:319-322]. For calcium concentrations of 3-12 mM, the critical pH for root tissue mineral was calculated as 5.22-5.66 assuming solubility equivalent to pI(HA) 54 and 5.08-5.51 assuming pI(HA) 55.

  17. Importance of root HTO uptake in controlling land-surface tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition: a numerical experiment.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu; Koarashi, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the role of belowground root uptake of tritiated water (HTO) in controlling land-surface tritium (T) dynamics, a sophisticated numerical model predicting tritium behavior in an atmosphere-vegetation-soil system was developed, and numerical experiments were conducted using the model. The developed model covered physical tritiated hydrogen (HT) transport in a multilayered atmosphere and soil, as well as microbial oxidation of HT to HTO in the soil, and it was incorporated into a well-established HTO-transfer organically bound tritium (OBT)-formation model. The model performance was tested through the simulation of an existing HT-release experiment. Numerical experiments involving a hypothetical acute HT exposure to a grassland field with a range of rooting depths showed that the HTO release from the leaves to the atmosphere, driven by the root uptake of the deposited HTO, can exceed the HTO evaporation from the ground surface to the atmosphere when root water absorption preferentially occurs beneath the ground surface. Such enhanced soil-leaf-atmosphere HTO transport, caused by the enhanced root HTO uptake, increased HTO concentrations in both the surface atmosphere and in the cellular water of the leaf. Consequently, leaf OBT assimilation calculated for shallow rooting depths increased by nearly an order of magnitude compared to that for large rooting depths.

  18. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  19. Colonization on root surface by a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium and its application for reducing plant phenanthrene contamination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuang; Sun, Kai; Sheng, Yuehui; Gu, Yujun; Gao, Yanzheng

    2014-01-01

    A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium, Pn2, was isolated from Alopecurus aequalis Sobol grown in soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on morphology, physiological characteristics and the 16S rRNA gene sequence, it was identified as Massilia sp. Strain Pn2 could degrade more than 95% of the phenanthrene (150 mg · L(-1)) in a minimal salts medium (MSM) within 48 hours at an initial pH of 7.0 and a temperature of 30 °C. Pn2 could grow well on the MSM plates with a series of other PAHs, including naphthalene, acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, and degrade them to different degrees. Pn2 could also colonize the root surface of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam), invade its internal root tissues and translocate into the plant shoot. When treated with the endophyte Pn2 under hydroponic growth conditions with 2 mg · L(-1) of phenanthrene in the Hoagland solution, the phenanthrene concentrations in ryegrass roots and shoots were reduced by 54% and 57%, respectively, compared with the endophyte-free treatment. Strain Pn2 could be a novel and useful bacterial resource for eliminating plant PAH contamination in polluted environments by degrading the PAHs inside plants. Furthermore, we provide new perspectives on the control of the plant uptake of PAHs via endophytic bacteria.

  20. Evaluation of the Arctic Surface Radiation Budget in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeke, R.; Taylor, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic region is warming at a rate nearly double the global average, and this trend is predicted to continue for the coming decades, as simulated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) climate projections. Despite the consistency in the projected surface warming rate relative to the globe, significant inter-model spread is found in the overall magnitude of Arctic surface temperature change, which leads to large inter-model spread in the simulation of surface radiative properties. The goal of this presentation is to determine the biases in the representation of the Arctic surface radiation budget seasonal cycle and discover the physical processes that explain the significant spread in projected Arctic warming. First, biases in the simulated Arctic surface radiation budget seasonal cycle within several CMIP5 climate models participating in the Historical forcing scenario are evaluated with respect to the CERES-SFC-EBAF and C3M data products. Next, the equations for longwave and shortwave cloud radiative forcing are decomposed using an independent column approximation (ICA) to identify which factors are driving changes to the annual cycle of cloud radiative forcing as well as what terms are contributing to the inter-model spread in the simulation of the surface energy budget. A multiple linear regression methodology is applied to the results of the ICA analysis using four atmospheric state variables as predictors: surface pressure, lower tropospheric stability, sea-ice concentration, and surface temperature. The impact of thermodynamics, atmospheric dynamics, and cloud-sea ice interactions on the annual cycle of cloud radiative effect will be determined.

  1. Influence of snow cover changes on surface radiation and heat balance based on the WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingxue; Liu, Tingxiang; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping; Zhang, Shuwen

    2016-07-01

    The snow cover extent in mid-high latitude areas of the Northern Hemisphere has significantly declined corresponding to the global warming, especially since the 1970s. Snow-climate feedbacks play a critical role in regulating the global radiation balance and influencing surface heat flux exchange. However, the degree to which snow cover changes affect the radiation budget and energy balance on a regional scale and the difference between snow-climate and land use/cover change (LUCC)-climate feedbacks have been rarely studied. In this paper, we selected Heilongjiang Basin, where the snow cover has changed obviously, as our study area and used the WRF model to simulate the influences of snow cover changes on the surface radiation budget and heat balance. In the scenario simulation, the localized surface parameter data improved the accuracy by 10 % compared with the control group. The spatial and temporal analysis of the surface variables showed that the net surface radiation, sensible heat flux, Bowen ratio, temperature and percentage of snow cover were negatively correlated and that the ground heat flux and latent heat flux were positively correlated with the percentage of snow cover. The spatial analysis also showed that a significant relationship existed between the surface variables and land cover types, which was not obviously as that for snow cover changes. Finally, six typical study areas were selected to quantitatively analyse the influence of land cover types beneath the snow cover on heat absorption and transfer, which showed that when the land was snow covered, the conversion of forest to farmland can dramatically influence the net radiation and other surface variables, whereas the snow-free land showed significantly reduced influence. Furthermore, compared with typical land cover changes, e.g., the conversion of forest into farmland, the influence of snow cover changes on net radiation and sensible heat flux were 60 % higher than that of land cover changes

  2. Predicting root zone soil moisture with soil properties and satellite near-surface moisture data across the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, D.; Manfreda, S.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite-based near-surface (0-2 cm) soil moisture estimates have global coverage, but do not capture variations of soil moisture in the root zone (up to 100 cm depth) and may be biased with respect to ground-based soil moisture measurements. Here, we present an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) hydrologic data assimilation system that predicts bias in satellite soil moisture data to support the physically based Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) infiltration model, which estimates root zone soil moisture with satellite soil moisture data. The SMAR-EnKF model estimates a regional-scale bias parameter using available in situ data. The regional bias parameter is added to satellite soil moisture retrievals before their use in the SMAR model, and the bias parameter is updated continuously over time with the EnKF algorithm. In this study, the SMAR-EnKF assimilates in situ soil moisture at 43 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) monitoring locations across the conterminous U.S. Multivariate regression models are developed to estimate SMAR parameters using soil physical properties and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) evapotranspiration data product as covariates. SMAR-EnKF root zone soil moisture predictions are in relatively close agreement with in situ observations when using optimal model parameters, with root mean square errors averaging 0.051 [cm3 cm-3] (standard error, s.e. = 0.005). The average root mean square error associated with a 20-fold cross-validation analysis with permuted SMAR parameter regression models increases moderately (0.082 [cm3 cm-3], s.e. = 0.004). The expected regional-scale satellite correction bias is negative in four out of six ecoregions studied (mean = -0.12 [-], s.e. = 0.002), excluding the Great Plains and Eastern Temperate Forests (0.053 [-], s.e. = 0.001). With its capability of estimating regional-scale satellite bias, the SMAR-EnKF system can predict root zone soil moisture over broad extents and has

  3. A surface-profile measuring system for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, S. ); Higashi, Y. ); Haya, S.; Otsuka, M.; Yamamoto, H. )

    1992-01-01

    The optical head for a new surface-profile measuring system was constructed on the basis of the Twyman--Green interferometer with heterodyne phase detection method. Stability in optical path difference (OPD) was within 2 nm for a fixed point under the well shielded condition. The measured OPD map at the null fringe condition shows the possibility for direct or segment measurement method of aspheric and/or large size mirrors in SR optics. Based on experiments, a new surface-profile measuring system by phase measurement interferometry and segment method is designed. Designed features of the system are briefly reported.

  4. Influence of tip wear of piezoelectric ultrasonic scalers on root surface roughness at different working parameters. A profilometric and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, T; Cicek, Y; Dilsiz, A; Erdogan, İ Y; Kose, O; Kizildağ, A

    2013-02-01

    Roughness on tooth surfaces is reported to facilitate the reestablishment of microbial dental plaque. Hence, the main goal of dental scaling is to remove bacterial plaque and obtain smoother tooth surfaces. This study was aimed to assess the influence of tip wear of ultrasonic scaler inserts on root surface roughness at different working parameters. Twenty piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler inserts (10 worn/10 new) were selected to examine the erosion ratio (ER) on the scaler tips and to assess the influence of tip wear on root surface roughness. Erosion on the tip surfaces was evaluated under atomic force microscopy (AFM). Root samples were prepared and instrumented by new (Group I) and worn (Group II) inserts at different working parameters. Roughness change (Rc) on root surfaces after instrumentation was examined under profilometer and compared between and within the groups. Statistically significant differences were found between the mean ERs of new and worn tips (P < 0.01). The results of this study showed that tip angulation and instrument power strongly influenced the Rc values on instrumented samples (P < 0.05). It was also revealed that tip wear influenced the Rc values on root surfaces especially at 45° tip angulation (P < 0.05). Therefore, tip wear should also be considered as much as the other parameters to minimize the surface roughness during ultrasonic treatment.

  5. The radiation refinement of polystyrene surface applied in immunoanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipota, J.; Plaček, V.; Vacek, K.; Burianová, T.

    1993-10-01

    Polystyrene, material frequently used for ELISA microtiter plates, was modified by gamma irradiation in order to enhance the passive absorption binding capacity of immunoglobuline E. The dependences of this capacity increase on dose and irradiation conditions (atmosphere, presence of water) permitted the optimization this treatment of plates up to the technological scale. However the increase of passive absorption in the case of low-molecular weight synthetic peptides, such as anti-EBNA, was not sufficient and the reason for this remains to be clarified. Radiation grafting made it possible to fix the hydrazide functional group onto the polysterene. It offers the possibility to of binding the proteins, via covalent linkage, with the carbonyl group formed by the oxidation of carbohydrates included in the protein molecule.

  6. A Radiation Dosimeter Concept for the Lunar Surface Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Watts, John; Kuznetsov, Eugeny N.; Parnell, Thomas A.; Pendleton, Geoff N.

    2007-01-01

    A novel silicon detector configuration for radiation dose measurements in an environment where solar energetic particles are of most concern is described. The dosimeter would also measure the dose from galactic cosmic rays. In the lunar environment a large range in particle flux and ionization density must be measured and converted to dose equivalent. This could be accomplished with a thick (e.g. 2mm) silicon detector segmented into cubic volume elements "voxels" followed by a second, thin monolithic silicon detector. The electronics needed to implement this detector concept include analog signal processors (ASIC) and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) for data accumulation and conversion to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra and to dose-equivalent (Sievert). Currently available commercial ASIC's and FPGA's are suitable for implementing the analog and digital systems.

  7. Long-term changes in net radiation at the Earth's surface: uncertainties and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Justin; Coccia, Gabriele; Siemann, Amanda; Wood, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Net radiation at the earth's surface plays a key role in terrestrial water, energy and carbon fluxes, but there is large uncertainty in its variation over decadal time scales. Globally, surface and satellite measurements indicate global dimming in solar radiation over many regions since the mid-20th century and then brightening over recent decades due to changes in cloudiness and aerosols. Changes in longwave radiation are driven by long-term increases in greenhouse gases and inter-annual variations in short-lived constituents such as dust and black carbon. These increases are partially offset, however, by increases in surface temperature. Current estimates of these components of the net radiation balance from satellite remote sensing are inconsistent because of inhomogeneities from changes in satellites, sensor calibration, retrieval algorithms, and so on, in addition to systematic biases. Estimates from direct ground observations are hampered by sparse spatial networks and often short-term records, and estimates based on denser networks of meteorological data are affected by errors in empirical radiation models. Some of the largest uncertainties are in the characterization of the global distribution and temporal changes in surface shortwave albedo and infrared emissivity, especially in regions with seasonal and patchy snow cover. This paper presents comparisons of legacy satellite-derived datasets (e.g. ISCCP, GEWEX/SRB) and recently developed datasets based on updated algorithms and homogenized data sources (e.g. NASA Princeton-Measures, HIRS) in the context of long-term changes in the net radiation balance at the earth's surface. We compare these with ground observations and empirical estimates based on meteorological data from in-situ sources and reanalysis. In particular we focus on the uncertainties in the magnitude and variation in surface albedo and emissivity, and their contribution to uncertainties in net radiation. We discuss the implications of these

  8. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    SciTech Connect

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    Within the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (Wielicki et al. 1996), the Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group is tasked with calculating vertical profiles of heating rates, globally, and continuously, beneath CERES footprint observations of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This is accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details on the code and its inputs can be found in Kato et al. (2005) and Rose and Charlock (2002). Among the many required inputs is characterization of the vertical column profile of aerosols beneath each footprint. To do this SARB combines aerosol optical depth information from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with aerosol constituents specified by the Model for Atmosphere and Chemical Transport (MATCH) of Collins et al. (2001), and aerosol properties (e.g. single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter) from Tegen and Lacis (1996) and OPAC (Hess et al. 1998). The publicly available files that include these flux profiles, called the Clouds and Radiative Swath (CRS) data product, available from the Langley Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). As various versions of the code are completed, publishable results are named ''Editions.'' After CRS Edition 2A was finalized it was found that dust aerosols were too absorptive. Dust aerosols have subsequently been modified using a new set of properties developed by Andy Lacis and results have been released in CRS Edition 2B. This paper discusses the effects of changing desert dust aerosol properties, which can be significant for the radiation budget in mid ocean, a few thousand kilometers from the source regions. Resulting changes are validated via comparison of surface observed fluxes from the Saudi Solar Village surface site (Myers et al. 1999), and the E13 site

  9. Waveguide-coupled directional Raman radiation for surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Jin-Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Dan-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2015-09-07

    Kretschmann-type waveguide structures, including Plasmon Waveguide (PW) and Resonant Mirror (RM), have been applied in interfacial Raman spectroscopy due to the following unique features: (1) unlike the classic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates made of either gold or silver, both PW and RM can be prepared using a large variety of inexpensive materials; (2) the field enhancement factors using these structures can be theoretically predicted and experimentally controlled, which enables us to manipulate the surface Raman sensitivity with high repeatability; (3) the use of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes for Raman excitation allows us to evaluate the orientation of target molecules immobilized on the waveguide surface; (4) the unwanted impact of noble metals on the Raman fingerprints of target molecules, which is often observed for conventional SERS substrates, can be avoided upon the use of dielectric waveguides. In this paper, guided-mode-coupled directional Raman emission, which is an additional important feature of the waveguide Raman technique, was theoretically investigated based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel equations. The simulation results indicate that the directional Raman emission from a dipole located within the field confinement and penetration depth of a guided mode depends on both the orientation of the dipole and its distance from the waveguide surface. Raman light from the TE-oriented dipoles is launched into the prism coupler at the TE-mode resonance angle and that from the non-TE-oriented dipoles propagates at the TM-mode resonance angle. The intensity of the guided-mode-excited Raman signal propagating at the mode resonance angle is proportional to the fourth power of the mode field (E(4)) at the depth of the dipole from the waveguide surface. This means that the guided-mode-excited and guided-mode-coupled directional Raman spectroscopy has a detection depth that is as

  10. Modelling variability in radiative fluxes on snow surfaces beneath coniferous canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essery, R.; Hardy, J.; Link, T.; Marks, D.; Pomeroy, J.; Rowlands, A.; Rutter, N.

    2005-12-01

    Absorption, scattering and emission of solar and thermal radiation by coniferous canopies can have a large influence on the surface energy balance of snow in forests. The high variability of radiative fluxes in sparse or discontinuous forests cannot be captured by simple two-stream canopy radiation models, and sophisticated ray-tracing models are too computationally and data intensive for practical applications. An efficient spatial model representing individual trees as simple geometric primitives with a stochastic component for smaller scales is presented, and model results are compared with measurements from radiometer arrays. Forest structure information for the model can be obtained from manual mapping, hemispherical photography, aerial photography or airborne laser scanning. The model is used to investigate spatial and temporal scaling of radiative fluxes at the snow surface.

  11. Impact of cirrus on the surface radiative environment at the FIRE ETLA Palisades, NY site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David A.; Kukla, George; Frei, Allan

    1990-01-01

    FIRE Extended Time Limited Area (ETLA) observations provide year round information critical to gaining a better understanding of cloud/climate interactions. The Lamont/Rutgers team has participated in the ETLS program through the collection and analysis of shortwave and longwave downwelling irradiances at Palisades, NY. These data are providing useful information on surface radiative fluxes with respect to sky condition, solar zenith angle and season. Their utility extends to the calibration and validation of cloud/radiative models and satellite cloud and radiative retrievals. The impact cirrus clouds have on the surface radiative environment is examined using Palisades ETLA information on atmospheric transmissivities and downwelling longwave fluxes for winter and summer cirrus and clear sky episodes in 1987.

  12. Plasma formation on a metal surface under combined action of laser and microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, A P; Shaparev, N Ya

    2013-10-31

    By means of numerical modelling of the combined effect of laser (1.06 mm) and microwave (10{sup 10} – 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}) radiation on the aluminium surface in vacuum it is shown that the additional action of microwave radiation with the frequency 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} provides complete ionisation of the metal vapour (for the values of laser radiation duration and intensity used in the calculations), while in the absence of microwave radiation the vapour remains weakly ionised. The mathematical model used accounts for the processes, occurring in the condensed phase (heat conduction, melting), the evaporation and the kinetic processes in the resulting vapour. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Evaluation of the Arctic surface radiation budget in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeke, Robyn C.; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2016-07-01

    The Arctic region is warming at a rate more than double the global average, a trend predicted to continue by all Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) climate models. Despite this consistency, significant intermodel spread exists in the simulated Arctic climate related to differences in the Arctic surface radiation budget. Building upon previous work to characterize and understand surface radiation budget biases in climate models, the annual mean and seasonal cycle of the Arctic surface radiation budget in 17 CMIP5 models using the Historical-forcing scenario is evaluated against state-of-the-art Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System Surface Energy Balanced and Filled data. The CMIP5 multimodel ensemble is found to simulate longwave surface fluxes well during the sunlit months ( 1 W m-2 differences in July) but exhibits significant wintertime biases (up to -19 W m-2). Shortwave fluxes show substantial across-model spread during summer; the model standard deviation approaches 20 W m-2 in July. Applying a decomposition analysis to the cloud radiative effect (CRE) seasonal cycles, an unrealistic compensation is uncovered between the model-simulated seasonal cycles of cloud fraction, all-sky/clear-sky flux differences, and surface albedo that enables models to simulate realistic CRE seasonal cycles with unrealistic individual contributions. This unrealistic behavior in models must be constrained to improve Arctic climate simulation; observational uncertainty is sufficient to do so. Lastly, biases in all and clear-sky longwave downwelling fluxes positively correlate with model surface temperature in winter, while in summer surface temperature is most strongly related to clear-sky upwelling radiation biases from surface albedo errors.

  14. Radiation Environment and Surface Radiolytic Interactions at Mimas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sturner, S. J.; Paranicas, C.; Cooper, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Saturn's innermost principal moon Mimas shares the distinction with Europa at Jupiter of being the most irradiated icy moon in its respective planetary system, although the energetic electron energy flux at Mimas is forty times smaller than at Europa. High energy (> 10 MeV) proton fluxes are low in this moon's orbital corridor, likely since slowly diffusing protons from the weak but steady source of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) cannot accumulate without impacting the moon surface. Lower energy proton fluxes are also evidently suppressed in this orbital region. Plasma ion and electron fluxes are also low apparently due to cooling by interaction with E-ring dust and neutral gas from Enceladus. Due to energy-dependent effects of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift for the electrons, the trailing hemisphere is mainly irradiated by electrons at energies below 1 MeV that drift relative to Mimas in the prograde direction of orbital motion around Saturn, while higher energy electrons primarily impact the leading hemisphere. Plasma ions in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn are mainly pickup ions forming from the dissociation products of Enceladus plume water molecules, additionally including some contribution from photosputtering of the main rings, and do not introduce new elemental materials at Mimas via surface implantation from the corotating plasma. Thus the primary interaction at the surface is radiolytic chemistry induced in pure water ice by relatively deep penetration of the energetic electrons to millimeter and greater depths, as compared to the micron depths impacted by the corotating plasma ions. If surface erosion by sputtering from relatively low fluxes of the plasma and more energetic ions is indeed ineffective, then molecular products (OH, H2O2, 02, 03) of the radiolytic interactions may accumulate in the meters-deep impact regolith of the surface ices. An effect of regolith trapped gas accumulation could be to increase porosity and reduce

  15. Extracting Metrics for Three-dimensional Root Systems: Volume and Surface Analysis from In-soil X-ray Computed Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Adams, Lexor; Beck, Anthon N.; McKinney, Adriana L.; Varga, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to climate change and forest management. Quantitative size information on roots in their native environment is invaluable for studying root growth and environmental processes involving the plant. X ray computed tomography (XCT) has been demonstrated to be an effective tool for in situ root scanning and analysis. Our group at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) has developed an XCT-based tool to image and quantitatively analyze plant root structures in their native soil environment. XCT data collected on a Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen was used to visualize its root structure. A combination of open-source software RooTrak and DDV were employed to segment the root from the soil, and calculate its isosurface, respectively. Our own computer script named 3DRoot-SV was developed and used to calculate root volume and surface area from a triangular mesh. The process utilizing a unique combination of tools, from imaging to quantitative root analysis, including the 3DRoot-SV computer script, is described.

  16. Optimization of meander line radiators for frequency selective surfaces by using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucuci, Stefania C.; Dumitrascu, Ana; Danisor, Alin; Berescu, Serban; Tamas, Razvan D.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we propose the use of frequency selective surfaces based on meander line radiators, as targets for monitoring slow displacements with synthetic aperture radars. The optimization of the radiators is performed by using genetic algorithms on only two parameters i.e., gain and size. As an example, we have optimized a single meander antenna, resonating in the X-band, at 9.65 GHz.

  17. Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ardanuy, P.E.; Kyle, H.L.; Hoyt, D. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1992-10-01

    Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature are analyzed using data obtained by the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. It was found that these parameters were interrelated on interannual time scales, demonstrating that the interannual variability in the earth's climate (i.e., radiation budget) is detectable and observable by current spaceborne instruments. The degree of global interannual variation is on the order of tenths of percent. 41 refs.

  18. Performances study of UWB monopole antennas using half-elliptic radiator conformed on elliptical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djidel, S.; Bouamar, M.; Khedrouche, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a performances study of UWB monopole antenna using half-elliptic radiator conformed on elliptical surface. The proposed antenna, simulated using microwave studio computer CST and High frequency simulator structure HFSS, is designed to operate in frequency interval over 3.1 to 40 GHz. Good return loss and radiation pattern characteristics are obtained in the frequency band of interest. The proposed antenna structure is suitable for ultra-wideband applications, which is, required for many wearable electronics applications.

  19. Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, Philip E.; Kyle, H. L.; Hoyt, Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature are analyzed using data obtained by the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. It was found that these parameters were interrelated on interannual time scales, demonstrating that the interannual variability in the earth's climate (i.e., radiation budget) is detectable and observable by current spaceborne instruments. The degree of global interannual variation is on the order of tenths of percent.

  20. Survey of surface roughness properties of synchrotron radiation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Colbert, J.; Church, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements of surface roughness were made on a large number of grazing incidence mirrors delivered for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The measurements were made with a WYKO optical profiler using a 2.5X and a 10X objective and analyzed with our PROFILE code to generate an average periodogram representation for each surface. The data is presented in the form of representative profiles with all of the periodogram curves arranged according to figure type. Analysis of the periodograms allows one to compute bandwidth-limited values for RMS roughness and slope, to provide valuable feedback information to manufacturers regarding compliance with specifications, and to predict the performance of the optic at x-ray wavelengths.

  1. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  2. XUV metrology: surface analysis with extreme ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyay, M.; Juschkin, L.; Bücker, T.; Loosen, P.; Bayer, A.; Barkusky, F.; Döring, S.; Peth, C.; Mann, K.; Blaschke, H.; Balasa, I.; Ristau, D.

    2009-05-01

    The utilization of nanostructured materials for modern applications gained more and more importance during the last few years. As examples super-fluorescent quantum dots, the use of carbon nano tubes (CNTs) in microelectronics, electrospun fibers in filter membranes, thin film coatings for solar cells, mirrors or LEDs, semiconductor electronics, and functionalized surfaces may be named to address only a few topics. To optimize the systems and enable the full range of capabilities of nanostructures a thorough characterization of the surface-near topography (e.g. roughness, thickness, lateral dimension) as well as of the chemical composition is essential. As a versatile tool for spatial and chemical characterization XUV reflectometry, scatterometry and diffractometry is proposed. Three different experimental setups have been realized evaluating spectral resolved reflectance under constant incidence angle, angular resolved reflectance at a constant wavelength, or a combined approach using laboratory scaled XUV sources to gain insight into chemical composition, film thickness and surface/interface roughness. Experiments on near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the carbon K-edge have been performed. The investigated systems range from synthetic polymers (PMMA, PI) over organic substances (humic acids) to biological matter (lipids), delivering unique spectra for each compound. Thus NEXAFS spectroscopy using a table-top XUV source could be established as a highly surface sensitive fingerprint method for chemical analysis. Future extended experiments will investigate the silicon L-edge where e.g. silicon oxide interlayers below high-k or other nano-layered material on Sisubstrates depict a technological important group of composite systems.

  3. Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

  4. Assessment of Satellite Surface Radiation Products in Highland Regions with Tibet Instrumental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kun; Koike, Toshio; Stackhouse, Paul; Mikovitz, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    This study presents results of comparisons between instrumental radiation data in the elevated Tibetan Plateau and two global satellite products: the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment - Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX-SRB) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project - Flux Data (ISCCP-FD). In general, shortwave radiation (SW) is estimated better by ISCCP-FD while longwave radiation (LW) is estimated better by GEWEX-SRB, but all the radiation components in both products are under-estimated. Severe and systematic errors were found in monthly-mean SRB SW (on plateau-average, -48 W/sq m for downward SW and -18 W/sq m for upward SW) and FD LW (on plateau-average, -37 W/sq m for downward LW and -62 W/sq m for upward LW) for radiation. Errors in monthly-mean diurnal variations are even larger than the monthly mean errors. Though the LW errors can be reduced about 10 W/sq m after a correction for altitude difference between the site and SRB and FD grids, these errors are still higher than that for other regions. The large errors in SRB SW was mainly due to a processing mistake for elevation effect, but the errors in SRB LW was mainly due to significant errors in input data. We suggest reprocessing satellite surface radiation budget data, at least for highland areas like Tibet.

  5. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  6. The effect of ozone and aerosols on the surface erythemal UV radiation estimated from OMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Deok Rae; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Song, Chang-Keun; Hong, Jun Suk; Hong, Youdeog; Lee, Sukjo

    2013-05-01

    Surface erythemal UV radiation is mainly affected by total column ozone, aerosols, clouds, and solar zenith angle. The effect of ozone on the surface UV radiation has been explored many times in the previous studies due to the decrease of ozone layer. In this study, we calculated the effect of aerosols on the surface UV radiation as well as that of ozone using data acquired from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). First, ozone, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and surface erythemal UVB radiation measured from satellite are compared with those from ground measurements. The results showed that the comparison for ozone was good with r 2 of 0.92. For aerosol, there was difference between satellite measurements and surface measurements due to the insufficient information on aerosol in the retrieval algorithm. The r 2 for surface erythemal UV radiation was high (˜0.94) but satellite measurements showed about 30% larger values than surface measurements on average by not considering the effect of absorbing aerosols in the retrieval process from satellite measurements. Radiative amplification factor (RAF) is used to access the effect of ozone and aerosol quantitatively. RAF for ozone was 0.97˜1.49 with solar zenith angle. To evaluate the effect of aerosol on the surface UV radiation, only clear-sky pixel data were used and solar zenith angle and total column amount of ozone were fixed. Also, RAF for aerosol was assessed according to the single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols. The results showed that RAF for aerosol with smaller SSA (< 0.90) was larger than that for with larger SSA (> 0.90). The RAF for aerosol was 0.09˜0.22 for the given conditions which was relatively small compared to that for ozone. However, considering the fact that aerosol optical depth can change largely in time and space while the total column amount of ozone does not change very much, it needs to include the effect of aerosol to predict the variations of surface UV radiation more correctly.

  7. "Intelligent Ensemble" Projections of Precipitation and Surface Radiation in Support of Agricultural Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Baker, Noel C.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's climate is changing and will continue to change into the foreseeable future. Expected changes in the climatological distribution of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation will significantly impact agriculture. Adaptation strategies are, therefore, required to reduce the agricultural impacts of climate change. Climate change projections of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation distributions are necessary input for adaption planning studies. These projections are conventionally constructed from an ensemble of climate model simulations (e.g., the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5)) as an equal weighted average, one model one vote. Each climate model, however, represents the array of climate-relevant physical processes with varying degrees of fidelity influencing the projection of individual climate variables differently. Presented here is a new approach, termed the "Intelligent Ensemble, that constructs climate variable projections by weighting each model according to its ability to represent key physical processes, e.g., precipitation probability distribution. This approach provides added value over the equal weighted average method. Physical process metrics applied in the "Intelligent Ensemble" method are created using a combination of NASA and NOAA satellite and surface-based cloud, radiation, temperature, and precipitation data sets. The "Intelligent Ensemble" method is applied to the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 anthropogenic climate forcing simulations within the CMIP5 archive to develop a set of climate change scenarios for precipitation, temperature, and surface solar radiation in each USDA Farm Resource Region for use in climate change adaptation studies.

  8. Evaluation of resin infiltration on demineralized root surface: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Matin, Khairul; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2017-03-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of resin infiltration on root caries induced by Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Human premolar specimens were divided to 5 groups: negative control (NC), Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Icon-etch120s+Icon-infiltrant (HA120), Icon-etch10s+Icon-infiltrant (HA10) and K-etchant10s+Icon-infiltrant (PA10). The resin penetration was observed by fluorescent microscope. Biofilm-induced demineralization was conducted again and observed by swept-source optical coherence tomography and confocal laser scanning microscope. The maximum resin penetration depth (PDmax), lesion depth increase (∆LD), frequency of cervical enamel loss and dentinoenamel junction separation length were measured and statistically analyzed. HA120 showed 138.00±49.25 µm PDmax that was significantly larger than PA10 and SEB (p<0.05). SEB created 136.58±64.73 µm coating layers. HA120 and SEB showed significantly lower ∆LD than NC (p<0.05). Resin infiltration with 120s-HCl pretreatment has got a good penetration ability and preventive effect on root caries, however, an additional risk factor of cervical enamel loss was identified.

  9. Long term global scale root zone soil moisture monitoring at ECMWF using a surface-only land data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albergel, Clement; de Rosnay, Patricia; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Dutra, Emanuel; Kral, Tomas; Munoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Isaksen, Lars; Boussetta, Souhail; Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the H-SAF (Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) project of EUMETSAT, ECMWF is developing a re-analysis of soil moisture that will cover 1992-2014 and will make use of satellite derived surface soil moisture (SSM) from ERS-1&2, ASCAT. This study presents the first steps toward the conception of this long term global scale root zone soil moisture; a surface-only Land Data Assimilation System (so-LDAS) able to ingest satellite-derived SSM observations is tested at global scale to increase prediction accuracy for surface and root zone soil moisture. The so-LDAS is defined as an offline sequential data assimilation system (simplified Extended Kalman Filter) based on a Land Surface Model (HTESSEL) uncoupled with the atmosphere, it is driven by ERA-Interim observations based atmospheric forcing. Its impact is assessed over 2010-2013 (1) using local in situ measurements of surface and root zone soil moisture and (2) at a basin scale initialising an event based Rainfall-Runoff hydrological model. Additionally to an open loop experiment (OL no analysis) three data assimilation experiments are used with different specification of the error matrices. The first one (Asc1) has been set up to test the so-LDAS with a soil moisture standard deviation of σb=0.01 m3m-3 for the first three layers of soil analysed and σo=0.02 m3m-3 for ASCAT SSM. σb was then doubled (Asc2) and σo set to 0.05 m3m-3 to be more consistent with satellite derived SSM errors deduced from previous independent studies. In a third experiment (Asc3), σo is set to 0.05 m3m-3, σb, is set to 0.1 × (wfc - wwilt), where wfc and wwilt are the volumetric water content at field capacity and at permanent wilting point, which depend on soil texture.

  10. Surface modification of dental tissues by KrF excimer laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, M.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2007-02-01

    Laser treatment is a promising technique for dental applications such as caries removal, dental hypersensitivity reduction and improvement of the bond strength between dentin and restoration materials. In this study the topographic and morphological changes induced in enamel and dentin surfaces by treating with KrF excimer laser radiation were studied as a function of the number of laser pulses and radiation fluence by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. For enamel, independently of the fluence used, material removal occurs preferentially at the prisms sheaths, leading to the formation of surface pits of a few micrometers. For dentin, a cone-like topography develops when the tubules are approximately parallel to the laser beam direction and the radiation fluence is within the range 0.5 to 1.5 J/cm2. For higher fluences, the treated surfaces are flat and covered with a layer of re-solidified materials.

  11. Spatial regression between soil surface elevation, water storage in root zone and biomass productivity of alfalfa within an irrigated field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2014-05-01

    Efficiency of water use for the irrigation purposes is connected to the variety of circumstances, factors and processes appearing along the transportation path of water from its sources to the root zone of the plant. Water efficiency of agricultural irrigation is connected with variety of circumstances, the impacts and the processes occurring during the transportation of water from water sources to plant root zone. Agrohydrological processes occur directly at the irrigated field, these processes linked to the infiltration of the applied water subsequent redistribution of the infiltrated water within the root zone. One of them are agrohydrological processes occurring directly on an irrigated field, connected with infiltration of water applied for irrigation to the soil, and the subsequent redistribution of infiltrated water in the root zone. These processes have the strongly pronounced spatial character depending on the one hand from a spatial variation of some hydrological characteristics of soils, and from other hand with distribution of volume of irrigation water on a surface of the area of an irrigated field closely linked with irrigation technology used. The combination of water application parameters with agrohydrological characteristics of soils and agricultural vegetation in each point at the surface of an irrigated field leads to formation of a vector field of intensity of irrigation water. In an ideal situation, such velocity field on a soil surface should represent uniform set of vertically directed collinear vectors. Thus values of these vectors should be equal to infiltration intensities of water inflows on a soil surface. In soil profile the field of formed intensities of a water flow should lead to formation in it of a water storage accessible to root system of irrigated crops. In practice this ideal scheme undergoes a lot of changes. These changes have the different nature, the reasons of occurrence and degree of influence on the processes connected

  12. Assimilation of Smos Observations to Generate a Prototype SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Crow, Wade T.; Koster, Randal D.; Kimball, John

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP; [1]) mission is being implemented by NASA for launch in October 2014. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high-resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [2]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. In this paper we describe our use of SMOS brightness temperature observations to generate a prototype of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product [5].

  13. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation upon the micromorphology and functional state of cell surface

    SciTech Connect

    Somosy, Z.; Kubasova, T.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1987-09-01

    The cellular membrane as one of the targets of ionizing radiation might play an important role in the development and modification of radiation-induced alterations after low doses. The present paper reviews the micromorphological and functional changes of plasma membranes of irradiated blood and cultured cells with special emphasis on the surface conditions: lectin binding, negative surface charges. The review is completed by our own studies on distribution of positive surface charges and the bindings of two lectins, the Concanavalin A and the wheat germ agglutinin. It was found that the decrease of negative surface charges is unconcomitant with appearance of domains exposing positive ones, particularly on the surfaces of rufflings. The distribution of Concanavalin A binding sites turned from a uniform distribution to a polarized one, especially on apical regions where it appeared in large aggregates. The polarity in localization of wheat germ agglutinin on untreated fibroblasts observed in our experiments ceased shortly after irradiation. 72 references.

  14. Multi-decadal trends of solar radiation reaching the surface: What is the role of aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Bian, H.; Yu, H.; Qian, Y.; Wild, M.; Streets, D. G.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We present the aerosol trends in the past 3 decades (1980-2009) in different regions and assess their effects on the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening"). The regions include the major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of pollution emissions, dust and biomass burning influenced regions that have large interannual variabilities, and relatively remote regions that maybe considered as "background". We will compare the GOCART model simulated surface radiation trends with data from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA), the Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN), and the China Meteorological Administration (CMA), as well as the satellite derived products. We will use the model to attribute the surface radiation changes to aerosol amount and type under all sky and clear sky conditions and link the changes to the emission trends in major source regions.

  15. Surface characterization of gallium nitride modified with peptides before and after exposure to ionizing radiation in solution.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Nolan, Michael W; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-12-30

    An aqueous surface modification of gallium nitride was employed to attach biomolecules to the surface. The modification was a simple two-step process using a single linker molecule and mild temperatures. The presence of the peptide on the surface was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, the samples were placed in water baths and exposed to ionizing radiation to examine the effects of the radiation on the material in an environment similar to the body. Surface analysis confirmed degradation of the surface of GaN after radiation exposure in water; however, the peptide molecules successfully remained on the surface following exposure to ionizing radiation. We hypothesize that during radiation exposure of the samples, the radiolysis of water produces peroxide and other reactive species on the sample surface. Peroxide exposure promotes the formation of a more stable layer of gallium oxyhydroxide which passivates the surface better than other oxide species.

  16. Surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene by excimer-laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishii, M.; Sugimoto, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, N.; Kewanishi, S.; Nagese, T.; Endo, M.; Eguchi, Y.

    1993-12-31

    The adhesive strength of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) films was enhanced remarkably by KrF-laser irradiation in air when a small amount of aromatic polymers such as aromatic polyester, polyetheretherketone and polyimide were blended with PTFE. From the surface analysis of the laser-irradiated PTFE by an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscopy, it was found that the enhancement in the adhesive properties was attributable to both the chemical effect owing to the formation of the polar groups such as carbonyl group and ethylene linkage and the physical one owing to the formation of the uneveness by the KrF-laser irradiation.

  17. Interaction of UV-Laser Radiation with Molecular Surface Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    reverse if nee~tary an~d Identify by biock number) FIEL GROP SU GR- Laser, Microelectronics , Surface Chemistry 19 ABSTRACT i CoiEIDue on reverset of...direct writing are also being pursued at the Microelectronics Sciences Laboratories at Columbia under separate funding. In addition, extensive interchange...R.M. Osgood and T.F. Deutsch, "Laser-Induced Chemistry for Microelectronics ," Science, Vol.277, pp. 709-714, 1985. R.M. Osgood and H.H. Gilgen, "Laser

  18. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  19. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime.

  20. Ultramorphology of the root surface subsequent to hand-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation during non-surgical periodontal treatments. An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    D. ASPRIELLO, Simone; PIEMONTESE, Matteo; LEVRINI, Luca; SAURO, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the ultramorphology of the root surfaces induced by mechanical instrumentation performed using conventional curettes or piezoelectric scalers when used single-handedly or with a combined technique. Material and Methods Thirty single-rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 groups: Group A, instrumentation with curettes; Group B instrumentation with titanium nitride coated periodontal tip mounted in a piezoelectric handpiece; Group C, combined technique with curette/ultrasonic piezoelectric instrumentation. The specimens were processed and analyzed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Differences between the different groups of instrumentation were determined using Pearson’s χ 2 with significance predetermined at α=0.001. Results Periodontal scaling and root planing performed with curettes, ultrasonic or combined instrumentation induced several morphological changes on the root surface. The curettes produced a compact and thick multilayered smear layer, while the morphology of the root surfaces after ultrasonic scaler treatment appeared irregular with few grooves and a thin smear layer. The combination of curette/ultrasonic instrumentation showed exposed root dentin tubules with a surface morphology characterized by the presence of very few grooves and slender remnants of smear layer which only partially covered the root dentin. In some cases, it was also possible to observe areas with exposed collagen fibrils. Conclusion The curette-ultrasonic simultaneous instrumentation may combine the beneficial effects of each instrument in a single technique creating a root surface relatively free from the physical barrier of smear layer and dentin tubules orifices partial occlusion. PMID:21437474

  1. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  2. Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; LEcuyer, Tristan; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli J.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Ice clouds influence the climate system by changing the radiation budget and large-scale circulation. Therefore, climate models need to have an accurate representation of ice clouds and their radiative effects. In this paper, new broadband parameterizations for ice cloud bulk scattering properties are developed for severely roughened ice particles. The parameterizations are based on a general habit mixture that includes nine habits (droxtals, hollow/solid columns, plates, solid/hollow bullet rosettes, aggregate of solid columns, and small/large aggregates of plates). The scattering properties for these individual habits incorporate recent advances in light-scattering computations. The influence of ice particle surface roughness on the ice cloud radiative effect is determined through simulations with the Fu-Liou and the GCM version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) codes and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5.1). The differences in shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative effect at both the top of the atmosphere and the surface are determined for smooth and severely roughened ice particles. While the influence of particle roughening on the single-scattering properties is negligible in the LW, the results indicate that ice crystal roughness can change the SW forcing locally by more than 10 W m(exp -2) over a range of effective diameters. The global-averaged SW cloud radiative effect due to ice particle surface roughness is estimated to be roughly 1-2 W m(exp -2). The CAM results indicate that ice particle roughening can result in a large regional SW radiative effect and a small but nonnegligible increase in the global LW cloud radiative effect.

  3. Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

  4. The effects of atomic oxygen on the thermal emittance of high temperature radiator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.L.; Paulsen, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Radiator surfaces on high temperature space power systems such as the SP-100 space nuclear power system must maintain a high emittance level in order to reject waste heat effectively. one of the primary materials under consideration for the radiators is carbon-carbon composite. Since carbon is susceptible to attack by atomic oxygen in the low Earth orbital environment, it is important to determine the durability of carbon composites in this environment as well as the effect atomic oxygen has on the thermal emittance of the surface if it is to be considered for use as a radiator. Results indicate that the thermal emittance of carbon-carbon composite (as low as 0.42) can be enhanced by exposure to a directed beam of atomic oxygen to levels above 0.85 at 800 K. This emittance enhancement is due to a change in the surface morphology as a result of oxidation. High aspect ratio cones are formed on the surface which allow more efficient trapping of incident radiation. Erosion of the surface due to oxidation is similar to that for carbon; so that at altitudes less than {approximately}600 km, thickness loss of the radiator could be significant (as much as 0.1 cm/year). A protective coating or oxidation barrier forming additive may be needed to prevent atomic oxygen attack after the initial high emittance surface is formed. Textured surfaces can be formed in ground based facilities or possibly in space if emittance is not sensitive to the orientation of the atomic oxygen arrival that forms the texture.

  5. Multi-decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diel, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang. Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model GOCART along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRB (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  6. A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2013-04-01

    Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using long-term datasets from the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The Nauru and Darwin sites show significant variability in sky cover, downwelling radiative fluxes, and surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) due to El Niño and the Australian monsoon, respectively, while the Manus site shows little intra-seasonal or interannual variability. Cloud radar measurement of cloud base and top heights are used to define cloud types so that the effect of cloud type on the surface CRE can be examined. Clouds with low bases contribute 71-75% of the surface shortwave (SW) CRE and 66-74% of the surface longwave (LW) CRE at the three TWP sites, while clouds with mid-level bases contribute 8-9% of the SW CRE and 12-14% of the LW CRE, and clouds with high bases contribute 16-19% of the SW CRE and 15-21% of the LW CRE.

  7. Effect of Joule Heating and Thermal Radiation in Flow of Third Grade Fluid over Radiative Surface

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in third grade fluid over an unsteady permeable stretching sheet. The transverse magnetic and electric fields in the momentum equations are considered. Thermal boundary layer equation includes both viscous and Ohmic dissipations. The related nonlinear partial differential system is reduced first into ordinary differential system and then solved for the series solutions. The dependence of velocity and temperature profiles on the various parameters are shown and discussed by sketching graphs. Expressions of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are calculated and analyzed. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated and examined. It is observed that both velocity and temperature increases in presence of electric field. Further the temperature is increased due to the radiation parameter. Thermal boundary layer thickness increases by increasing Eckert number. PMID:24454694

  8. Effect of Joule heating and thermal radiation in flow of third grade fluid over radiative surface.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in third grade fluid over an unsteady permeable stretching sheet. The transverse magnetic and electric fields in the momentum equations are considered. Thermal boundary layer equation includes both viscous and Ohmic dissipations. The related nonlinear partial differential system is reduced first into ordinary differential system and then solved for the series solutions. The dependence of velocity and temperature profiles on the various parameters are shown and discussed by sketching graphs. Expressions of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are calculated and analyzed. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated and examined. It is observed that both velocity and temperature increases in presence of electric field. Further the temperature is increased due to the radiation parameter. Thermal boundary layer thickness increases by increasing Eckert number.

  9. Satellite-based surface solar radiation data provided by CM SAF - Solar energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Müller, Richard W.; Posselt, Rebekka; Stöckli, Reto

    2013-04-01

    The planning of solar power plants requires accurate estimates of the solar energy available at the surface. Satellite observations provide useful information on the cloud coverage, which is one of the main factors modulating the solar surface radiation. This information can be used to estimate the solar surface radiation from satellite. Observations from geostationary satellites allow the retrieval of the surface solar radiation with high temporal (up to hourly) and spatial (approx. 5 km) resolution. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving surface solar radiation from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. While CM SAF is focusing on the generation of high-quality long-term climate data records, also operationally data is provided in short time latency within 8 weeks. CM SAF has already released one data set based on geostationary Meteosat satellite covering 1983 to 2005 (doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/RAD_MVIRI/V001) and one global data set based on measurements of the polar-orbiting AVHRR instruments covering 1982 to 2009 (doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLARA_AVHRR/V001). Here, we present details and applications of the CM SAF surface radiation data generated from the observations of the geostationary Meteosat satellites. The climate data set is available at high spatial (0.03 x 0.03 deg) and temporal (hourly, daily, monthly) resolutions. Besides global radiation, also the direct beam component is provided, which is for instance required for the estimation of the energy generated by solar thermal plants. Based on comparisons with surface observations the accuracy of CM SAF surface solar radiation data is better than 10 W/m2 on a monthly basis and 25 W/m2 on a daily basis. The data sets are well documented (incl. validation using surface observations) and available in netcdf-format at no cost without restrictions at www.cmsaf.eu. Solar energy applications of the data include the Photovoltaic Geographical

  10. Interaction of surface plasmon polaritons in heavily doped GaN microstructures with terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentev, G. A.; Shalygin, V. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Firsov, D. A.; Riuttanen, L.; Suihkonen, S.; Korotyeyev, V. V.; Lyaschuk, Yu. M.; Kochelap, V. A.; Poroshin, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental and theoretical studies of the surface plasmon polariton excitations in heavily doped GaN epitaxial layers. Reflection and emission of radiation in the frequency range of 2-20 THz including the Reststrahlen band were investigated for samples with grating etched on the sample surface, as well as for samples with flat surface. The reflectivity spectrum for p-polarized radiation measured for the sample with the surface-relief grating demonstrates a set of resonances associated with excitations of different surface plasmon polariton modes. Spectral peculiarities due to the diffraction effect have been also revealed. The characteristic features of the reflectivity spectrum, namely, frequencies, amplitudes, and widths of the resonance dips, are well described theoretically by a modified technique of rigorous coupled-wave analysis of Maxwell equations. The emissivity spectra of the samples were measured under epilayer temperature modulation by pulsed electric field. The emissivity spectrum of the sample with surface-relief grating shows emission peaks in the frequency ranges corresponding to the decay of the surface plasmon polariton modes. Theoretical analysis based on the blackbody-like radiation theory well describes the main peculiarities of the observed THz emission.

  11. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2<2 (Er-laser microprocessing). Proposed method was used for preparation of hard tooth tissues surface before filling for improvement of bond strength between tissues surface and restorative materials, microleakage reduction between tissues surface and restorative materials, and for caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  12. Solar irradiance computations compared with observations at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network Payerne site

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Daniela; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Long, Charles N.; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2008-07-18

    Radiative transfer model calculations of solar fluxes during cloud free periods often show considerable discrepancies with surface radiation observations. Many efforts have been undertaken to explain the differences between modeled and observed shortwave downward radiation (SDR). In this study, MODTRAN4v3r1TM (designed later simply as MODTRANTM) was used for model simulations and compared with high quality radiation observations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) site at Payerne, Switzerland. Results are presented for cloud free shortwave downward radiation calculations. The median differences of modeled minus observed global SDR are small (< 1%) and within the instrumental error. The differences of modeled and observed direct and diffuse SDR show larger discrepancies of -1.8% and 5.2% respectively. The diffuse SDR is generally overestimated by the model and more important, the model to observation linear regression slope and zero-intercept differs significantly from their ideal values of 1 and 0. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are presented and discussed and some modifications are investigated for decreasing such differences between modeled and observed diffuse SDR. However, we could not resolve all the discrepancies. The best agreement is obtained when comparing model simulations whose 550nm aerosol optical depth input is inferred from observations using nine spectral channels, and using BSRN observations performed with a new and more precise shading disk and sun tracker system. In this case, the median bias between model simulations and observed diffuse SDR is -0.4 Wm-2 (< 1%).

  13. Progress in Projecting Solar Radiation at the Earth's Surface in Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W.; Fildier, B.; Feldman, D.

    2015-12-01

    Projecting changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface in futureclimates is a critical input to forecast surface irradiance for solarenergy. We demonstrate the current state of the art using theensemble of opportunity assembled for the Coupled ModelIntercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The reliability of these projections depends upon the accuracy of theunderlying radiation codes, the fidelity of these codes to themeasured optical properties of key radiatively active atmosphericconstituents, and the realism of future projections of theseatmospheric constituents. These constituents include aerosols,clouds, water vapor, greenhouse gases that absorb near-infraredsunlight. Since the realism of future projections of anthropogenicaerosol species is contingent on the underlying scenario, we focus onthe other challenges in forecasting surface irradiance. Regarding accuracy, we demonstrate that current GCM shortwaveparameterizations often exhibit quite small errors relative tobenchmark radiative transfer codes. In addition, recent work hasbracketed the uncertainties in solar irradiance associated withcomplex cloud geometries. There is also an emerging consensus howcloud radiative effects will evolve in a warmer climate. However,there is evidence that current GCM codes still exhibit systematicerrors in the near-infrared water vapor bands, particularly for moistsub-tropical atmospheres. These errors will become more acute aswater vapor feedbacks, combined with global warming, increase thetotal precipitable water in the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Method for surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER)

    DOEpatents

    Stockman, Mark I.; Bergman, David J.

    2011-09-13

    A nanostructure is used to generate a highly localized nanoscale optical field. The field is excited using surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER). The SPASER radiation consists of surface plasmons that undergo stimulated emission, but in contrast to photons can be localized within a nanoscale region. A SPASER can incorporate an active medium formed by two-level emitters, excited by an energy source, such as an optical, electrical, or chemical energy source. The active medium may be quantum dots, which transfer excitation energy by radiationless transitions to a resonant nanosystem that can play the same role as a laser cavity in a conventional laser. The transitions are stimulated by the surface plasmons in the nanostructure, causing the buildup of a macroscopic number of surface plasmons in a single mode.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Aerodynamic Noise Radiation from a High-Speed Train Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SASSA, T.; SATO, T.; YATSUI, S.

    2001-10-01

    The aerodynamic noise radiation from a vestibule side door on a high-speed train surface is calculated by the combination of unsteady incompressible fluid flow analysis and acoustic analysis. Pressure fluctuation on a vestibule side door surface is measured to verify the results of fluid flow analysis. Analysis results agree with measured data very well at low frequencies. For high-frequency components, the solvable frequency is limited by the analysis mesh size. Required mesh size is typically one eighth of the wavelength of the pressure fluctuation on the model surface. The aerodynamic noise is mainly radiated from around the following corner where the vortices that are shed from the leading corner strongly interact with the train surface.

  16. The Martian surface radiation environment - a comparison of models and MSL/RAD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Ehresmann, Bent; Lohf, Henning; Köhler, Jan; Zeitlin, Cary; Appel, Jan; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Slaba, Tony; Martin, Cesar; Berger, Thomas; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Hassler, Donald M.; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Reitz, Günther; Wilson, John W.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    Context: The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been measuring the radiation environment on the surface of Mars since August 6th 2012. MSL-RAD is the first instrument to provide detailed information about charged and neutral particle spectra and dose rates on the Martian surface, and one of the primary objectives of the RAD investigation is to help improve and validate current radiation transport models. Aims: Applying different numerical transport models with boundary conditions derived from the MSL-RAD environment the goal of this work was to both provide predictions for the particle spectra and the radiation exposure on the Martian surface complementing the RAD sensitive range and, at the same time, validate the results with the experimental data, where applicable. Such validated models can be used to predict dose rates for future manned missions as well as for performing shield optimization studies. Methods: Several particle transport models (GEANT4, PHITS, HZETRN/OLTARIS) were used to predict the particle flux and the corresponding radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic radiation on Mars. From the calculated particle spectra the dose rates on the surface are estimated. Results: Calculations of particle spectra and dose rates induced by galactic cosmic radiation on the Martian surface are presented. Although good agreement is found in many cases for the different transport codes, GEANT4, PHITS, and HZETRN/OLTARIS, some models still show large, sometimes order of magnitude discrepancies in certain particle spectra. We have found that RAD data is helping to make better choices of input parameters and physical models. Elements of these validated models can be applied to more detailed studies on how the radiation environment is influenced by solar modulation, Martian atmosphere and soil, and changes due to the Martian seasonal pressure cycle. By extending the range of the calculated particle spectra with respect to

  17. Observational study of surface spectral radiation and corresponding albedo over Gobi, desert, and bare loess surfaces in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Dong, W.; Li, Z.; Zhao, W.; Hu, S.; Yan, X.; Zhao, J.; Wei, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the field experiments on ground surface spectral broadband solar radiation (SR) and corresponding albedo were introduced at three man-made sites at Gobi, desert, and bare loess zones during three different intensive observational periods (IOP) from 2010 to 2013 in Gansu Province, respectively. The continuous and high temporal resolution records of ground surface solar radiation are presented, including global (GR), ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), and near-infrared radiation (NIR). The corresponding albedos are analyzed over three typical non-vegetated underlying surfaces in arid and semiarid and semihumid regions of northwestern China. The preliminary investigations were carried out. The results show that the variation trends of UV, VIS, and NIR are coincident with the GR, and the irradiances are gradually decreasing throughout the IOP at each site; the energy ratios of VIS/GR are all approximately 40.2%, and the ratios of NIR/GR are all approximately 54.4% at the Gobi, desert, and bare loess zones; and the averaged albedos of the soil for VIS are 0.231, 0.211, and 0.142 and for the NIR are 0.266, 0.252, and 0.255 over the Gobi, desert, and bare loess land surfaces, respectively. The energy ratios of VIS/GR and NIR/GR are not 50% as prescribed for all of the soil color classes in most of land surface models (LSMs). The observational soil albedo values for NIR are not twice to that of the VIS as predicted in some LSMs for the underlying surface at the three sites. GR albedo is determined by the energy ratios of SR/GR and SR albedos.

  18. Observational study of surface spectral radiation and corresponding albedo over Gobi, desert, and bare loess surfaces in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhiyuan; Dong, Wenjie; Li, Zhenchao; Zhao, Wei; Hu, Shanshan; Yan, Xiaodong; Zhao, Jiaqi; Wei, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the field experiments on ground surface spectral broadband solar radiation (SR) and corresponding albedo were introduced at three man-made sites at Gobi, desert, and bare loess zones during three different intensive observational periods (IOP) from 2010 to 2013 in Gansu Province, respectively. The continuous and high temporal resolution records of ground surface solar radiation are presented, including global (GR), ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), and near-infrared radiation (NIR). The corresponding albedos are analyzed over three typical nonvegetated underlying surfaces in arid and semiarid and semihumid regions of northwestern China. The preliminary investigations were carried out. The results show that the variation trends of UV, VIS, and NIR are coincident with the GR, and the irradiances are gradually decreasing throughout the IOP at each site; the energy ratios of VIS/GR are all approximately 40.2%, and the ratios of NIR/GR are all approximately 54.4% at the Gobi, desert, and bare loess zones; and the averaged albedos of the soil for VIS are 0.231, 0.211, and 0.142 and for the NIR are 0.266, 0.252, and 0.255 over the Gobi, desert, and bare loess land surfaces, respectively. The energy ratios of VIS/GR and NIR/GR are not 50% as prescribed for all of the soil color classes in most of land surface models (LSMs). The observational soil albedo values for NIR are not twice to that of the VIS as predicted in some LSMs for the underlying surface at the three sites. GR albedo is determined by the energy ratios of SR/GR and SR albedos.

  19. The WCRP/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project Release 2: An Assessment of Surface Fluxes at 1 Degree Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Gupta, S. K.; Cox, S. J.; Chiacchio, M.; Mikovitz, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) based Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project in association with the World Climate Research Programme Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (WCRP/GEWEX) is preparing a new 1 deg x 1 deg horizontal resolution product for distribution scheduled for release in early 2001. The new release contains several significant upgrades from the previous version. This paper summarizes the most significant upgrades and presents validation results as an assessment of the new data set.

  20. Efficient conversion of surface-plasmon-like modes to spatial radiated modes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun Jun; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-12

    We propose a spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) emitter which is composed of ultrathin corrugated metallic strips, exhibiting the directional radiation property. The spoof SPP emitter provides a way to quickly convert the SPP mode to a radiated mode. By controlling phase modulations produced by the phase-gradient metasurface on the ultrathin metallic strips, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that spoof SPP waves are converted into spatial propagating waves with high efficiency, which are further radiated with flexible beam steering. The proposed method sets up a link between SPP waves and radiation waves in a highly controllable way, which would possibly open an avenue in designing new kinds of microwave and optical elements in engineering.

  1. Distinct impact of different types of aerosols on surface solar radiation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhou, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of surface direct solar radiation (DSR) and visibility, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), together with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) taken from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, were investigated to gain insight into the impact of aerosol pollution on surface solar radiation in China. The surface DSR decreased during 2004-2014 compared with 1993~2003 over eastern China, but no clear reduction was observed in remote regions with cleaner air. Significant correlations of visibility, PM2.5, and regionally averaged AOT with the surface DSR over eastern China indicate that aerosol pollution greatly affects the energy available at the surface. The net loss of surface solar radiation also reduces the surface ground temperature over eastern China. However, the slope of the linear variation of the radiation with respect to atmospheric visibility is distinctly different at different stations, implying that the main aerosol type varies regionally. The largest slope value occurs at Zhengzhou and indicates that the aerosol absorption in central China is the highest, and lower slope values suggest relatively weakly absorbing types of aerosols at other locations. The spatial distribution of the linear slopes agrees well with the geographical distribution of the absorbing aerosols derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations and Ozone Monitoring Instrument over China. The regional correlation between a larger slope value and higher absorbance properties of aerosols indicates that the net effects of aerosols on the surface solar energy and corresponding climatic effects are dependent on both aerosol amount and optical properties.

  2. The `Chocolate Experiment' - A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using their bare hands in this experiment because they learned in early science lessons that skin is not a reliable detector of heat transfer. Moreover, when the experiment is conducted in a school laboratory, it is often difficult for students to perceive the slight differences in heat transfer on the dull black and silvery aluminum leaves attached to their hands. Rather than replacing students' bare hands with such sophisticated apparatus as a data logger and temperature probe, I suggest using a simple (and delicious!) low-cost instrument, i.e., chocolate, which simply melts when it receives radiation.

  3. Toward a new radiative-transfer-based model for remote sensing of terrestrial surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shengcheng; Zhen, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Shizhi; Zhu, WenYue; Li, Xuebin; Huang, Honghua; Wei, Heli

    2015-08-15

    This Letter formulates a simple yet accurate radiative-transfer-based theoretical model to characterize the fraction of radiation reflected by terrestrial surfaces. Emphasis is placed on the concept of inhomogeneous distribution of the diffuse sky radiation function (DSRF) and multiple interaction effects (MIE). Neglecting DSRF and MIE produces a -1.55% mean relative bias in albedo estimates. The presented model can elucidate the impact of DSRF on the surface volume scattering and geometry-optical scattering components, respectively, especially for slant illuminations with solar zenith angles (SZA) larger than 50°. Particularly striking in the comparisons between our model and ground-based observations is the achievement of the agreement level, indicating that our model can effectively resolve the longstanding issue in accurately estimating albedo at extremely large SZAs and is promising for land-atmosphere interactions studies.

  4. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Gero, P. Johnathan; Torn, Margaret S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2015-02-25

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing1, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth’s radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m-2 (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations—the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska—are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra3 together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations4. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m-2 per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m-2 per decade and ±0.07 W m-2 per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1–0.2 W m-2. This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation5, 6, 7. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  5. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D R; Collins, W D; Gero, P J; Torn, M S; Mlawer, E J; Shippert, T R

    2015-03-19

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth's radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m(-2) (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations-the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska-are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m(-2) per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m(-2) per decade and ±0.07 W m(-2) per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1-0.2 W m(-2). This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  6. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  7. An Improved Algorithm for Retrieving Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation from Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Kratz, David P.; Wilber, Anne C.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Cess, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Zhou and Cess [2001] developed an algorithm for retrieving surface downwelling longwave radiation (SDLW) based upon detailed studies using radiative transfer model calculations and surface radiometric measurements. Their algorithm linked clear sky SDLW with surface upwelling longwave flux and column precipitable water vapor. For cloudy sky cases, they used cloud liquid water path as an additional parameter to account for the effects of clouds. Despite the simplicity of their algorithm, it performed very well for most geographical regions except for those regions where the atmospheric conditions near the surface tend to be extremely cold and dry. Systematic errors were also found for scenes that were covered with ice clouds. An improved version of the algorithm prevents the large errors in the SDLW at low water vapor amounts by taking into account that under such conditions the SDLW and water vapor amount are nearly linear in their relationship. The new algorithm also utilizes cloud fraction and cloud liquid and ice water paths available from the Cloud and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) single scanner footprint (SSF) product to separately compute the clear and cloudy portions of the fluxes. The new algorithm has been validated against surface measurements at 29 stations around the globe for Terra and Aqua satellites. The results show significant improvement over the original version. The revised Zhou-Cess algorithm is also slightly better or comparable to more sophisticated algorithms currently implemented in the CERES processing and will be incorporated as one of the CERES empirical surface radiation algorithms.

  8. Surface energy and radiation budgets in a steppe ecosystem in the Upper Columbia River Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.

    1994-08-01

    Measurements of radiation and surface energy budget components are presented for a semiarid grassland-steppe ecosystem in the Upper Columbia River Gorge (45{degrees}45`25.6 inches N, 120{degrees}01`39.3 inches W, 190 m) for June 2-27, 1991. Over this period, the ratio of sensible to latent heat flux (the Bowen ratio) averaged 5.0, and mean daily surface energy balance totals were: net radiation, 9.23; ground heat flux, 1.25; latent heat flux, 1.32; and sensible heat flux, 6.66 MJ m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}, where the mean daily nonradiative fluxes were directed away from the surface, and the mean daily radiative flux was directed toward the surface. On clear days, the site received from 0.71 to 0.76 of the theoretical extraterrestrial solar radiation. Albedo over the 26-d period varied from 0.17 to 0.21. Daily and daytime average values of the components are summarized, and a plot is presented of the 30-min average values of all components for the entire period.

  9. Observation of radiative surface plasmons in metal-oxide-metal tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, J. F.; Yang, E. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A peak in the UV region of the spectrum of light emitted from metal-oxide-metal (MOM) tunnel junctions has been observed at room temperature. Both the amplitude and wavelength of the peak are sensitive to applied junction bias. The UV peak corresponds to the normal or radiative surface plasmon mode while a visible peak, also present in the present spectra and reported in past MOM literature, is due to the tangential or nonradiative mode. The radiative mode requires no surface roughness or gratings for photon coupling. The results show that it is possible to obtain radiative surface plasmon production followed by a direct decay into photons with MOM tunnel diodes. A MOM diode with a double anode structure is found to emit light associated only with the nonradiative mode. The thickness dependence of the UV peak, along with the experimental results of the double anode MOM diode and the ratio of the UV peak to visible peak, support the contention that the UV light emission is indeed due to the radiative surface plasmon.

  10. Surface Emissivity Maps for Use in Satellite Retrievals of Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate accounting of surface emissivity is essential for the retrievals of surface temperature from remote sensing measurements, and for the computations of longwave (LW) radiation budget of the Earth?s surface. Past studies of the above topics assumed that emissivity for all surface types, and across the entire LW spectrum is equal to unity. There is strong evidence, however, that emissivity of many surface materials is significantly lower than unity, and varies considerably across the LW spectrum. We have developed global maps of surface emissivity for the broadband LW region, the thermal infrared window region (8-12 micron), and 12 narrow LW spectral bands. The 17 surface types defined by the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP) were adopted as such, and an additional (18th) surface type was introduced to represent tundra-like surfaces. Laboratory measurements of spectral reflectances of 10 different surface materials were converted to corresponding emissivities. The 10 surface materials were then associated with 18 surface types. Emissivities for the 18 surface types were first computed for each of the 12 narrow spectral bands. Emissivities for the broadband and the window region were then constituted from the spectral band values by weighting them with Planck function energy distribution.

  11. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  12. Assessing the radiative impacts of precipitating clouds on winter surface air temperatures and land surface properties in general circulation models using observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Lee, Wei-Liang; Wang, Yi-Hui; Richardson, Mark; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Suhas, E.; Fetzer, Eric; Lo, Min-Hui; Yue, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Using CloudSat-CALIPSO ice water, cloud fraction, and radiation; Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) radiation; and long-term station-measured surface air temperature (SAT), we identified a substantial underestimation of the total ice water path, total cloud fraction, land surface radiative flux, land surface temperature (LST), and SAT during Northern Hemisphere winter in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. We perform sensitivity experiments with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) in fully coupled modes to identify processes driving these biases. We found that biases in land surface properties are associated with the exclusion of downwelling longwave heating from precipitating ice during Northern Hemisphere winter. The land surface temperature biases introduced by the exclusion of precipitating ice radiative effects in CESM1 and CMIP5 both spatially correlate with winter biases over Eurasia and North America. The underestimated precipitating ice radiative effect leads to colder LST, associated surface energy-budget adjustments, and cooler SAT. This bias also shifts regional soil moisture state from liquid to frozen, increases snow cover, and depresses evapotranspiration (ET) and total leaf area index in Northern Hemisphere winter. The inclusion of the precipitating ice radiative effects largely reduces the model biases of surface radiative fluxes (more than 15 W m-2), SAT (up to 2-4 K), and snow cover and ET (25-30%), compared with those without snow-radiative effects.

  13. Coherent and tunable light radiation from nanoscale surface plasmons array via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate that surface plasmons on a nanoscale metallic array can be transformed into radiation waves via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect. Although the radiation frequency and direction satisfy the Smith-Purcell relation, it is coherent radiation with directions specified, which is essentially different from the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Its radiation spectral density is an order of magnitude higher. By adjusting the material and structure of the array, the radiation frequency can be tuned from an infrared to ultraviolet region. Its remarkable advantages in intensity, coherence, tunability, and miniature size indicate new prospects in developing nanoscale light sources and related techniques.

  14. UV and IR laser radiation's interaction with metal film and teflon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Alekseev, S. B.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Lipatov, E. I.; Orlovskii, V. M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) and XeCl (0.308 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of metal and TiN-ceramic coatings on glass and steel substrates has been studied. Correlation between parameters of surface erosion versus laser-specific energy was investigated. Monitoring of laser-induced erosion on smooth polished surfaces was performed using optical microscopy. The correlation has been revealed between characteristic zones of thin coatings damaged by irradiation and energy distribution over the laser beam cross section allowing evaluation of defects and adhesion of coatings. The interaction of pulsed periodical CO2 ([lambda] [similar] 10.6 [mu]m), and Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene—PTFE) has been studied. Monitoring of erosion track on surfaces was performed through optical microscopy. It has been shown that at pulsed periodical CO2-radiation interaction with teflon the sputtering of polymer with formation of submicron-size particles occurs. Dependencies of particle sizes, form, and sputtering velocity on laser pulse duration and target temperature have been obtained.

  15. Impact of aerosol radiative effects on 2000-2010 surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Shindell, D. T.; Lamarque, J. F.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing from direct and indirect effects of aerosols is examined over the recent past (last 10-15 years) using updated sulfate aerosol emissions in two Earth System Models with very different surface temperature responses to aerosol forcing. The hypothesis is that aerosol forcing and in particular, the impact of indirect effects of aerosols on clouds (Aerosol-Cloud Interactions, or ACI), explains the recent `hiatus' in global mean surface temperature increases. Sulfate aerosol emissions increase globally from 2000 to 2005, and then decrease slightly to 2010. Thus the change in anthropogenic sulfate induced net global radiative forcing is small over the period. Regionally, there are statistically significant forcings that are similar in both models, and consistent with changes in simulated emissions and aerosol optical depth. Coupled model simulations are performed to look at impacts of the forcing on recent surface temperatures. Temperature response patterns in the models are similar, and reflect the regional radiative forcing. Pattern correlations indicate significant correlations between observed decadal surface temperature changes and simulated surface temperature changes from recent sulfate aerosol forcing in an equilibrium framework. Sulfate ACI might be a contributor to the spatial patterns of recent temperature forcing, but not to the global mean `hiatus' itself.

  16. Thermal Model of Europa: Calculating the Effects of Surface Topography and Radiation from Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kristen; Paige, D.; Hayne, P.; Greenhagen, B.; Schenk, P.

    2010-10-01

    Europa's surface temperature distribution results from global effects such as insolation and heat flow, as well as local topography and possibly active tectonic processes. Accurate surface temperature models will greatly benefit future orbital investigations searching for global-scale variations in heat flow and local thermal anomalies resulting from frictional heating on faults or diapirs (Paige et al, this meeting). At the global scale, a major challenge for such models is the strong influence of Jupiter on the solar and infrared flux at Europa's surface. At the local scale, the thermal signature is dominated by complex topography. In order to address these two problems, we developed a model that modifies the Digital Moon program created by D. Paige and S. Meeker (2009) that uses a 3-dimensional geodesic gridding scheme to calculate the surface temperature of a body due to multiple scatterings of radiation and heat flow. We can account for Jupiter's influence on Europa by including data on Jupiter's solar and infrared radiation (which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiation at Europa), and on Europa's orbit (as Europa spends several minutes out of its 3.55 day orbital period in Jupiter's shadow). To address the issue of Europa's complicated terrain, we have simulated the effects of local heat flow as well as added topography and surface roughness to the thermal model by using digital elevation models produced by Schenk and Pappalardo (2004) that show altitude changes of several hundred meters and tectonic features that may produce regions of anomalously high heat flow.

  17. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  18. Spectral enhancement of thermal radiation by laser fabricating grating structure on nickel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown some correlations between the optical properties of objects and their surface patterns. We fabricate tens of micrometer period gratings by femtosecond laser direct writing technology on polished nickel targets and measure their thermal radiation spectra at a temperature of 623 K by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The results show an obvious major enhanced peak in which the wavelength is slightly larger than the grating period. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Kirchhoff’s law of thermal radiation are applied to give this phenomenon a preliminary explanation. In addition, we utilized rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to simulate the absorption spectrum of the grating surface. The experiment results show good agreement with the simulation results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275012).

  19. Four-stream solution for atmospheric radiative transfer over a non-Lambertian surface.

    PubMed

    Liang, S; Strahler, A H

    1994-08-20

    An analytical model characterizing the atmospheric radiance field over a non-Lambertian surface divides the radiation field into three components: unscattered radiance, single-scattering radiance, and multiple-scattering radiance. The first two components are calculated exactly. A δ-four-stream approximation is extended to calculate the azimuth-independent multiple-scattering radiance over a non-Lambertian surface, which is modeled by a statistical bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). Accuracy is assessed with respect to the exact results computed from a Gauss-Seidel iterative algorithm. Experiments comparing the results obtained with Lambertian and non-Lambertian surfaces show that incorporating the BRDF into the four-stream approximation significantly improves the accuracy in calculating radiance as well as radiative flux.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in curved specular surfaces in Czochralski crystal growth furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z.; Maruyama, Shigenao; Tsukada, Takao

    1997-11-07

    A numerical investigation of radiative heat transfer constructed by curved surfaces with specular and diffuse reflection components is carried out. The ray tracing method is adopted for the calculation of view factors, in which a new ray emission model is proposed. The second-degree radiation ring elements are introduced, which are of engineering importance and numerical efficiency. The accuracy of the method is analyzed and verified using a simple configuration. The present computation using the proposed ray emission model is in good agreement with the analytical solution. As a numerical example and engineering application, the effects of the specular reflection and the meniscus of the melt surface in Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth are investigated. A marked temperature decrease in the melt surface is found by introducing specular reflection and the meniscus. The combined effects of the specular reflection and the meniscus should be considered in precision heat transfer control of a CZ apparatus.

  1. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  2. Observations Determination of Surface Radiative Forcing by CO2 and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, William; Feldman, Daniel; Gero, Jonathan; Torn, Margaret; Mlawer, Eli; Shippert, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Earth's background atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations have been steadily rising due to anthropogenic emissions, and these increases since 1750 have implications for the radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere. The physics governing how atmospheric CO2 and CH4, both well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHGs), influence atmospheric infrared energy balance, and thus climate, are well established, but the impact of recent atmospheric WMGHG trends on the surface energy balance has not been experimentally confirmed in the field. Using infrared WMGHG absorption bands and controlling for atmospheric temperature and water vapor, spectra from the DOE ARM Program's Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers (AERI) yield the first direct observational evidence of the time-series of WMGHG surface radiative forcing directly attributable to recent increases in WMGHGs, in this case between 2000-2010. The time-series shows a secular trend of in the radiative forcing from both CO2 and CH4. This data record provides the first comprehensive observational evidence of surface radiative forcing by WMGHGs, confirming theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect. Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Department of Energy.

  3. Radiation induced surface modification and contamination for EUV lithography and fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ajlony, Al-Montaser Bellah

    Al-Montaser Bellah Al-Ajlony. Ph.D., Purdue University, May 2014. Radiation Induced Surface Modification and Contamination for EUV Lithography and Fusion Applications. Major Professor: Ahmed Hassanein. The effect of ionizing radiation on materials surfaces is of major interest for many engineering applications. The importance of this topic rises from the severity of the implications that a surface at a certain application might suffer due its interaction with some sort of ionizing radiation. The severity of implication is not always related to the severity of the radiation, in many applications the concern comes from the over-sensitivity of the surface to a low doses of radiations. One example of these sensitive applications is the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) induced surface contaminations of the optics in EUV lithography devices. In this application, a small dose of ionizing radiation (EUV at 13.5 nm wavelength) can cause slight change in the chemical composition of the irradiated surface. This change in chemical composition can cause large change in the surface optical properties of the irradiated surface (EUV optics). This degradation in reflectivity is an issue that needs to be avoided. On the other extreme where intense radiation is implemented, the main concern of the radiation-surface interaction comes from the severity of the irradiation process. The plasma-facing component (PFC) in future thermonuclear devices represent the ultimate example where the materials might be exposed to severe irradiation processes. Under such extreme irradiation processes, some candidate PFC materials exhibit the formation of very fine and fragile nanostructure (Fuzz) that can be washed out into the fusion device plasma and stop the fusion reaction. These two extreme examples of the radiation-surface interaction were selected to be my PhD research topic. The change in chemical properties of Ru surface during exposure to a 13.5 nm wavelength of EUV light radiation was investigated

  4. Measurement of the surface wavelength distribution of narrow-band radiation by a colorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T

    2010-09-10

    A method is suggested for determining the wavelength of narrow-band light from a digital photograph of a radiating surface. The digital camera used should be appropriately calibrated. The accuracy of the wavelength measurement is better than 1 nm. The method was tested on the yellow doublet of mercury spectrum and on the adjacent continuum of the incandescent lamp radiation spectrum. By means of the method suggested the homogeneity of holographic sensor swelling was studied in stationary and transient cases. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  6. Temporal variation of optimal UV exposure time over Korea: risks and benefits of surface UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar UV radiation in a wavelength range between 280 to 400 nm has both positive and negative influences on human body. Surface UV radiation is the main natural source of vitamin D, providing the promotion of bone and musculoskeletal health and reducing the risk of a number of cancers and other medical conditions. However, overexposure to surface UV radiation is significantly related with the majority of skin cancer, in addition other negative health effects such as sunburn, skin aging, and some forms of eye cataracts. Therefore, it is important to estimate the optimal UV exposure time, representing a balance between reducing negative health effects and maximizing sufficient vitamin D production. Previous studies calculated erythemal UV and vitamin-D UV from the measured and modelled spectral irradiances, respectively, by weighting CIE Erythema and Vitamin D3 generation functions (Kazantzidis et al., 2009; Fioletov et al., 2010). In particular, McKenzie et al. (2009) suggested the algorithm to estimate vitamin-D production UV from erythemal UV (or UV index) and determined the optimum conditions of UV exposure based on skin type Ⅱ according to the Fitzpatrick (1988). Recently, there are various demands for risks and benefits of surface UV radiation on public health over Korea, thus it is necessary to estimate optimal UV exposure time suitable to skin type of East Asians. This study examined the relationship between erythemally weighted UV (UVEry) and vitamin D weighted UV (UVVitD) over Korea during 2004-2012. The temporal variations of the ratio (UVVitD/UVEry) were also analyzed and the ratio as a function of UV index was applied in estimating the optimal UV exposure time. In summer with high surface UV radiation, short exposure time leaded to sufficient vitamin D and erythema and vice versa in winter. Thus, the balancing time in winter was enough to maximize UV benefits and minimize UV risks.

  7. Solar absorption estimated from surface radiation measurements and collocated satellite products over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is physically speaking a perturbation of the atmospheric energy budget through the insertion of constituents such as greenhouse gases or aerosols. Changes in the atmospheric energy budget largely affect the global climate and hydrological cycle, but the quantification of the different energy balance components is still afflicted with large uncertainties. The overall aim of the present study is the assessment of the mean state and the spatio-temporal variations in the solar energy disposition, in which we focus on obtaining an accurate partitioning of absorbed solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Surface based measurements of solar radiation (GEBA, BSRN) are combined with collocated satellite-retrieved surface albedo (MODIS, CERES FSW, or CM SAF GAC-SAL) and top-of-atmosphere net incoming solar radiation (CERES EBAF) to quantify the absorbed solar radiation (ASR) at the surface and within the atmosphere over Europe for the period 2001-2005. In a first step, we examine the quality and temporal homogeneity of the monthly time series beyond 2000 provided by GEBA in order to identify a subset of sufficient quality. We find the vast majority of monthly time series to be suitable for our purposes. Using the satellite-derived CM SAF surface solar radiation product at 0.03° spatial resolution, we assess the spatial representativeness of the GEBA and BSRN sites for their collocated 1° grid cells as we intend to combine the point measurements with the coarser resolved CERES EBAF products (1° resolution), and we find spatial sampling errors of on average 3 Wm-2 or 2% (normalized by point values). Based on the combination of 134 GEBA surface solar radiation (SSR) time series with MODIS white-sky albedo and CERES EBAF top-of-atmosphere net radiation (TOAnet), we obtain a European mean partitioning (2001-2005) of absorbed solar radiation (relative to total incoming radiation) of: ASRsurf= 41% and ASRatm= 25%, together equaling

  8. A new formulation of electromagnetic wave scattering using an on-surface radiation boundary condition approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegsmann, Gregory A.; Taflove, Allen; Umashankar, Koradar R.

    1987-01-01

    A new formulation of electromagnetic wave scattering by convex, two-dimensional conducting bodies is reported. This formulation, called the on-surface radiation condition (OSRC) approach, is based upon an expansion of the radiation condition applied directly on the surface of a scatterer. It is now shown that application of a suitable radiation condition directly on the surface of a convex conducting scatterer can lead to substantial simplification of the frequency-domain integral equation for the scattered field, which is reduced to just a line integral. For the transverse magnetic case, the integrand is known explicitly. For the transverse electric case, the integrand can be easily constructed by solving an ordinary differential equation around the scatterer surface contour. Examples are provided which show that OSRC yields computed near and far fields which approach the exact results for canonical shapes such as the circular cylinder, square cylinder, and strip. Electrical sizes for the examples are ka = 5 and ka = 10. The new OSRC formulation of scattering may present a useful alternative to present integral equation and uniform high-frequency approaches for convex cylinders larger than ka = 1. Structures with edges or corners can also be analyzed, although more work is needed to incorporate the physics of singular currents at these discontinuities. Convex dielectric structures can also be treated using OSRC.

  9. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model, GOCART, along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from BSRN and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRS (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions. The comparisons and methods from this study can be applied to multiple model analysis in the AeroCom framework.

  10. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  11. [Effects of soil surface mulching on solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber growth and soil environment].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Sheng; Liang, Yinli; Wang, Juyuan

    2005-12-01

    The study on the effects of different soil surface mulching models, including wheat straw mulching (WS), plastic film mulching (PF), and wheat straw plus plastic film mulching (WP), on the growth of solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber and on soil environment showed that soil surface mulching not only increased the individuals of pistillate flower, improved its differentiation and development, shortened fruit-developing period, increased fruit weight, reduced fruit malformation percentage, but also raised total yield. Among the test mulching models, WP was better than WS and PF, and the effects were superior on grafted than on own-rooted cucumber. Soil surface mulching also had considerable effects on soil environment, but the effects varied with different modules. For example, under field condition, the diurnal change of soil temperature was a single-peak curve, with its peak higher and appeared at 14:30 in 5 cm and 10 cm soil depth, but lower and appeared later in deeper soil layers. In this study, WS lowered the maximum soil temperature and raised the minimum soil temperature, making soil temperature quite stable, while PF raised the maximum soil temperature much higher and enhanced the minimum soil temperature less than WS and WP, making the largest variation range of soil temperature. WP played a role of raising soil temperature and kept it stable. Similar to the diurnal change of soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth, that of soil respiration rate was also a single-peak curve. The soil respiration rate in all treatmentg was significantly higher than that of CK, and WP had a higher soil respiration rate than PF and WS. There was a significant positive correlation between soil respiration rate and soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth. By the end of the experiment, soil bulk density at the depth of 0-20 cm was measured, which was significantly lower in WS and WP than in CK and PF. The difference in soil bulk density was gradually inconspicuous

  12. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems.

  13. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems. PMID:28112238

  14. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  15. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-23

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems.

  16. Maximal Cherenkov γ-radiation on Fermi-surface of compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-05-15

    The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model is employed in this paper to study the extraordinary (XO) elliptically polarized electromagnetic wave dispersion in quantum plasmas with spin-1/2 magnetization and relativistic degeneracy effects, considering also the electron-exchange and quantum diffraction of electrons. From the lower and upper calculated XO-modes, it is observed that, for electrons on the surface of the Fermi-sphere, the lower XO-mode can excite the Cherenkov radiation by crossing the Fermi-line, with some proper conditions depending on the values of independent plasma parameters, such as the relativistic-degeneracy, the atomic-number of constituent ions, and the magnetic field strength. Particularly, a lower electron number-density and Cherenkov radiation frequency limits are found to exist, for instance, for given values of the plasma ions atomic-number and the magnetic field strength below which the radiation can not be excited by the electrons on the Fermi-surface. This lower density limit increases by decrease in the atomic-number but decreases with decrease in the strength of the ambient magnetic field. It is remarkable that in this research it is discovered that the maximal Cherenkov-radiation per unit-length (the energy radiated by superluminal electrons traveling through the dielectric medium) coincides with the plasma number-densities, which is present in compact stars with the maximal radiation frequency lying in the gamma-ray spectrum. Current study can provide an important plasma diagnostic tool for a wide plasma density range, be it the solid density, the warm dense matter, the inertial confined or the astrophysical compact plasmas and may reveal an important cooling mechanism for white dwarfs. Current findings may also answer the fundamental astrophysical question on the mysterious origin of intense cosmic gamma-ray emissions.

  17. High harmonics from solid surfaces as a source of ultra-bright XUV radiation for experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörlein, R.; Nomura, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Major, Zs; Karsch, S.; Krausz, F.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    The coherent high-order harmonic generation from the interaction of ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses with solid density plasmas holds promise for tabletop sources of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray radiation with attosecond duration and unprecedented intensities. Together with the generation of mono-energetic electron beams from gas jets and capillaries and the generation of mono-energetic ions from thin foils, this offers a unique tool box of tabletop-laser-generated radiation sources for a wide range of applications previously only accessible with large-scale accelerator and synchrotron-radiation facilities. Especially, the generation of high harmonics from laser plasmas has the potential of being applied to a wide range of experiments from plasma physics to molecular dynamics. So far the studies addressing the generation of high harmonics from laser-generated overcritical plasma surfaces have concentrated mainly on the characterization of the harmonic beams themselves not considering how, in a next step, these beams could be applied to experiments. In this paper we discuss the generation of surface harmonics with the ATLAS (800 mJ, 40 fs) laser system with the emphasis on the transport, spectral shaping refocusing of the harmonic beams, all of these being absolute prerequisites for multi-shot experiments. We also present considerations for future improvements and possible future experiments exploiting the full potential of high harmonic radiation from solid targets.

  18. Effect of lunar surface material on radiation damage in mice (investigation of biological action of lunar surface material returned to earth by Luna 16 automatic station)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Davydov, B. I.; Gaydamakin, N. A.; Lvova, T. S.; Petrukhin, V. G.; Komarova, S. N.; Skvortsova, Y. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effect was studied of lunar surface material from the Sea of Fertility on the radiation reaction (damage) in mice caused by exposure to ionizing radiation. The material was administered to the organism in three ways -- aerogenically, through the esophagus, or peritoneally. It was shown that administering the lunar surface material did not appreciably affect the death of the animals and the reaction of the peripheral blood caused by the action of radiation. In mice which prior to irradiation had been administered inhalationally or peritoneally the lunar surface material, a lag in the increment of bodyweight was observed.

  19. Effect of Mechanical and Chemical Root Surface Treatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Intracanal Post in Primary Anterior Teeth: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Shanmugaavel; Subramanian, EMG; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Aesthetic restoration of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth still remains as a special challenge to paediatric dentist. Due to increased parent’s concern for aesthetic rehabilitation for their children, paediatric dentist are in a state to improve technique sensitive restorative procedure to improve aesthetic rehabilitation in children. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of different root surface treatment on the shear bond strength of glass fibre reinforced post in primary anterior teeth using Universal Testing Machine (UTM). Materials and Methods Twenty single rooted primary anterior teeth were selected. Coronal portions of the teeth were sectioned transversally 2 mm above the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) and specimens were treated endodontically and obturated using metapex. Then the specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1: Control group; Group 2: Chemical surface treatment of the root with 2% chlorhexidine; Group 3: Mechanical surface treatment with mushroom-shaped undercut; Group 4: Combination of mechanical and chemical surface treatments. Samples were tested for shear bond strength. ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test were used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 20.0. Results Combination of mechanical and chemical surface treatments exhibited higher mean shear bond strength (8.41 MPa), followed by mechanical surface treatment (4.68 MPa), chemical surface treatment (3.92 MPa) and control group (2.76 MPa). Conclusion Mechanical and chemical surface treatments together led to a improved shear bond strength and increased the retention of the post to the root surface. PMID:28274043

  20. Ultraviolet radiation climatology of the Earth`s surface and lower atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, S.; Stamnes, K.

    1999-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the driving force of tropospheric chemistry and is furthermore detrimental to most living tissues. A three year modeling program was carried out to characterize the UV radiation in the lower atmosphere, with the objective of development a climatology of UV biologically active radiation, and of photo-dissociation reaction rates that are key to tropospheric chemistry. A comprehensive model, the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model, was developed and made available to the scientific community. The model incorporates updated spectroscopic data, recent advances in radiative transfer theory, and allows flexible customization for the needs of different users. The TUV model has been used in conjunction with satellite-derived measurements of total atmospheric ozone and cloud amount, to develop a global climatology of UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Initial validation studies are highly encouraging, showing that model predictions agree with direct measurements to ca. 5--10% at times when environmental conditions are well known, and to 10--30% for monthly averages when local environmental conditions can only be estimated remotely from satellite-based measurements. Additional validation studies are continuing.

  1. Mixed Convection with Conduction and Surface Radiation from a Vertical Channel with Discrete Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londhe, S. D.; Rao, C. G.

    2013-10-01

    A numerical investigation into fluid flow and heat transfer for the geometry of a vertical parallel plate channel subjected to conjugate mixed convection with radiation is attempted here. The channel considered has three identical flush-mounted discrete heat sources in its left wall, while the right wall that does not contain any heat source acts as a sink. Air, assumed to be a radiatively non-participating and having constant thermophysical properties subject to the Boussinesq approximation, is the cooling agent. The heat generated in the left wall gets conducted along it and is later dissipated by mixed convection and radiation. The governing equations, considered in their full strength sans the boundary layer approximations, are converted into vorticity-stream function form and are then normalized. These equations along with pertinent boundary conditions are solved through finite volume method coupled with Gauss-Seidel iterative technique. The effects of modified Richardson number, surface emissivity, thermal conductivity and aspect ratio on local temperature distribution along the channel, maximum channel temperature and relative contributions of mixed convection and radiation have been thoroughly studied. The prominence of radiation in the present problem has been highlighted.

  2. BOREAS RSS-14 Level -3 Gridded Radiometer and Satellite Surface Radiation Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hodges, Gary; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-14 team collected and processed GOES-7 and -8 images of the BOREAS region as part of its effort to characterize the incoming, reflected, and emitted radiation at regional scales. This data set contains surface radiation parameters, such as net radiation and net solar radiation, that have been interpolated from GOES-7 images and AMS data onto the standard BOREAS mapping grid at a resolution of 5 km N-S and E-W. While some parameters are taken directly from the AMS data set, others have been corrected according to calibrations carried out during IFC-2 in 1994. The corrected values as well as the uncorrected values are included. For example, two values of net radiation are provided: an uncorrected value (Rn), and a value that has been corrected according to the calibrations (Rn-COR). The data are provided in binary image format data files. Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program. See section 8.2 for details. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Downward longwave surface radiation from sun-synchronous satellite data - Validation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darnell, W. L.; Gupta, S. K.; Staylor, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive study has been carried out to validate a satellite technique for estimating downward longwave radiation at the surface. The technique, mostly developed earlier, uses operational sun-synchronous satellite data and a radiative transfer model to provide the surface flux estimates. The satellite-derived fluxes were compared directly with corresponding ground-measured fluxes at four different sites in the United States for a common one-year period. This provided a study of seasonal variations as well as a diversity of meteorological conditions. Dome heating errors in the ground-measured fluxes were also investigated and were corrected prior to the comparisons. Comparison of the monthly averaged fluxes from the satellite and ground sources for all four sites for the entire year showed a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and a standard error of estimate of 10 W/sq m. A brief description of the technique is provided, and the results validating the technique are presented.

  4. Effects of dust accumulation and removal on radiator surfaces on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.; Olle, R.

    1991-01-01

    Tests were carried out to assess the impact of wind blown dust accumulation and abrasion on radiator surfaces on Mars. High emittance arc-textured copper (Cu) and niobium-1%-zirconium (Nb-1%Zr) samples were subjected to basaltic dust laden wind at Martian pressure (1000 Pa) at speeds varying from 19 to 97 m/s in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The effect of accumulated dust was also observed by pre-dusting some of the samples before the test. Radiator degradation was determined by measuring the change in the emittance after dust was deposited and/or removed. The principal mode of degradation was abrasion. Arc-textured Nb-1%Zr proved to be more susceptible to degradation than Cu, and pre-dusting appeared to have lessened the abrasion.

  5. Effects of dust accumulation and removal on radiators surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hotes, Deborah; Olle, Raymond M.

    1991-01-01

    Tests were carried out to assess the impact of wind blown dust accumulation and abrasion on radiator surfaces on Mars. High emittance arc-textured copper and niobium-1 percent-zirconium samples were subjected to basaltic dust laden wind at Martian pressure (1000 Pa) at speeds varying from 19 to 97 m/s in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. The effect of accumulated dust was also observed by pre-dusting some of the samples before the test. Radiator degradation was determined by measuring the change in the emittance after dust was deposited and/or removed. The principle mode of degradation was abrasion. Arc textured Nb-1 percent-Zr proved to be more susceptible to degradation than Cu, and pre-dusting appeared to have lessened the abrasion.

  6. Transformation of surface plasmon polaritons to radiation in graphene in terahertz regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Sen; Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Shenggang; Sanderson, Matthew; Zhang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a concept that allows direct excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by a moving electron bunch above a single layer graphene sheet deposited on a dielectric substrate without any additional coupling requirements. We show that if the two-dimensional current in the graphene is dominated by the third order nonlinear effect when the surface electric field exceeds a moderate strength of ∼5 kV/cm, the SPP mode can cross the light line although the group velocity remains much smaller than the speed of light. This effect gives rise to direct transformation of SPPs into radiation. The underlying mechanism of the crossing of the SPP dispersion into the light line is the energy shift of charged particles in the nonlinear regime and the finite transport scattering time in graphene. Both the energy and lifetime of the SPPs increase with the field intensity. The radiation intensity and frequency can be tuned with an AC bias.

  7. A review of progress towards understanding the transient global mean surface temperature response to radiative perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Kamae, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The correct understanding of the transient response to external radiative perturbation is important for the interpretation of observed climate change, the prediction of near-future climate change, and committed warming under climate stabilization scenarios, as well as the estimation of equilibrium climate sensitivity based on observation data. It has been known for some time that the radiative damping rate per unit of global mean surface temperature increase varies with time, and this inconstancy affects the transient response. Knowledge of the equilibrium response alone is insufficient, but understanding the transient response of the global mean surface temperature has made rapid progress. The recent progress accompanies the relatively new concept of the efficacies of ocean heat uptake and forcing. The ocean heat uptake efficacy associates the temperature response induced by ocean heat uptake with equilibrium temperature response, and the efficacy of forcing compares the temperature response caused by non-CO2 forcing with that by CO2 forcing.

  8. Manifestation of topological surface electron states in the photoelectromagnetic effect induced by terahertz laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeeva, A. V.; Egorova, S. G.; Chernichkin, V. I.; Tamm, M. E.; Yashina, L. V.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Plank, H.; Danilov, S. N.; Ryabova, L. I.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that measurements of the photoelectromagnetic effect using terahertz laser radiation may provide a unique opportunity to discriminate between the topological surface states and other highly conductive surface electron states. We performed a case study of mixed (Bi{}1-xIn x )2Se3 crystals undergoing a topological phase transformation due to the transition from the inverse to the direct electron energy spectrum in the crystal bulk at variation of the composition x. We show that for the topological insulator phase, the photoelectromagnetic effect amplitude is defined by the number of incident radiation quanta, whereas for the trivial insulator phase, it depends on the power in a laser pulse irrespective of its wavelength. We assume that such behavior is attributed to a strong damping of the electron-electron interaction in the topological insulator phase compared to the trivial insulator.

  9. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Blasi, M. G.; Venafra, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007.

  10. Multi-Decadal Variations of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effects on Surface Radiation Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Streets, David; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world.

  11. Radiation protection using Martian surface materials in human exploration of Mars.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Thibeault, S A; Wilson, J W; Heilbronn, L; Kiefer, R L; Weakley, J A; Dueber, J L; Fogarty, T; Wilkins, R

    2001-01-01

    To develop materials for shielding astronauts from the hazards of GCR, natural Martian surface materials are considered for their potential as radiation shielding for manned Mars missions. The modified radiation fluences behind various kinds of Martian rocks and regolith are determined by solving the Boltzmann equation using NASA Langley's HZETRN code along with the 1977 Solar Minimum galactic cosmic ray environmental model. To develop structural shielding composite materials for Martian surface habitats, theoretical predictions of the shielding properties of Martian regolith/polyimide composites has been computed to assess their shielding effectiveness. Adding high-performance polymer binders to Martian regolith to enhance structural properties also enhances the shielding properties of these composites because of the added hydrogenous constituents. Heavy ion beam testing of regolith simulant/polyimide composites is planned to validate this prediction. Characterization and proton beam tests are performed to measure structural properties and to compare the shielding effects on microelectronic devices, respectively.

  12. Impact of surface inhomogeneity on solar radiative transfer under overcast conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Cribb, Maureen C.; Trishchenko, Alexander P.

    2002-08-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the ability of the Moderate-Resolution Transmittance 4 (MODTRAN-4) code to simulate high-resolution shortwave (SW) fluxes given detailed and complete input information under overcast conditions. The study underlines the impact of surface inhomogeneity on the closure of SW radiative transfer. It also leads to a method of estimating surface spectral areal-mean albedo from downwelling solar transmittance measurements. The investigation made use of ample Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) field data collected by a suite of instruments, including broadband and narrowband radiometers and spectrometers, cloud radar and lidar, microwave radiometer, atmospheric sounding instruments, and satellite data. Furnishing the MODTRAN-4 code with observed atmospheric, cloud, and surface parameters generates spectral solar transmittance at the surface and reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The transmittances were compared with the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer measurements and showed significant discrepancies in the near-infrared (NIR) region, the bulk of which was attributed to the use of unrepresentative surface spectral albedos. A field campaign was undertaken to collect surface albedo data for a wide variety of land cover types near the ARM Central Facility. The sampled data were combined with thematic mapper/Landsat-based land cover classification data to map surface spectral albedo. Substitution of the derived areal-mean spectral albedo into the MODTRAN-4 model eliminates major discrepancies in the NIR, and also leads to good agreements with surface solar broadband fluxes and TOA satellite spectral reflectance. On the basis of these findings, one may use downwelling spectral transmittance data, together with detailed cloud and atmospheric information, to estimate surface effective areal-mean albedo. The estimated values agree well with those derived from the ground survey data. Following the method, a data set of

  13. Preparation of clean InP(100) surfaces studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Machuca, Francisco; Pianetta, Piero; Spicer, William E.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical cleaning of indium phosphide (InP),(100) surfaces is studied systematically by using photoemission electron spectroscopy. In order to achieve the necessary surface sensitivity and spectral resolution, synchrotron radiation with photon energies ranging from 60 to 600 eV are used to study the indium 4d, phosphorus 2p, carbon 1s, and oxygen 1s core levels, and the valence band. Typical H2SO4:H2O2:H2O solutions used to etch GaAs(100) surfaces are applied to InP(100) surfaces. It is found that the resulting surface species are significantly different from those found on GaAs(100) surfaces and that a second chemical cleaning step using a strong acid is required to remove residual surface oxide. This two-step cleaning process leaves the surface oxide free and with approximately 0.4 ML of elemental phosphorus, which is removed by vacuum annealing. The carbon coverage is also reduced dramatically from approximately 1 to about 0.05 ML. The chemical reactions are investigated, the resulting InP surface species at different cleaning stages are determined, and the optimum cleaning procedure is presented.

  14. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  15. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Padula

    2000-09-13

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations.

  16. Relevance of decadal variations in surface radiative fluxes for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that radiative fluxes incident at Earth's surface are not stable over time but undergo significant changes on decadal timescales. This is not only found in the thermal spectral range, where an increase in the downwelling flux is expected due to the increasing greenhouse effect, but also in the solar spectral range. Observations suggest that surface solar radiation, after a period of decline from the 1950s to the 1980s ("global dimming"), reversed into a "brightening" since the mid-1980s at widespread locations, often in line with changes in anthropogenic air pollution. These decadal variations observed in both solar and thermal surface radiative fluxes have the potential to affect various aspects of climate change. Discussed here are specifically the evidence for potential effects on global warming, as seen in asymmetries in hemispheric warming rates as well as in differences in the decadal warming rates over land and oceans. These variations in observed warming rates fit well to our conceptual understanding of how aerosol and greenhouse gas-induced changes in the surface radiative fluxes should affect global warming. Specifically, on the Northern Hemisphere, the suppression of warming from the 1950s to the 1980s fits to the concurrent dimming and increasing air pollution, while the accelerated warming from the 1980s to 2000 matches with the brightening and associated reduction in pollution levels. The suppression of warming from the 1950s to the 1980s is even somewhat stronger over oceans than over land, in line with the conceptual idea that aerosol-induced dimming and brightening tendencies may be enhanced through cloud aerosol interactions particularly over the pristine ocean areas. On the Southern Hemisphere, the absence of significant pollution levels as well as trend reversals therein, fit to the observed stable warming rates over the entire 1950 to 2000 period.

  17. Mapping the downwelling atmospheric radiation at the Earth's surface: A research strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E.

    1986-01-01

    A strategy is presented along with background material for determining downward atmospheric radiation at the Earth's surface on a regional scale but over the entire globe, using available information on the temperature and humidity of the air near the ground and at cloud base altitudes. Most of these parameters can be inferred from satellite radiance measurements. Careful validation of the derived radiances will be required using ground-based direct measurements of radiances, to avoid systematic biases of these derived field quantities.

  18. Algorithm for Surface of Translation Attached Radiators (A-STAR). Volume 1: Formulation of the analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgyesimitschang, L. N.; Putnam, J. M.

    1982-05-01

    A general analytical formulation, based on the method of moments (MM) is described for solving electromagnetic problems associated with off-surface (wire) and aperture radiators on finite-length cylinders of arbitrary cross section, denoted in this report as bodies of translation (BOT). This class of bodies can be used to model structures with noncircular cross sections such as wings, fins and aircraft fuselages.

  19. Algorithm for Surface of Translation Attached Radiators (A-STAR). Volume 2. Users manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgyesimitschang, L. N.; Putnam, J. M.

    1982-05-01

    A hierarchy of computer programs implementing the method of moments for bodies of translation (MM/BOT) is described. The algorithm treats the far-field radiation from off-surface and aperture antennas on finite-length open or closed bodies of arbitrary cross section. The near fields and antenna coupling on such bodies are computed. The theoretical development underlying the algorithm is described in Volume 1 of this report.

  20. The Radiation Environment on the Martian Surface and during MSL's Cruise to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    An important part of assessing present and past habitability of Mars is to understand and characterize "life limiting factors" on the surface, such as the radiation environment. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions and characterizing the radiation environment, both on the surface of Mars and inside the spacecraft during the cruise to Mars, provides critical information to aid in the planning for future human exploration of Mars. RAD was the first MSL instrument to start collecting data, beginning its science investigation during cruise (10 days after launch) and making the first ever measurements of the radiation environment on another planet. RAD is an energetic particle analyzer designed to characterize a broad spectrum of energetic particle radiation including galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and secondary neutrons created both in the Mars atmosphere and regolith. RAD observations consist of a time series of periodic (typically hourly) measurements of charged particles from protons (Z=1) up to iron (Z=26) for energies above >10 MeV/nucleon, as well as neutrons from 10 to ~ 100 MeV. These synoptic observations are designed to characterize both the short term variability associated with the onset of solar energetic particle events as well as the long term variability of galactic cosmic rays over the solar cycle. RAD measurements will also be used to quantify the flux of biologically hazardous radiation at the surface of Mars today, and determine how these fluxes vary on diurnal, seasonal, solar cycle and episodic (flare, storm) timescales. These measurements will allow calculations of the depth in rock or soil to which this flux, when integrated over long timescales, provides a lethal dose for known terrestrial organisms. Through such measurements, we can learn how deep below the surface life would have to be, or have been in the past, to be protected. This talk will discuss the results obtained during the ~7 months

  1. The Radiation Environment on the Martian Surface and during MSL's Cruise to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Martin, Cesar; Boettcher, Stephan; Koehler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Brinza, David E.; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik; the MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    An important part of assessing present and past habitability of Mars is to understand and characterize "life limiting factors" on the surface, such as the radiation environment. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions and characterizing the radiation environment, both on the surface of Mars and inside the spacecraft during the cruise to Mars, provides critical information to aid in the planning for future human exploration of Mars. RAD was the first MSL instrument to start collecting data, beginning its science investigation during cruise (10 days after launch) and making the first ever measurements of the radiation environment on another planet. RAD is an energetic particle analyzer designed to characterize a broad spectrum of energetic particle radiation including galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and secondary neutrons created both in the Mars atmosphere and regolith. RAD observations consist of a time series of periodic (typically hourly) measurements of charged particles from protons (Z=1) up to iron (Z=26) for energies above >10 MeV/nucleon, as well as neutrons from 10 to ~ 100 MeV. These synoptic observations are designed to characterize both the short term variability associated with the onset of solar energetic particle events as well as the long term variability of galactic cosmic rays over the solar cycle. RAD measurements will also be used to quantify the flux of biologically hazardous radiation at the surface of Mars today, and determine how these fluxes vary on diurnal, seasonal, solar cycle and episodic (flare, storm) timescales. These measurements will allow calculations of the depth in rock or soil to which this flux, when integrated over long timescales, provides a lethal dose for known terrestrial organisms. Through such measurements, we can learn how deep below the surface life would have to be, or have been in the past, to be protected. This talk will discuss the results obtained during the ~7 months

  2. Radiation exposure to the orbiting lunar station and lunar surface related to reusable nuclear shuttle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation environment created by the Reusable Nuclear Vehicle (RNS) in performing its normal mission functions while in the lunar vicinity and the impact of that environment on the Orbiting Lunar Station (OLS) and/or the lunar surface are examined. Lunar surface exposures from the operating reactor were evaluated for both the arrival and departure burns and while there is little probability that manned bases would lie along the paths in which measurable exposures would be recorded, the analyses do indicate the need to consider this possibility in planning such operations. Conclusions supported by the analyses and recommended operational constraints for the RNS are presented.

  3. Effects of sulfate aerosol on the central Pennsylvania surface shortwave radiation budget. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guimond, P.W.

    1994-12-01

    Surface radiation measurements are taken simultaneously with measurements of meteorological variables including temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and visibility to evaluate the impact of sulfate haze on the surface radiation budget. A relationship is sought between flux losses due only to aerosol and relative humidity, visibility or both, with the goal of facilitating parameterization of sulfate hazes by climate modelers. At the same time, a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is compared with a more costly sun photometer to determine the feasibility of substituting the former for the latter in future research. It is found that depletion of surface radiation due to aerosol is typically ten to twenty percent of initial insolation, and that the losses can be correlated with zenith angle, relative humidity and optical depth. In the case of flux loss as a function of optical depth, the two are related in a nearly linear fashion. It is also discovered that the RSR has a predictable error owing to a wider field of view than the sun photometer, and can be used as a replacement for the former by correcting for the error.

  4. A clear-sky radiation closure study using a one-dimensional radiative transfer model and collocated satellite-surface-reanalysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, Erica K.; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Loeb, Norman G.

    2016-11-01

    Earth's climate is largely determined by the planet's energy budget, i.e., the balance of incoming and outgoing radiation at the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA). Studies have shown that computing clear-sky radiative fluxes are strongly dependent on atmospheric state variables, such as temperature and water vapor profiles, while the all-sky fluxes are greatly influenced by the presence of clouds. NASA-modeled vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor are used to derive the surface radiation budget from Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), which is regarded as one of the primary sources for evaluating climate change in climate models. In this study, we evaluate the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications version 2 (MERRA-2) reanalyzed clear-sky temperature and water vapor profiles with newly generated atmospheric profiles from Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)-merged soundings and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder retrievals at three ARM sites. The temperature profiles are well replicated in MERRA-2 at all three sites, whereas tropospheric water vapor is slightly dry below 700 hPa. These profiles are then used to calculate clear-sky surface and TOA radiative fluxes from the Langley-modified Fu-Liou radiative transfer model (RTM). In order to achieve radiative closure at both the surface and TOA, the ARM-measured surface albedos and aerosol optical depths are adjusted to account for surface inhomogeneity. In general, most of the averaged RTM-calculated surface downward and TOA upward shortwave and longwave fluxes agree within 5 W/m2 of the observations, which is within the uncertainties of the ARM and CERES measurements. Yet still, further efforts are required to reduce the bias in calculated fluxes in coastal regions.

  5. Effect of spine-like surface structures on the radiative properties of microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.

    2016-04-01

    Many species of microorganisms possess spine-like surface structures. In this paper, we built a sphere with surface spines (SSS) model to represent such featured particles. The volume fraction of surface spines varied from 0% to 22% and the effects of the relative length, number, and radius of the spines on the radiation characteristics were studied using the discrete dipole approximation method with a complex relative refractive index of m=1.05+0.005i. Meanwhile, the approximations by the equivalent volume sphere (EVS) and the core shell sphere (CSS) models were examined. Surface spines led to increased scattering and absorption cross sections and asymmetry parameter. The EVS model overestimated the scattering cross section and underestimated the asymmetry parameter of SSS, the relative errors of which can exceed 10%, but EVS predicted the absorption cross section well. The CSS model combined with the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule predicted the integral radiation parameters with relative errors less than 5% in all the cases, which was also valid for relative refractive indices with an imaginary part up to 0.1 and a real part up to 1.2. The resonance peaks of the phase function and Mueller matrix elements in the back scattering directions were damped out due to the existence of surface spines for size parameters larger than 10, which could not be captured by either the EVS or the CSS models.

  6. Supragingival root surface removal during maintenance procedures utilizing an air-powder abrasive system or hand scaling. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Berkstein, S; Reiff, R L; McKinney, J F; Killoy, W J

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of root surface removal in vitro using an air-powder abrasive system or sharp curet on root surfaces simulating the cumulative effects of an every 3-month periodontal maintenance regimen over a 3-year period and to compare the amount of time spent in the utilization of each instrument. Fifty extracted teeth with fully formed roots were cleaned and mounted in one of 10 different artificial alveolar arches. Each arch contained one central incisor, one lateral incisor, one canine, one first and one second premolar. The buccal and mesial tooth root diameters were measured initially and after each treatment with a digital point micrometer. All teeth were stained with coffee and repositioned in their artificial alveolae and treated by the air-powder abrasive system or curet until all visible stain was removed. Time required for removal of stain in both treatment groups was recorded. Both groups were restained, retreated, and retimed 12 times to reproduce a 3-month maintenance interval for 3 years. The average root structure removed by the air-powder abrasive system following each treatment was 10.68 micron while the curet removed an average of 27.09 micron. Stain was removed 3.15 times faster by the air-powder abrasive system than with a curet.

  7. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  8. Mercury net methylation in five tropical flood plain regions of Brazil: high in the root zone of floating macrophyte mats but low in surface sediments and flooded soils.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, J R; Meili, M; Hylander, L D; de Castro e Silva, E; Roulet, M; Mauro, J B; de Lemos, R

    2000-10-16

    In aquatic systems, bottom sediments have often been considered as the main methylmercury (MeHg) production site. In tropical floodplain areas, however, floating meadows and flooded forests extend over large areas and can be important Hg methylating sites. We present here a cross-system comparison of the Hg net methylation capacity in surface sediments, flooded soils and roots of floating aquatic macrophytes, assayed by in situ incubation with 203Hg and extraction of formed Me203 Hg by acid leaching and toluene. The presence of mono-MeHg was confirmed by thin layer chromatography and other techniques. Study areas included floodplain lakes in the Amazon basin (Tapajós, Negro and Amazon rivers), the Pantanal floodplain (Paraguay river basin), freshwater coastal lagoons in Rio de Janeiro and oxbow lakes in the Mogi-Guaçú river, São Paulo state. Different Hg levels were added in assays performed in 1994-1998, but great care was taken to standardise all other test parameters, to allow data comparisons. Net MeHg production was one order of magnitude higher (mean 13.8%, range 0.28-35) in the living or decomposing roots of floating or rooted macrophyte mats (Eichhornia azurea, E. crassipes, Paspalum sp., Eleocharis sellowiana, Salvinia sp., S. rotundifolia and Scirpus cubensis) than in the surface layer of underlying lake sediments (mean 0.6%, range 0.022-2.5). Methylation in flooded soils presented a wide range and was in some cases similar to the one found in macrophyte roots but usually much lower. In a Tapajós floodplain lake, natural concentrations of MeHg in soil and sediment cores taken along a lake-forest transect agreed well with data on net methylation potentials in the same samples. E. azurea, E. crassipes and Salvinia presented the highest methylation potentials, up to 113 times higher than in sediments. Methylation in E. azurea from six lakes of the Paraguay and Cuiabá rivers, high Pantanal, was determined in the 1998 dry and wet seasons and ranged from

  9. Quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics of root-zone soil water in a mixed forest on subtropical coastal sand dune using surface ERT and spatial TDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Junliang; Scheuermann, Alexander; Guyot, Adrien; Baumgartl, Thomas; Lockington, David A.

    2015-04-01

    We jointly used surface electrical resistivity tomography (surface ERT) and spatial time domain reflectometry (spatial TDR) to quantify spatial patterns and seasonal dynamics of root-zone soil water under three contrasting vegetation covers in a sand dune forest of subtropical coastal Australia. We wanted to obtain a better understanding of the applicability of both techniques in these environments as well as investigate vegetation-soil water interactions. Soil temperature and topographic changes were taken into account in soil resistivity interpretation. The results demonstrated the capability of both surface ERT and spatial TDR to spatially monitor root-zone soil water dynamics, with root mean square error (RMSE) <0.018 cm3 cm-3 and absolute deviation <0.034 cm3 cm-3 between gravimetrically derived water content and those derived by the two geophysical techniques. Soil water was depleted to low levels during the dry season but quickly replenished with onset of the wet season. Soil water content profiles revealed obvious differences in water dynamics of the dune sands under different vegetation covers, with highest infiltration and deep drainage under the grassland compared with tree cover. The spatial variation in soil water content due to rainfall interception by trees, root water uptake and preferential infiltration associated with stemflow could be detected by the joint use of surface ERT and spatial TDR. We conclude that surface ERT can be an effective method for quantifying two-dimensional root-zone soil water dynamics and understanding the hydrological processes in these sand dune environments, if complemented by the one-dimensional high-resolution soil water measurements from spatial TDR.

  10. Status of the Development of Low Cost Radiator for Surface Fission Power - II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Maxwell, Taylor; Anderson, William G.; Wagner, Corey; Wrosch, Matthew; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar and Martian surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kWe range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kWe non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. The paper reports on the development of the heat pipe radiator to reject the waste heat from the Stirling convertors. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water Variable Conductance Heat Pipes (VCHPs). By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POCO"TM" foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. As mentioned in previous papers by the authors, the final design of the waste heat radiator is described as being modular with independent GFRC panels for each heat pipe. The present paper reports on test results for a single radiator module as well as a radiator cluster consisting of eight integral modules. These tests were carried out in both ambient and vacuum conditions. While the vacuum testing of the single radiator module was performed in the ACT's vacuum chamber, the vacuum testing of the eight heat pipe radiator cluster took place in NASA GRC's vacuum chamber to accommodate the larger size of the cluster. The results for both articles show good agreement

  11. Interpretation of Impact Features on the Surface of the WFPC-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was the predominance of impact features resident only in the thermal paint layer; similar phenomenology was observed during a prior survey of the WFPC-1 radiator. As well, larger impact features displayed spallation zones, darkened areas, and other features not encountered in impacts onto bare surfaces. Whereas the characterization of impact features by depth and diameter on unpainted surfaces has been long established, the mitigation provided by the painted layer presented a challenge to further analysis of the WFPC-2 features; a literature search revealed no systematic characterization of the ballistic limit equations of painted or coated surfaces. In order to characterize the impactors responsible for the observed damage, an understanding of the cratering and spallation phenomenology of the painted surface was required. To address that challenge, NASA sponsored a series of hypervelocity calibration shots at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This effort required the following activities: the production, painting, and artificial ageing of test coupons in a manner similar to the actual radiator; the determination of the test matrix parameters projectile diameter and material (mass density), impact velocity, and impact angle, so as to enable both an adequate characterization of the impact by projectile and impact geometry and support hydrocode modeling to fill in and extend the applicability of the calibration shots; the selection of suitable projectiles; logistics; and an analysis of feature characteristics upon return of the coupons. This paper reports the results of the test campaign and presents ballistic limit equations for painted surfaces. We also present initial results of our interpretation methodologies.

  12. A Retrospective, Iterative, Geometry-Based (RIGB) tilt-correction method for radiation observed by automatic weather stations on snow-covered surfaces: application to Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenshan; Zender, Charles S.; van As, Dirk; Smeets, Paul C. J. P.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-03-01

    Surface melt and mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet may play crucial roles in global climate change due to their positive feedbacks and large fresh-water storage. With few other regular meteorological observations available in this extreme environment, measurements from automatic weather stations (AWS) are the primary data source for studying surface energy budgets, and for validating satellite observations and model simulations. Station tilt, due to irregular surface melt, compaction and glacier dynamics, causes considerable biases in the AWS shortwave radiation measurements. In this study, we identify tilt-induced biases in the climatology of surface shortwave radiative flux and albedo, and retrospectively correct these by iterative application of solar geometric principles. We found, over all the AWS from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net), the Kangerlussuaq transect (K-transect) and the Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet (PROMICE) networks, insolation on fewer than 40 % of clear days peaks within ±0.5 h of solar noon time, with the largest shift exceeding 3 h due to tilt. Hourly absolute biases in the magnitude of surface insolation can reach up to 200 W m-2, with respect to the well-understood clear-day insolation. We estimate the tilt angles and their directions based on the solar geometric relationship between the simulated insolation at a horizontal surface and the observed insolation by these tilted AWS under clear-sky conditions. Our adjustment reduces the root mean square error (RMSE) against references from both satellite observation and reanalysis by 16 W m-2 (24 %), and raises the correlation coefficients with them to above 0.95. Averaged over the whole Greenland Ice Sheet in the melt season, the adjustment in insolation to compensate station tilt is ˜ 11 W m-2, enough to melt 0.24 m of snow water equivalent. The adjusted diurnal cycles of albedo are smoother, with consistent semi-smiling patterns. The seasonal

  13. Radiative forcing of climate in the western Antarctic Peninsula: Effects of cloud, surface, and aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Allison Mccomiskey

    2003-12-01

    Polar regions are expected to show early and extreme responses to a rise in average global temperatures. The region west of the Antarctic Peninsula has shown a significant rise in temperature of the past half century while temperatures over the rest of the continent are decreasing. Approximately half of the warming over the western Antarctic Peninsula has been explained by changes in atmospheric circulation. This research has examined local climate feedback processes involving aerosols, clouds, and surface properties relative to sea ice cover, to explain the remainder of the warming, and addresses the most appropriate approach in examining local radiative processes. Two data sets are used: a highly resolved ground-based data set from the spring and summer season of 1999 2000 at Palmer Station, Antarctica and a 14 year satellite-derived data set. A three- dimensional radiative transfer model is shown to perform better than the plane-parallel models traditionally used for this application. Aerosol concentrations are low, as expected, and have a typical optical depth of 0.05 which has little effect on surface radiation budgets and climate feedback processes. An absorption process is found on three clear-sky days that accounts for 5 20 W·m-2 of energy absorbed by the atmosphere. The absorption process is of unknown origin. Cloud properties over the short- and long-term were found to be invariant with time and changes in temperature except in the summer season. Cloud radiative forcing was negative throughout the 14 year time period, but the majority of this effect was attributed to changes in surface properties (decreasing reflectance) rather than increasing cloud amount or thickness. The trend in cloud cover over the long-term and the effect of clouds on climate appears to be different in the region of the western Antarctic Peninsula than in the Arctic.

  14. Estimates of Surface Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation over North America from GOES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhavi, H. S.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.

    2006-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) rays have harmful effects on living organisms and plants. Information on UV radiation is also needed for modeling chemical processes in the atmosphere. Therefore, there is a wide interest in estimating UV flux reaching the earth surface. This led to the establishment of world-wide UV monitoring networks, yet, only satellites can provide large scale and homogeneous information. In addition to ozone, clouds and aerosols affect the surface UV radiation. These are highly variable in space and time which limits the applicability of point measurements to wider areas. Several algorithms have been developed for estimating UV flux from space-borne observations. These vary from simple parameterizations to full radiative transfer calculations. The most common limitations of these algorithms are related to their local dependence, satellite specific assumptions and/or large computational time requirement. We present an algorithm for estimating UV flux from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data. The methodology will utilize information derived from independent satellites such as ozone. It relies on transmission table based on the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The algorithm accounts for surface elevation variation, incorporates region dependent aerosol models and provides spectrally resolved output for UV flux at 5 nm interval. The algorithm is generic and can be adapted to different geographic regions. Initially, it will be implemented over North America for a period of about five years. The inferred UV values are being evaluated against ground observations as available from several networks over the United States and results will be presented at the meeting.

  15. SURFRAD-A National Surface Radiation Budget Network for Atmospheric Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, John A.; Deluisi, John J.; Long, Charles N.

    2000-10-01

    A surface radiation budget observing network (SURFRAD) has been established for the United States to support satellite retrieval validation, modeling, and climate, hydrology, and weather research. The primary measurements are the downwelling and upwelling components of broadband solar and thermal infrared irradiance. A hallmark of the network is the measurement and computation of ancillary parameters important to the transmission of radiation. SURFRAD commenced operation in 1995. Presently, it is made up of six stations in diverse climates, including the moist subtropical environment of the U.S. southeast, the cool and dry northern plains, and the hot and arid desert southwest. Network operation involves a rigorous regimen of frequent calibration, quality assurance, and data quality control. An efficient supporting infrastructure has been created to gather, check, and disseminate the basic data expeditiously. Quality controlled daily processed data files from each station are usually available via the Internet within a day of real time. Data from SURFRAD have been used to validate measurements from NASA's Earth Observing System series of satellites, satellite-based retrievals of surface erythematogenic radiation, the national ultraviolet index, and real-time National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) products. It has also been used for carbon sequestration studies, to check radiative transfer codes in various physical models, for basic research and instruction at universities, climate research, and for many other applications. Two stations now have atmospheric energy flux and soil heat flux instrumentation, making them full surface energy balance sites. It is hoped that eventually all SURFRAD stations will have this capability.

  16. Interannual variability of surface radiative fluxes and rainfall in the semi-arid Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, F.; Grippa, M.; Kergoat, L.; Hiernaux, P.; Mougin, E.; Timouk, F.; Delbart, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the Sahel, interannual variability of rainfall is known to be strong, from meso- to continental spatial scales. This is associated with changes in surface radiative fluxes. The actual role played by surface fluxes on the interannual variability of rainfall has been much debated, especially within the context of the major regional scale, multi-decadal West African drought which started at the end of the 1960's (e.g. changes in surface albedo, Charney et al. Science 1975). The significance of conclusions that have been drawn, essentially from modelling approaches, is however limited because of weaknesses in models (e.g. parametrizations of rainfall and clouds, vegetation and aerosols) coupled to a lack of data for assessing the relevance of theories or hypotheses put forward on such bases. The present study aims to quantify and to analyse the interannual variability of surface radiative fluxes and rainfall measured with ground-based automatic weather stations (AWS) for seven years. The AWS are located in the Malian Gourma, from the semi-arid Central Sahel (15°N, 1.5°W) to Northern Sahel (17°N, 1°W), on the border of the Sahara, over the dominant Sahelian surface type (sandy soil). The variability displayed by satellite estimates SRB over this area is also presented and discussed. This study is linked to another one presented in the session AS1.14, African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) by Guichard et al. "Couplings between the seasonal cycles of surface thermodynamics and radiative fluxes in the semi-arid Sahel" (see also Guichard et al. J. Hydrology 2009, AMMA-Catch special issue, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2008.09.007) The large interannual variability of annual rainfall sampled by AWS (less than 200 mm to more than 400 mm) is associated with an equally significant variability of surface net radiation Rnet. It is the more pronounced during the core of the monsoon season. More rainy monsoon seasons are characterized by higher Rnet; the

  17. Analysis of solar radiation on the surface estimated from GWNU solar radiation model with temporal resolution of satellite cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Bu-Yo

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary analysis with a solar radiation model is generally performed for photovoltaic power generation projects. Therefore, model accuracy is extremely important. The temporal and spatial resolutions used in previous studies of the Korean Peninsula were 1 km × 1 km and 1-h, respectively. However, calculating surface solar radiation at 1-h intervals does not ensure the accuracy of the geographical effects, and this parameter changes owing to atmospheric elements (clouds, aerosol, ozone, etc.). Thus, a change in temporal resolution is required. In this study, one-year (2013) analysis was conducted using Chollian geostationary meteorological satellite data from observations recorded at 15-min intervals. Observation data from the intensive solar site at Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) showed that the coefficient of determination (R²), which was estimated for each month and season, increased, whereas the standard error (SE) decreased when estimated in 15-min intervals over those obtained in 1-h intervals in 2013. When compared with observational data from 22 solar sites of the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA), R2 was 0.9 or higher on average, and over- or under-simulated sites did not exceed 3 sites. The model and 22 solar sites showed similar values of annual accumulated solar irradiation, and their annual mean was similar at 4,998 MJ m-2 (3.87 kWh m-2). These results show a difference of approximately ± 70 MJ m-2 (± 0.05 kWh m-2) from the distribution of the Korean Peninsula estimated in 1-h intervals and a higher correlation at higher temporal resolution.

  18. Long-Term Validation and Variability of the Shortwave and Longwave Radiation Data of the GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Taiping; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Cox, Stephan J.; Mikovitz, Colleen; Hinkelman, Laura M.

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation, we make systematic Surface Radiation Budget-Baseline Surface Radiation Network (SRB-BSRN), Surface Radiation Data Centre (SRB-WRDC) and Surface Radiation Budget-Global Energy Balance Archive (SRB-GEBA) comparisons for both shortwave and longwave daily and monthly mean radiation fluxes at the Earth's surface. We first have an overview of all the comparable pairs of data in scatter or scatter density plots. Then we show the time series of the SRB data at grids in which there are ground sites where longterm records of data are available for comparison. An overall very good agreement between the SRB data and ground observations is found. To see the variability of the SRB data during the 21.5 years, we computed the global mean and its linear trend. No appreciable trend is detected at the 5% level. The empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) of the SRB deseasonalized shortwave downward flux are computed over the Pacific region, and the first EOF coefficient is found to be correlated with the ENSO Index at a high value of coefficient of 0.7083.

  19. Clouds, radiation, and the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature in the tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P.J.; Clayson, C.A.; Curry, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    In the tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Ocean, the clouds and the cloud-radiation feedback can only be understood in the context of air/sea interactions and the ocean mixed layer. Considerable interest has been shown in attempting to explain why sea surface temperature (SST) rarely rises above 30{degrees}C, and gradients of the SST. For the most part, observational studies that address this issue have been conducted using monthly cloud and SST data, and the focus has been on intraseasonal and interannual time scales. For the unstable tropical atmosphere, using monthly averaged data misses a key feedback between clouds and SST that occurs on the cloud-SST coupling time scale, which was estimated to be 3-6 days for the unstable tropical atmosphere. This time scale is the time needed for a change in cloud properties, due to the change of ocean surface evaporation caused by SST variation, to feed back to the SST variation, to feed back to the SST through its effect on the surface heat flux. This paper addresses the relationship between clouds, surface radiation flux and SST of the TWP ocean over the diurnal cycle.

  20. Investigating the photostability of carboxylic acids exposed to Mars surface ultraviolet radiation conditions.

    PubMed

    Stalport, F; Coll, P; Szopa, C; Cottin, H; Raulin, F

    2009-01-01

    The detection and identification of organic molecules on Mars are of primary importance to establish the existence of a possible ancient prebiotic chemistry or even biological activity. The harsh environmental conditions at the surface of Mars could explain why the Viking probes-the only efforts, to date, to search for organics on Mars-detected no organic matter. To investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organic molecules that could survive such environmental conditions, we developed a series of experiments that simulate martian surface environmental conditions. Here, we present results with regard to the impact of solar UV radiation on various carboxylic acids, such as mellitic acid, which are of astrobiological interest to the study of Mars. Our results show that at least one carboxylic acid, mellitic acid, could produce a resistant compound-benzenehexacarboxylic acid-trianhydride (C(12)O(9))-when exposed to martian surface radiation conditions. The formation of such products could contribute to the presence of organic matter in the martian regolith, which should be considered a primary target for in situ molecular analyses during future surface missions.

  1. Scaling of the entropy budget with surface temperature in radiative-convective equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Martin S.; O'Gorman, Paul A.

    2016-09-01

    The entropy budget of the atmosphere is examined in simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium with a cloud-system resolving model over a wide range of surface temperatures from 281 to 311 K. Irreversible phase changes and the diffusion of water vapor account for more than half of the irreversible entropy production within the atmosphere, even in the coldest simulation. As the surface temperature is increased, the atmospheric radiative cooling rate increases, driving a greater entropy sink that must be matched by greater irreversible entropy production. The entropy production resulting from irreversible moist processes increases at a similar fractional rate as the entropy sink and at a lower rate than that implied by Clausius-Clapeyron scaling. This allows the entropy production from frictional drag on hydrometeors and on the atmospheric flow to also increase with warming, in contrast to recent results for simulations with global climate models in which the work output decreases with warming. A set of approximate scaling relations is introduced for the terms in the entropy budget as the surface temperature is varied, and many of the terms are found to scale with the mean surface precipitation rate. The entropy budget provides some insight into changes in frictional dissipation in response to warming or changes in model resolution, but it is argued that frictional dissipation is not closely linked to other measures of convective vigor.

  2. Effect of radiation light characteristics on surface hardness of paint-on resin for shade modification.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation light characteristics--of different types of clinical light-curing unit--on polymerization efficiency, as determined by the surface hardness of light-cured paint-on resins. Four shades of paint-on resin for shade modification of restorative resins were used. Materials were cured using one laboratory and three clinical light-curing units with different light sources, namely tungsten-halogen, LED, plasma arc, and xenon flash lamps. Knoop hardness measurements were taken at both the top and bottom surfaces of the specimens to assess the mechanical properties and degree of polymerization. Both LED and plasma arc light units caused significantly poorer surface hardness than the halogen and laboratory xenon lights. In addition, the transparent shade was more sensitive to surface hardness than other chromatic shades. Our results indicated that the polymerization efficiency of paint-on resin was significantly influenced by the radiation light characteristics of clinical light-curing units.

  3. Seasonal variation of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing over the globe derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Staylor, W. Frank; Darnell, Wayne L.; Wilber, Anne C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Global distributions of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing parameters have been derived using parameterized radiation models with satellite meteorological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, and directly measured top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Specifically, shortwave, longwave, and total cloud forcing at the surface, and column-averaged values of longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere were derived for the midseasonal months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986, covering a complete annual cycle. Seasonal variability is illustrated by comparing the results for July 1985 and January 1986, which represent the seasonal extremes. Surface shortwave cloud forcing is always negative, representing a cooling of the surface, with strongest cooling (-120 to -180 W/sq m) occurring over midlatitude storm tracks of the summer hemisphere. Surface longwave cloud forcing is always positive, representing a warming of the surface, with strongest warming (60 to 75 W/sq m) occurring over storm tracks of the winter hemisphere. Zonal averages show the entire summer hemisphere dominated by shortwave cooling, the middle and high latitudes of the winter hemisphere dominated by longwave warming, and a broad zone of transition in between. The globally averaged total cloud forcing amounts to a cooling throughout the year, ranging from a low of about -12 W/sq m for July 1985 to a high of about -25 W/sq m for January 1986. The longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere shows a strong warming over deep convective regions in the tropics and a moderate cooling outside the tropics, amounting to a weak cooling (-2 to -5 W/sq m) in the global average. Comparisons of the results with general circulation model simulations show broad qualitative agreement regarding the locations of prominent warming and cooling regions. Quantitative comparisons, on the other hand, show significant differences between the

  4. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  5. More Frequent Cloud Free Sky and Less Surface Solar Radiation in China from 1955-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Yun; Kaiser, Dale P.; Leung, L. Ruby; Xu, Ming

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we used newly available data frorn extended weather stations and time period to reveal that much of China has experienced significant decreases in cloud cover over the last half of the Twentieth century. This conclusion is supported by analysis of the more reliably observed frequency of cloud-free sky and overcast sky. We estimated that the total cloud cover and low cloud cover in China have decreased 0.88% and 0.33% per decade, respectively, and cloud-free days have increased 0.60% and overcast days decreased 0.78% per decade from 1954-2001. Meanwhile, both solar radiation and pan evaporation have decreased in China, with'solar radiation decreasing 3.1 w/square m and pan evaporation decreasing 39 mm per decade. Combining these results with findings of previous studies, we speculated that increased air pollution may have produced a fog-like haze that reflected/absorbed radiation from the sun and resulted in less solar radiation reaching the surface, despite concurrent increasing trends in cloud-free sky over China.

  6. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine their durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  7. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, J.A.; Bruckner, E.J.; Rodriguez, E. Cleveland State University, OH )

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine their durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together. 14 refs.

  8. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine there durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  9. Interaction of surface radiation with combined conduction and convection from a discretely heated L-corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaja Rao, C.; Santhosh, D.; Vijay Chandra, P.

    2009-08-01

    Prominent results pertaining to the problem of multi-mode heat transfer from an L-corner equipped with three identical flush-mounted discrete heat sources in its left leg are given here. The heat generated in the heat sources is conducted along the two legs of the device before being dissipated by combined convection and radiation into air that is considered to be the cooling agent. The governing equations for temperature distribution along the L-corner are obtained by making appropriate energy balance between the heat generated, conducted, convected and radiated. The non-linear partial differential equations thus obtained are converted into algebraic form using a finite-difference formulation. The resulting equations are solved simultaneously by Gauss-Seidel iterative solver. A computer code is specifically written to solve the problem. The computational domain is discretised using 101 grids along the left leg, with 15 grids taken per heat source, and 21 grids along the bottom leg. The effects of surface emissivity, convection heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity and aspect ratio on local temperature distribution, peak device temperature and relative contributions of convection and radiation to heat dissipation from the L-corner are studied in detail. The point that one cannot overlook radiation in problems of this class has been clearly elucidated.

  10. Local Adaptive Calibration of the GLASS Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Product Using Smoothing Spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liang, S.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    Incident solar radiation (ISR) over the Earth's surface plays an important role in determining the Earth's climate and environment. Generally, can be obtained from direct measurements, remotely sensed data, or reanalysis and general circulation models (GCMs) data. Each type of product has advantages and limitations: the surface direct measurements provide accurate but sparse spatial coverage, whereas other global products may have large uncertainties. Ground measurements have been normally used for validation and occasionally calibration, but transforming their "true values" spatially to improve the satellite products is still a new and challenging topic. In this study, an improved thin-plate smoothing spline approach is presented to locally "calibrate" the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) ISR product using the reconstructed ISR data from surface meteorological measurements. The influences of surface elevation on ISR estimation was also considered in the proposed method. The point-based surface reconstructed ISR was used as the response variable, and the GLASS ISR product and the surface elevation data at the corresponding locations as explanatory variables to train the thin plate spline model. We evaluated the performance of the approach using the cross-validation method at both daily and monthly time scales over China. We also evaluated estimated ISR based on the thin-plate spline method using independent ground measurements at 10 sites from the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Network (CEON). These validation results indicated that the thin plate smoothing spline method can be effectively used for calibrating satellite derived ISR products using ground measurements to achieve better accuracy.

  11. A comparative scanning electron microscopy study between hand instrument, ultrasonic scaling and erbium doped:Yttirum aluminum garnet laser on root surface: A morphological and thermal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Mitul Kumar; Prakash, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Scaling and root planing is one of the most commonly used procedures for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Removal of calculus using conventional hand instruments is incomplete and rather time consuming. In search of more efficient and less difficult instrumentation, investigators have proposed lasers as an alternative or as adjuncts to scaling and root planing. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of erbium doped: Yttirum aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser scaling and root planing alone or as an adjunct to hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: A total of 75 freshly extracted periodontally involved single rooted teeth were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five treatment groups having 15 teeth each: Hand scaling only, ultrasonic scaling only, Er:YAG laser scaling only, hand scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling and ultrasonic scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling. Specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and photographs were evaluated by three examiners who were blinded to the study. Parameters included were remaining calculus index, loss of tooth substance index, roughness loss of tooth substance index, presence or absence of smear layer, thermal damage and any other morphological damage. Results: Er:YAG laser treated specimens showed similar effectiveness in calculus removal to the other test groups whereas tooth substance loss and tooth surface roughness was more on comparison with other groups. Ultrasonic treated specimens showed better results as compared to other groups with different parameters. However, smear layer presence was seen more with hand and ultrasonic groups. Very few laser treated specimens showed thermal damage and morphological change. Interpretation and Conclusion: In our study, ultrasonic scaling specimen have shown root surface clean and practically unaltered. On the other hand, hand instrument have produced a plane surface, but removed more

  12. Clear-Sky Surface Solar Radiation During South China Sea Monsoon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Po-Hsiung; Chou, Ming-Dah; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Downward solar fluxes measured at Dungsha coral island (20 deg. 42 min. N, 116 deg. 43 min. E) during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (May-June 1998) have been calibrated and compared with radiative transfer calculations for three clear-sky days. Model calculations use water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosound measurements and the aerosol optical thickness derived from sunphotometric radiance measurements at the surface. Results show that the difference between observed and model-calculated downward fluxes is less than 3% of the daily mean. Averaged over the three clear days, the difference reduces to 1%. The downward surface solar flux averaged over the three days is 314 W per square meters from observations and 317 W per square meters from model calculations, This result is consistent with a previous study using TOGA CAORE measurements, which found good agreements between observations and model calculations. This study provides an extra piece of useful information on the modeling of radiative transfer, which fills in the puzzle of the absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere.

  13. Surface Radiation Survey at the Shepley’s Hill Remediation Site, Devens, Massachusettes

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Giles; C. P. Oertel; L. G. Roybal

    2009-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site, near Devens, MA. The technical support included the completion of a radiation survey of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) at Shepley’s Hill, Shepley’s Hill landfill cover, and Red Cove areas. The objective of the radiation survey was to assess the ability of the INL backpack sodium iodide spectroscopy (BaSIS) system to detect elevated levels of NORM that may be associated with radon-222 emanation from near surface and subsurface fractures in the area. It is postulated that these fracture zones provide subsurface conduits for the transport of environmental contaminants. As such, location of these fracture sets will proved EPA Region 1 with the means for completing the development of an accurate site conceptual model. The results of the radiological survey show that some of the radiological anomalies correlate with currently mapped rock outcrops; however, not all of the rock outcrops in the surveyed area have been mapped. As such, it is not conclusive that all of the radiological anomalies correspond with surface rock outcrops. EPA Region 1 intends to perform a more comprehensive correlation of the radiation data collected with the BaSIS system with additional data sets such as detailed bedrock structural mapping, 2-dimensional resistivity profiling, and high-resolution topographic mapping. The results of this effort will be used in consideration of designing a potential follow-on effort for mapping of radon.

  14. NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget: First Results From The Release 4 GEWEX Integrated Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, Paul; Cox, Stephen; Gupta, Shashi; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; zhang, taiping

    2016-04-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The current release 3 (available at gewex-srb.larc.nasa.gov) uses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX product for pixel level radiance and cloud information. This product is subsampled to 30 km. ISCCP is currently recalibrating and recomputing their entire data series, to be released as the H product, at 10km resolution. The ninefold increase in pixel number should help improve the RMS of the existing products and allow for future higher resolution SRB gridded product (e.g. 0.5 degree). In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made. Most notable has been the adaptation of Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) from CERES to improve the initial calculation of shortwave TOA fluxes, from which the surface flux calculations follow. Other key input improvements include a detailed aerosol history using the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC), temperature and moisture profiles from HIRS, and new topography, surface type, and snow/ice. Here we present results for the improved GEWEX Shortwave and Longwave algorithm (GSW and GLW) with new ISCCP data, the various other improved input data sets and the incorporation of many additional internal SRB model improvements. As of the time of abstract submission, results from 2007 have been produced with ISCCP H availability the limiting factor. More SRB data will be produced as ISCCP reprocessing continues. The SRB data produced will be released as part of the Release 4.0 Integrated Product, recognizing the interdependence of the radiative fluxes with other GEWEX products providing estimates of the Earth's global water and energy cycle (I.e., ISCCP, SeaFlux, LandFlux, NVAP, etc.).

  15. Nonlinear Radiative Heat Transfer in Blasius and Sakiadis Flows Over a Curved Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, M.; Abbas, Z.; Sajid, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the heat transfer characteristics for Blasius and Sakiadis flows over a curved surface coiled in a circle of radius R having constant curvature. Effects of thermal radiation are also analyzed for nonlinear Rosseland approximation which is valid for all values of the temperature difference between the fluid and the surface. The considered physical situation is represented by a mathematical model using curvilinear coordinates. Similar solutions of the developed partial differential equations are evaluated numerically using a shooting algorithm. Fluid velocity, skin-friction coefficient, temperature and local Nusselt number are the quantities of interest interpreted for the influence of pertinent parameters. A comparison of the present and the published data for a flat surface validates the obtained numerical solution for the curved geometry.

  16. Temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless steel exposed to curium-242 alpha radiations

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W R; Dillich, S

    1981-01-01

    Implantation of helium in materials exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides such as /sup 242/Cm causes surface blistering at elevated temperatures. The temperature thresholds for such blistering are of practical importance to the selection of suitable container materials for radionuclides, and are of fundamental interest with regard to the mechanisms of helium blistering of materials in radiation environments. The purpose of this investigation was to establish temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless-steel container materials by post-irradiation heating of specimens exposed at room temperature to alpha particles from an external /sup 242/Cm source. These thresholds were compared with (1) the analogous temperature thresholds for surface blistering of materials exposed to external beams of accelerator helium ions, and (2) thresholds for swelling and grain-boundary cracking of materials in which helium is generated internally by (n,..cap alpha..) reactions during reactor exposures.

  17. Radiative transfer in the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. III - Interpretation of lunar photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Narrowband and UBV photoelectric phase curves of the entire lunar disk and surface photometry of some craters have been interpreted using a newly developed generalized radiative transfer theory for planetary regoliths. The data are well fitted by the theory, yielding information on both macroscopic and microscopic lunar properties. Derived values for the integrated disk geometric albedo are considerably higher than quoted previously, because of the present inclusion of an accurately determined opposition effect. The mean surface roughness, defined as the ratio of the height to the radius of a typical irregularity, is found to be 0.9 + or - 0.1, or somewhat less than the mean value of 1.2 obtained for the asteroids. From the phase curves, wavelength-dependent values of the single scattering albedo and the Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry factor for the average surface particle are derived.

  18. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  19. Performance Analysis of Transposition Models Simulating Solar Radiation on Inclined Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-02

    Transposition models have been widely used in the solar energy industry to simulate solar radiation on inclined photovoltaic panels. Following numerous studies comparing the performance of transposition models, this work aims to understand the quantitative uncertainty in state-of-the-art transposition models and the sources leading to the uncertainty. Our results show significant differences between two highly used isotropic transposition models, with one substantially underestimating the diffuse plane-of-array irradiances when diffuse radiation is perfectly isotropic. In the empirical transposition models, the selection of the empirical coefficients and land surface albedo can both result in uncertainty in the output. This study can be used as a guide for the future development of physics-based transposition models and evaluations of system performance.

  20. Diagnosing Model Errors in Simulations of Solar Radiation on Inclined Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-01

    Transposition models have been widely used in the solar energy industry to simulate solar radiation on inclined PV panels. Following numerous studies comparing the performance of transposition models, this paper aims to understand the quantitative uncertainty in the state-of-the-art transposition models and the sources leading to the uncertainty. Our results suggest that an isotropic transposition model developed by Badescu substantially underestimates diffuse plane-of-array (POA) irradiances when diffuse radiation is perfectly isotropic. In the empirical transposition models, the selection of empirical coefficients and land surface albedo can both result in uncertainty in the output. This study can be used as a guide for future development of physics-based transposition models.

  1. Compact Feeding Network for Array Radiations of Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun Jun; Yin, Jia Yuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a splitter feeding network for array radiations of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are guided by ultrathin corrugated metallic strips. Based on the coupled mode theory, SPP fields along a single waveguide in a certain frequency range can be readily coupled into two adjacent branch waveguides with the same propagation constants. We propose to load U-shaped particles anti-symmetrically at the ends of such two branch waveguides, showing a high integration degree of the feeding network. By controlling linear phase modulations produced by the U-shaped particle chain, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the SPP fields based on bound modes can be efficiently radiated to far fields in broadside direction. The proposed method shows that the symmetry of electromagnetic field modes can be exploited to the SPP transmission network, providing potential solutions to compact power dividers and combiners for microwave and optical devices and systems. PMID:26948142

  2. Diagnosing Model Errors in Simulation of Solar Radiation on Inclined Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-11-21

    Transposition models have been widely used in the solar energy industry to simulate solar radiation on inclined PV panels. Following numerous studies comparing the performance of transposition models, this paper aims to understand the quantitative uncertainty in the state-of-the-art transposition models and the sources leading to the uncertainty. Our results show significant differences between two highly used isotropic transposition models with one substantially underestimating the diffuse plane-of-array (POA) irradiances when diffuse radiation is perfectly isotropic. In the empirical transposition models, the selection of empirical coefficients and land surface albedo can both result in uncertainty in the output. This study can be used as a guide for future development of physics-based transposition models.

  3. Shortwave surface radiation budget network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, B. L.; Kalisch, J.; Macke, A.

    2015-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high spatial density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km x 12 km area) from April to July 2013, to capture the variability in the radiation field at the surface induced by small-scale cloud inhomogeneity. Each of these autonomously operated pyranometer stations was equipped with weather sensors for simultaneous measurements of ambient air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network and the data analysis with initial quality screening procedure we adopted. We also present some exemplary cases consisting of the days with clear, broken cloudy and overcast skies to assess our spatio-temporal observations from the network, and validate their consistency with other collocated radiation measurements available during the HOPE period.

  4. Shortwave surface radiation network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Kalisch, John; Macke, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high-density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km × 12 km area) from April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability of cloud-induced radiation fields at the surface. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network, data processing, quality control, and uncertainty assessment under variable conditions. Some exemplary days with clear, broken cloudy, and overcast skies were explored to assess the spatiotemporal observations from the network along with other collocated radiation and sky imager measurements available during the HOPE period.

  5. Final report. [Impact of tropospheric aerosols on the past surface radiation income: Calibration with ARM site data

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, George

    2001-03-15

    This work involved a comparison of surface solar radiation observations from the SOCMET-DATA BASE from 1960-1990 and results from a General Circulation Model to test and evaluate the effects of tropospheric aerosols on clouds.

  6. The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget: Next Generation Data Product With Reprocessed ISCCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Gupta, S. K.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Temporal resolutions are 3-hourly, 3-hourly-monthly, daily, and monthly. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The current release 3.0 (available at gewex-srb.larc.nasa.gov) uses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX product for pixel level radiance and cloud information. This product is subsampled to 30 km, resulting in pixel counts of ~10 per grid box. ISCCP is currently recalibrating and recomputing their entire data series, to be released as the HX product, at 10km resolution. The large increase in pixel number will allow SRB greater flexibility in its own spatial resolution, allowing a higher resolution gridded product (e.g. 0.5 degree), as well as the production of pixel-level fluxes. Additionally, the SRB team is collaborating with other global GEWEX energy flux teams to improve key inputs such as the inclusion of an aerosol history, meteorological, and ozone data sets. For instance, the aerosol history will be specified from the first version of the Max-Planck-Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC) containing a climatological coarse mode and an emission based fine mode history. Here we present our first look at results for the improved GEWEX Shortwave and Longwave algorithm (GSW and GLW) with new ISCCP data, the various other improved input data sets and the incorporation of many additional internal SRB model improvements. Improvements in GSW include the incorporation of variable composition aerosol from the MAC data set, an expansion of the number of wavelength bands is expanded from five to eighteen, and the inclusion of ice cloud vs. water cloud radiative transfer. The GLW improvements include the MAC aerosol vertical profiles, meteorology from HIRS, diurnally varying sea surface and land surface temperatures, and new topography, surface type, and snow/ice fields. The

  7. Operational surface UV radiation product from GOME-2 and AVHRR/3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpää, J.; Kalakoski, N.

    2015-05-01

    The surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation product, version 1.20, generated operationally in the framework of the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is described. The product is based on the total ozone column derived from the measurements of the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument aboard EUMETSAT's polar orbiting meteorological operational (Metop) satellites. The input total ozone product is generated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) also within the O3M SAF framework. Polar orbiting satellites provide global coverage but infrequent sampling of the diurnal cloud cover. The diurnal variation of the surface UV radiation is extremely strong due to modulation by solar elevation and rapidly changing cloud cover. At the minimum, one sample of the cloud cover in the morning and another in the afternoon are needed to derive daily maximum and daily integrated surface UV radiation quantities. This is achieved by retrieving cloud optical depth from the channel 1 reflectance of the third Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/3) instrument aboard both Metop in the morning orbit (daytime descending node around 09:30 LT) and Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the afternoon orbit (daytime ascending node around 14:30 LT). In addition, more overpasses are used at high latitudes where the swaths of consecutive orbits overlap. The input satellite data are received from EUMETSAT's Multicast Distribution System (EUMETCast) using commercial telecommunication satellites for broadcasting the data to the user community. The surface UV product includes daily maximum dose rates and integrated daily doses with different biological weighting functions, integrated UVB and UVA radiation, solar noon UV Index and daily maximum photolysis

  8. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  9. Ion radiation albedo effect: influence of surface roughness on ion implantation and sputtering of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yonggang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Zejun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2017-01-01

    In fusion devices, ion retention and sputtering of materials are major concerns in the selection of compatible plasma-facing materials (PFMs), especially in the context of their microstructural conditions and surface morphologies. We demonstrate how surface roughness changes ion implantation and sputtering of materials under energetic ion irradiation. Using a new, sophisticated 3D Monte Carlo (MC) code, IM3D, and a random rough surface model, ion implantation and the sputtering yields of tungsten (W) with a surface roughness varying between 0-2 µm have been studied for irradiation by 0.1-1 keV D+, He+ and Ar+ ions. It is found that both ion backscattering and sputtering yields decrease with increasing roughness; this is hereafter called the ion radiation albedo effect. This effect is mainly dominated by the direct, line-of-sight deposition of a fraction of emitted atoms onto neighboring asperities. Backscattering and sputtering increase with more oblique irradiation angles. We propose a simple analytical formula to relate rough-surface and smooth-surface results.

  10. Surface modification of polymers for biocompatibility via exposure to extreme ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Inam Ul Ahad; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Korczyc, Barbara; Ciach, Tomasz; Brabazon, Dermot

    2014-09-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are being widely used for the treatment of various traumata, diseases and defects in human beings due to ease in their synthesis. As biomaterials have direct interaction with the extracellular environment in the biological world, biocompatibility is a topic of great significance. The introduction or enhancement of biocompatibility in certain polymers is still a challenge to overcome. Polymer biocompatibility can be controlled by surface modification. Various physical and chemical methods (e.g., chemical and plasma treatment, ion implantation, and ultraviolet irradiation etc.) are in use or being developed for the modification of polymer surfaces. However an important limitation in their employment is the alteration of bulk material. Different surface and bulk properties of biomaterials are often desirable for biomedical applications. Because extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation penetration is quite limited even in low density mediums, it could be possible to use it for surface modification without influencing the bulk material. This article reviews the degree of biocompatibility of different polymeric biomaterials being currently employed in various biomedical applications, the surface properties required to be modified for biocompatibility control, plasma and laser ablation based surface modification techniques, and research studies indicating possible use of EUV for enhancing biocompatibility.

  11. Trends in surface solar radiation in Spain since the 1980s: the role of the changes in the radiative effects of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Mateos, David; Wild, Martin; Calbó, Josep; Antón, Manuel; Enriquez-Alonso, Aaron; Sanchez-Romero, Alex

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of decadal variations in surface solar radiation, although the analyses of long-term time series in some areas with major gaps in observations, such as in Spain, are still pending. In the first part of this work, a previously published surface solar radiation dataset in Spain is described (for more details, see Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013) based on the longest series with ground-based records of global and diffuse solar radiation, most of them starting in the early 1980s and ending in 2012. Particular emphasis is placed upon the homogenization of this dataset in order to ensure the reliability of the trends. The linear trend in the mean annual series of global solar radiation shows a significant increase since 1981 of 4.0 Wm-2 (or 2.4 %) per decade. These results are in line with the increase of global solar radiation (i.e. brightening period) reported at many worldwide observation sites (Wild, 2009). In addition, the annual mean diffuse solar radiation series shows a significant decrease during the last three decades, but it is disturbed by strong increases in 1983 and 1991-1992, which might reflect the effects of the El Chichón and Pinatubo volcanic eruptions as a result of enhanced scattering of the aerosols emitted during these large volcanic eruptions. As clouds and aerosols are the main sources of uncertainty in the determination of the energy balance of the Earth, there is a growing interest in the evaluation of their radiative effects and their impact on the decadal variability of the surface solar radiation. Hence, in the second part of this work, the changes of the combined radiative effects of clouds and aerosols in Spain since the 1980s are investigated (for more details, see Mateos et al., 2013). In particular, the global solar radiation data above mentioned and radiative transfer simulations fed with reanalysis data of ozone, water vapour and surface albedo, are used to evaluate the cloud and aerosol

  12. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  13. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, J.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Ferrier, B.; Johnson, D.; Khain, A.; Lang, S.; Lynn, B.

    2001-01-01

    The response of cloud systems to their environment is an important link in a chain of processes responsible for monsoons, frontal depression, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes and other climate variations (e.g., 30-60 day intra-seasonal oscillations). Numerical models of cloud properties provide essential insights into the interactions of clouds with each other, with their surroundings, and with land and ocean surfaces. Significant advances are currently being made in the modeling of rainfall and rain-related cloud processes, ranging in scales from the very small up to the simulation of an extensive population of raining cumulus clouds in a tropical- or midlatitude-storm environment. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a multi-dimensional nonhydrostatic dynamic/microphysical cloud resolving model. It has been used to simulate many different mesoscale convective systems that occurred in various geographic locations. In this paper, recent GCE model improvements (microphysics, radiation and surface processes) will be described as well as their impact on the development of precipitation events from various geographic locations. The performance of these new physical processes will be examined by comparing the model results with observations. In addition, the explicit interactive processes between cloud, radiation and surface processes will be discussed.

  14. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  15. Surface energy balance, clouds and radiation over Antarctic sea ice during Austral spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancoppenolle, M.; Ackley, S. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Tison, J.-L.

    2009-04-01

    In Sept-Oct 2007, a sea ice drift station, Ice Station Belgica, was established in the Bellingshausen Sea. Over twenty-seven days, measurements of meteorological variables, radiation and surface albedo were performed by combining ship-based and in situ data, in order to assess the surface energy balance. Visual observations of the state of the sky (clear or overcast) were also done. The sampled floe was characterized by thin (0.6m) and medium thick (1.1m) first-year ice and older, second-year ice of greater than 2m mean thickness. Snow cover depth varied from zero cm over the new ice to > 0.8m on the second year ice. The weather at Ice Station Belgica was characterized by typical spring conditions. Synoptic variability was mostly driven by the wind direction, which determines the origin - continental or oceanic - of the air masses. Under northerly winds, warm (from -5 to 0 °C) and wet (relative humidity from 90 to 100%) oceanic air was advected on the floe. Under southerlies, cold (from -20 to -10°C) and dry (70-85 %) continental air was brought on site. In turn, this also determined the state of the sky, with clear (overcast) skies mostly associated to continental (oceanic) weather. The incoming solar radiation was on average 124 W/m², with a trend of 3.5 W/m² over the ice station, while the incoming longwave radiation was on average 227 W/m², with no trend. As expected, the incoming solar radiation shows a marked diurnal cycle, while LW does not. The day-to-day variability in radiation is largely determined by changes in the state of the sky. Broadband surface albedo was measured in situ, using a bidirectional pyranometer, on two sites respectively covered by thin (10-15 cm) and deep (30-40 cm) snow. Both sites were visited every 5 days and albedo was measured on 6 points, spaced by 5 m on an 25-m long "albedo" line. Snow depth was also monitored every meter along the albedo line. The mean albedo is 0.83 ± 0.05. Variations around this mean value are

  16. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  17. Evaluating radiative transfer schemes treatment of vegetation canopy architecture in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghiere, Renato; Quaife, Tristan; Black, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Incoming shortwave radiation is the primary source of energy driving the majority of the Earth's climate system. The partitioning of shortwave radiation by vegetation into absorbed, reflected, and transmitted terms is important for most of biogeophysical processes, including leaf temperature changes and photosynthesis, and it is currently calculated by most of land surface schemes (LSS) of climate and/or numerical weather prediction models. The most commonly used radiative transfer scheme in LSS is the two-stream approximation, however it does not explicitly account for vegetation architectural effects on shortwave radiation partitioning. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) canopy radiative transfer schemes have been developed, but they are too computationally expensive to address large-scale related studies over long time periods. Using a straightforward one-dimensional (1D) parameterisation proposed by Pinty et al. (2006), we modified a two-stream radiative transfer scheme by including a simple function of Sun zenith angle, so-called "structure factor", which does not require an explicit description and understanding of the complex phenomena arising from the presence of vegetation heterogeneous architecture, and it guarantees accurate simulations of the radiative balance consistently with 3D representations. In order to evaluate the ability of the proposed parameterisation in accurately represent the radiative balance of more complex 3D schemes, a comparison between the modified two-stream approximation with the "structure factor" parameterisation and state-of-art 3D radiative transfer schemes was conducted, following a set of virtual scenarios described in the RAMI4PILPS experiment. These experiments have been evaluating the radiative balance of several models under perfectly controlled conditions in order to eliminate uncertainties arising from an incomplete or erroneous knowledge of the structural, spectral and illumination related canopy characteristics typical

  18. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  19. fs Laser surface nano-structuring of high refractory ceramics to enhance solar radiation absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    High refractory pressure-less sintered ternary composite ceramics of AlN-SiC-MoSi2 (ASMY), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness R a ~40 nm, have been treated in vacuum by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration, and increasing fluence, to generate a "black ceramic material", able to minimize solar radiation reflectance, in such a way that they could be used as the absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. Disk specimens of approximately 3 cm in diameter and 3 mm thick have been treated by normal incident laser beam, generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines, at a lateral distance of about 80 μm, using a stage in motion, in the x, y, z directions, driven by a computer. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition and lateral distance of steps) have been optimized to maximize the absorption properties of the patterned surface. In some samples this value was increased by about 15 %, compared to untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95 %, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to NIR). The morphological and chemical effects have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At higher fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and corresponding local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (over the ablation threshold) an ordered periodic nano-structure has been obtained, exploitable for its high capacity of entrapment of visible light. The laser treated ceramic specimen, characterized by very high absorption properties and reflectivity values lower than 4 %, has been used as active absorber material in a conversion module, installed in a solar test platform.

  20. Effects of variability in land surface characteristics on the summer radiation budget across desert-oasis region in Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Zhao, Wenzhi

    2015-02-01

    The oasis area in the middle reaches of the Heihe River has changed since a water diversion scheme was implemented in 2000. The resultant variation land surface characteristics affects radiation budget during the oasisification process. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation in radiation budget within land surfaces during the oasisification process, through spatial instead of time-successional sequence method. Radiant data in the oasis fringe (maize field) and the desert-oasis ecotone was observed during the summer of 2009. The results showed that solar radiation (SR) in the oasis fringe was identical to that of the desert-oasis ecotone on selected clear, cloudy, and rainy days. Surface reflective radiation (SRR) and surface effective radiation (SER) both decreased from clear day to cloudy day and were lowest on the rainy day. The diurnal variation in radiation budget for cloudy and rainy days did not follow the same cycle as on clear day. The albedo values in the oasis fringe and the desert-oasis ecotone were 0.18 and 0.26, respectively. The diurnal variation in albedo tended toward a "U-shaped" curve on clear day. When the solar elevation angle was greater than 40°; the albedo was symmetrical in the a.m. and p.m. time frames. The radiation budget changed within land surfaces during the oasisification process. In summer, the albedo decreased, as did SER, with the transition from desert to oasis interior; whereas the surface-absorbed radiation (SAR) and net radiation (NR) both increased. More than half of the absorbed net energy in the desert was released in longwave form. The absorbed energy in the oasis was conserved to ensure stable light and heat resources utilization for agricultural production.

  1. Lunar dusty plasma: A result of interaction of the solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, E. A.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Popel, S. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main problems of future missions to the Moon is associated with lunar dust. Solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation interact with the lunar surface. As a result, there is a substantial surface change and a near-surface plasma sheath. Dust particles from the lunar regolith, which turned in this plasma because of any mechanical processes, can levitate above the surface, forming dust clouds. In preparing of the space experiments “Luna-Glob” and “Luna-Resource” particle-in-cell calculations of the near-surface plasma sheath parameters are carried out. Here we present some new results of particle-in-cell simulation of the plasma sheath formed near the surface of the moon as a result of interaction of the solar wind and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface. The conditions of charging and stable levitation of dust particles in plasma above the lunar surface are also considered.

  2. Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lianhong; Meyers, Tilden; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hanson, Paul J.; Yang, Bai; Heuer, Mark; Hosman, Kevin P.; Liu, Qing; Riggs, Jeffery S.; Sluss, Dan; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2007-01-01

    The interest of this study was to develop an initial assessment on the potential importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions, an issue that has been largely neglected so far. We conducted flux tower observations and model simulations at a temperate deciduous forest site in central Missouri in the summer of 2004. The model used was the comprehensive terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes and Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without the representation of biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the biomass energy storages calculated by FAPIS. Finally, the effects of biomass energy storages on land-atmosphere exchanges of sensible and latent heat fluxes and variations of land surface radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without these storage terms. We found that with the representation of the two biomass energy storage terms, FAPIS predictions agreed with flux tower measurements fairly well; without the representation, however, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all predicted surface energy flux terms although the effect on the predicted CO2 flux was minimal. In addition, we found that the biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 W m-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, FAPIS simulations without the energy storages produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with simulations with the energy storages. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the

  3. A parameterization for longwave surface radiation from sun-synchronous satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.

    1989-01-01

    A parameterization is presented for computing downward, upward, and net longwave radiation at the earth's surface using data from NOAA sun-synchronous satellites. The parameterization is applied to satellite soundings for April, 1982 over a large region of the tropical Pacific Ocean. Sensitivity studies were used to estimate the random and systematic errors in computed fluxes due to probable errors in TOVS-derived parameters. It is suggested that large biases in the results due to errors in TOVS-derived parameters may be corrected with data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project.

  4. About mechanisms of radiation-induced effect of nanostructurization of near-surface volumes of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms of the radiation-induced development of nanostructures in subsurface metal regions have been analyzed based on field-ion microscopy data. It is concluded that the modification of near-surface metal regions on a nanometer scale as a result of the interaction with Ar+ ion beams proceeds by several mechanisms. In particular, for a fluence of F = 1016 ion/cm2 (at an ion energy of E = 30 keV), the main contribution is due to the ion channeling. A tenfold increase in the ion fluence leads to prevailing deformation mechanism in nanostructure formation in the subsurface metal regions.

  5. Photosynthetically available radiation on surface of the Black Sea based on ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslin, V. V.; Korolev, S. N.; Kucheryaviy, A. A.; Churilova, T. Ya.; Krivenko, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Long term (1996 - 2014) averaged annual dynamics of daily photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) incident on the surface of the Black Sea have been estimated for different degree of sky coverage by the cloudiness. To this aim PAR standard product of color scanners (OCTS, SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua/Terra) has been processed. The processing method was based on the assumption that temporal PAR dynamics over one day corresponded to PAR spatial variability in the Black Sea area scanned by satellite instruments during one overpass. PAR data could be applied for different researches of the Black Sea ecosystem, which is related to photo-physiological processes.

  6. Effects of high energy simulated space radiation on polymeric second-surface mirrors. [thermal control coatings - performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A radiation effects experimental program was performed, in which second surface mirror type thermal control coatings were exposed to ultraviolet radiation, electrons, and protons simultaneously. Stability was assessed by making periodic spectral reflectance measurements in situ (and in air after testing for comparison). Solar absorption coefficients were derived by computer. Many of the exposed materials showed large amounts of degradation in reflectance absorptance, principally due to the electron exposure. A series of tests was conducted, leading to the identification of a modified second surface mirror that shows considerable improvement and promise for stability during thermal control applications in a charged particle space radiation environment.

  7. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. Cao, L. H.; He, X. T.; Wu, Dong; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-11-02

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation.

  8. Surface radiation during the total solar eclipse over Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, on 20 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Marion; Ritter, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    On 20 March 2015, a total solar eclipse occurred over Ny-Ålesund (78.9° N, 11.9° E), Svalbard, in the high Arctic. It was the first time that the surface radiation components during the totality of a solar eclipse were measured by a Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station. With the Ny-Ålesund long-term radiation data set as background (available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.150000), we present here the peculiarities of the radiation components and basic meteorology observed during the eclipse event. The supplementary data set contains the basic BSRN radiation and surface meteorological data in 1 min resolution for March 2015, and is available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.854326. The eclipse radiation data will be a useful auxiliary data set for further studies on micrometeorological surface-atmosphere exchange processes in the Svalbard environment, and may serve as a test case for radiative transfer studies.

  9. The Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface-Atmosphere System: Interfacing Measurements and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Nemesure, Seth; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; DeLuisi, John J.; Potter, Gerald L.; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques

    1993-01-01

    Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two measurements of net downward shortwave radiation: one of near-surface measurements made at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower, and the other of collocated top-of-the-atmosphere measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Output from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts General Circulation Model also has been used as an aid in interpreting the data, while the data have in turn been employed to validate the model's shortwave radiation code as it pertains to cloud radiation properties. Combined, the datasets and model demonstrate a strategy for determining under what conditions the shortwave radiative impact of clouds leads to a heating or cooling of the atmospheric column. The datasets also show, in terms of a linear slope-offset algorithm for retrieving the net downward shortwave radiation at the surface from satellite measurements, that the clouds present during this study produced a modest negative bias in the retrieved surface flux relative to that inferred from a clear-sky algorithm.

  10. The impact of clouds on the shortwave radiation budget of the surface-atmosphere system - Interfacing measurements and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Nemesure, Seth; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Deluisi, John J.; Potter, Gerald L.; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques

    1993-01-01

    Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two measurements of net downward shortwave radiation: one of near-surface measurements made at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower, and the other of collocated top-of-the-atmosphere measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Output from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts General Circulation Model also has been used as an aid in interpreting the data, while the data have in turn been employed to validate the model's shortwave radiation code as it pertains to cloud radiation properties. Combined, the datasets and model demonstrate a strategy for determining under what conditions the shortwave radiative impact of clouds leads to a heating or cooling of the atmospheric column. The datasets also show, in terms of a linear slope-offset algorithm for retrieving the net downward shortwave radiation at the surface from satellite measurements, that the clouds present during this study produced a modest negative bias in the retrieved surface flux relative to that inferred from a clear-sky algorithm.

  11. Nonlinear Wave Radiation and Diffraction by a Near-Surface Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, P.

    1997-11-01

    Physics of surface-wave and rigid-body interactions is of importance in naval architecture, in that a good understanding of wave-body interactions is necessary for the design of hulls with minimum ship-motion and resistance characteristics. Particular topics of contemporary research such as generation of spray and breaking waves by a surface ship and control of ship motion in high seas are however highly nonlinear, rendering analysis a challenging task. Using a robust numerical algorithm developed for analyzing fully nonlinear free-surface flow in a viscous fluid (see P. Ananthakrishnan, Three-dimensional wave-body interactions in a viscous fluid, Proc. of ISOPE'97 Conference, Hawaii), we have investigated diffraction and radiation of waves by floating and submerged rigid bodies. In the numerical model, the Navier-Stokes equations subject to exact free-surface and body boundary conditions are solved in primitive variables using a fractional-step finite-difference method which is implemented using curvilinear coordinates. Approximate conditions are however used to model the open boundary and the movement of the contact line. Results presented shed light to a better understanding of generation and ensuing spatial-temporal evolution of vortices under the influence of a free surface, vortical and potential components of hydrodynamics forces, symmetry-breaking in the case of large-amplitude oscillations, generation and damping of super-harmonic waves, and parameter ranges in which effect of viscosity is significant.

  12. Distributed approximation of Pareto surfaces in multicriteria radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2013-06-01

    We consider multicriteria radiation therapy treatment planning by navigation over the Pareto surface, implemented by interpolation between discrete treatment plans. Current state of the art for calculation of a discrete representation of the Pareto surface is to sandwich this set between inner and outer approximations that are updated one point at a time. In this paper, we generalize this sequential method to an algorithm that permits parallelization. The principle of the generalization is to apply the sequential method to an approximation of an inexpensive model of the Pareto surface. The information gathered from the model is sub-sequently used for the calculation of points from the exact Pareto surface, which are processed in parallel. The model is constructed according to the current inner and outer approximations, and given a shape that is difficult to approximate, in order to avoid that parts of the Pareto surface are incorrectly disregarded. Approximations of comparable quality to those generated by the sequential method are demonstrated when the degree of parallelization is up to twice the number of dimensions of the objective space. For practical applications, the number of dimensions is typically at least five, so that a speed-up of one order of magnitude is obtained.

  13. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  14. Effect of localized surface-plasmon mode on exciton transport and radiation emission in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Roslyak, Oleksiy; Cherqui, Charles; Dunlap, David H; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2014-07-17

    We report on a general theoretical approach to study exciton transport and emission in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) in the presence of a localized surface-plasmon (SP) mode within a metal nanoparticle interacting via near-field coupling. We derive a set of quantum mechanical equations of motion and approximate rate equations that account for the exciton, SP, and the environmental degrees of freedom. The material equations are complemented by an expression for the radiated power that depends on the exciton and SP populations and coherences, allowing for an examination of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation that would be measured in experiment. Numerical simulations for a (6,5) SWNT and cone-shaped Ag metal tip (MT) have been performed using this methodology. Comparison with physical parameters shows that the near-field interaction between the exciton-SP occurs in a weak coupling regime, with the diffusion processes being much faster than the exciton-SP population exchange. In such a case, the effect of the exciton population transfer to the MT with its subsequent dissipation (i.e., the Förster energy transfer) is to modify the exciton steady state distribution while reducing the equilibration time for excitons to reach a steady sate distribution. We find that the radiation distribution is dominated by SP emission for a SWNT-MT separation of a few tens of nanometers due to the fast SP emission rate, whereas the exciton-SP coherences can cause its rotation.

  15. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne; Clowdsley, Martha; Qualls, Garry; Blattnig, Steve; Lee, Kerry; Fry, Dan; Stoffle, Nicholas; Simonsen, Lisa; Slaba, Tony; Walker, Steven; Zapp, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large Solar Particle Event (SPE). Longer duration missions have both SPE and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) risks. SPE exposure can contribute significantly toward cancer induction in combination with GCR. As mission duration increases, mitigation strategies must address the combined risks from SPE and GCR exposure. In this paper, full mission exposure assessments were performed for the proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, previously developed radiation shielding models for a proposed lunar habitat and rover were utilized. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for the proposed timelines. Mission exposure results, assessed in terms of effective dose, are presented for the proposed timelines and recommendations are made for improved astronaut shielding and safer operational practices.

  16. Radiative heat pumping from the Earth using surface phonon resonant nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gentle, A R; Smith, G B

    2010-02-10

    Nanoparticles that have narrow absorption bands that lie entirely within the atmosphere's transparent window from 7.9 to 13 mum can be used to radiatively cool to temperatures that are well below ambient. Heating from incoming atmospheric radiation in the remainder of the Planck radiation spectrum, where the atmosphere is nearly "black", is reduced if the particles are dopants in infrared transmitting polymers, or in transmitting coatings on low emittance substrates. Crystalline SiC nanoparticles stand out with a surface phonon resonance from 10.5 to 13 mum clear of the atmospheric ozone band. Resonant SiO(2) nanoparticles are complementary, absorbing from 8 to 10 mum, which includes atmospheric ozone emissions. Their spectral location has made SiC nanoparticles in space dust a feature in ground-based IR astronomy. Optical properties are presented and subambient cooling performance analyzed for doped polyethylene on aluminum. A mixture of SiC and SiO(2) nanoparticles yields high performance cooling at low cost within a practical cooling rig.

  17. Cherenkov radiation in a surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide (SWABSiC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhong; Lai, Kueifu; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-03-01

    We report on theoretical investigations of Cherenkov-type emission of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) by relativistic electron bunches. The polaritons are confined by a planar waveguide comprised of two SiC slabs separated by a vacuum gap. The SPhPs are generated in the reststrahlen band, where the dielectric permittivity of SiC is negative. Two surface modes are analyzed: the accelerating (symmetric) and the deflecting (anti-symmetric) wakes. Both form Cherenkov cones that exhibit rapid spatial oscillations and beats behind the moving charge. Moreover, the accelerating mode forms a reversed Cherenkov radiation cone due the negative group velocity for sufficiently small gaps. The wakefield acceleration of electron bunches inside the structure is also discussed, as well as our recent experimental progress in propagating the electron beam through the structure at the Advanced Test Facility (ATF) that resulted in > 12% beam transmission.

  18. Surface plasmon-polariton resonance at diffraction of THz radiation on semiconductor gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spevak, I. S.; Kuzmenko, A. A.; Tymchenko, M.; Gavrikov, V. K.; Shulga, V. M.; Feng, J.; Sun, H. B.; Kamenev, Yu. E.; Kats, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Resonance diffraction of THz hidrogen cyanide laser radiation on a semiconductor (InSb) grating is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The specular reflectivity suppression due to the resonance excitation of the THz surface plasmon-polariton is observed on a pure semiconductor grating and on semiconductor gratings covered with a thin dielectric layer. The dielectric coating of the grating results in the resonance shift and widening depending both on the layer thickness and dielectric properties. A simple analytical theory of the resonance diffraction on rather shallow gratings covered with a dielectric layer is presented, and the results are in a good accordance with the experimental data. Analytical expressions for the resonance shift and broadening are essential for the resonance properties understanding and useful for sensing data interpretation of the agents deposited on the grating surface.

  19. Longwave surface radiation over the globe from satellite data - An error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Wilber, A. C.; Darnell, W. L.; Suttles, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Errors have been analyzed for monthly-average downward and net longwave surface fluxes derived on a 5-deg equal-area grid over the globe, using a satellite technique. Meteorological data used in this technique are available from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) system flown aboard NOAA's operational sun-synchronous satellites. The data used are for February 1982 from NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 satellites. The errors in the parametrized equations were estimated by comparing their results with those from a detailed radiative transfer model. The errors in the TOVS-derived surface temperature, water vapor burden, and cloud cover were estimated by comparing these meteorological parameters with independent measurements obtained from other satellite sources. Analysis of the overall errors shows that the present technique could lead to underestimation of downward fluxes by 5 to 15 W/sq m and net fluxes by 4 to 12 W/sq m.

  20. A Sea-Surface Radiation Data Set for Climate Applications in the Tropical Western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The sea-surface shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes have been retrieved from the radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The surface radiation data set covers the domain 40S-40N and 90E-170W. The temporal resolution is 1 day, and the spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface radiation have been validated with the radiometric measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measuring (ARM) site on Manus island in the equatorial western Pacific for a period of 15 months. It has also been validated with the measurements at the radiation site on Dungsha island in the South China Sea during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) Intensive Observing Period (May and June 1998). The data set is used to study the effect of El Nino and East Asian Summer monsoon on the heating of the ocean in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. Interannual variations of clouds associated with El Nino and the East Asian Summer monsoon have a large impact on the radiative heating of the ocean. It has been found that the magnitude of the interannual variation of the seasonal mean surface radiative heating exceeds 40 W/sq m over large areas. Together with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) shortwave fluxes at top of the atmosphere and the radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky fluxes, this surface radiation data set is also used to study the impact of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere. It is found that clouds enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approx. 20 W/sq m in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. This result is important for evaluating the accuracy of solar flux calculations in clear and cloudy atmospheres.

  1. Leaf surface wax is a source of plant methane formation under UV radiation and in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, D; Mikkelsen, T N; Rolsted, M M M; Egsgaard, H; Ambus, P

    2014-03-01

    The terrestrial vegetation is a source of UV radiation-induced aerobic methane (CH4 ) release to the atmosphere. Hitherto pectin, a plant structural component, has been considered as the most likely precursor for this CH4 release. However, most of the leaf pectin is situated below the surface wax layer, and UV transmittance of the cuticle differs among plant species. In some species, the cuticle effectively absorbs and/or reflects UV radiation. Thus, pectin may not necessarily contribute substantially to the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission measured at surface level in all species. Here, we investigated the potential of the leaf surface wax itself as a source of UV radiation-induced leaf aerobic CH4 formation. Isolated leaf surface wax emitted CH4 at substantial rates in response to UV radiation. This discovery has implications for how the phenomenon should be scaled to global levels. In relation to this, we demonstrated that the UV radiation-induced CH4 emission is independent of leaf area index above unity. Further, we observed that the presence of O2 in the atmosphere was necessary for achieving the highest rates of CH4 emission. Methane formation from leaf surface wax is supposedly a two-step process initiated by a photolytic rearrangement reaction of the major component followed by an α-cleavage of the generated ketone.

  2. A Global Model Simulation of Aerosol Effects of Surface Radiation Budget- Toward Understanding of the "Dimming to Brightening" Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study on the role aerosols play in the change of solar radiation at Earth's surface that transitioned from a decreasing (dimming) trend to an increasing (brightening) trend. Our primary objective is to understand the relationship between the long-term trends of aerosol emission, atmospheric burden, and surface solar radiation. More specifically, we use the recently compiled comprehensive global emission datasets of aerosols and precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions and other sources from 1980 to 2006 to simulate long-term variations of aerosol distributions and optical properties, and then calculate the multi-decadal changes of short-wave radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere by coupling the GOCART model simulated aerosols with the Goddard radiative transfer model. The model results are compared with long-term observational records from ground-based networks and satellite data. We will address the following critical questions: To what extent can the observed surface solar radiation trends, known as the transition from dimming to brightening, be explained by the changes of anthropogenic and natural aerosol loading on global and regional scales? What are the relative contributions of local emission and long-range transport to the surface radiation budget and how do these contributions change with time?

  3. Changes in biologically-active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M

    2007-03-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working. Concentrations of major ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere are now decreasing, and the decline in total column amounts seen in the 1980s and 1990s at mid-latitudes has not continued. In polar regions, there is much greater natural variability. Each spring, large ozone holes continue to occur in Antarctica and less severe regions of depleted ozone continue to occur in the Arctic. There is evidence that some of these changes are driven by changes in atmospheric circulation rather than being solely attributable to reductions in ozone-depleting substances, which may indicate a linkage to climate change. Global ozone is still lower than in the 1970s and a return to that state is not expected for several decades. As changes in ozone impinge directly on UV radiation, elevated UV radiation due to reduced ozone is expected to continue over that period. Long-term changes in UV-B due to ozone depletion are difficult to verify through direct measurement, but there is strong evidence that UV-B irradiance increased over the period of ozone depletion. At unpolluted sites in the southern hemisphere, there is some evidence that UV-B irradiance has diminished since the late 1990s. The availability and temporal extent of UV data have improved, and we are now able to evaluate the changes in recent times compared with those estimated since the late 1920s, when ozone measurements first became available. The increases in UV-B irradiance over the latter part of the 20th century have been larger than the natural variability. There is increased evidence that aerosols have a larger effect on surface UV-B radiation than previously thought. At some sites in the Northern Hemisphere, UV-B irradiance may continue to increase because of continuing reductions in aerosol extinctions since the 1990s. Interactions between ozone depletion and climate change are complex and can be mediated through changes in chemistry, radiation, and atmospheric circulation

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Collective migration of adsorbed atoms on a solid surface in the laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Ignat'ev, D. V.; Telegin, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    The lateral (in the substrate plane) interaction between dipoles induced in particles adsorbed on a solid surface is studied in a comparatively weak laser radiation field with a Gaussian transverse distribution. It is shown that the particles migrate over the surface in the radial direction either outside an illuminated spot with the formation of a 'crater' or inside the spot with the formation of a 'mound'.

  5. Calculated activity of Mn2+ at the outer surface of the root cell plasma membrane governs Mn nutrition of cowpea seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kopittke, Peter M.; Blamey, F. Pax C.; Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth but is often toxic in acid or waterlogged soils. Using cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) grown with 0.05–1500 μM Mn in solution, two short-term (48 h) solution culture experiments examined if the effects of cations (Ca, Mg, Na, Al, or H) on Mn nutrition are related to the root cells’ plasma membrane (PM) surface potential, ψ00. When grown in solutions containing levels of Mn that were toxic, both relative root elongation rate (RRER) and root tissue Mn concentration were more closely related to the activity of Mn2+ at the outer surface of the PM, {Mn2+}00 (R2=0.812 and 0.871) than to its activity in the bulk solution, {Mn2+}b (R2=0.673 and 0.769). This was also evident at lower levels of Mn (0.05–10 μM) relevant to studies investigating Mn as an essential micronutrient (R2=0.791 versus 0.590). In addition, changes in the electrical driving force for ion transport across the PM influenced both RRER and the Mn concentration in roots. The {Mn2+}b causing a 50% reduction in root growth was found to be c. 500 to >1000 μM (depending upon solution composition), whilst the corresponding value was 3300 μM when related to {Mn2+}00. Although specific effects such as competition are not precluded, the data emphasize the importance of non-specific electrostatic effects in the Mn nutrition of cowpea seedlings over a 1×105-fold range of Mn concentration in solution. PMID:21511910

  6. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  7. Cherenkov radiation in a surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhong; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    We report on our theoretical investigations of Cherenkov-type emission of surface phonon polaritons (SPPs) by relativistic electron bunches. The polaritons are confined by a planar waveguide comprised of two SiC slabs separated by an air gap. The SPPs are generated in the spectral range known as the reststrahlen band, where the dielectric permittivity of SiC is negative. Two surface modes of the radiation are analyzed: the longitudinal (accelerating) and the transverse (deflecting) ones. Both form Cherenkov cones that are different in the magnitude of the cone angle and the central frequency. However, both exhibits rapid spatial oscillations and beats behind the moving charge. Moreover, the longitudinal mode forms a reversed Cherenkov radiation cone due the negative group velocity for sufficiently small air gaps, but the transverse mode does not. The wakefield acceleration of electron beam inside the structure is also studied. Transverse instabilities and BBU effects can be suppressed by flat driver beam, meanwhile the longitudinal mode can support accelerating fields >1 GeV.

  8. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effects on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007) during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations) ground-based measurements) and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world) including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America) Europe) Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions) dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities) downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area) and remote regions that are considered to representing "backgroundH conditions.

  9. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Tan, Qian; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations and ground-based remote sensing and in-situ measurements have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol optical depth and concentration trends and their relationship to the changes of emissions" and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world, including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  10. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Fiorese, L.; Pinto, N.; Caproli, F.; Napoli, D. R.; Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G.

    2017-01-01

    This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  11. Surface accuracy and radiation pattern characteristics of mesh deployable refector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Miyoshi; Ebisui, Takashi; Okamato, Teruki; Orikasa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Toshio; Iso, Akio

    To facilitate the growth of mobile satellite communications, both an increase in the Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) of satellites and improved frequency reuse are required to achiveve compact size, low cost terminal usage, and high channel capacity. High gain and low sidelobe antenna technology are very important for high EIRP and frequency reuse, respectively. These requirements are expected to be met by using a large deployable mesh reflector antenna, which is the key technology for future multibeam moble communications systems. In this paper, surface accruracy and related electrical characteristics are studied using a TETRUS-(Tetra Trigonal Prism Truss) type deployable mesh reflector antenna. Surface accuracy and related electrical characteristics of refl