Science.gov

Sample records for rotameric transitions insights

  1. Effects of histidine protonation and rotameric states on virtual screening of M. tuberculosis RmlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Meekyum Olivia; Nichols, Sara E.; Wang, Yi; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-03-01

    While it is well established that protonation and tautomeric states of ligands can significantly affect the results of virtual screening, such effects of ionizable residues of protein receptors are less well understood. In this study, we focus on histidine protonation and rotameric states and their impact on virtual screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme RmlC. Depending on the net charge and the location of proton(s), a histidine can adopt three states: HIP (+1 charged, both δ- and ɛ-nitrogens protonated), HID (neutral, δ-nitrogen protonated), and HIE (neutral, ɛ-nitrogen protonated). Due to common ambiguities in X-ray crystal structures, a histidine may also be resolved as three additional states with its imidazole ring flipped. Here, we systematically investigate the predictive power of 36 receptor models with different protonation and rotameric states of two histidines in the RmlC active site by using results from a previous high-throughput screening. By measuring enrichment factors and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, we show that virtual screening results vary depending on hydrogen bonding networks provided by the histidines, even in the cases where the ligand does not obviously interact with the side chain. Our results also suggest that, even with the help of widely used pKa prediction software, assigning histidine protonation and rotameric states for virtual screening can still be challenging and requires further examination and systematic characterization of the receptor-ligand complex.

  2. An insight into fluorescent transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chia, Y Y; Tay, M G

    2014-09-21

    The emission from transition metal complexes is usually produced from triplet excited states. Owing to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the fast conversion of singlet to triplet excited states via intersystem crossing (ISC) is facilitated. Hence, in transition metal complexes, emission from singlet excited states is not favoured. Nevertheless, a number of examples of transition metal complexes that fluoresce with high intensity have been found and some of them were even comprehensively studied. In general, three common photophysical characteristics are used for the identification of fluorescent emission from a transition metal complex: emission lifetimes on the nanosecond scale; a small Stokes shift; and intense emission under aerated conditions. For most of the complexes reviewed here, singlet emission is the result of ligand-based fluorescence, which is the dominant emission process due to poor metal-ligand interactions leading to a small metal contribution in the excited states, and a competitive fluorescence rate constant when compared to the ISC rate constant. In addition to the pure fluorescence from metal complexes, another two types of fluorescent emissions were also reviewed, namely, delayed fluorescence and fluorescence-phosphorescence dual emissions. Both emissions also have their respective unique characteristics, and thus they are discussed in this perspective.

  3. Unexpected Rotamerism at the Origin of a Chessboard Supramolecular Assembly of Ruthenium Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Giuseppe; Larciprete, Rosanna; Alippi, Paola; Amore Bonapasta, Aldo; Filippone, Francesco; Lacovig, Paolo; Lizzit, Silvano; Paoletti, Anna Maria; Pennesi, Giovanna; Ronci, Fabio; Zanotti, Gloria; Colonna, Stefano

    2017-08-18

    We have investigated the formation and the properties of ultrathin films of ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc)₂ vacuum deposited on graphite by scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy measurements assisted by ab initio simulations. Thanks to its unique dimeric structure connected by a direct Ru-Ru bond, (RuPc)₂ can be found in two stable rotameric forms separated by a low-energy barrier. Such isomerism leads to a peculiar organization of the molecules in flat, horizontal layers on the graphite surface, characterized by a chessboard-like alternation of the two rotamers. Moreover, the molecules are vertically connected to form π-stacked columnar pillars of akin rotamers, compatible with the high conductivity measured in (RuPc)₂ powders. Such features yield an unprecedented supramolecular assembly of phthalocyanine films, which could open interesting perspectives toward the realization of new architectures of organic-electronics devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Insight into Structural Phase Transitions from Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2014-03-01

    Structural phase transitions caused by high pressure or temperature are very relevant in materials science. The high pressure transitions are essential to understand the interior of planets. Pressure or temperature induced phase transitions can be relevant to understand other phase transitions in strongly correlated systems or molecular crystals.Phase transitions are important also from the aspect of method development. Lower level density functionals, LSDA and GGAs all fail to predict the lattice parameters of different polymorphs and the phase transition parameters at the same time. At this time only nonlocal density functionals like HSE and RPA have been proved to resolve the geometry-energy dilemma to some extent in structural phase transitions. In this talk I will report new results from the MGGA_MS family of meta-GGAs and give an insight why this type of meta-GGAs can give a systematic improvement of the geometry and phase transition parameters together. I will also present results from the RPA and show a possible way to improve beyond RPA.

  5. Insights into phase transitions and entanglement from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bo-Bo

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has met great success in solid state physics, quantum chemistry and in computational material sciences. In this work we show that DFT could shed light on phase transitions and entanglement at finite temperatures. Specifically, we show that the equilibrium state of an interacting quantum many-body system which is in thermal equilibrium with a heat bath at a fixed temperature is a universal functional of the first derivatives of the free energy with respect to temperature and other control parameters respectively. This insight from DFT enables us to express the average value of any physical observable and any entanglement measure as a universal functional of the first derivatives of the free energy with respect to temperature and other control parameters. Since phase transitions are marked by the nonanalytic behavior of free energy with respect to control parameters, the physical quantities and entanglement measures may present nonanalytic behavior at critical point inherited from their dependence on the first derivative of free energy. We use two solvable models to demonstrate these ideas. These results give new insights for phase transitions and provide new profound connections between entanglement and phase transitions in interacting quantum many-body physics.

  6. Complete NMR assignments of bioactive rotameric (3 → 8) biflavonoids from the bark of Garcinia hombroniana.

    PubMed

    Jamila, Nargis; Khairuddean, Melati; Khan, Sadiq Noor; Khan, Naeem

    2014-07-01

    The genus Garcinia is reported to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, hepatoprotective and anti-HIV activities. Garcinia hombroniana in Malaysia is used to treat itching and as a protective medicine after child birth. This study was aimed to isolate the chemical constituents from the bark of G. hombroniana and explore their possible pharmacological potential. Ethyl acetate extract afforded one new (1) and six (2-7) known 3 → 8 rotameric biflavonoids. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR and NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopy together with electron ionization/ESI mass spectrometric techniques and were identified as (2R, 3S) volkensiflavone-7-O-rhamnopyranoside (1), volkensiflavone (2), 4″-O-methyl-volkensiflavone (3), volkensiflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (4), morelloflavone (5), 3″-O-methyl-morelloflavone (6) and morelloflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (7). The absolute configuration of compound 1 was assigned by circular dichroism spectroscopy as 2R, 3S. The coexistence of conformers of isolated biflavonoids in solution at 25 °C in different solvents was confirmed by variable temperature NMR studies. At room temperature (25 °C), compounds 1-7 exhibited duplicate NMR signals, while at elevated temperature (90 °C), a single set of signals was obtained. Compound 5 showed significant in vitro antioxidant activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals. The antibacterial studies showed that compounds 5 and 6 are the most active against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Compounds 3 and 6 also showed moderate antituberculosis activity against H38 Rv. Based on the research findings, G. hombroniana could be concluded as a rich source of flavanone-flavone (3 → 8) biflavonoids that exhibit rotameric behaviour at room temperature and display significant antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

  7. Transition to University Life: Insights from High School and University Female Students in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuo, Mary; Edda, Medhanit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to get an insight about how high school female students perceive the transition to university life, and to understand the transition experience of university female students in the first semester. An exploratory study design was used where 166 high school female students and 88 first year university female students…

  8. Insight into the Helix-to-Coil Transition in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, Boualem

    2006-03-01

    Dissolved DNA is known to undergo a helix-to-coil transition when temperature is increased. For a solution of 4% DNA in water, the transition temperature is around 94^oC. UV absorption spectroscopy was performed to characterize such a transition. The 260 nm absorption line is a good monitor of the un-stacking of the DNA amine bases. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering was also performed to investigate structural changes that accompany the transition. A characteristic DNA cross section correlation length was found to increase from 9A to 15A and the Porod exponent was found to decrease from close to 4 to around 2 across the transition. The average sugar-sugar inter-distance is larger in the open molecule coil phase. The helix phase is characterized by a cylindrical structure with well-defined interface whereas melted DNA macromolecules behave like Gaussian coils. Jump in the scattered (solvation) intensity was also observed across the transition. A hysteresis cycle was observed upon a subsequent temperature decrease. Once DNA melts, it does not reform the helix phase easily. DNA solvation (interaction of DNA and solvent molecules) has also been investigated. When solvent mixtures (for example water/alcohol mixtures) are used, ideal solvent mixing is observed for the helix phase but a highly non-ideal mixing behavior is observed for the coil phase.

  9. New insights in the electroweak phase transition in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weicong; Kang, Zhaofeng; Shu, Jing; Wu, Peiwen; Yang, Jin Min

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed semianalytical analysis of the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) property in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric standard model, which serves as a good benchmark model in which the 126 GeV Higgs mixes with a singlet. In this case, a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition (SFOEWPT) is achieved by the tree-level effects, and the phase transition strength γc is determined by the vacua energy gap at T =0 . We make an anatomy of the energy gap at both tree level and loop level and extract out a dimensionless phase transition parameter Rκ≡4 κ vs/Aκ, which can replace Aκ in the parameterization and affect the light CP-odd/even Higgs spectra. We find that SFOEWPT only occurs in Rκ˜-1 and positive Rκ≲O (10 ), which in the non-PQ limit case would prefer either a relatively light CP-odd or CP-even Higgs boson ˜(60 ,100 ) GeV , and therefore serves as a smoking gun signal and requires new search strategies at the LHC.

  10. Estimation of the rotamerization constants of different conformations of N-acetylalanine: a theoretical and matrix-isolation FT-IR study.

    PubMed

    Boeckx, Bram; Maes, Guido

    2012-02-01

    The conformational landscape of N-acetylalanine has been investigated by a theoretical and matrix-isolation FT-IR study. Optimizations of N-acetylalanine structures has been conducted at successive higher levels of theory HF/3-21G, DFT(B3LYP)/6-31++G** and MP2/6-31++G**. This resulted in three stable conformations. Among these, one conformation contains an intramolecular H-bond. The vibrational properties of these conformations were calculated and used to identify the conformations in a cryogenic argon matrix. The intensities of some bands assigned to a particular conformation were used to estimate the rotamerization constants K(r12) and K(r13) for the equilibria NAA1 NAA2 and NAA1 NAA3, respectively. The obtained experimental values were in agreement with the theoretical predictions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition: new and old insights from the classical neural crest model

    PubMed Central

    Pablo H., Strobl-Mazzulla; Marianne E., Bronner

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important event converting compact and ordered epithelial cells into migratory mesenchymal cells. Given the molecular and cellular similarities between pathological and developmental EMTs, studying this event during neural crest development offers and excellent in vivo model for understanding the mechanisms underlying this process. Here, we review new and old insight into neural crest EMT in search of commonalities with cancer progression that might aid in the design of specific therapeutic prevention. PMID:22575214

  12. Transition Zone of the Cascadia Subduction Fault: Insights from Seismic Imaging of Slow Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.

    2012-12-01

    insights into the physics of fault slip, dynamics of the transition zone, and may provide important clues on along-dip interaction of fault segments characterized by different frictional regimes.

  13. Motivations for enterprise system adoption in transition economies: insights from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Piotr; Weistroffer, Heinz Roland

    2016-06-01

    Enterprise system (ES) adoption can bring many benefits, but may also put tremendous strain on an organisation or business, sometimes with disastrous outcomes. The specific motivations and expectations that lead to ES adoption may impact the success or failure of these endeavours, and understanding these motivations may be useful in predicting the success of ES projects. Most of the published research on ES adoption motivation has been in the context of highly developed countries. The social, cultural, economic and political conditions in developing, emerging and transition economies make for a different business environment, and insights obtained from developed countries may not always transfer to these settings. This study seeks to identify and help understand the motivations for ES adoption specifically in transition economies, as these economies play a significant role in the global market, but have not been receiving adequate research attention. Drawing on the experience of 129 ES adopters in Poland, a transition economy, this study categorises motivations into coherent groups of issues and evaluates the influence of discovered motivations on ES adoption success. Further, motivations revealed by this study are compared with motivations reported by prior research conducted in developed countries.

  14. Insights into the Microbial and Viral Dynamics of a Coastal Downwelling-Upwelling Transition

    PubMed Central

    Gregoracci, Gustavo Bueno; Soares, Ana Carolina dos Santos; Miranda, Milene Dias; Coutinho, Ricardo; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have described opposing states in upwelling regions, i.e., the rise of cold nutrient-rich waters and prevalence of surface warm nutrient-poor waters, few have addressed the transition from one state to the other. This study aimed to describe the microbial and viral structure during this transition and was able to obtain the taxonomic and metabolic compositions as well as physical-chemical data. This integrated approach allowed for a better understanding of the dynamics of the downwelling upwelling transition, suggesting that a wealth of metabolic processes and ecological interactions are occurring in the minute fractions of the plankton (femto, pico, nano). These processes and interactions included evidence of microbial predominance during downwelling (with nitrogen recycling and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis), different viral predation pressures over primary production in different states (cyanobacteria vs eukaryotes), and a predominance of diatoms and selected bacterial and archaeal groups during upwelling (with the occurrence of a wealth of nitrogen metabolism involving ammonia). Thus, the results provided insights into which microbes, viruses and microbial-mediated processes are probably important in the functioning of upwelling systems. PMID:26327119

  15. Tibetan uplift prior to the Eocene-Oligocene transition, insight from chronostratigraphic and palynologic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straathof, J.; Abels, H. A.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Hoorn, C.; Krijgsman, W.

    2009-04-01

    To unravel the interplay between Tibetan uplift and global climate, proxy records of Asian paleoenvironments constrained by accurate age models are needed for the Paleogene period. Uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas since the onset of the Indo-Asia collision is held responsible for Asian aridification and monsoon intensification, but may also have gradually cooled global climate, leading to the 34 Ma Eocene-Oligocene transition, an abrupt cooling step associated with the onset of glaciation in Antarctica. New insight is provided by integrated chronostratigraphic and pollen analyses of an exceptional Paleogene record from playa lake deposits of the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau (Xining Basin) constituted of red bed / gypsum alternations. Aridification is indicated by the disappearance of gypsum deposits occurring precisely at the time of the Eocene-Oligocene transition (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2007, Nature vol. 445, p. 637-638). In addition, regional orographic uplift is indicated by the sudden appearance of representatives of the Pinaceae family - and in particular that of Picea (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2008, Geology, vol. 36, p. 987-990). Cyclostratigraphic analysis indicates that the conifer appearance coincides with a change in the dominant orbital cycle forcing the paleoenvironment (see Abels et al., this session). These results suggest that threshold conditions for the vegetation change were reached after the long-term combined effects of regional uplift and gradual global cooling. Regional uplift at least 4 m.y. before the Eocene-Oligocene transition is consistent with the idea that the associated increase in rock weathering and erosion contributed to the Eocene-Oligocene transition

  16. Molecular insight into protein conformational transition in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Guofeng; Sun, Yan

    2009-05-14

    Hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) is an adsorption chromatography combining hydrophobic interaction in adsorption with electrostatic repulsion in elution. The method has been successfully applied in the separation and purification of antibodies and other proteins. However, little is understood about protein conformational transition and the dynamic process within adsorbent pores. In the present study, a pore model is established to represent the realistic porous adsorbent composed of matrix and immobilized HCIC ligands. Protein adsorption, desorption, and conformational transition in the HCIC pore and its implications to the separation performance are shown by a molecular dynamics simulation of a 46-bead beta-barrel coarse-grained model protein in the adsorbent pore. Repeated adjustment of both protein position and orientation is observed before reaching a stable adsorption. Once the protein is adsorbed, there is a dynamic equilibrium between unfolding and refolding. The effect of hydrophobic interaction strength between protein and ligands on adsorption phenomena is then examined. Strong hydrophobic interaction, representing the presence of high-concentration lyotropic salt in mobile phase, can speed up the adsorption but cause protein unfolding more significantly. On the contrary, weak hydrophobic interaction, representing the absence of a lyotropic salt or the presence of a chaotropic agent, can reserve native protein conformation but does not lead to stable adsorption. In the elution, protein unfolding occurs due to simultaneous hydrophobic adsorption and electrostatic repulsion in the opposite directions. When the protein has been desorbed, the conformational transition between unfolded and native protein is still observed due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interaction. The simulation has provided molecular insight into protein conformational transition in the whole HCIC process, and it would be beneficial to the rational design of

  17. Two-Dimensional Phase Transition of Viral Capsid Gives Insights into Subunit Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresset, Guillaume; Chen, Jingzhi; Chevreuil, Maelenn; Nhiri, Naïma; Jacquet, Eric; Lansac, Yves

    2017-01-01

    We show that the thermal dissociation of icosahedral viral capsids can be interpreted in terms of a two-dimensional phase transition. The approach provides a useful framework to get direct insights into the interactions at work between viral components. We devise a mean-field lattice model that relates the melting temperature to subunit attractive energy, effective charge, and chemical potential. Through fluorescence thermal shift assay on a plant viral system, we illustrate how the model gives access to the interaction parameters for empty and loaded viral capsids in various ionic conditions. This work should help construct physical models accounting for the assembly and disassembly mechanisms of viruses, with possible fallout in the development of therapeutic inhibitors.

  18. Role of nitrogen substitution in phenyl ring on excited state intramolecular proton transfer and rotamerism of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Chipem, Francis A S; Dash, Nihar; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2011-03-14

    A comparative study of 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (2',3'-HPyBI), 2-(3'-hydroxy-4'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (3',4'-HPyBI), 2-(4'-hydroxy-3'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (4',3'-HPyBI), 2-(3'-hydroxy-2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (3',2'-HPyBI), and 2-(5'-hydroxy-4'-pyrimidinyl)benzimidazole (5',4'-HPymBI) with 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole (HPBI) was performed theoretically to evaluate the effect of nitrogen substitution in the phenolic ring on the photophysics and rotamerism of HPBI. Density functional theory (DFT) and configuration interaction singles (CIS) combined with time-dependent DFT were employed for ground and excited state studies, respectively. Different possible molecular forms were considered for each molecule viz., cis-enol, trans-enol, open-enol, and keto forms. The computational results revealed that cis-enol is the most stable form in the ground state for all the molecules except in 2',3'-HPyBI. In 2',3'-HPyBI, K-2 keto is the most stable form. Water molecule assisted interconversions between different forms of 2',3'-HPyBI were examined theoretically. Excitation and emission energies for all the forms have been calculated theoretically and the values are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The calculations show that intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) is endothermic in the ground state while it is exothermic in the first excited singlet state (except 5',4'-HPymBI). The barrier for the excited state ESIPT reaction increases with nitrogen substitution. Torsional rotation between the benzimidazole and the pyridinyl∕pyrimidinyl rings in the S(1) state depicts that twisted-keto structures involve charge transfer from the hydroxypyridinyl∕hydoxypyrimidinyl to the benzimidazole ring. However, the formation of twisted-keto is not energetically favored in these systems.

  19. Benchmark quantum-chemical calculations on a complete set of rotameric families of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and their comparison with modern density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Mládek, Arnošt; Krepl, Miroslav; Svozil, Daniel; Cech, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Sponer, Jiří

    2013-05-21

    The DNA sugar-phosphate backbone has a substantial influence on the DNA structural dynamics. Structural biology and bioinformatics studies revealed that the DNA backbone in experimental structures samples a wide range of distinct conformational substates, known as rotameric DNA backbone conformational families. Their correct description is essential for methods used to model nucleic acids and is known to be the Achilles heel of force field computations. In this study we report the benchmark database of MP2 calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, MP2(T,Q), augmented by ΔCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ corrections. The calculations are performed in the gas phase as well as using a COSMO solvent model. This study includes a complete set of 18 established and biochemically most important families of DNA backbone conformations and several other salient conformations that we identified in experimental structures. We utilize an electronically sufficiently complete DNA sugar-phosphate-sugar (SPS) backbone model system truncated to prevent undesired intramolecular interactions. The calculations are then compared with other QM methods. The BLYP and TPSS functionals supplemented with Grimme's D3(BJ) dispersion term provide the best tradeoff between computational demands and accuracy and can be recommended for preliminary conformational searches as well as calculations on large model systems. Among the tested methods, the best agreement with the benchmark database has been obtained for the double-hybrid DSD-BLYP functional in combination with a quadruple-ζ basis set, which is, however, computationally very demanding. The new hybrid density functionals PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 yield outstanding results and even slightly outperform the computationally more demanding PWPB95 double-hybrid functional. B3LYP-D3 is somewhat less accurate compared to the other hybrids. Extrapolated MP2(D,T) calculations are not as

  20. The Transition Zone low-velocity zone: insights from Northwestern Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Bostock, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic studies over the past decade have identified an S-wave low-velocity zone (LVZ) above the transition zone at various locations around the globe. Recent observations indicate that, although not of global extent, this feature is observed across a variety of tectonic environments spanning a large range in age, from ancient Archean cratons to modern active margins. Hypothesized to be a lens of dense, hydrous, silicate melt ponding atop the 410 km discontinuity, beneath the silicate melt-density crossover predicted to exist within the upper mantle, the nature of this LVZ and its effect on volatile and incompatible element cycling may provide further insight into their distribution within the mantle. We assembled a P- and S-receiver function (PRF and SRF) dataset to quantify the physical properties and geographical extent of the layer in Northwestern Canada. Geographic profiles formed from 1-D migration of RFs computed for the CANOE and POLARIS-Slave arrays reveal an LVZ beneath many stations at a nominal depth of ~340 km. To constrain layer thickness and Poisson's ratio, we performed a grid search over a suite of 1-D velocity profiles to model the relative delay times of direct conversions and reverberations from the top of the LVZ and 410 km discontinuity, as recorded at the Yellowknife Array. In addition, we performed linearized inversion of transmission coefficient amplitudes to estimate S-velocity contrasts at the bounding interfaces. The LVZ is characterized by a thickness of ~36 km with an S-velocity contrast of -7.8%, and Poisson's ratio of 0.42. This estimate for Poisson's ratio lies well above the IASP91 average of 0.29-0.3 for this depth range and favours the presence of high melt or fluid fractions. Taken at face value, the two latter results require an increase in P-velocity into the LVZ, which has implications on the expected changes in elastic moduli into the layer.

  1. The Fourth Grade Experience: Insights toward the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kelly A.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from elementary to middle school can be an exciting as well as scary time for young adolescents. The stress of this transition can be decreased by incorporating transition programs that address student needs and concerns. This qualitative research study was designed to gain an overall sense of fourth grade in order to better…

  2. Safety threats and opportunities to improve interfacility care transitions: insights from patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Kitto, Simon; Merkley, Jane; Lyons, Renee F; Bell, Chaim M

    2012-01-01

    To explore patients' and family members' perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions and strategies that improve care transitions from acute care hospitals to complex continuing care and rehabilitation health care organizations. Poorly executed care transitions can result in additional health care spending due to adverse outcomes and delays as patients wait to transfer from acute care to facilities providing different levels of care. Patients and their families play an integral role in ensuring they receive safe care, as they are the one constant in care transitions processes. However, patients' and family members' perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions from health care facility to health care facility remain poorly understood. This qualitative study used semistructured interviews with patients (15) and family members (seven) who were transferred from an acute care hospital to a complex continuing care/rehabilitation care facility. Data were analyzed using a directed content analytical approach. OUR RESULTS REVEALED THREE KEY OVERARCHING THEMES IN THE PERCEPTIONS: lacking information, getting "funneled through" too soon, and difficulty adjusting to the shift from total care to almost self-care. Several patients and families described their expectations and experiences associated with their interfacility care transitions as being uninformed about their transfer or that transfer happened too early. In addition, study participants identified the need for having a coordinated approach to care transitions that engages patients and family members. Study findings provide patients' and family members' perspectives on key safety threats and how to improve care transitions. Of particular importance is the need for patients and family members to play a more active role in their care transition planning and self-care management.

  3. Statistical mechanics of protein structural transitions: Insights from the island model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The so-called island model of protein structural transition holds that hydrophobic interactions are the key to both the folding and function of proteins. Herein, the genesis and statistical mechanical basis of the island model of transitions are reviewed, by presenting the results of simulations of such transitions. Elucidating the physicochemical mechanism of protein structural formation is the foundation for understanding the hierarchical structure of life at the microscopic level. Based on the results obtained to date using the island model, remaining problems and future work in the field of protein structures are discussed, referencing Professor Saitô’s views on the hierarchic structure of science. PMID:28409078

  4. NEW INSIGHT INTO THE SOLAR SYSTEM’S TRANSITION DISK PHASE PROVIDED BY THE METAL-RICH CARBONACEOUS CHONDRITE ISHEYEVO

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Knauth, L. Paul

    2015-03-10

    Many aspects of planet formation are controlled by the amount of gas remaining in the natal protoplanetary disks (PPDs). Infrared observations show that PPDs undergo a transition stage at several megayears, during which gas densities are reduced. Our Solar System would have experienced such a stage. However, there is currently no data that provides insight into this crucial time in our PPD’s evolution. We show that the Isheyevo meteorite contains the first definitive evidence for a transition disk stage in our Solar System. Isheyevo belongs to a class of metal-rich meteorites whose components have been dated at almost 5 Myr after formation of Ca, Al-rich inclusions, and exhibits unique sedimentary layers that imply formation through gentle sedimentation. We show that such layering can occur via the gentle sweep-up of material found in the impact plume resulting from the collision of two planetesimals. Such sweep-up requires gas densities consistent with observed transition disks (10{sup −12}–10{sup −11} g cm{sup −3}). As such, Isheyevo presents the first evidence of our own transition disk and provides new constraints on the evolution of our solar nebula.

  5. Transition metal phthalocyanines: Insight into the electronic structure from soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, T.; Kraus, R.; Schönfelder, R.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Molodtsova, O. V.; Hoffmann, P.; Knupfer, M.

    2012-08-01

    Transition metal phthalocyanines (MPc's) are an interesting class of material, and their magnetic and electronic properties are determined by the orbital occupation of the transition metal 3d orbitals incorporated in the molecules center. Thus, the ground state configuration of the transition metal center is very important for a complete understanding of these materials. We present experimental data taken using x-ray absorption and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy together with a theoretical interpretation of MPc series with M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, and Mn. The combination of these methods allows us to narrow down possible dominating ground state configurations and shed a brighter light on the electronic structure of these complexes.

  6. Socio-economic status and fertility decline: Insights from historical transitions in Europe and North America.

    PubMed

    Dribe, Martin; Breschi, Marco; Gagnon, Alain; Gauvreau, Danielle; Hanson, Heidi A; Maloney, Thomas N; Mazzoni, Stanislao; Molitoris, Joseph; Pozzi, Lucia; Smith, Ken R; Vézina, Hélène

    2017-03-01

    The timings of historical fertility transitions in different regions are well understood by demographers, but much less is known regarding their specific features and causes. In the study reported in this paper, we used longitudinal micro-level data for five local populations in Europe and North America to analyse the relationship between socio-economic status and fertility during the fertility transition. Using comparable analytical models and class schemes for each population, we examined the changing socio-economic differences in marital fertility and related these to common theories on fertility behaviour. Our results do not provide support for the hypothesis of universally high fertility among the upper classes in pre-transitional society, but do support the idea that the upper classes acted as forerunners by reducing their fertility before other groups. Farmers and unskilled workers were the latest to start limiting their fertility. Apart from these similarities, patterns of class differences in fertility varied significantly between populations.

  7. Zipping and Unzipping of Adenylate Kinase: Atomistic Insights into the Ensemble of Open ↔ Closed Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Beckstein, Oliver; Denning, Elizabeth J.; Perilla, Juan R.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AdK), a phosphotransferase enzyme, plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. It undergoes a large conformational change between an open and a closed state, even in the absence of substrate. We investigate the apo-AdK transition at the atomic level both with free energy calculations and our new dynamic importance sampling (DIMS) molecular dynamics (MD) method. DIMS is shown to sample biologically relevant conformations as verified by comparing an ensemble of hundreds of DIMS transitions to AdK crystal structure intermediates. The simulations reveal in atomic detail how hinge regions partially and intermittently unfold during the transition. Conserved salt bridges are seen to have important structural and dynamic roles; in particular four ionic bonds are identified that open in a sequential, zipper-like fashion and thus dominate the free energy landscape of the transition. Transitions between the closed and open conformations only have to overcome moderate free energy barriers. Unexpectedly, the closed and open state encompass broad free energy basins that contain conformations differing in domain hinge motions by up to 40°. The significance of these extended states is discussed in relation to recent experimental FRET measurements. Taken together, these results demonstrate how a small number of cooperative key interactions can shape the overall dynamics of an enzyme and suggest an “all-or-nothing” mechanism for the opening and closing of AdK. Our efficient DIMS-MD computer simulation approach can provide a detailed picture of a functionally important macromolecular transition and thus help to interpret and suggest experiments to probe the conformational landscape of dynamic proteins such as AdK. PMID:19751742

  8. Coordinated encoding between cell types in the retina: insights from the theory of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpee, Tatyana

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will describe how the emergence of some types of neurons in the brain can be quantitatively described by the theory of transitions between different phases of matter. The two key parameters that control the separation of neurons into subclasses are the mean and standard deviation of noise levels among neurons in the population. The mean noise level plays the role of temperature in the classic theory of phase transitions, whereas the standard deviation is equivalent to pressure, in the case of liquid-gas transitions, or to magnetic field for magnetic transitions. Our results account for properties of two recently discovered types of salamander OFF retinal ganglion cells, as well as the absence of multiple types of ON cells. We further show that, across visual stimulus contrasts, retinal circuits continued to operate near the critical point whose quantitative characteristics matched those expected near a liquid-gas critical point and described by the nearest-neighbor Ising model in three dimensions. Because the retina needs to operate under changing stimulus conditions, the observed parameters of cell types corresponded to metastable states in the region between the spinodal line and the line describing maximally informative solutions. Such properties of neural circuits can maximize information transmission in a given environment while retaining the ability to quickly adapt to a new environment. NSF CAREER award 1254123 and NIH R01EY019493

  9. Metal-Insulator Transition in Nanoparticle Solids: Insights from Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Luman; Vörös, Márton; Zimanyi, Gergely T.

    2017-08-01

    Progress has been rapid in increasing the efficiency of energy conversion in nanoparticles. However, extraction of the photo-generated charge carriers remains challenging. Encouragingly, the charge mobility has been improved recently by driving nanoparticle (NP) films across the metal-insulator transition (MIT). To simulate MIT in NP films, we developed a hierarchical Kinetic Monte Carlo transport model. Electrons transfer between neighboring NPs via activated hopping when the NP energies differ by more than an overlap energy, but transfer by a non-activated quantum delocalization, if the NP energies are closer than the overlap energy. As the overlap energy increases, emerging percolating clusters supportmore » a metallic transport across the entire film. We simulated the evolution of the temperature-dependent electron mobility. We analyzed our data in terms of two candidate models of the MIT: (a) as a Quantum Critical Transition, signaled by an effective gap going to zero; and (b) as a Quantum Percolation Transition, where a sample-spanning metallic percolation path is formed as the fraction of the hopping bonds in the transport paths is going to zero. We found that the Quantum Percolation Transition theory provides a better description of the MIT. We also observed an anomalously low gap region next to the MIT. We discuss the relevance of our results in the light of recent experimental measurements.« less

  10. Some Insights on Roughness Induced Transition and Control from DNS and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Ibitayo, Ifeoluwa; Goldstein, David; Brown, Garry

    2016-11-01

    We study the receptivity and subsequent evolution of an initially laminar flat boundary layer on a flat plate to single and multiple discrete roughness elements (DRE) using a combination of immersed boundary DNS and water channel flow visualization experiments. We examine the transition caused by a single DRE and demonstrate the possibility of suppressing it by an appropriately designed second DRE in both DNS and experiments. The different phases of transition are identified and the roles of Reynolds numbers based on roughness height and boundary layer thickness are investigated. The underlying mechanisms in the observed transition and its control are understood by examining detailed vorticity flux balances. Connections are also made to recent developments in transient growth and streak instability. A unified picture is sought from a parametric study of different DRE dimensions and orientations. The potential applicability of the observations and understanding derived from this study to controlling transition caused by design and environmental roughness over aircraft wings is discussed. Supported by AFOSR # FA9550-15-1-0345.

  11. Electronic structure of carbon dioxide under pressure and insights into the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Sean R.; Jarrige, Ignace; Wu, Min; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tse, John S.; Mi, Zhongying; Kaci, Linada; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Cai, Yong Q.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the high-pressure behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2), an important planetary material found in Venus, Earth, and Mars, is vital to the study of the evolution and dynamics of the planetary interiors as well as to the fundamental understanding of the C–O bonding and interaction between the molecules. Recent studies have revealed a number of crystalline polymorphs (CO2-I to -VII) and an amorphous phase under high pressure–temperature conditions. Nevertheless, the reported phase stability field and transition pressures at room temperature are poorly defined, especially for the amorphous phase. Here we shed light on the successive pressure-induced local structural changes and the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition of CO2 at room temperature by performing an in situ study of the local electronic structure using X-ray Raman scattering, aided by first-principle exciton calculations. We show that the transition from CO2-I to CO2-III was initiated at around 7.4 GPa, and completed at about 17 GPa. The present study also shows that at ∼37 GPa, molecular CO2 starts to polymerize to an extended structure with fourfold coordinated carbon and minor CO3 and CO-like species. The observed pressure is more than 10 GPa below previously reported. The disappearance of the minority species at 63(±3) GPa suggests that a previously unknown phase transition within the nonmolecular phase of CO2 has occurred. PMID:24167283

  12. Insights into enzyme catalysis from QM/MM modelling: transition state stabilization in chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaghan, Kara E.; Ridder, Lars; Szefczyk, Borys; Sokalski, W. Andrzej; Hermann, Johannes C.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    Chorismate mutase provides an important test of theories of enzyme catalysis, and of modelling methods. The Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in the enzyme has been modelled here by a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method. Several pathways have been calculated. The sensitivity of the results to details of model preparation and pathway calculation is tested, and the results are compared in detail to previous similar studies and experiments. The potential energy barrier for the enzyme reaction is estimated at 24.5-31.6 kcal mol-1 (AM1/CHARMM), and 2.7-11.9 kcal mol-1 with corrections (e.g. B3LYP/6-31+G(d)). In agreement with previous studies, the present analysis of the calculated paths provides unequivocal evidence of significant transition state stabilization by the enzyme, indicating that this is central to catalysis by the enzyme. The active site is exquisitely complementary to the transition state, stabilizing it more than the substrate, so reducing the barrier to reaction. A number of similar pathways for reaction exist in the protein, as expected. Small structural differences give rise to differences in energetic contributions. Major electrostatic contributions to transition state stabilization come in all cases from Arg90, Arg7, one or two water molecules, and Glu78 (Glu78 destabilizes the transition state less than the substrate), while Arg63 contributes significantly in one model.

  13. Student Transition from Primary to Lower Secondary School in Cambodia: Narrative Insights into Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Sitha, Chhinh; Williams, James H.; Kitamura, Yuto

    2014-01-01

    This article has three purposes. First, it presents findings from a study of student retention and dropout in Cambodia, as pupils transition from primary to lower secondary school. Second, it aims to understand from an in-depth, emic perspective the dynamics of this process and the challenges that individual families and their students face around…

  14. Rheological transitions in the middle crust: insights from Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Frances J.; Platt, John P.; Behr, Whitney M.

    2017-02-01

    High-strain mylonitic rocks in Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes reflect ductile deformation in the middle crust, but in many examples it is unclear how these mylonites relate to the brittle detachments that overlie them. Field observations, microstructural analyses, and thermobarometric data from the footwalls of three metamorphic core complexes in the Basin and Range Province, USA (the Whipple Mountains, California; the northern Snake Range, Nevada; and Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range, Nevada), suggest the presence of two distinct rheological transitions in the middle crust: (1) the brittle-ductile transition (BDT), which depends on thermal gradient and tectonic regime, and marks the switch from discrete brittle faulting and cataclasis to continuous, but still localized, ductile shear, and (2) the localized-distributed transition, or LDT, a deeper, dominantly temperature-dependent transition, which marks the switch from localized ductile shear to distributed ductile flow. In this model, brittle normal faults in the upper crust persist as ductile shear zones below the BDT in the middle crust, and sole into the subhorizontal LDT at greater depths.In metamorphic core complexes, the presence of these two distinct rheological transitions results in the development of two zones of ductile deformation: a relatively narrow zone of high-stress mylonite that is spatially and genetically related to the brittle detachment, underlain by a broader zone of high-strain, relatively low-stress rock that formed in the middle crust below the LDT, and in some cases before the detachment was initiated. The two zones show distinct microstructural assemblages, reflecting different conditions of temperature and stress during deformation, and contain superposed sequences of microstructures reflecting progressive exhumation, cooling, and strain localization. The LDT is not always exhumed, or it may be obscured by later deformation, but in the Whipple Mountains, it can be directly

  15. Novel insight into the effect of disappearance of the Morin transition in hematite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuev, M. A.; Mishchenko, I. N.; Kubrin, S. P.; Lastovina, T. A.

    2017-06-01

    An alternative treatment of the well-known effect of a decrease in the Morin transition temperature in hematite with a decrease in the size of crystallites to the complete disappearance of the transition for nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm is proposed. In contrast to the standard speculative explanation of this effect in terms of the effect of surface and defectiveness of grains, we suggest that the decisive factor is an increase in the contribution of the shape anisotropy of particles with a decrease in their size, which is responsible for the spread of orientations of the axes of the resulting magnetic anisotropy with respect to the crystallographic axes. Our reasons are confirmed by a numerical analysis of Mössbauer spectra of hematite nanoparticles within the continuous model of magnetic dynamics of an ensemble of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles in the two-sublattice approximation generalized to the existence of weak ferromagnetism (Dzyaloshinskii interaction).

  16. Recent insights into instability and transition to turbulence in open-flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1988-01-01

    Roads to turbulence in open-flow shear layers are interpreted as sequences of often competing instabilities. These correspond to primary and higher order restructurings of vorticity distributions which culminate in convected spatial disorder (with some spatial coherence on the scale of the shear layer) traditionally called turbulence. Attempts are made to interpret these phenomena in terms of concepts of convective and global instabilities on one hand, and of chaos and strange attractors on the other. The first is fruitful, and together with a review of mechanisms of receptivity provides a unifying approach to understanding and estimating transition to turbulence. In contrast, current evidence indicates that concepts of chaos are unlikely to help in predicting transition in open-flow systems. Furthermore, a distinction should apparently be made between temporal chaos and the convected spatial disorder of turbulence past Reynolds numbers where boundary layers and separated shear layers are formed.

  17. Decreased Temperate but not Polar Fish Productivity Across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition: Insights from Ichthyoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zill, M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, 38-28 Ma) was a period of global cooling and increased nutrient delivery to the ocean. It is associated with the onset of permanent ice sheet on Antarctica, and the beginning of a highly productive polar ecosystem, dominated by diatoms and favoring short, efficient food chains. In a highly efficient, large phytoplankton-dominated ecosystem, we would expect to see higher abundances of consumers, as fewer trophic steps means more carbon available to upper trophic level groups. Here we use the accumulation rate of ichthyoliths (fish teeth and dermal scales) to measure the relative export production of fish through this time period of changing climate. Records from the South Atlantic gyre (DSDP Site 522) the South Pacific Gyre (DSDP Site 596) and the Southern Ocean (DSDP Site 689) show a 50% reduction in ichthyolith accumulation rate in the vicinity the Eocene Oligocene boundary. However, this drop in fish production occurs just after the E/O in the Atlantic, 4 million years before the E/O in the Pacific and 6 million years prior to the E/O in the Southern Ocean. Since the EOT is generally associated with an increase in productivity and diatom blooms in the Southern Ocean and tropical Pacific, we would expect that the abundance of fish would increase across the transition. Our results are surprisingly the inverse of this expectation, and suggest that the transition from greenhouse to icehouse did not produce increase in forage fish or even a response of any kind during the climatological transition into the icehouse world. Indeed, it seems that ichthyolith accumulation rate and primary productivity are not perfectly linked, and it may be that ichthyolith accumulation is responding more to another factor, such as ocean temperature or prey availability that is not linked to the increased diatom production during the EOT.

  18. Insights into the crustal structure of the transition between Nares Strait and Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbernd, Tabea; Jokat, Wilfried; Heyde, Ingo; Damm, Volkmar

    2016-11-01

    The crustal structure and continental margin between southern Nares Strait and northern Baffin Bay were studied based on seismic refraction and gravity data acquired in 2010. We present the resulting P wave velocity, density and geological models of the crustal structure of a profile, which extends from the Greenlandic margin of the Nares Strait into the deep basin of central northern Baffin Bay. For the first time, the crustal structure of the continent-ocean transition of the very northern part of Baffin Bay could be imaged. We divide the profile into three parts: continental, thin oceanic, and transitional crust. On top of the three-layered continental crust, a low-velocity zone characterizes the lowermost layer of the three-layered Thule Supergroup underneath Steensby Basin. The 4.3-6.3 km thick oceanic crust in the southern part of the profile can be divided into a northern and southern section, more or less separated by a fracture zone. The oceanic crust adjacent to the continent-ocean transition is composed of 3 layers and characterized by oceanic layer 3 velocities of 6.7-7.3 km/s. Toward the south only two oceanic crustal layers are necessary to model the travel time curves. Here, the lower oceanic crust has lower seismic velocities (6.4-6.8 km/s) than in the north. Rather low velocities of 7.7 km/s characterize the upper mantle underneath the oceanic crust, which we interpret as an indication for the presence of upper mantle serpentinization. In the continent-ocean transition zone, the velocities are lower than in the adjacent continental and oceanic crustal units. There are no signs for massive magmatism or the existence of a transform margin in our study area.

  19. Insights into the photochemical disproportionation of transition metal dimers on the picosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2013-05-09

    The reactivity of five transition metal dimers toward photochemical, in-solvent-cage disproportionation has been investigated using picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Previous ultrafast studies on [CpW(CO)3]2 established the role of an in-cage disproportionation mechanism involving electron transfer between 17- and 19-electron radicals prior to diffusion out of the solvent cage. New results from time-resolved infrared studies reveal that the identity of the transition metal complex dictates whether the in-cage disproportionation mechanism can take place, as well as the more fundamental issue of whether 19-electron intermediates are able to form on the picosecond time scale. Significantly, the in-cage disproportionation mechanism observed previously for the tungsten dimer does not characterize the reactivity of four out of the five transition metal dimers in this study. The differences in the ability to form 19-electron intermediates are interpreted either in terms of differences in the 17/19-electron equilibrium or of differences in an energetic barrier to associative coordination of a Lewis base, whereas the case for the in-cage vs diffusive disproportionation mechanisms depends on whether the 19-electron reducing agent is genuinely characterized by 19-electron configuration at the metal center or if it is better described as an 18 + δ complex. These results help to better understand the factors that dictate mechanisms of radical disproportionation and carry implications for radical chain mechanisms.

  20. Transitional behavior of convective patterns in porous media: Insights from basin stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karani, Hamid; Huber, Christian

    2016-11-01

    The present study investigates the transitional behavior of convective modes in Horton-Rogers-Lapwood convection (HRLC). We first provide new pore-scale numerical and experimental evidences on the variation of the stability level of single-cell and double-cell convection modes in a 2D HRLC problem. In order to interpret this transitional behavior, we employ the concept of basin stability and develop a basin stability diagram of the first four convection modes in HRLC. This is in contrast to the standard bifurcation analysis of HRLC using linear stability analysis and continuation techniques, which only provides local information about the (range of) existence, and any possible co-existence of different convection modes. The present basin stability analysis of HRLC not only provides the local information about the (co-)existence of different patterns, but also, it determines their relative stability as well as how the basin of stability of these modes contract or expands as the Rayleigh number varies. The results of the present study show how establishing the dependence of basin stability on the Rayleigh number is essential to analyze the transition between different convection patterns observed experimentally and numerically.

  1. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, Jeanne L.; Choike, James R.

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical observations are made about some continuous curves, called transitions, encountered in well-known experiences. The transition parabola, the transition spiral, and the sidestep maneuver are presented. (MNS)

  2. Insights into the water mean transit time in a high-elevation tropical ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Giovanny M.; Segura, Catalina; Vaché, Kellie B.; Windhorst, David; Breuer, Lutz; Crespo, Patricio

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the mean transit time (MTT) of water and its spatial variability in a tropical high-elevation ecosystem (wet Andean páramo). The study site is the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory (7.53 km2) located in southern Ecuador. A lumped parameter model considering five transit time distribution (TTD) functions was used to estimate MTTs under steady-state conditions (i.e., baseflow MTT). We used a unique data set of the δ18O isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow water samples collected for 3 years (May 2011 to May 2014) in a nested monitoring system of streams. Linear regression between MTT and landscape (soil and vegetation cover, geology, and topography) and hydrometric (runoff coefficient and specific discharge rates) variables was used to explore controls on MTT variability, as well as mean electrical conductivity (MEC) as a possible proxy for MTT. Results revealed that the exponential TTD function best describes the hydrology of the site, indicating a relatively simple transition from rainfall water to the streams through the organic horizon of the wet páramo soils. MTT of the streams is relatively short (0.15-0.73 years, 53-264 days). Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between the catchment's average slope and MTT (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.05). MTT showed no significant correlation with hydrometric variables, whereas MEC increases with MTT (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001). Overall, we conclude that (1) baseflow MTT confirms that the hydrology of the ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow; (2) the interplay between the high storage capacity of the wet páramo soils and the slope of the catchments provides the ecosystem with high regulation capacity; and (3) MEC is an efficient predictor of MTT variability in this system of catchments with relatively homogeneous geology.

  3. Binding and Activation of N2O at Transition Metal Centers: Recent Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Tolman, William B.

    2010-01-01

    No laughing matter, nitrous oxide’s role in stratospheric ozone depletion and as a greenhouse gas has stimulated great interest in developing and understanding its decomposition, particularly through the use of transition metal promoters. Recent advances in our understanding of the reaction pathways for N2O reduction by metal ions in the gas phase and in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and biological catalytic systems have provided provocative ideas about the structure and properties of metal-N2O adducts and derived intermediates. These ideas are likely to inform efforts to design more effective catalysts for N2O remediation. PMID:20058284

  4. Metastability of the Nonlinear Wave Equation: Insights from Transition State Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhall, Katherine A.; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2017-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the longtime dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation in one-space dimension, u_{tt} - κ ^2 u_{xx} +V'(u) =0 \\quad x\\in [0,1] where κ >0 is a parameter and V( u) is a potential bounded from below and growing at least like u^2 as |u|→ ∞. Infinite energy solutions of this equation preserve a natural Gibbsian invariant measure, and when the potential is double-welled, for example when V(u) = 1/4 (1-u^2)^2, there is a regime such that two small disjoint sets in the system's phase-space concentrate most of the mass of this measure. This suggests that the solutions to the nonlinear wave equation can be metastable over these sets, in the sense that they spend long periods of time in these sets and only rarely transition between them. Here, we quantify this phenomenon by calculating exactly via transition state theory (TST) the mean frequency at which the solutions of the nonlinear wave equation with initial conditions drawn from its invariant measure cross a dividing surface lying in between the metastable sets. We also investigate numerically how the mean TST frequency compares to the rate at which a typical solution crosses this dividing surface. These numerical results suggest that the dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation is ergodic and rapidly mixing with respect to the Gibbs invariant measure when the parameter κ in small enough. In this case, successive transitions between the two regions are roughly uncorrelated and their dynamics can be coarse-grained to jumps in a two-state Markov chain whose rate can be deduced from the mean TST frequency. This is a regime in which the dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation displays a metastable behavior that is not fundamentally different from that observed in its stochastic counterpart in which random noise and damping terms are added to the equation. For larger κ , however, the dynamics either stops being ergodic, or its mixing time becomes larger than the inverse of the TST frequency

  5. Metastability of the Nonlinear Wave Equation: Insights from Transition State Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhall, Katherine A.; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the longtime dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation in one-space dimension, u_{tt} - κ^2 u_{xx} +V'(u) =0 quad xin [0,1] where κ >0 is a parameter and V(u) is a potential bounded from below and growing at least like u^2 as |u|→ ∞. Infinite energy solutions of this equation preserve a natural Gibbsian invariant measure, and when the potential is double-welled, for example when V(u) = 1/4 (1-u^2)^2 , there is a regime such that two small disjoint sets in the system's phase-space concentrate most of the mass of this measure. This suggests that the solutions to the nonlinear wave equation can be metastable over these sets, in the sense that they spend long periods of time in these sets and only rarely transition between them. Here, we quantify this phenomenon by calculating exactly via transition state theory (TST) the mean frequency at which the solutions of the nonlinear wave equation with initial conditions drawn from its invariant measure cross a dividing surface lying in between the metastable sets. We also investigate numerically how the mean TST frequency compares to the rate at which a typical solution crosses this dividing surface. These numerical results suggest that the dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation is ergodic and rapidly mixing with respect to the Gibbs invariant measure when the parameter κ in small enough. In this case, successive transitions between the two regions are roughly uncorrelated and their dynamics can be coarse-grained to jumps in a two-state Markov chain whose rate can be deduced from the mean TST frequency. This is a regime in which the dynamics of the nonlinear wave equation displays a metastable behavior that is not fundamentally different from that observed in its stochastic counterpart in which random noise and damping terms are added to the equation. For larger κ, however, the dynamics either stops being ergodic, or its mixing time becomes larger than the inverse of the TST frequency

  6. Insight into the microscopic structure of an AdS black hole from a thermodynamical phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2015-09-11

    Comparing with an ordinary thermodynamic system, we investigate the possible microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole completely from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The number density of the black hole molecules is introduced to measure the microscopic degrees of freedom of the black hole. We found that the number density suffers a sudden change accompanied by a latent heat when the black hole system crosses the small-large black hole coexistence curve, while when the system passes the critical point, it encounters a second-order phase transition with a vanishing latent heat due to the continuous change of the number density. Moreover, the thermodynamic scalar curvature suggests that there is a weak attractive interaction between two black hole molecules. These phenomena might cast new insight into the underlying microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole.

  7. Exploring sustainability transitions in households: insights from real-life experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baedeker, Carolin; Buhl, Johannes; Greiff, Kathrin; Hasselkuß, Marco; Liedtke, Christa; Lukas, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Societal transformation towards sustainable consumption and production, especially in urban areas, is a key challenge. The design and implementation of sustainable product service systems (PSS) might be the initial point, in which private households play a major role. The Sustainable LivingLab research infrastructure was developed as an experimental setting for investigating consumption and production patterns in private households, especially to explore socio-technical innovations which are helpful to guide sustainability transitions. The suggested presentation describes results of several real-life experiments conducted in German households, e.g. the project SusLabNRW (North-Rhine Westphalia as part of the European SusLabNWE-Project), the EnerTransRuhr project as well as the PATHWAYS project that explore patterns of action, time use, social practices and the related resource use in private households. The presentation gives an overview of the employed methods and analysed data (qualitative interviews, social network analysis, survey on household activities and inventories and a sustainability assessment (resource profiles - MIPS household analysis). Households' resource consumption was calculated in all fields of activity to analyse social practices' impact. The presentation illustrates how aggregated data can inform scenario analysis and concludes with an outlook onto transition pathways at household level and socio-technical innovations in the fields of housing, nutrition and mobility.

  8. Interaction of carbon monoxide with transition metals: evolutionary insights into drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The perception that carbon monoxide (CO) is poisonous and life-threatening for mammalian organisms stems from its intrinsic propensity to bind iron in hemoglobin, a reaction that ultimately leads to impaired oxygen delivery to tissues. From evolutionary and chemical perspectives, however, CO is one of the most essential molecules in the formation of biological components and its interaction with transition metals is at the origin of primordial cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mammals have gradually evolved systems to finely control the synthesis and the sensing of this gaseous molecule. Cells are indeed continuously exposed to small quantities of CO produced endogenously during the degradation of heme by constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase enzymes. We have gradually learnt that heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide (CO) serves as a ubiquitous signaling mediator which could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. The development of transition metal carbonyls as prototypic carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) represents a novel stratagem for a safer delivery of CO-based pharmaceuticals in the treatment of various pathological disorders. This review will look back at evolution to analyze and argue that a dynamic interaction of CO with specific intracellular metal centers is the common denominator for the diversified beneficial effects mediated by this gaseous molecule.

  9. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  10. Role of Hydration Layer in Dynamical Transition in Proteins: Insights from Translational Self-Diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Prithwish K; English, Niall J

    2016-12-01

    Elucidation of the role of hydration water underpinning dynamical crossover in proteins has proven challenging. Indeed, many contradictory findings in the literature seek to establish either causal or correlative links between water and protein behavior. Here, via molecular dynamics, we compute the temperature dependence of mean-square displacement and translational self-diffusivities for both hen egg white lysozyme and its hydration layer from 190 to 300 K. We find that the protein's mobility increases sharply at ∼230 K, indicating dynamical onset; concerted motion with hydration-water molecules is evident up to ∼285 K, confirming dynamical correlation between them. Exploring underlying mechanisms of such concerted motion, we scrutinize the water-protein hydrogen-bonding network as a function of temperature, noting sharp deviation from linearity of the hydrogen bond number's profile with temperature originating near the protein dynamical transition. Our studies reveal a common temperature profile/dependence of self-diffusivity values of the protein, hydration water, and the bulk solvent, originating from a common dependence on the bulk solvent viscosity, ηS. The key mechanistic role adopted by the protein-water hydrogen bond network in relation to the onset of proteins' dynamical transition is also discussed.

  11. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  12. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  13. Thermodynamics of hyperbranched poly(ethylenimine) with isobutyramide residues during phase transition: an insight into the molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongna; Sun, Shengtong; Wu, Peiyi

    2011-07-21

    The thermodynamic behavior of hyperbranched poly(ethylenimine) with isobutyramide groups (HPEI-IBAm) during thermal-induced phase transition in water was investigated by turbidity measurement, calorimetric measurements (DSC), FT-IR, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Both turbidity and calorimetric measurements indicated a recoverable phase transition with a small hysteresis. Detailed FT-IR investigation gave an insight into its molecular mechanism about detailed group interaction during the heating-cooling process. The second derivative and Gaussian fit were carried out to separate three components of ν(C═O): 1648, 1625, and 1600 cm(-1), which are assigned to C═O···D-N H-bonds, single and double H-bonded carbonyl groups with water molecules, respectively. Quantitative analysis of amide I groups indicates a better revival compared to PNIPAM. The isosbestic point determination and 2D correlation analysis together with dynamic light scattering were applied to draw out the mechanism. Thermosensitive HPEI-IBAm dissolves in water exhibits small particles of ca. 3 nm at room temperature at first. As temperature increases, the polymer begins to shrink and water is driven out from the polymer. Finally, the polymer results in a hydrophobic sphere, which aggregates further for a relative stable state upon heating. Above LCST, C═O···D-N hydrogen bonds form with the disassociation of C═O···D(2)O, which helps in the dehydration of CH groups. Upon cooling, the driven force of the transition is the hydration of CH groups. Compared with linear-PNIPAM, the globule-like hyperbranched polymer has a high specific area which endows the groups with a high degree of freedom and more sufficient interaction with water.

  14. Structures and electronic properties of transition metal-containing ionic liquids: insights from ion pairs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weihong; Lu, Yunxiang; Liu, Yingtao; Li, Haiying; Peng, Changjun; Liu, Honglai; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-04-03

    Transition metal-containing ionic liquids (TM-ILs) have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years, due to their unique physical and chemical properties. In this work, several representative TM-ILs, such as the cations consisting of silver(I) center coordinated by two n-alkylimidazole ligands ([(C(n)(im))Ag(mim)](+)) and the anions involving mercury(II) (HgCl3(-)), zinc(II) (ZnCl3(-)), and rhenium(VII) (ReO4(-)), were investigated using density functional theory calculations. First, the structural and energetic properties of the ion pairs for these TM-ILs have been examined in detail and compared with properties for conventional ILs. It was found that the interactions between the cations and anions, including hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, in TM-ILs become weaker in strength than those in traditional ILs. In particular, the calculated geometric and energetic features compare fairly well with the experimental results, such as melting points and X-ray crystal structures of these TM-ILs. Then, the structures and energetics of ion-pair dimers for three ILs containing HgCl3(-), ZnCl3(-), and ReO4(-) were also explored, to gain a deeper understanding of the properties of TM-ILs. Finally, a survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) was undertaken to provide some crystallographic implications of TM-ILs.

  15. Democratic transitions, health institutions, and financial protection in the emerging economies: insights from Asia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Eduardo J

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, several emerging economies have introduced national health insurance programs ensuring access to health care while offering financial protection from out-of-pocket and catastrophic expenses. Nevertheless, in several nations these expenses continue to increase. While recent research has emphasized the lack of funding, poor policy design and corruption as the main culprits, little is known about the politics of establishing federal regulatory agencies ensuring that state governments adhere to national insurance reimbursement and coverage procedures. This article fills in this lacuna by providing an alternative perspective, one that accounts for differences between nations in the creation of regulatory institutions, with an emphasis instead on governing elite strategies to campaign on access to health care during transitions to democracy, civil societal mobilization, constitutional constraints and the national electoral incentives to overcome ineffective decentralization processes. The cases of Indonesia and China are introduced as examples of how and why their differences in this political process accounted for Indonesia's success and China's failure to ensure financial protection.

  16. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries. PMID:27230887

  17. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  18. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  19. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  20. Along-axis transition between narrow and wide rifts: Insights from 3D numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Calais, Eric; Burov, Evgueni; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Based on performed high-resolution rheologically consistent three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical models, we show that there is a significant difference in the influence of the rheological profile on rifting style in the case of dominant active (plume-activated) rifting compared to dominant passive (far-field tectonic stresses) rifting. Narrow rifting, conventionally attributed to cold strong lithosphere in passive rifting mode, may develop in weak hot ultra-stretched lithosphere during active rifting, after plume impingement on a tectonically pre-stressed lithosphere. In that case, initially ultra-wide small-amplitude rift patterns focus, in a few Myr, in large-scale faults that form a narrow rift. Also, wide rifting may develop during ultra-slow spreading of strong lithosphere, and "switch" to the narrow rifting upon plume impingement. For further understanding the mechanisms behind the interactions between the mantle plume and far-field stresses in case of realistic horizontally heterogeneous lithosphere, we have tested our models on the case of the central East African Rift system (EARS). The EARS south of the Ethiopian Rift Valley bifurcates in two branches (eastern, magma-rich and western, magma-poor) surrounding the strong Tanzanian craton. Broad zones of low seismic velocity observed throughout the upper mantle beneath the central part of the EARS are consistent with the spreading of a deep mantle plume. The extensional features and topographic expression of the Eastern rift varies significantly north-southward: in northern Kenya the area of deformation is very wide (some 150-250 km in E-W direction), to the south the rift narrows to 60-70 km, yet further to the south this localized deformation widens again. Here we investigate this transition between localized and wide rifting using thermo-mechanical numerical modeling that couples, in a dynamic sense, the rise of the upper mantle material with the deformation of the African lithosphere below the

  1. Effect of transition metal-doped Ni(211) for CO dissociation: Insights from DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kuiwei; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2017-03-01

    Density functional theory slab calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption and dissociation of CO over pure and M-doped Ni(211) (M = Fe, Co, Ru and Rh) with the aim to elucidate the effect of transition metal doping for CO activation. Doping the step edge of Ni(211) with Fe, Co and Ru is found to enhance the binding of CO in the initial state (IS) (in the sequence by the improvement degree: Fe > Ru > Co) as well as the co-adsorption of C and O in the final state (FS) (Ru > Fe > Co). In contrast, Rh doping is unfavorable both in the IS and in the FS. Analysis of the overall potential energy surfaces (PES) suggests CO dissociation is facilitated by Fe, Ru and Co doping both kinetically and thermodynamically, wherein Fe and Ru behave extraordinary. Interestingly, Fe substitute is slightly superior to Ru in kinetics whereas the contrary is the case in thermodynamics. Rh doping elevates the energy height from 0.97 eV on Ni(211) to 1.32 eV and releases 0.39 eV less heat relative to Ni(211), again manifesting a negative effect. Besides the classical Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship, we put forward another two neat linear relations, which can well describe the feature of CO dissociation. The differences of CO adsorption and activation in the IS over pure and doped Ni(211) surfaces are rationalized via electronic structure analysis. The findings presented herein are expected to provide theoretical guidance for catalyst design and optimization in relevant processes.

  2. Food Choices and Consequences for the Nutritional Status: Insights into Nutrition Transition in an Hospital Community.

    PubMed

    Piple, Jitendra; Gora, Ranjeet; Purbiya, Pragati; Puliyel, Ashish; Chugh, Parul; Bahl, Pinky; Puliyel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Although economic development is generally accompanied by improvements in the overall nutritional status of the country's population the 'nutritional transition' often involves a shift to high energy diets and less exercise with negative consequences. This pilot study was done to examine if education of parents operates at the household level to influence dietary choices and the nutritional status of children in a small community of hospital workers. 3 groups of persons with varying skill and education levels participated. Weighed food logs were used in all households to calculate 'adult equivalent' per-capita-consumption. Nutrients were calculated using nutrients calculator software. BMI was used to classify children as underweight, normal weight and overweight. 128 individuals participated from 30 families included 47 children. 10 children (21%) were underweight, 29 (62%) were normal and 8 (17%) were overweight. Energy consumption was highest in families with overweight children 2692 +/-502 compared to 2259 +/-359 in families with normal weight and 2031+/-354 in the family of underweight children. These differences were statistically significant. 42% underweight children belonged to Class 1 at the lowest skill level and there were no overweight children in this group. Most of the overweight children belonged to Class 2. In Class 3 there were no underweight children and the majority was normal weight children. Underweight children came from the poorer households. Per capita intake of the family as a whole correlated well with BMI in the children. There was increased obesity in middle income families belonging to Class 2-probably in families who move up the scale from deprivation. Nutritional status in children correlated mostly with maternal education status.

  3. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  4. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  5. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  6. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition…

  7. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  8. Laser flash photolysis generation of high-valent transition metal-oxo species: insights from kinetic studies in real time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Newcomb, Martin

    2008-03-01

    High-valenttransition metal-oxo species are active oxidizing species in many metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions in both Nature and the laboratory. In homogeneous catalytic oxidations, a transition metal catalyst is oxidized to a metal-oxo species by a sacrificial oxidant, and the activated transition metal-oxo intermediate oxidizes substrates. Mechanistic studies of these oxidizing species can provide insights for understanding commercially important catalytic oxidations and the oxidants in cytochrome P450 enzymes. In many cases, however, the transition metal oxidants are so reactive that they do not accumulate to detectable levels in mixing experiments, which have millisecond mixing times, and successful generation and direct spectroscopic characterization of these highly reactive transients remain a considerable challenge. Our strategy for understanding homogeneous catalysis intermediates employs photochemical generation of the transients with spectroscopic detection on time scales as short as nanoseconds and direct kinetic studies of their reactions with substrates by laser flash photolysis (LFP) methods. This Account describes studies of high-valent manganese- and iron-oxo intermediates. Irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) nitrates and chlorates or corrole-manganese(IV) chlorates resulted in homolytic cleavage of the O-X bonds in the ligands, whereas irradiation of porphyrin-manganese(III) perchlorates resulted in heterolytic cleavage of O-Cl bonds to give porphyrin-manganese(V)-oxo cations. Similar reactions of corrole- and porphyrin-iron(IV) complexes gave highly reactive transients that were tentatively identified as macrocyclic ligand-iron(V)-oxo species. Kinetic studies demonstrated high reactivity of the manganese(V)-oxo species, and even higher reactivities of the putative iron(V)-oxo transients. For example, second-order rate constants for oxidations of cis-cyclooctene at room temperature were 6 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for a corrole-iron(V)-oxo species

  9. Petrological insights on the effusive-explosive transitions of the Nisyros-Yali Volcanic Center, South Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Bachmann, Olivier; Ellis, Ben; Degruyter, Wim; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes erupting silicic, volatile-rich magmas can exhibit both effusive and explosive eruptions, even during closely spaced eruptive episodes. Understanding the effusive-explosive transition is fundamental in order to assess the hazards involved. Magma properties strongly influence the processes during magma ascent that determine the eruptive style. Here, we investigate the link between changing conditions in the magma reservoir and the eruptive style. The Quaternary Nisyros-Yali volcanic center, from the South Aegean Sea, provides an excellent natural laboratory to study this process. Over the last 60-100 kyrs, it produced a series of dacitic to rhyolitic eruptions that emplaced alternating effusive and explosive deposits (with explosive eruptions likely shortly following effusive ones). For this study, nine fresh and well-preserved units (five effusive and four explosive) were sampled and analyzed for whole-rock, groundmass glass and mineral compositions, in order to draw insights into the magma chamber processes and thermodynamic conditions that preceded both types of eruptions. Silicic magmas in Nisyros-Yali record a complex, open-system evolution, dominated by fractionation in mushy reservoirs at mid to upper crustal depths, frequently recharged by warmer input from below. Storage temperatures recorded by the amphibole-plagioclase thermometer span a wide range, and they are always cooler than the pre-eruptive temperatures yielded by Fe-Ti oxide thermometry for the same unit, whether it is effusive or explosive. However, magmas feeding effusive eruptions typically reached cooler conditions (expressed by the presence of low-Al, low-Ti amphiboles) than in the explosive cases. The difference between the pre-eruptive and the lowest storing temperatures in the Nisyros series are in the order of 10-30°C for explosive units, while the difference is of about 40-110°C for the effusive units. The Yali series does not perfectly fit this pattern, where explosive units

  10. Structural Insights into the Calcium-Mediated Allosteric Transition in the C-Terminal Domain of Calmodulin from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kukic, Predrag; Lundström, Patrik; Camilloni, Carlo; Evenäs, Johan; Akke, Mikael; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-12

    Calmodulin is a two-domain signaling protein that becomes activated upon binding cooperatively two pairs of calcium ions, leading to large-scale conformational changes that expose its binding site. Despite significant advances in understanding the structural biology of calmodulin functions, the mechanistic details of the conformational transition between closed and open states have remained unclear. To investigate this transition, we used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the Ca(2+)-saturated E140Q C-terminal domain variant. Using chemical shift restraints in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we obtained a high-resolution structural ensemble consisting of two conformational states and validated such an ensemble against three independent experimental data sets, namely, interproton nuclear Overhauser enhancements, (15)N order parameters, and chemical shift differences between the exchanging states. Through a detailed analysis of this structural ensemble and of the corresponding statistical weights, we characterized a calcium-mediated conformational transition whereby the coordination of Ca(2+) by just one oxygen of the bidentate ligand E140 triggers a concerted movement of the two EF-hands that exposes the target binding site. This analysis provides atomistic insights into a possible Ca(2+)-mediated activation mechanism of calmodulin that cannot be achieved from static structures alone or from ensemble NMR measurements of the transition between conformations.

  11. Insights into the Effects of Zinc Doping on Structural Phase Transition of P2-Type Sodium Nickel Manganese Oxide Cathodes for High-Energy Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuehang; Xu, Gui-Liang; Zhong, Guiming; Gong, Zhengliang; McDonald, Matthew J; Zheng, Shiyao; Fu, Riqiang; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Yang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    P2-type sodium nickel manganese oxide-based cathode materials with higher energy densities are prime candidates for applications in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. A systematic study combining in situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), ex situ X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) techniques was carried out to gain a deep insight into the structural evolution of P2-Na0.66Ni0.33-xZnxMn0.67O2 (x = 0, 0.07) during cycling. In situ HEXRD and ex situ TEM measurements indicate that an irreversible phase transition occurs upon sodium insertion-extraction of Na0.66Ni0.33Mn0.67O2. Zinc doping of this system results in a high structural reversibility. XAFS measurements indicate that both materials are almost completely dependent on the Ni(4+)/Ni(3+)/Ni(2+) redox couple to provide charge/discharge capacity. SS-NMR measurements indicate that both reversible and irreversible migration of transition metal ions into the sodium layer occurs in the material at the fully charged state. The irreversible migration of transition metal ions triggers a structural distortion, leading to the observed capacity and voltage fading. Our results allow a new understanding of the importance of improving the stability of transition metal layers.

  12. Synaptic plasticity modulates autonomous transitions between waking and sleep states: Insights from a Morris-Lecar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciszak, Marzena; Bellesi, Michele

    2011-12-01

    The transitions between waking and sleep states are characterized by considerable changes in neuronal firing. During waking, neurons fire tonically at irregular intervals and a desynchronized activity is observed at the electroencephalogram. This activity becomes synchronized with slow wave sleep onset when neurons start to oscillate between periods of firing (up-states) and periods of silence (down-states). Recently, it has been proposed that the connections between neurons undergo potentiation during waking, whereas they weaken during slow wave sleep. Here, we propose a dynamical model to describe basic features of the autonomous transitions between such states. We consider a network of coupled neurons in which the strength of the interactions is modulated by synaptic long term potentiation and depression, according to the spike time-dependent plasticity rule (STDP). The model shows that the enhancement of synaptic strength between neurons occurring in waking increases the propensity of the network to synchronize and, conversely, desynchronization appears when the strength of the connections become weaker. Both transitions appear spontaneously, but the transition from sleep to waking required a slight modification of the STDP rule with the introduction of a mechanism which becomes active during sleep and changes the proportion between potentiation and depression in accordance with biological data. At the neuron level, transitions from desynchronization to synchronization and vice versa can be described as a bifurcation between two different states, whose dynamical regime is modulated by synaptic strengths, thus suggesting that transition from a state to an another can be determined by quantitative differences between potentiation and depression.

  13. Microstructural, textural and thermal evolution of an exhumed strike-slip fault and insights into localization and rheological transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Bernroider, Manfred; Genser, Johann

    2016-04-01

    The presence of deep exhumed crustal rocks with a dominant but contrasting mineralogy results in shear concentration in the rheological weakest layer, which exhibits contrasting patterns of fabrics and thermal conditions during their formation. We tested a combination of methodologies including microstructural and textural investigations, geochronology and geothermometry on deformed rocks from exhumed strike-slip fault, Ailao Shan-Red River, SE, Asian. Results indicate that the exhumed deep crustal rocks since late Oligocene (ca. 28 Ma) to Pliocene (ca. 4 Ma) typically involve dynamic microstructural, textural and thermal evolution processes, which typically record a progressive deformation and syn-kinematic reactions from ductile to semi-ductile and brittle behavior during exhumation. This transformation also resulted in dramatic strength reduction that promoted strain localization along the strike-slip and transtensional faults. Detailed analysis has revealed the co-existence of microfabrics ranging from high-temperatures (granulite facies conditions) to overprinting low-temperatures (lower greenschist facies conditions). The high-temperature microstructures and textures are in part or entirely altered by subsequent, overprinting low-temperature shearing. In quartz-rich rocks, quartz was deformed in the dislocation creep regime and records transition of microfabrics and slip systems during decreasing temperature, which lasted until retrogression related to final exhumation. As a result, grain-size reduction associated by fluids circulating within the strike-slip fault zone at brittle-ductile transition leads to rock softening, which resulted in strain localization, weak rock rheology and the overall hot thermal structure of the crust. Decompression occurred during shearing and as a result of tectonic exhumation. All these results demonstrate that the ductile to ductile-brittle transition involves a combination of different deformation mechanisms, rheological

  14. Insights into the Effects of Zinc Doping on Structural Phase Transition of P2-Type Sodium Nickel Manganese Oxide Cathodes for High-Energy Sodium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xuehang; Xu, Gui-Liang; Zhong, Guiming; Gong, Zhengliang; McDonald, Matthew J.; Zheng, Shiyao; Fu, Riqiang; Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil; Yang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    P2-type sodium nickel manganese oxide-based cathode materials with higher energy densities are prime candidates for applications in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. A systematic study combining in situ high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), ex situ Xray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) techniques was carried out to gain a deep insight into the structural evolution of P2-Na0.66Ni0.33-xZnxMn0.67O2 (x = 0, 0.07) during cycling. In situ HEXRD and ex situ TEM measurements indicate that an irreversible phase transition occurs upon sodium insertion-extraction of Na0.66Ni0.33Mn0.67O2. Zinc doping of this system results in a high structural reversibility. XAFS measurements indicate that both materials are almost completely dependent on the Ni4+/Ni3+/ Ni2+ redox couple to provide charge/discharge capacity. SS-NMR measurements indicate that both reversible and irreversible migration of transition metal ions into the sodium layer occurs in the material at the fully charged state. The irreversible migration of transition metal ions triggers a structural distortion, leading to the observed capacity and voltage fading. Our results allow a new understanding of the importance of improving the stability of transition metal layers.

  15. Glaciation and erosion of Eastern Greenland at the Eocene-Oligocene transition: Insights from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Thomas; Steer, Philippe; Gallagher, Kerry; Szulc, Adam; Whittam, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Climate cooling through the Late Cenozoic was important in the evolution of glaciated mountain ranges. While the onset of accelerated Cenozoic exhumation is generally associated with the Quaternary at mid-latitudes, coincident with the local onset of glaciation, some high-latitude passive margins may have experienced earlier glaciation starting at 30-38 Ma or even 45 Ma. To address this issue, we use a set of new AFT data from 16 sub-vertical profiles sampled along the fjords of the central Eastern Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N, combined with new apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) data from selected profiles. To infer thermal histories and exhumation from these profiles, we use the software QTQt. The modeling results show a major phase of exhumation in the East Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N starting at 30±5 Ma. The spatial distribution of the exhumation shows that normal faulting on East Greenland margin had no resolvable influence on exhumation related to the cooling phase. However, the timing is coincident with the dramatic worldwide fall of surface temperature at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We therefore suggest that a transition from an Eocene fluvial to an Oligocene glacial-dominated landscape triggered a period of enhanced erosion. We infer from the thermal histories that around 2.7±1.9 km of erosion occurred close to the coast since the Eocene-Oligocene transition. This amount of erosion is consistent with the incision of the fjords and with the effective removal of 2.3±1.5 km of basalt thickness, deduced by the thermal modeling of a heating phase at 55±5 Ma. This phase of erosion is most strongly evidenced near the coast, suggesting either that continental ice extent was limited to the coastal areas or that erosion was less efficient outside these areas, leading to no obvious signal in thermochronometric data further north. Overall, this study provides the first onshore evidence of the onset of continental ice in East Greenland margin

  16. Increased alpha (8-12 Hz) activity during slow wave sleep as a marker for the transition from implicit knowledge to explicit insight.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during the night between two sessions of the NRT. Alpha (8-12 Hz) EEG power during slow wave sleep (SWS) emerged as a specific marker of the transformation of presleep implicit knowledge to postsleep explicit knowledge (ExK). Beta power during SWS was increased whenever ExK was attained after sleep, irrespective of presleep knowledge. No such EEG predictors of insight were found during Sleep Stage 2 and rapid eye movement sleep. These results support the view that it is neuronal memory reprocessing during sleep, in particular during SWS, that lays the foundations for restructuring those task-related representations in the brain that are necessary for promoting the gain of ExK.

  17. New insights into the transition pathway from nonspecific to specific complex of DNA with Escherichia coli integration host factor.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Paula; Kuznetsov, Serguei V; Ansari, Anjum

    2008-05-15

    To elucidate the nature of the transition-state ensemble along the reaction pathway from a nonspecific protein-DNA complex to the specific complex, we have carried out measurements of DNA bending/unbending dynamics on a cognate DNA substrate in complex with integration host factor (IHF), an architectural protein from E. coli that bends its cognate site by approximately 180 degrees . We use a laser temperature jump to perturb the IHF-DNA complex and monitor the relaxation kinetics with time-resolved FRET measurements on DNA substrates end-labeled with a FRET pair. Previously, we showed that spontaneous bending/kinking of DNA, from thermal disruption of base-pairing/-stacking interactions, may be the rate-limiting step in the formation of the specific complex (Kuznetsov, S. V.; Sugimura, S.; Vivas, P.; Crothers, D. M.; Ansari, A. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2006, 103, 18515). Here, we probe the effect of varying [KCl], which affects the stability of the complex, on this rate-limiting step. We find that below approximately 250 mM KCl, the observed relaxation kinetics are from the unimolecular bending/unbending of DNA, and the relaxation rate kr is independent of [KCl]. Above approximately 300 mM KCl, dissociation of the IHF-DNA complex becomes significant, and the observed relaxation process includes contributions from the association/dissociation step, with kr decreasing with increasing [KCl]. The DNA bending step occurs with a positive activation enthalpy, despite the large negative enthalpy change reported for the specific IHF-DNA complex (Holbrook, J. A.; Tsodikov, O. V.; Saecker, R. M.; Record, M. T., Jr. J. Mol. Biol. 2001, 310, 379). Our conclusion from these studies is that in the uphill climb to the transition state, the DNA is kinked, but with no release of ions, as indicated by the salt-independent behavior of k(r) at low [KCl]. Any release of ions in the unimolecular process, together with conformational changes in the protein-DNA complex that facilitate

  18. Stick-slip and creep behavior in lubricated granular material: Insights into the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2014-05-01

    Crustal deformation can occur via stick-slip events, viscous creep, or strain transients at variable rates. Here we explore such strain transients with physical experiments comprising a quasi-two-dimensional shear zone with elastic, acrylic discs and interstitial viscous silicone. Experiments of solely elastic discs produce stick-slip events and an overall (constant volume) strengthening. The addition of the viscous silicone enhances localization but does not greatly change the overall pattern of strengthening. It does, however, damp the stick-slip events, leading to transient, creep-like behavior that approaches the behavior of a Maxwell body. There is no gradual transition from frictional to viscous deformation with increasing amounts of silicone, suggesting that the mixed rheology is in effect as soon as an interstitial fluid is present. Our experiments support the hypothesis that a possible cause for strain transients in nature is an interstitial viscous phase in shear zones.

  19. Decay Rate of Correlated Real-Space Delocalization Measures: Insights into Chemical Bonding and Mott Transitions from Hydrogen Chains.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Bueno, A; Kohout, M; Martı́n Pendás, A

    2016-07-12

    We study in this contribution the spatial decay rate of real-space localization and delocalization indices in correlated systems. To that end, we examine Hubbard and quantum chemical models of simple cyclic hydrogen chains, showing that all descriptors of delocalization converge quickly toward the infinite chain limits. It is then shown that the localization index may be understood as a generalization of the standard order parameter in Mott insulator transitions and that the origin of the enigmatic sigmoidal profile of delocalization indices in chemical bond-breaking processes lies in the nonlinear mapping between intersite distances and correlation parameters. Although the long-range asymptotic decay of delocalization indices is exponential, we show that as the correlation parameter decreases quantum mechanical interference sets in and a switch to an oscillating pattern, related to core chemical concepts such as resonance or mesomerism, appears.

  20. Lunar-induced reproductive patterns in transitional habitats: Insights from a Mediterranean killifish inhabiting northern Adriatic saltmarshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavraro, Francesco; Varin, Cristiano; Malavasi, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    Estuaries and coastal lagoons play a key role in the functioning of coastal ecosystems and represent important natural areas for fish communities. Species living in these habitats often show specialised ecological and life history traits. The reproductive periodicity of a northern population of the Mediterranean killifish Aphanius fasciatus was assessed using the male courtship behaviour as indicator of reproductive motivation under laboratory conditions. Timing of egg development was also checked to further support the existence of a tidal-related periodicity. Using a statistical model applied to the intensity of courtship behaviour measured over a two-month period, a semilunar periodicity was revealed, with two main peaks corresponding with full moons. Both behaviours and timing of egg development were consistent with a periodicity of 14 days, suggesting that the tidal cycle drives the reproduction of A. fasciatus in Northern Adriatic saltmarshes. The findings are assessed with a comparative approach within both European and North American transitional waters.

  1. IGF-IR signaling in epithelial to mesenchymal transition and targeting IGF-IR therapy: overview and new insights.

    PubMed

    Li, Heming; Batth, Izhar Singh; Qu, Xiujuan; Xu, Ling; Song, Na; Wang, Ruoyu; Liu, Yunpeng

    2017-01-30

    The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and contributes to metastasis and drug resistance in several subtypes of tumors. In preclinical studies, targeting of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) showed promising anti-tumor effects. Unfortunately, high expectations for anti-IGF-IR therapy encountered challenge and disappointment in numerous clinical trials. This review summarizes the regulation of EMT by IGF-I/IGF-IR signaling pathway and drug resistance mechanisms of targeting IGF-IR therapy. Most importantly, we address several factors in the regulation of IGF-I/IGF-IR-associated EMT progression that may be potential predictive biomarkers in targeted therapy.

  2. On the mechanism(s) of membrane permeability transition in liver mitochondria of lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: insights from cadmium.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Savina, Margarita V

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca(2+) plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated "winter" mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd(2+) did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd(2+) enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the "winter" mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd(2+) or Ca(2+) plus Pi in the "winter" mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the "spring" lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd(2+) produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed.

  3. On the Mechanism(s) of Membrane Permeability Transition in Liver Mitochondria of Lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: Insights from Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Elena A.; Emelyanova, Larisa V.; Korotkov, Sergey M.; Brailovskaya, Irina V.; Savina, Margarita V.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd2+ and Ca2+ plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca2+ plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated “winter” mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd2+ did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the “winter” mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd2+ or Ca2+ plus Pi in the “winter” mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the “spring” lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd2+ produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed. PMID:24995321

  4. Dissecting Rotavirus Particle-Raft Interaction with Small Interfering RNAs: Insights into Rotavirus Transit through the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cuadras, Mariela A.; Bordier, Bruno B.; Zambrano, Jose L.; Ludert, Juan E.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of rotavirus morphogenesis, transport, and release have shown that although these viruses are released from the apical surface of polarized intestinal cells before cellular lysis, they do not follow the classic exocytic pathway. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that lipid rafts actively participate in the exit of rotavirus from the infected cell. In this study, we silenced the expression of VP4, VP7, and NSP4 by using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and evaluated the effect of shutting down the expression of these proteins on rotavirus-raft interactions. Silencing of VP4 and NSP4 reduced the association of rotavirus particles with rafts; in contrast, inhibition of VP7 synthesis slightly affected the migration of virions into rafts. We found that inhibition of rotavirus migration into lipid rafts, by either siRNAs or tunicamycin, also specifically blocked the targeting of VP4 to rafts, suggesting that the association of VP4 with rafts is mostly mediated by the formation of viral particles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We showed that two populations of VP4 exist, one small population that is independently targeted to rafts and a second large pool of VP4 whose association with rafts is mediated by particle formation in the ER. We also present evidence to support the hypothesis that assembly of VP4 into mature virions takes place in the late stages of transit through the ER. Finally, we analyzed the progression of rotavirus proteins in the exocytic pathway and found that VP4 and virion-assembled VP7 colocalized with ERGIC-53, suggesting that rotavirus particles transit through the intermediate compartment between the ER and the Golgi complex. PMID:16571810

  5. Insights into bonding interactions and excitation energies of 3d-4f mixed lanthanide transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2016-12-07

    In this contribution, a computational study of equatorial bound tetranuclear macrocycle (butylene linked) [LnZn(HOM(Bu))](3+) (Ln = La(3+), Ce(3+)) complexes was carried out. Here, the electronic structure, bonding interaction and excitation energies were studied within the relativistic density functional theory framework. From the electronic structure analysis, the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) were strongly localized in the d-orbitals of the Zn centers and the f-orbitals of the lanthanide ions. Besides, the inner MOs were found to exhibit a π-character from the organic part of the macrocyclic chain. EDA-NOCV was used as a tool for evaluating the bonding interaction, taking the trinuclear metallomacrocycle (ZnHOM(Bu)) and the lanthanide center as fragments. This analysis showed that the interaction between these fragments was slightly covalent; with this covalency being the result of a charge transfer from the metallomacrocyclic ring to the lanthanide. This phenomenon was observed in the deformation density channels obtained from the EDA-NOCV study; in which π- and σ-charge transfer was observed. Finally, the TD-DFT study of the excitation energies evidenced three sets of bands: the first set with the highest intensity represented the ligand to metal charge transfer bands; the second set could be attributed to the 3d-4f electronic transitions between the metal centers; and the third set represented the f-f bands found for the open-shell cerium complex. This class of complexes accomplishes the "antenna effect" principle, which states that highly absorptive transition-metal (TM) complexes can be used to enhance the luminescence of poorly emissive systems, and are introduced in this study as self-sensitizer bimetallic d-f systems with potential applications in near infra-red (NIR) technologies.

  6. Insights from a novel model of slow-transit constipation generated by partial outlet obstruction in the murine large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Dante J.; Grainger, Nathan; McCann, Conor J.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying slow-transit constipation (STC) are unclear. In 50% of patients with STC, some form of outlet obstruction has been reported; also an elongated colon has been linked to patients with STC. Our aims were 1) to develop a murine model of STC induced by partial outlet obstruction and 2) to determine whether this leads to colonic elongation and, consequently, activation of the inhibitory “occult reflex,” which may contribute to STC in humans. Using a purse-string suture, we physically reduced the maximal anal sphincter opening in C57BL/6 mice. After 4 days, the mice were euthanized (acutely obstructed), the suture was removed (relieved), or the suture was removed and replaced repeatedly (chronically obstructed, over 24–31 days). In partially obstructed mice, we observed increased cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels in muscularis and mucosa, an elongated impacted large bowel, slowed transit, nonpropagating colonic migrating motor complexes (CMMCs), a lack of mucosal reflexes, a depolarized circular muscle with slow-wave activity due to a lack of spontaneous inhibitory junction potentials, muscle hypertrophy, and CMMCs in mucosa-free preparations. Elongation of the empty obstructed colon produced a pronounced occult reflex. Removal of the obstruction or addition of a COX-2 antagonist (in vitro and in vivo) restored membrane potential, spontaneous inhibitory junction potentials, CMMC propagation, and mucosal reflexes. We conclude that partial outlet obstruction increases COX-2 leading to a hyperexcitable colon. This hyperexcitability is largely due to suppression of only descending inhibitory nerve pathways by prostaglandins. The upregulation of motility is suppressed by the occult reflex activated by colonic elongation. PMID:22961801

  7. Shell-Dependent Photoluminescence Studies Provide Mechanistic Insights into the Off-Grey-On Transitions of Blinking Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Bajwa, Pooja; Nguyen, Anh; Heyes, Colin D

    2017-03-28

    The majority of quantum dot (QD) blinking studies have used a model of switching between two distinct fluorescence intensity levels, "on" and "off". However, a distinct intermediate intensity level has been identified in some recent reports, a so-called "grey" or "dim" state, which has brought this binary model into question. While this grey state has been proposed to result from the formation of a trion, it is still unclear under which conditions it is present in a QD. By performing shell-dependent blinking studies on CdSe QDs, we report that the populations of the grey state and the on state are strongly dependent on both the shell material and its thickness. We found that adding a ZnS shell did not result in a significant population of the grey state. Using ZnSe as the shell material resulted in a slightly higher population of the grey state, although it was still poorly resolved. However, adding a CdS shell resulted in the population of a grey state, which depended strongly on its thickness up to 5 ML. Interestingly, while the frequency of transitions to and from the grey state showed a very strong dependence on CdS shell thickness, the brightness of and the dwell time in the grey state did not. Moreover, we found that the grey state acts as an on-pathway intermediate state between on and off states, with the thickness of the shell determining the transition probability between them. We also identified two types of blinking behavior in QDs, one that showed long-lived but lower intensity on states and another that showed short-lived but brighter on states that also depended on the shell thickness. Intensity-resolved single QD fluorescence lifetime analysis was used to identify the relationship between the various exciton decay pathways and the resulting intensity levels. We used this data to propose a model in which multiple on, grey, and off states exist whose equilibrium populations vary with time that give rise to the various intensity levels of single QDs

  8. Diversity in the molecular and cellular strategies of epithelium-to-mesenchyme transitions: Insights from the neural crest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMT) are often viewed as a unique event, they are characterized by a great diversity of cellular processes resulting in strikingly different outcomes. They may be complete or partial, massive or progressive, and lead to the complete disruption of the epithelium or leave it intact. Although the molecular and cellular mechanisms of EMT are being elucidated owing chiefly from studies on transformed epithelial cell lines cultured in vitro or from cancer cells, the basis of the diversity of EMT processes remains poorly understood. Clues can be collected from EMT occuring during embryonic development and which affect equally tissues of ectodermal, endodermal or mesodermal origins. Here, based on our current knowledge of the diversity of processes underlying EMT of neural crest cells in the vertebrate embryo, we propose that the time course and extent of EMT do not depend merely on the identity of the EMT transcriptional regulators and their cellular effectors but rather on the combination of molecular players recruited and on the possible coordination of EMT with other cellular processes. PMID:20559020

  9. High-pressure experiments provide insights into the Mantle Transition Zone history of chromitite in Tibetan ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Jin, Zhenmin; Griffin, William L.; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yao

    2017-04-01

    The chromitites in the Luobusha ophiolite (Tibet) have been proposed as messengers from the deep mantle. The exsolution of diopside, MgSiO3 and coesite in chromite from these bodies has been used to argue that the chromite previously existed as a phase with the CaFe2O4 structure (idealized composition (Mg, Fe)(Cr, Al)2O4), an indicator of Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ) conditions. However, evidence about the stability of the CaFe2O4-structured phase and its formation mechanism are limited. Here we present experimental evidence for the depth of metamorphism and subsequent petrogenesis of the podiform chromitite. The CaFe2O4-structured phase was observed at ∼14-18 GPa, and can contain several weight percent of CaO and SiO2. Partial-melting experiments show that chromite cannot be formed through direct crystallization in the MTZ. Therefore, we suggest that the Tibetan chromitites formed under shallow conditions, were then subducted, and were metamorphosed near the top of MTZ. During the tectonics/buoyancy-driven ascent of the enclosing peridotites, the CaFe2O4-phase transformed to chromite at depths of ∼400 km, accompanied by the simultaneous exsolution of diopside and other phases, which were then preserved during transportation to shallow depths. These observations provide a new window into the processes of mantle geodynamics, and constraints on mantle convection in major collision zones.

  10. Unravelling the deep fluid composition in the Taupo Volcanic Zone: insight into the magmatic-hydrothermal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Lewis, B.; Boseley, C.; Begue, F.; Rae, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Ngatamariki Geothermal Field represents the only location in the Taupo Volcanic Zone where geothermal well drilling has intercepted intrusive rocks with a high temperature alteration halo. Thus it presents the perfect opportunity to study the magmatic-hydrothermal transition in the TVZ by characterising the nature of the deep magmatic fluids inferred to be linked to the geothermal heat source. In addition to the calc-alkaline Ngatamariki diorite (encountered in a 1985 drillhole; Wood, 1986), recent (2012) geothermal drilling encountered a quartz-phyric tonalite. After emplacement, these intrusions cooled, degassed, and produced a high temperature alteration halo, associated with intense quartz-illite/muscovite-pyrite alteration and pervasive quartz replacement of the overlying tuff-breccia. This alteration zone contains abundant high temperature quartz veins, similar to quartz veining stockwork characteristic of Porphyry Cu (±Au-Mo) systems. The recently encountered quartz-phyric tonalite contains common phenocrysts of quartz and pseudomorphs of plagioclase and minor ferromagnesian minerals (predominantly amphiboles) in a medium-grained, magnetite-bearing felsic groundmass. Quartz phenocrysts are generally rounded and embayed quartz eyes (≤1 cm diam.), or skeletal crystals. SEM-CL imaging was used to map the crystallisation history of the phenocrystic quartz in the tonalite and the quartz veins cross-cutting the diorite and overlying pyroclastic rocks. The quartz eyes show a complex growth history with zones of dissolution and recrystallisation. Skeletal quartz crystals also have complex zoning and are outlined by myrmekitic textures and/or dendritic overgrowths with the groundmass (granophyric textures). These features form in granites due to undercooling during shallow magmatic emplacement and are often associated with the exsolution of a volatile phase. Cathodoluminescence indicates that the edges of the quartz veins are lined by euhedral crystals

  11. Spin-orbit angle measurements for six southern transiting planets. New insights into the dynamical origins of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Collier Cameron, A.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, M.; Hebb, L.; Hellier, C.; Loeillet, B.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Context. Several competing scenarios for planetary-system formation and evolution seek to explain how hot Jupiters came to be so close to their parent stars. Most planetary parameters evolve with time, making it hard to distinguish between models. The obliquity of an orbit with respect to the stellar rotation axis is thought to be more stable than other parameters such as eccentricity. Most planets, to date, appear aligned with the stellar rotation axis; the few misaligned planets so far detected are massive (> 2 MJ). Aims: Our goal is to measure the degree of alignment between planetary orbits and stellar spin axes, to search for potential correlations with eccentricity or other planetary parameters and to measure long term radial velocity variability indicating the presence of other bodies in the system. Methods: For transiting planets, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect allows the measurement of the sky-projected angle β between the stellar rotation axis and a planet's orbital axis. Using the HARPS spectrograph, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for six transiting hot Jupiters found by the WASP consortium. We combine these with long term radial velocity measurements obtained with CORALIE. We used a combined analysis of photometry and radial velocities, fitting model parameters with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. After obtaining β we attempt to statistically determine the distribution of the real spin-orbit angle ψ. Results: We found that three of our targets have β above 90°: WASP-2b: β = 153°+11-15, WASP-15b: β = 139.6°+5.2-4.3 and WASP-17b: β = 148.5°+5.1-4.2; the other three (WASP-4b, WASP-5b and WASP-18b) have angles compatible with 0°. We find no dependence between the misaligned angle and planet mass nor with any other planetary parameter. All six orbits are close to circular, with only one firm detection of eccentricity e = 0.00848+0.00085-0.00095 in WASP-18b. No long-term radial acceleration was detected for any of the targets

  12. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  13. New insight into magneto-structural phase transitions in layered TbMn2Ge2-based compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chunsheng; Li, Guoxing; Wang, Jianli; Hutchison, W. D.; Ren, Q. Y.; Deng, Zhenyan; Ma, Guohong; Dou, Shixue; Campbell, S. J.; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    The Tb1−xYxMn2Ge2 series (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) compounds are found to exhibit two magnetic phase transitions with decreasing temperature: from the paramagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic interlayer state at TNinter and from an antiferromagnetic interlayer structure to a collinear ferrimagnetic interlayer structure at TCinter. Compared with the slight change of TNinter (409 K, 410 K and 417 K for x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2 respectively), the replacement of Y for Tb leads to a significant decrease in TCinter from 97.5 K for x = 0 to 74.6 K for x = 0.2. The variation in TCinter can be ascribed to the combination of two effects: (1) chemical pressure and (2) magnetic dilution effect by Y substitution for Tb. Besides, a strong anisotropic magnet-volume effect has been detected around TCinter in all compounds with Δa/a = 0.125%, 0.124% and 0.130% for x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2, respectively while no obvious effect is detected along the c-axis. The maximum magnetic entropy change were found to be −ΔSmax = 9.1 J kg−1 K−1, 11.9 J kg−1 K−1 and 6.3 J kg−1 K−1 with a field change from 0 T to 5 T for x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 respectively. PMID:28374763

  14. From Resilience to Vulnerability: Mechanistic Insights into the Effects of Stress on Transitions in Critical Period Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Bridget L.; Graham, Bronwyn M.; Li, Stella; Richardson, Rick

    2013-01-01

    While early experiences are proposed to be important for the emergence of anxiety and other mental health problems, there is little empirical research examining the impact of such experiences on the development of emotional learning. Of the research that has been performed in this area, however, a complex picture has emerged in which the maturation of emotion circuits is influenced by the early experiences of the animal. For example, under typical laboratory rearing conditions infant rats rapidly forget learned fear associations (infantile amnesia) and express a form of extinction learning which is relapse-resistant (i.e., extinction in infant rats may be due to fear erasure). In contrast, adult rats exhibit very long-lasting memories of past learned fear associations, and express a form of extinction learning that is relapse-prone (i.e., the fear returns in a number of situations). However, when rats are reared under stressful conditions then they exhibit adult-like fear retention and extinction behaviors at an earlier stage of development (i.e., good retention of learned fear and relapse-prone extinction learning). In other words, under typical rearing conditions infant rats appear to be protected from exhibiting anxiety whereas after adverse rearing fear learning appears to make those infants more vulnerable to the later development of anxiety. While the effects of different experiences on infant rats’ fear retention and extinction are becoming better documented, the mechanisms which mediate the early transition seen following stress remain unclear. Here we suggest that rearing stress may lead to an early maturation of the molecular and cellular signals shown to be involved in the closure of critical period plasticity in sensory modalities (e.g., maturation of GABAergic neurons, development of perineuronal nets), and speculate that these signals could be manipulated in adulthood to reopen infant forms of emotional learning (i.e., those that favor resilience

  15. New Insights on Planet Formation in WASP-47 from a Simultaneous Analysis of Radial Velocities and Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Deck, Katherine M.; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A.; Agol, Eric; Lee, Eve J.; Becker, Juliette C.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Hirsch, Lea; Benneke, Björn

    2017-06-01

    Measuring precise planet masses, densities, and orbital dynamics in individual planetary systems is an important pathway toward understanding planet formation. The WASP-47 system has an unusual architecture that motivates a complex formation theory. The system includes a hot Jupiter (“b”) neighbored by interior (“e”) and exterior (“d”) sub-Neptunes, and a long-period eccentric giant planet (“c”). We simultaneously modeled transit times from the Kepler K2 mission and 118 radial velocities to determine the precise masses, densities, and Keplerian orbital elements of the WASP-47 planets. Combining RVs and TTVs provides a better estimate of the mass of planet d (13.6+/- 2.0 {M}\\oplus ) than that obtained with only RVs (12.75+/- 2.70 {M}\\oplus ) or TTVs (16.1+/- 3.8 {M}\\oplus ). Planets e and d have high densities for their size, consistent with a history of photoevaporation and/or formation in a volatile-poor environment. Through our RV and TTV analysis, we find that the planetary orbits have eccentricities similar to the solar system planets. The WASP-47 system has three similarities to our own solar system: (1) the planetary orbits are nearly circular and coplanar, (2) the planets are not trapped in mean motion resonances, and (3) the planets have diverse compositions. None of the current single-process exoplanet formation theories adequately reproduce these three characteristics of the WASP-47 system (or our solar system). We propose that WASP-47, like the solar system, formed in two stages: first, the giant planets formed in a gas-rich disk and migrated to their present locations, and second, the high-density sub-Neptunes formed in situ in a gas-poor environment.

  16. Insight into the Structural and Biological Relevance of the T/R Transition of the N-Terminus of the B-Chain in Human Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminus of the B-chain of insulin may adopt two alternative conformations designated as the T- and R-states. Despite the recent structural insight into insulin–insulin receptor (IR) complexes, the physiological relevance of the T/R transition is still unclear. Hence, this study focused on the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of human insulin analogues structurally locked in expected R- or T-states. Sites B3, B5, and B8, capable of affecting the conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain, were subjects of rational substitutions with amino acids with specific allowed and disallowed dihedral φ and ψ main-chain angles. α-Aminoisobutyric acid was systematically incorporated into positions B3, B5, and B8 for stabilization of the R-state, and N-methylalanine and d-proline amino acids were introduced at position B8 for stabilization of the T-state. IR affinities of the analogues were compared and correlated with their T/R transition ability and analyzed against their crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures. Our data revealed that (i) the T-like state is indeed important for the folding efficiency of (pro)insulin, (ii) the R-state is most probably incompatible with an active form of insulin, (iii) the R-state cannot be induced or stabilized by a single substitution at a specific site, and (iv) the B1–B8 segment is capable of folding into a variety of low-affinity T-like states. Therefore, we conclude that the active conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain must be different from the “classical” T-state and that a substantial flexibility of the B1–B8 segment, where GlyB8 plays a key role, is a crucial prerequisite for an efficient insulin–IR interaction. PMID:24819248

  17. Genome-wide transcriptomic analyses provide insights into the lifestyle transition and effector repertoire of Leptosphaeria maculans during the colonization of Brassica napus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, Parham; Ma, Lisong; Wang, Haiyan; Borhan, M Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Molecular interaction between the causal agent of blackleg disease, Leptosphaeria maculans (Lm), and its host, Brassica napus, is largely unknown. We applied a deep RNA-sequencing approach to gain insight into the pathogenicity mechanisms of Lm and the defence response of B. napus. RNA from the infected susceptible B. napus cultivar Topas DH16516, sampled at 2-day intervals (0-8 days), was sequenced and used for gene expression profiling. Patterns of gene expression regulation in B. napus showed multifaceted defence responses evident by the differential expression of genes encoding the pattern recognition receptor CERK1 (chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1), receptor like proteins and WRKY transcription factors. The up-regulation of genes related to salicylic acid and jasmonic acid at the initial and late stages of infection, respectively, provided evidence for the biotrophic and necrotrophic life stages of Lm during the infection of B. napus cotyledons. Lm transition from biotrophy to necrotropy was also supported by the expression function of Lm necrosis and ethylene-inducing (Nep-1)-like peptide. Genes encoding polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, with potential roles in pathogenicity, were up-regulated at 6-8 days after inoculation. Among other plant defence-related genes differentially regulated in response to Lm infection were genes involved in the reinforcement of the cell wall and the production of glucosinolates. Dual RNA-sequencing allowed us to define the Lm candidate effectors expressed during the infection of B. napus. Several candidate effectors suppressed Bax-induced cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamaina leaves. © 2015 Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada Molecular Plant Pathology © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

  18. An insight into the interaction of L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+): a gas phase theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with L-proline has been studied. Three modes of interaction have been considered: salt bridged (SB), involving binding in a bi-dentate manner through the carboxylate group of L-proline, charge solvated 1 (CS1) involving carbonyl and hydroxyl oxygen, and charge solvated 2 (CS2) involving carbonyl oxygen and the lone pair of the nitrogen atom. All calculations including geometry optimization, metal ion affinities (MIAs), and frequency calculations of the binding structures of Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) to L-proline were calculated using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT-B3LYP) method. All three cations were found to bind preferentially in a zwitterionic (SB) coordination pattern with the metal ion affinity in the order Ni(2+) ˃ Co(2+) ˃ Fe(2+) in all binding forms. The nature of the binding interaction between metal cations and L-proline was found to be mainly electrostatic. Comparison of the infrared vibrations of the C=O, the N-H and the O-H groups of free L-proline with L-proline-M(2+) in both CS1 and CS2 complex structures indicated a considerable shift to lower frequency during complexation. In order to gain more insight into the nature of the interaction of L-proline with group VIIIB metal ions, comparison of the interaction of L-proline with other cations such as (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)) was made. Graphical Abstract L-proline with the transition metal cations Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2.)

  19. Latest Pannonian and Quaternary evolution at the transition between Eastern Alps and Pannonian Basin: new insights from geophysical, sedimentological and geochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámolyi, A.; Salcher, B.; Draganits, E.; Exner, U.; Wagreich, M.; Gier, S.; Fiebig, M.; Lomax, J.; Surányi, G.; Diel, M.; Zámolyi, F.

    2017-07-01

    The transition zone between Eastern Alps and Pannonian Basin is a key area for the investigation of the interplay between regional uplift, local tectonic subsidence and depositional environment. Our study area, the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain, is characterized by gentle hills, plateaus and depressions, of which several are filled by lakes—including one of Austria's largest and shallowest lakes, Lake Neusiedl. Geological investigation is hampered by the scarcity of outcrops, and thus direct observation of sedimentological or structural features is difficult. Despite a long research history in the area, a consistent landscape evolution model considering all relevant constraints is lacking so far. In this study, we apply multidisciplinary methods to decipher the complex tectonic and fluvial depositional evolution of the region. Local data from shallow-lake drilling and seismic investigation are combined with regional data from industrial seismics and core data to gain new insights into the latest Pannonian (Late Miocene) and Quaternary evolution. Shallow-lake seismic data show the erosionally truncated Pannonian sediments dipping and thickening toward southeast, toward the modern depocenter of the Little Hungarian Plain. Overlying Quaternary fluvial sediments show a very similar thickening trend except for the area on the plateau north of the lake indicating ongoing subsidence in major parts of the basin. Drill cores from locations along the lake seismic lines were analyzed concerning their age, mineralogy and heavy minerals and compared with outcrop samples from the surrounding plains and the plateau to derive indications on sediment provenance. A key observation is the apparent lack of a significant gravel layer on top of the tilted Pannonian sediments beneath Lake Neusiedl. Small-scale faults can be observed in the lake seismic sections along with key sedimentary features. Significant differences of the current elevation of the top Pannonian

  20. Latest Pannonian and Quaternary evolution at the transition between Eastern Alps and Pannonian Basin: new insights from geophysical, sedimentological and geochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámolyi, A.; Salcher, B.; Draganits, E.; Exner, U.; Wagreich, M.; Gier, S.; Fiebig, M.; Lomax, J.; Surányi, G.; Diel, M.; Zámolyi, F.

    2016-08-01

    The transition zone between Eastern Alps and Pannonian Basin is a key area for the investigation of the interplay between regional uplift, local tectonic subsidence and depositional environment. Our study area, the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain, is characterized by gentle hills, plateaus and depressions, of which several are filled by lakes—including one of Austria's largest and shallowest lakes, Lake Neusiedl. Geological investigation is hampered by the scarcity of outcrops, and thus direct observation of sedimentological or structural features is difficult. Despite a long research history in the area, a consistent landscape evolution model considering all relevant constraints is lacking so far. In this study, we apply multidisciplinary methods to decipher the complex tectonic and fluvial depositional evolution of the region. Local data from shallow-lake drilling and seismic investigation are combined with regional data from industrial seismics and core data to gain new insights into the latest Pannonian (Late Miocene) and Quaternary evolution. Shallow-lake seismic data show the erosionally truncated Pannonian sediments dipping and thickening toward southeast, toward the modern depocenter of the Little Hungarian Plain. Overlying Quaternary fluvial sediments show a very similar thickening trend except for the area on the plateau north of the lake indicating ongoing subsidence in major parts of the basin. Drill cores from locations along the lake seismic lines were analyzed concerning their age, mineralogy and heavy minerals and compared with outcrop samples from the surrounding plains and the plateau to derive indications on sediment provenance. A key observation is the apparent lack of a significant gravel layer on top of the tilted Pannonian sediments beneath Lake Neusiedl. Small-scale faults can be observed in the lake seismic sections along with key sedimentary features. Significant differences of the current elevation of the top Pannonian

  1. The effectiveness of Light Rail transit in achieving regional CO2 emissions targets is linked to building energy use: insights from system dynamics modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cities worldwide face the challenges of accommodating a growing population, while reducing emissions to meet climate mitigation targets. Public transit investments are often proposed as a way to curb emissions while maintaining healthy urban economies. However, cities face a syst...

  2. Transitioning HIV-infected adolescents to adult care at 14 clinics across the United States: using adolescent and adult providers' insights to create multi-level solutions to address transition barriers.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Chambers, Brittany D; Ma, Alice; Ware, Samuella; Lee, Sonia; Fortenberry, J Dennis; The Adolescent Trials Network

    2017-10-01

    HIV-infected adolescents have disproportionately low rates of care retention and viral suppression. Approximately half disengage from care while transitioning to adult clinics, in part due to fragmented care systems and lack of streamlined protocols. We conducted 58 qualitative interviews with social service and health care providers across 14 Adolescent Trials Network clinics (n = 28) and 20 adult clinics that receive transitioning adolescents (n = 30) from August 2015-June 2016. We used the constant comparative approach to examine processes, barriers, and facilitators of adult care transition. Transition barriers coalesced around three levels. Structural: insurance eligibility, transportation, and HIV-related stigma; Clinical: inter-clinic communication, differences in care cultures, and resource/personnel limitations; and Individual: adolescents' transition readiness and developmental capacity. Staff-initiated solutions (e.g., grant-funded transportation) were often unsustainable and applied individual-level solutions to structural-level barriers. Comprehensive initiatives, which develop collaborative policies and protocols that support providers' ability to match the solution and barrier level (i.e., structural-to-structural), are sorely needed. These initiatives should also support local systematic planning to facilitate inter-clinic structures and communication. Such approaches will help HIV-infected adolescents transition to adult care and improve long-term health outcomes.

  3. Novel Insights Into The Mode of Inhibition of Class A SHV-1 Beta-Lactamases Revealed by Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    W Ke; J Sampson; C Ori; F Prati; S Drawz; C Bethel; R Bonomo; F van den Akker

    2011-12-31

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are potent class A and C {beta}-lactamase inactivators and are of particular interest due to their reversible nature mimicking the transition state. Here, we present structural and kinetic data describing the inhibition of the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase, a clinically important enzyme found in Klebsiella pneumoniae, by BATSI compounds possessing the R1 side chains of ceftazidime and cefoperazone and designed variants of the latter, compounds 1 and 2. The ceftazidime and cefoperazone BATSI compounds inhibit the SHV-1 {beta}-lactamase with micromolar affinity that is considerably weaker than their inhibition of other {beta}-lactamases. The solved crystal structures of these two BATSIs in complex with SHV-1 reveal a possible reason for SHV-1's relative resistance to inhibition, as the BATSIs adopt a deacylation transition state conformation compared to the usual acylation transition state conformation when complexed to other {beta}-lactamases. Active-site comparison suggests that these conformational differences might be attributed to a subtle shift of residue A237 in SHV-1. The ceftazidime BATSI structure revealed that the carboxyl-dimethyl moiety is positioned in SHV-1's carboxyl binding pocket. In contrast, the cefoperazone BATSI has its R1 group pointing away from the active site such that its phenol moiety moves residue Y105 from the active site via end-on stacking interactions. To work toward improving the affinity of the cefoperazone BATSI, we synthesized two variants in which either one or two extra carbons were added to the phenol linker. Both variants yielded improved affinity against SHV-1, possibly as a consequence of releasing the strain of its interaction with the unusual Y105 conformation.

  4. Analysis of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase family provides insight into vertebrate adaptation to different oxygen levels during the water-to-land transition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chengchi; Guan, Lihong; Zhong, Zaixuan; Gan, Xiaoni; He, Shunping

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important events in vertebrate evolutionary history is the water-to-land transition, during which some morphological and physiological changes occurred in concert with the loss of specific genes in tetrapods. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition have not been well explored. To explore vertebrate adaptation to different oxygen levels during the water-to-land transition, we performed comprehensive bioinformatics and experimental analysis aiming to investigate the NAMPT family in vertebrates. NAMPT, a rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of NAD+ biosynthesis, is critical for cell survival in a hypoxic environment, and a high level of NAMPT significantly augments oxidative stress in normoxic environments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that NAMPT duplicates arose from a second round whole-genome duplication event. NAMPTA existed in all classes of vertebrates, whereas NAMPTB was only found in fishes and not tetrapods. Asymmetric evolutionary rates and purifying selection were the main evolutionary forces involved. Although functional analysis identified several functionally divergent sites during NAMPT family evolution, in vitro experimental data demonstrated that NAMPTA and NAMPTB were functionally conserved for NAMPT enzymatic function in the NAD+ salvage pathway. In situ hybridization revealed broad NAMPTA and NAMPTB expression patterns, implying regulatory functions over a wide range of developmental processes. The morpholino-mediated knockdown data demonstrated that NAMPTA was more essential than NAMPTB for vertebrate embryo development. We propose that the retention of NAMPTB in water-breathing fishes and its loss in air-breathing tetrapods resulted from vertebrate adaptation to different oxygen levels during the water-to-land transition. © 2015 FEBS.

  5. Pulmonary O₂ uptake kinetics during moderate-intensity exercise transitions initiated from low versus elevated metabolic rates: insights from manipulations in cadence.

    PubMed

    Keir, Daniel A; Nederveen, Joshua P; Paterson, Donald H; Kowalchuk, John M

    2014-12-01

    The rate of adjustment (τ) of phase II pulmonary O₂ uptake (VO₂p) is slower when exercise transitions are initiated from an elevated baseline work rate (WR) and metabolic rate (MR). In this study, combinations of cycling cadence (40 vs. 90 rpm) and external WR were used to examine the effect of prior MR on τVO₂p. Eleven young men completed transitions from 20 W (BSL) to 90% lactate threshold, with transitions performed as two steps of equal ∆WR (LS, lower step; US, upper step), while maintaining a cadence of (1) 40 rpm, (2) 90 rpm, and (3) 40 rpm but with the WRs elevated to match the higher VO₂p associated with 90 rpm cycling (40MATCH); transitions lasted 6 min. VO₂p was measured breath-by-breath using mass spectrometry and turbinometry; vastus lateralis muscle deoxygenation [HHb] was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. VO₂p and HHb responses were modeled using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. VO₂p at BSL, LS and US was similar for 90 rpm and 40MATCH, but greater than in 40 rpm. Compared to 90 rpm, τVO₂p at 40 rpm was shorter (p < 0.05) in LS (18 ± 5 vs. 28 ± 8 s) but not in US (26 ± 8 vs. 33 ± 9 s), and at 40MATCH, τVO₂p was lower (p < 0.05) (19 ± 6 s) in LS but not in US (34 ± 13 s) despite differing external WR and ∆WR. A similar overall adjustment of [HHb] and VO₂p in LS and US across conditions suggested dynamic matching between microvascular blood flow and O₂ utilization. Prior MR (rather than external WR per se) plays a role in the dynamic adjustment of pulmonary (and muscle) VO₂p.

  6. Failure and frictional sliding envelopes in three-dimensional stress space: Insights from Distinct Element Method (DEM) models and implications for the brittle-ductile transition of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Rocks deformed at low confining pressure are brittle, meaning that after peak stress the strength decreases to a residual value determined by frictional sliding. The difference between the peak and residual value is the stress drop. At high confining pressure, however, no stress drop occurs. The transition pressure at which no loss in strength occurs is a possible definition of the brittle-ductile transition. The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is used to illustrate how this type of brittle-ductile transition emerges from a simple model in which rock is idealised as an assemblage of cemented spherical unbreakable grains. These bonded particle models are subjected to loading under constant mean stress and stress ratio conditions using distortional periodic space, which eliminates possible boundary effects arising from the usage of rigid loading platens. Systematic variation of both mean stress and stress ratio allowed determination of the complete three dimensional yield, peak stress and residual strength envelopes. The models suggest that the brittle-ductile transition is a mean stress and stress ratio dependent space curve, which cannot be adequately described by commonly used failure criteria (e.g., Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager). The model peak strength data exhibit an intermediate principal stress dependency which is, at least qualitatively, similar to that observed for natural rocks deformed under polyaxial laboratory conditions. Comparison of failure envelopes determined for bonded particle models with and without bond shear failure suggests that the non-linear pressure dependence of strength (concave failure envelopes) is, at high mean stress, the result of microscopic shear failure, a result consistent with earlier two-dimensional numerical multiple-crack simulations [D. A. Lockner & T. R. Madden, JGR, Vol. 96, No. B12, 1991]. Our results may have implications for a wide range of geophysical research areas, including the strength of the crust, the seismogenic

  7. A comparative study of claisen and cope rearrangements catalyzed by chorismate mutase. An insight into enzymatic efficiency: transition state stabilization or substrate preorganization?

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicente; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2004-01-14

    In this work we present a detailed analysis of the activation free energies and averaged interactions for the Claisen and Cope rearrangements of chorismate and carbachorismate catalyzed by Bacillus subtilischorismate mutase (BsCM) using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation methods. In gas phase, both reactions are described as concerted processes, with the activation free energy for carbachorismate being about 10-15 kcal mol(-)(1) larger than for chorismate, at the AM1 and B3LYP/6-31G levels. Aqueous solution and BsCM active site environments reduce the free energy barriers for both reactions, due to the fact that in these media the two carboxylate groups can be approached more easily than in the gas phase. The enzyme specifically reduces the activation free energy of the Claisen rearrangement about 3 kcal mol(-)(1) more than that for the Cope reaction. This result is due to a larger transition state stabilization associated to the formation of a hydrogen bond between Arg90 and the ether oxygen. When this oxygen atom is changed by a methylene group, the interaction is lost and Arg90 moves inside the active site establishing stronger interactions with one of the carboxylate groups. This fact yields a more intense rearrangement of the substrate structure. Comparing two reactions in the same enzyme, we have been able to obtain conclusions about the relative magnitude of the substrate preorganization and transition state stabilization effects. Transition state stabilization seems to be the dominant effect in this case.

  8. On the abnormal "forced hydration" behavior of P(MEA-co-OEGA) aqueous solutions during phase transition from infrared spectroscopic insights.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-06-21

    Turbidity, DLS and FTIR measurements in combination with the perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) technique and 2D correlation spectroscopy (2Dcos) analysis have been utilized to investigate the LCST-type transition of a oligo ethylene glycol acrylate-based copolymer (POEGA) in aqueous solutions in this work. As demonstrated in turbidity and DLS curves, the macroscopic phase separation was sharp and slightly concentration dependent. Moreover, individual chemical groups along polymer chains also display abrupt changes in temperature-variable IR spectra. However, according to conventional IR analysis, the C-H groups present obvious dehydration, whereas C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O-C groups exhibit anomalous "forced hydration" during the steep phase transition. From these analyses together with the PCMW and 2Dcos results, it has been confirmed that the hydrophobic interaction among polymer chains drove the chain collapse and dominated the phase transition. In addition, the unexpected enhanced hydration behavior of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O-C groups was induced by forced hydrogen bonding between polar groups along polymer chains and entrapped water molecules in the aggregates, which originated from the special chemical structure of POEGA.

  9. Mechanism of mechanically induced optoelectronic and spintronic phase transitions in 1D graphene spirals: insight into the role of interlayer coupling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Bingyi; Zhao, Wenyu; Jiang, Yongyuan; Liu, Linhua; Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Guiling; Tian, Wei Quan

    2017-07-13

    Graphene spirals (GSs), an emerging carbonic nano-material with a Riemann surface, demonstrate extraordinary topological electronic signatures: interlayer coupling similar to van der Waals (vdW) heterojunctions and intralayer coupling within the spiral conformation. Based on the state-of-the-art first-principles technique, the electronic properties of the periphery-modified GSs with geometry deformation are explored under axial strain. For all GSs, there emerges a remarkable phase transition from metal to semiconductor, due to the attenuation of interlayer "σ-bonds" reducing the interlayer tunneling probability for carriers. Analogous to graphene, GSs consist of bipartite sublattices with carbonic sp(2) hybridization as well. Once the balance of the bipartite sublattices is lost, there will emerge intense edge (corner) states, contributed by the pz orbitals. In contrast to isolated graphene nanoflakes, GSs realize the continuous spin-polarized edge (corner) state coupling with 1D morphology. However, the spin-polarization is blocked by the robust interlayer "σ-bonds" so that the spintronic transition takes place until this interlayer coupling is broken. More intriguingly, an indirect-direct bandgap transition is observed, revealing excellent optical on-off features. Their tunable properties provide great potential for their application in optoelectronics, spintronics and chemical or biological sensors.

  10. Transit Timing Study of Kepler Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei

    2015-08-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. In this talk, I will talk about two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties.

  11. The Continent-Ocean Transition in the Mid-Norwegian Margin: Insight From Seismic Data and the Onshore Caledonian Analogue in the Seve Nappe Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, Mansour M.; Planke, Sverre; Andersen, Torgeir B.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Corfu, Fernando; Tegner, Christian; Myklebust, Reidun

    2015-04-01

    The continental breakup and initial seafloor spreading in the NE Atlantic was accompanied by widespread intrusive and extrusive magmatism and the formation of conjugate volcanic passive margins. These margins are characterized by the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDR), an intense network of mafic sheet intrusions of the continental crust and adjacent sedimentary basins and a high-velocity lower crustal body. Nevertheless many issues remain unclear regarding the structure of volcanic passive margins; in particular the transitional crust located beneath the SDR.New and reprocessed seismic reflection data on the Mid-Norwegian margin allow a better sub-basalt imaging of the transitional crust located beneath the SDR. Different high-amplitude reflections with abrupt termination and saucer shaped geometries are identified and interpreted as sill intrusions. Other near vertical and inclined reflections are interpreted as dykes or dyke swarms. We have mapped the extent of the dyke reflections along the volcanic margin. The mapping suggests that the dykes represent the main feeder system for the SDR. The identification of saucer shaped sills implies the presence of sediments in the transitional zone beneath the volcanic sequences. Onshore exposures of Precambrian basement of the eroded volcanic margin in East Greenland show that, locally, the transitional crust is highly intruded by dykes and intrusive complexes with an increasing intensity of the plumbing and dilatation of the continental crust ocean-ward. Another well exposed analogue for a continent-ocean transitional crust is located within the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the Scandinavian Caledonides. The best-preserved parts of SNC in the Pårte, Sarek, Kebnekaise, Abisko, and Indre Troms mountains are composed mainly of meta-sandstones and shales (now hornfelses) truncated typically by mafic dykes. At Sarek and Pårte, the dykes intrude the sedimentary rocks of the Favoritkammen Group, with a dyke density up

  12. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-08-17

    The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population.

  13. Hydrous melting and partitioning in and above the mantle transition zone: Insights from water-rich MgO-SiO2-H2O experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhill, R.; Frost, D. J.; Novella, D.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrous melting at high pressures affects the physical properties, dynamics and chemical differentiation of the Earth. However, probing the compositions of hydrous melts at the conditions of the deeper mantle such as the transition zone has traditionally been challenging. In this study, we conducted high pressure multianvil experiments at 13 GPa between 1200 and 1900 °C to investigate the liquidus in the system MgO-SiO2-H2O. Water-rich starting compositions were created using platinic acid (H2Pt(OH)6) as a novel water source. As MgO:SiO2 ratios decrease, the T -XH2O liquidus curve develops an increasingly pronounced concave-up topology. The melting point reduction of enstatite and stishovite at low water contents exceeds that predicted by simple ideal models of hydrogen speciation. We discuss the implications of these results with respect to the behaviour of melts in the deep upper mantle and transition zone, and present new models describing the partitioning of water between the olivine polymorphs and associated hydrous melts.

  14. Nodal and BMP expression during the transition to pentamery in the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma: insights into patterning the enigmatic echinoderm body plan.

    PubMed

    Koop, Demian; Cisternas, Paula; Morris, Valerie B; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa; Wray, Gregory A; Byrne, Maria

    2017-02-13

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of the unusual echinoderm pentameral body plan and their likeness to mechanisms underlying the development of the bilateral plans of other deuterostomes are of interest in tracing body plan evolution. In this first study of the spatial expression of genes associated with Nodal and BMP2/4 signalling during the transition to pentamery in sea urchins, we investigate Heliocidaris erythrogramma, a species that provides access to the developing adult rudiment within days of fertilization. BMP2/4, and the putative downstream genes, Six1/2, Eya, Tbx2/3 and Msx were expressed in the earliest morphological manifestation of pentamery during development, the five hydrocoele lobes. The formation of the vestibular ectoderm, the specialized region overlying the left coelom that forms adult ectoderm, involved the expression of putative Nodal target genes Chordin, Gsc and BMP2/4 and putative BMP2/4 target genes Dlx, Msx and Tbx. The expression of Nodal, Lefty and Pitx2 in the right ectoderm, and Pitx2 in the right coelom, was as previously observed in other sea urchins. That genes associated with Nodal and BMP2/4 signalling are expressed in the hydrocoele lobes, indicates that they have a role in the developmental transition to pentamery, contributing to our understanding of how the most unusual body plan in the Bilateria may have evolved. We suggest that the Nodal and BMP2/4 signalling cascades might have been duplicated or split during the evolution to pentamery.

  15. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population. PMID:27399214

  16. Insights into the kinematic Cenozoic evolution of the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition from coincident seismic refraction and reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.; Parsons, T.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of surface extension in the southern Basin and Range province and transition into the Colorado Plateau range from a few percent to several hundred percent locally, yet the crustal thickness varies perhaps only 10-15km across these provinces. Within the southern Basin and Range and the metamorphic core complex belt, extremely extended crust is directly juxtaposed against equally thick (or thinner) crust that underwent far milder extension. Unless preextension crustal thickness varied dramatically over a short distance, the crust must have maintained its thickness during extrusion, through mechanisms that involve crustal flow and magmatism. A 300km-long profile of seismic refraction and coincident vertical-incidence reflection data are employed to investigate the geophysical signature of these processes from the extended southern Basin and Range province to the unextended Colorado Plateau. -from Author

  17. Mantle transition zone structure beneath the Changbai volcano: Insight into deep slab dehydration and hot upwelling near the 410 km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhu, Hongxiang; Zhao, Dapeng; Liu, Cai; Feng, Xuan; Liu, Ting; Ma, Jincheng

    2016-08-01

    We study the detailed mantle transition zone structure beneath the active Changbai intraplate volcano in Northeast China by using a receiver-function method. A total of 3005 teleseismic receiver functions recorded by 70 broadband stations are obtained by using a common-conversion-point stacking method. For conducting the time-to-depth conversion, we use a three-dimensional velocity model of the study region so as to take into account the influence of structural heterogeneities. Our results reveal significant depth variations of the 410, 520, and 660 km discontinuities. A broad depression of the 410 km discontinuity and a low-velocity anomaly are revealed beneath the Changbai volcano, which may reflect a large-scale hot mantle upwelling around the 410 km discontinuity with a positive Clapeyron slope. The 520 km discontinuity is identified clearly, and its uplift occurs above the stagnant Pacific slab. We also find a prominent depression of the 660 km discontinuity, which is elongated along the trend of deep earthquake clusters in a range of 39°N-44°N latitude, and the depression area has a lateral extent of about 400 km. Because the 520 and 660 km discontinuities correspond to positive and negative Clapeyron slopes, respectively, we think that the 520 uplift and the 660 depression are caused by the cold subducting Pacific slab. A part of the Pacific slab may have penetrated into the lower mantle and so caused the large-scale 660 depression in front of the deep earthquake clusters. Our results also reveal a part of the upper boundary of the subducting Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone.

  18. Continental hyperextension, mantle exhumation and thin oceanic crust at the continent-ocean transition, West Iberia: new insights from wide-angle seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Minshull, Tim; Bayrakci, Gaye; Bull, Jon; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Sawyer, Dale; Zelt, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously thin oceanic crust and expanses of exhumed and serpentinised mantle material at magma-poor rift margins are now a globally observed phenomena that characterizes the seaward limit of the continent-ocean transition. Hyperextension of continental crust at the Deep Galicia rifted margin in the North Atlantic has been accommodated by the rotation of continental fault blocks, which are underlain by the S-reflector, an interpreted detachment fault, along which exhumed and serpentinized mantle peridotite is observed. West of these features, the enigmatic Peridotite Ridge has been suggested to delimit the seaward extent of the continent-ocean transition. An outstanding question at this margin is where oceanic crust begins, with little existing data to constrain this boundary and a lack of clear seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies. Here we present results from a 160-km-long wide-angle seismic profile (WE-1). Forward modelling and travel time tomography models of the crustal compressional velocity structure reveal highly thinned and rotated crustal blocks overlying the S-reflector, which correlates with the 6.0 - 7.0 kms-1 velocity contours, corresponding to peridotite serpentinization of 60 - 30 %, respectively. West of the Peridotite Ridge we observe a basement layer which is 2.8 - 3.5 km thick in which velocities increase smoothly and rapidly from ˜4.6 kms-1 to 7.3 - 7.6 kms-1,with an average velocity gradient of 1.00 s-1. Below this, velocities slowly increase toward typical mantle velocities. Such a downward increase into mantle velocities is interpreted as decreasing serpentinization of mantle material with depth. However, sparse Moho reflections indicate the onset of an anomalously thin oceanic crust, which increases in thickness from ˜0.5 km to ˜1.5 km over a distance of 35 km, seaward.

  19. Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-05-01

    African bovids are a famous example of a taxonomic group in which the correlated evolution of body size, feeding mode, gregariousness, and social organization in relation to the preferred habitat type has been investigated. A continuum has been described ranging from small-bodied, sedentary, solitary or socially monogamous, forest- or bush-dwelling, browsing species that seek shelter from predation in dense vegetation, to large-bodied, migratory, highly gregarious, grazing taxa inhabiting open savannahs and relying on flight or group-defense behaviors when facing predators. Here, we examined a geographically widespread clade within the Bovidae (the genus Gazella) that shows minimal interspecific variation in body size and asked if we could still uncover correlated changes of key ecological and behavioral traits during repeated transitions from open-land to mountain-dwelling. Our study used a multi-locus phylogeny (based on sequence variation of Cytb and six nuclear intron markers) of all extant members of the genus Gazella to infer evolutionary patterns of key ecological and behavioral traits and to estimate ancestral character states using Bayesian inference. At the base of the Gazella-phylogeny, open plains were inferred as the most likely habitat type, and three independent transitions toward mountain-dwelling were uncovered. Those shifts coincided with shifts from migratory to sedentary lifestyles. Character estimation for group size was largely congruent with movement patterns in that species forming large groups tended to be migratory, while small group size was correlated with a sedentary lifestyle. Evolutionary patterns of two other conspicuous traits (twinning ability vs. exclusive singleton births and hornless vs. horned females) did not follow this trend in the Gazella-phylogeny. Furthermore, we inferred the genus Gazella to have emerged in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (10-3Mya), and estimating ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal

  20. New insights into the thermal behaviour of organic ionic plastic crystals: magnetic resonance imaging of polycrystalline morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Pringle, Jennifer M; O'Dell, Luke A; Forsyth, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) show strong potential as solid-state electrolytes for lithium battery applications, demonstrating promising electrochemical performance and eliminating the need for a volatile and flammable liquid electrolyte. The ionic conductivity (σ) in these systems has recently been shown to depend strongly on polycrystalline morphology, which is largely determined by the sample's thermal history. [K. Romanenko et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 15638]. Tailoring this morphology could lead to conductivities sufficiently high for battery applications, so a more complete understanding of how phenomena such as solid-solid phase transitions can affect the sample morphology is of significant interest. Anisotropic relaxation of nuclear spin magnetisation provides a new MRI based approach for studies of polycrystalline materials at both a macroscopic and molecular level. In this contribution, morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions in triisobutyl(methyl)phosphonium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (P1444FSI) and diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (P1224PF6) are examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), alongside nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, diffusion measurements and conductivity data. These observations are linked to molecular dynamics and structural behaviour crucial for the conductive properties of OIPCs. A distinct correlation is established between the conductivity at a given temperature, σ(T), and the intensity of the narrow NMR signal that is attributed to a mobile fraction, fm(T), of ions in the OIPC. To explain these findings we propose an analogy with the well-studied relationship between permeability (k) and void fraction (θ) in porous media, with k(θ) commonly quantified by a power-law dependence that can also be employed to describe σ(fm).

  1. Magmatism and metamorphism at the sheeted dyke-gabbro transition zone: new insight from beerbachite from ODP/IODP Hole 1256D and Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Python, Marie; Abily, Bénédicte; France, Lydéric

    2014-05-01

    During IODP Expedition 335, two-pyroxenes bearing granulites (beerbachites) were extensively recovered as drilling cuttings at the gabbro-sheeted dyke transition zone of ODP Hole 1256D (East Pacific Rise, 6°44.163'N, 91°56.061'W). This lithology results from high-temperature metamorphism of previously hydrothermally altered diabases, basalts and/or gabbros; the heat source likely stems from the melt lens located at the top of the magmatic chambers imaged along present-day fast-spreading ridges. This lithology, associated with gabbroic bodies, characterises the transition zone between the sheeted dyke complex and the uppermost gabbroic section and represents the interface between magmatic and hydrothermal convecting systems in an oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Samples acquired during IODP Exp. 335 show a particularly high degree of recrystallisation and are characterised by the absence of hydrous phases like amphibole, suggesting very high-T metamorphism. The Beerbachites mineral chemical characteristics are rather homogeneous compared to gabbros or dolerite from the sheeted dyke but pyroxenes Mg#, Ti, Al and Cr contents as well as the anorthite content of plagioclase are closer to gabbro than dolerite. This similarity may be explained by two hypothesis: either beerbachites in Hole 1256D are metamorphosed gabbros, or they underwent a melt-rock reaction process with the gabbros parental magma and were re-equilibrated at high temperature until their mineral composition become similar to that of gabbros. The gabbro-sheeted dyke transition zone in the Oman ophiolite is also outlined by the presence of high grade metamorphic rocks. Fine grained granulites and amphibolites that may be derived from the transformation of altered sheeted dyke diabases are in direct contact with fresh gabbroic and troctolitic bodies which are themselves cross-cut by dolerite dykes. The observation of textures show that high-T recrystallisation occurred in the fine grained

  2. Major softening at brittle-ductile transition due to interplay between chemical and deformation processes: An insight from evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of S-C/C' fabrics in the South Armorican Shear Zone has been evaluated by detailed microstructural study where the focus was given to initiation and early evolution of the C/C' fabric shear bands. Our observations suggest that the S-C/C' fabrics formed at distinct temperature conditions indicating >550°C for the S fabric and 300-350°C at 100-400 MPa for the C/C' fabric shear bands. The evolving microstructure within shear bands documents switches in deformation mechanisms related to positive feedbacks between deformation and chemical processes and imposes mechanical constraints on the evolution of the brittle-ductile transition in the continental transform fault domains. Three stages of shear band evolution have been identified. Stage I corresponds to initiation of shear bands via formation of microcracks with possible yielding differential stress of up to 250 MPa. Stage II is associated with subgrain rotation recrystallization and dislocation creep of quartz and coeval dissolution-precipitation creep of microcline. Recrystallized quartz grains show continual increase in size and decrease in stress and strain rates from 94 MPa to 17-26 MPa and 1.8 × 10-1 s-1-9 × 10-17 s-1 associated with deformation partitioning into weaker microcline layer and shear band widening. The quartz mechanical data allowed us to set some constrains for coeval dissolution-precipitation of microcline which at our estimated pressure-temperature conditions suggests creep at 17-26 MPa differential stress and 1.8 × 10-15 s-1 strain rate. Stage III is characterized by localized slip along white mica bands accommodated by dislocation creep at strain rate 1.8 × 10-14 s-1 and stress 5.75 MPa. Our mechanical data point to dynamic evolution of the studied brittle-ductile transition characterized by major weakening to strengths >10 MPa. Such nonsteady state evolution may be common in crustal shear zones especially when phase transformations are involved.

  3. Nitric oxide signaling differentially affects habitat choice by two larval morphs of the sea slug Alderia willowi: mechanistic insight into evolutionary transitions in dispersal strategies.

    PubMed

    Romero, Melissa R; Phuong, Mark A; Bishop, Cory; Krug, Patrick J

    2013-03-15

    In many marine animals, adult habitat is selected by lecithotrophic (non-feeding) larvae with a limited lifespan. In generalist species, larvae may increasingly accept sub-optimal habitat over time as energy stores are depleted ('desperate larva' hypothesis). If the fitness cost of suboptimal habitat is too high, larvae of specialists may prolong the searching phase until they encounter a high-quality patch or die ('death before dishonor' hypothesis). In generalists, starvation is hypothesized to lead to a decline in inhibitory nitric oxide (NO) signaling, thereby triggering metamorphosis. Here, we document alternative functions for identified signaling pathways in larvae having 'desperate' versus 'death before dishonor' strategies in lecithotrophic clutches of a habitat specialist, the sea slug Alderia willowi. In an unusual dimorphism, each clutch of A. willowi hatches both non-selective larvae that settle soon after hatching and siblings that delay settlement in the absence of cues from the alga Vaucheria, the sole adult food. Pharmacological manipulation of NO signaling induced metamorphosis in non-selective but not selective stages. However, decreased NO signaling in selective larvae lowered the threshold for response to habitat cues, mimicking the effect of declining energy levels. Manipulation of cGMP or dopamine production induced metamorphosis in selective and non-selective larvae alike, highlighting a distinct role for the NO pathway in the two larval morphs. We propose a model in which NO production (1) links nitrogen metabolism with sensory receptor signaling, and (2) shifts from a regulatory role in 'desperate larva' strategies to a modulatory role in 'death before dishonor' strategies. This study provides new mechanistic insight into how the function of conserved signaling pathways may change in response to selection on larval habitat choice behaviors.

  4. Computational insights into the S3 transfer reaction: A special case of double group transfer reaction featuring bicyclically delocalized aromatic transition state geometries.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Andrés G

    2017-08-15

    An unusual pericyclic process that involves the intermolecular transfer of thiozone (S3 ) is computationally described. The process can be considered as a special case of double group transfer reaction whereby the two migrating groups are connected to the same substituent, taking place in a concerted manner via transition states featuring two five-membered C2 S3 rings fused together. Analysis of the aromaticity at the TS geometries by computing NICS values at the (3,+1) RCPS as well as ACID calculations confirms the aromatic character of each C2 S3 ring, thus resulting in bicyclically delocalized aromatic structures. The free energy barriers for the transfer of S3 are relatively similar (40-50 kcal mol(-1) ) to those computed for typical double H group transfer reactions. The similarities and differences between these processes have been further analysed by applying ASM-EDA and NBO approaches to the model reactions between ethene and ethane, and ethene and 1,2,3-trithiolane. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Feeding behaviour in a 'basal' tortoise provides insights on the transitional feeding mode at the dawn of modern land turtle evolution.

    PubMed

    Natchev, Nikolay; Tzankov, Nikolay; Werneburg, Ingmar; Heiss, Egon

    2015-01-01

    Almost all extant testudinids are highly associated with terrestrial habitats and the few tortoises with high affinity to aquatic environments are found within the genus Manouria. Manouria belongs to a clade which forms a sister taxon to all remaining tortoises and is suitable as a model for studying evolutionary transitions within modern turtles. We analysed the feeding behaviour of Manouria emys and due to its phylogenetic position, we hypothesise that the species might have retained some ancestral features associated with an aquatic lifestyle. We tested whether M. emys is able to feed both in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In fact, M. emys repetitively tried to reach submerged food items in water, but always failed to grasp them-no suction feeding mechanism was applied. When feeding on land, M. emys showed another peculiar behaviour; it grasped food items by its jaws-a behaviour typical for aquatic or semiaquatic turtles-and not by the tongue as generally accepted as the typical feeding mode in all tortoises studied so far. In M. emys, the hyolingual complex remained retracted during all food uptake sequences, but the food transport was entirely lingual based. The kinematical profiles significantly differed from those described for other tortoises and from those proposed from the general models on the function of the feeding systems in lower tetrapods. We conclude that the feeding behaviour of M. emys might reflect a remnant of the primordial condition expected in the aquatic ancestor of the tortoises.

  6. Distribution of transition times in a stochastic model of excitable cell: Insights into the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of randomness in neuronal interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Requena-Carrión, Jesús; Requena-Carrión, Víctor J

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an analytical approach to studying random patterns of activity in excitable cells. Our analytical approach uses a two-state stochastic model of excitable system based on the electrophysiological properties of refractoriness and restitution, which characterize cell recovery after excitation. By applying the notion of probability density flux, we derive the distributions of transition times between states and the distribution of interspike interval (ISI) durations for a constant applied stimulus. The derived ISI distribution is unimodal and, provided that the time spent in the excited state is constant, can be approximated by a Rayleigh peak followed by an exponential tail. We then explore the role of the model parameters in determining the shape of the derived distributions and the ISI coefficient of variation. Finally, we use our analytical results to study simulation results from the stochastic Morris-Lecar neuron and from a three-state extension of the proposed stochastic model, which is capable of reproducing multimodal ISI histograms.

  7. AP-1-mediated chromatin looping regulates ZEB2 transcription: new insights into TNFα-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yichun; Shiue, Chiou-Nan; Zhu, Jian; Zhuang, Ting; Jonsson, Philip; Wright, Anthony P H; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2015-04-10

    The molecular determinants of malignant cell behaviour in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are potential therapeutic targets for TNBC. In this study, we demonstrate that the inflammatory cytokine TNFα induces EMT in TNBC cells via activation of AP-1 signaling and subsequently induces expression of the EMT regulator ZEB2. We also show that TNFα activates both the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways, which act upstream of AP-1. We further investigated in detail AP-1 regulation of ZEB2 expression. We show that two ZEB2 transcripts derived from distinct promoters are both expressed in breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor samples. Using the chromosome conformation capture assay, we demonstrate that AP-1, when activated by TNFα, binds to a site in promoter 1b of the ZEB2 gene where it regulates the expression of both promoter 1b and 1a, the latter via mediating long range chromatin interactions. Overall, this work provides a plausible mechanism for inflammation-induced metastatic potential in TNBC, involving a novel regulatory mechanism governing ZEB2 isoform expression.

  8. High resolution structures of Plasmodium falciparum GST complexes provide novel insights into the dimer-tetramer transition and a novel ligand-binding site.

    PubMed

    Perbandt, Markus; Eberle, Raphael; Fischer-Riepe, Lena; Cang, Huaixing; Liebau, Eva; Betzel, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Protection from oxidative stress and efficient redox regulation are essential for malarial parasites which have to grow and multiply rapidly in pro-oxidant rich environments. Therefore, redox active proteins currently belong to the most attractive antimalarial drug targets. The glutathione S-transferase from Plasmodium falciparum (PfGST) is a redox active protein displaying a peculiar dimer-tetramer transition that causes full enzyme-inactivation. This distinct structural feature is absent in mammalian GST isoenzyme counterparts. A flexible loop between residues 113-119 has been reported to be necessary for this tetramerization process. However, here we present structural data of a modified PfGST lacking loop 113-119 at 1.9 Å resolution. Our results clearly show that this loop is not essential for the formation of stable tetramers. Moreover we present for the first time the structures of both, the inactive and tetrameric state at 1.7 Å and the active dimeric state in complex with reduced glutathione at 2.4 Å resolution. Surprisingly, the structure of the inactive tetrameric state reveals a novel non-substrate binding-site occupied by a 2-(N-morpholino) ethane sulfonic acid (MES) molecule in each monomer. Although it is known that the PfGST has the ability to bind lipophilic anionic ligands, the location of the PfGST ligand-binding site remained unclear up to now. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An all-atom model of the pore-like structure of hexameric VP40 from Ebola: structural insights into the monomer-hexamer transition.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam Luong; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Hermone, Ann R; Burnett, James C; Panchal, Rekha G; McGrath, Connor; Zaharevitz, Dan W; Aman, M Javad; Gussio, Rick; Bavari, Sina

    2005-07-01

    The matrix protein VP40 is an indispensable component of viral assembly and budding by the Ebola virus. VP40 is a monomer in solution, but can fold into hexameric and octameric states, two oligomeric conformations that play central roles in the Ebola viral life cycle. While the X-ray structures of monomeric and octameric VP40 have been determined, the structure of hexameric VP40 has only been solved by three-dimensional electron microscopy (EM) to a resolution of approximately 30 A. In this paper, we present the refinement of the EM reconstruction of truncated hexameric VP40 to approximately 20 A and the construction of an all-atom model (residues 44-212) using the EM model at approximately 20 A and the X-ray structure of monomeric VP40 as templates. The hexamer model suggests that the monomer-hexamer transition involves a conformational change in the N-terminal domain that is not evident during octamerization and therefore, may provide the basis for elucidating the biological function of VP40.

  10. Feeding behaviour in a ‘basal’ tortoise provides insights on the transitional feeding mode at the dawn of modern land turtle evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tzankov, Nikolay; Werneburg, Ingmar; Heiss, Egon

    2015-01-01

    Almost all extant testudinids are highly associated with terrestrial habitats and the few tortoises with high affinity to aquatic environments are found within the genus Manouria. Manouria belongs to a clade which forms a sister taxon to all remaining tortoises and is suitable as a model for studying evolutionary transitions within modern turtles. We analysed the feeding behaviour of Manouria emys and due to its phylogenetic position, we hypothesise that the species might have retained some ancestral features associated with an aquatic lifestyle. We tested whether M. emys is able to feed both in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In fact, M. emys repetitively tried to reach submerged food items in water, but always failed to grasp them—no suction feeding mechanism was applied. When feeding on land, M. emys showed another peculiar behaviour; it grasped food items by its jaws—a behaviour typical for aquatic or semiaquatic turtles—and not by the tongue as generally accepted as the typical feeding mode in all tortoises studied so far. In M. emys, the hyolingual complex remained retracted during all food uptake sequences, but the food transport was entirely lingual based. The kinematical profiles significantly differed from those described for other tortoises and from those proposed from the general models on the function of the feeding systems in lower tetrapods. We conclude that the feeding behaviour of M. emys might reflect a remnant of the primordial condition expected in the aquatic ancestor of the tortoises. PMID:26339550

  11. AP-1-mediated chromatin looping regulates ZEB2 transcription: new insights into TNFα-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yichun; Shiue, Chiou-Nan; Zhu, Jian; Zhuang, Ting; Jonsson, Philip; Wright, Anthony P.H.; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The molecular determinants of malignant cell behaviour in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are potential therapeutic targets for TNBC. In this study, we demonstrate that the inflammatory cytokine TNFα induces EMT in TNBC cells via activation of AP-1 signaling and subsequently induces expression of the EMT regulator ZEB2. We also show that TNFα activates both the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways, which act upstream of AP-1. We further investigated in detail AP-1 regulation of ZEB2 expression. We show that two ZEB2 transcripts derived from distinct promoters are both expressed in breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor samples. Using the chromosome conformation capture assay, we demonstrate that AP-1, when activated by TNFα, binds to a site in promoter 1b of the ZEB2 gene where it regulates the expression of both promoter 1b and 1a, the latter via mediating long range chromatin interactions. Overall, this work provides a plausible mechanism for inflammation-induced metastatic potential in TNBC, involving a novel regulatory mechanism governing ZEB2 isoform expression. PMID:25762639

  12. Insights on the isotropic-to-smectic A transition in ionic liquid crystals from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations: the role of microphase segregation.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo; Bagno, Alessandro; Wang, Yanting

    2015-03-05

    We have investigated the role of microphase segregation as the driving force in the stabilization of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals of smectic type. To this end we have applied the heterogeneity order parameter, initially proposed for ionic liquids, to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation results for a model system of an imidazolium nitrate ionic liquid crystal, [C16mim][NO3], whose phase diagram was recently studied. We have found that the heterogeneity order parameters become larger when the system goes through the transition from the isotropic phase to the smectic A phase as the temperature decreases. This can be understood by considering that, in the smectic A phase, the layered structure allows the tail groups to have a degree of aggregation larger than that in the isotropic phase. Our results highlight the role of microsegregation in the stabilization of ionic liquid crystals, which cannot be revealed by the commonly used translational and orientational order parameters used to describe liquid crystal phases.

  13. Correlation-induced metal-insulator transitions in d0 magnetic superlattices based on alkaline-earth monoxides: Insights from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Lin; Dong, Shengjie; Zhou, Baozeng; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the electronic structure and magnetic properties of four superlattices (MO)1/(MX)1 (001) (M=Ca and Sr; X=N and C). Our results show that compared with standard GGA approach, the GGA plus effective Ueff scheme can correct electronic structure and magnetic properties in some extent. With enhancing electronic correlation, for (CaO)1/(CaN)1, (SrO)1/(SrN)1, and (SrO)1/(SrC)1, the bands across Fermi level are divided into two parts and the shape of isotropic spherical spin atmosphere becomes anisotropic dumbbell-like with specific orientation, accompanying metal-insulator transitions. For (CaO)1/(CaC)1, the states just smearing with the Fermi level shift to lower energy region below Fermi level, indicating the transformation from a nearly half metal to an actual half metal occurs. The different behavior of (CaO)1/(CaC)1 compared with three other compounds may be caused by the larger ionization energy of calcium than that of strontium and the smaller electronegativity of carbon than that of nitrogen.

  14. Insights on the opening of the Galerian mammal migration pathway from magnetostratigraphy of the Pleistocene marine-continental transition in the Arda River section (northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monesi, Edoardo; Muttoni, Giovanni; Scardia, Giancarlo; Felletti, Fabrizio; Bona, Fabio; Sala, Benedetto; Tremolada, Fabrizio; Francou, Carlo; Raineri, Gianluca

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the magnetostratigraphy of the Arda River section (northern Italy) where the transition from marine to continental sedimentation occurring in the Po River basin during the Pleistocene is registered. Four magnetic polarity reversals were used to construct an age model of sedimentation aided by marine biostratigraphy and tied to a standard δ18O curve from the literature. The section spans from the Olduvai subchron (1.94-1.78 Ma) across the Jaramillo subchron (1.07-0.99 Ma) up to the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary (0.78 Ma). The onset of continental deposition occurred during marine isotope stage (MIS) 30 at ˜1.04 Ma. An association of Villafranchian and Early Galerian mammals, including Sus strozzii and Ursus dolinensis, has been found in the continental sediments dated to MIS 29-27 (˜0.99 Ma). Above follows a prominent fluvial conglomerate attributed to the first major lowstand of the Pleistocene culminating with MIS 22 at ˜0.9 Ma during the late Early Pleistocene climate turnover (EPT). These and other data from the literature are used to reconstruct the onset of continental deposition in the greater Po basin and shed light on the opening of the migration pathway that brought far-traveled Galerian mammal immigrants to enter Europe for the first time during the EPT.

  15. Arterial Transit Time Effects in Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling CBF Mapping: Insight From a PET and MR Study in Normal Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Maolin; Maguire, R. Paul; Arora, Jagriti; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Weinzimmer, David; Wang, Jinghua; Wang, Yuenan; Kim, Hyeonjin; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Constable, R. Todd

    2010-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT), a key parameter required to calculate absolute cerebral blood flow in arterial spin labeling (ASL), is subject to much uncertainty. In this study, ASL ATTs were estimated on a per-voxel basis using data measured by both ASL and positron emission tomography in the same subjects. The mean ATT increased by 260 ± 20 (standard error of the mean) ms when the imaging slab shifted downwards by 54 mm, and increased from 630 ± 30 to 1220 ± 30 ms for the first slice, with an increase of 610 ± 20 ms over a four-slice slab when the gap between the imaging and labeling slab increased from 20 to 74 mm. When the per-slice ATTs were employed in ASL cerebral blood flow quantification and the in-slice ATT variations ignored, regional cerebral blood flow could be significantly different from the positron emission tomography measures. ATT also decreased with focal activation by the same amount for both visual and motor tasks (~80 ms). These results provide a quantitative relationship between ATT and the ASL imaging geometry and yield an assessment of the assumptions commonly used in ASL imaging. These findings should be considered in the interpretation of, and comparisons between, different ASL-based cerebral blood flow studies. The results also provide spatially specific ATT data that may aid in optimizing the ASL imaging parameters. PMID:19953506

  16. Continental hyperextension, mantle exhumation, and thin oceanic crust at the continent-ocean transition, West Iberia: New insights from wide-angle seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, R. G.; Minshull, T. A.; Bayrakci, G.; Bull, J. M.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C.; Reston, T. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Zelt, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperextension of continental crust at the Deep Galicia rifted margin in the North Atlantic has been accommodated by the rotation of continental fault blocks, which are underlain by the S reflector, an interpreted detachment fault, along which exhumed and serpentinized mantle peridotite is observed. West of these features, the enigmatic Peridotite Ridge has been inferred to delimit the western extent of the continent-ocean transition. An outstanding question at this margin is where oceanic crust begins, with little existing data to constrain this boundary and a lack of clear seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies. Here we present results from a 160 km long wide-angle seismic profile (Western Extension 1). Travel time tomography models of the crustal compressional velocity structure reveal highly thinned and rotated crustal blocks separated from the underlying mantle by the S reflector. The S reflector correlates with the 6.0-7.0 km s-1 velocity contours, corresponding to peridotite serpentinization of 60-30%, respectively. West of the Peridotite Ridge, shallow and sparse Moho reflections indicate the earliest formation of an anomalously thin oceanic crustal layer, which increases in thickness from ~0.5 km at ~20 km west of the Peridotite Ridge to ~1.5 km, 35 km further west. P wave velocities increase smoothly and rapidly below top basement, to a depth of 2.8-3.5 km, with an average velocity gradient of 1.0 s-1. Below this, velocities slowly increase toward typical mantle velocities. Such a downward increase into mantle velocities is interpreted as decreasing serpentinization of mantle rock with depth.

  17. An insight into the effects of B-site transition metals on the activity, activation effect and stability of perovskite oxygen electrodes for solid oxide electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jiaxin; Yang, Shengbing; Zhong, Shaohua; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Chou; Chen, Xinbing; Liu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Here, effects of B-site transition metals (TMs) in the (La0.6Sr0.4)XO3-δ (X = Mn, Fe, Co) perovskite structure on the activity and stability of the oxygen electrodes during high temperature electrolysis are discussed to provide a deep understanding of the phenomena observed for different oxygen electrodes under anodic polarizations. Performance and stability of the electrodes vary significantly at 800 °C as the TMs changed from Mn to Fe and Co, which is attributed to the different ionic conductivities and surface chemistry of the materials that have a strong dependence on the valence state and electronic structure of TMs. Under an anodic current passage of 200 mA cm-2 at 800 °C, electrode polarization resistance (RE) and overpotential (η) of the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ (LSM) electrode decrease significantly by 1.75 Ω cm2 and 101 mV during the 1200 min test, compared with the constant values of RE and η for the (La0.6Sr0.4)FeO3-δ (LSF) and (La0.6Sr0.4)CoO3-δ (LSC) electrodes, an indication of the influence of B-site TMs on the electrode performance and stability. Most serious degradation is observed at the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ electrode due to the electrode detachment arising from the accelerated SrO surface segregation and related disintegration of LSM particles near the electrode/electrolyte interface.

  18. Structure and Mechanism of Dimer-Monomer Transition of a Plant Poly(A)-Binding Protein upon RNA Interaction: Insights into Its Poly(A) Tail Assembly.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Soprano, Adriana Santos; Lee, Jack; Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil de; Cassago, Alexandre; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Sadanandom, Ari; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2015-07-31

    Poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) play crucial roles in mRNA biogenesis, stability, transport and translational control in most eukaryotic cells. Although animal PABPs are well-studied proteins, the biological role, three-dimensional structure and RNA-binding mode of plant PABPs remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report the structural features and RNA-binding mode of a Citrus sinensis PABP (CsPABPN1). CsPABPN1 has a domain architecture of nuclear PABPs (PABPNs) with a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) flanked by an acidic N-terminus and a GRPF-rich C-terminus. The RRM domain of CsPABPN1 displays virtually the same three-dimensional structure and poly(A)-binding mode of animal PABPNs. However, while the CsPABPN1 RRM domain specifically binds poly(A), the full-length protein also binds poly(U). CsPABPN1 localizes to the nucleus of plant cells and undergoes a dimer-monomer transition upon poly(A) interaction. We show that poly(A) binding by CsPABPN1 begins with the recognition of the RNA-binding sites RNP1 and RNP2, followed by interactions with residues of the β2 strands, which stabilize the dimer, thus leading to dimer dissociation. Like human PABPN1, CsPABPN1 also seems to form filaments in the presence of poly(A). Based on these data, we propose a structural model in which contiguous CsPABPN1 RRM monomers wrap around the RNA molecule creating a superhelical structure that could not only shield the poly(A) tail but also serve as a scaffold for the assembly of additional mRNA processing factors.

  19. Coupled pyrite concentration and sulfur isotopic insight into the paleo sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Taladay, Katie; Lu, Hongfeng; Hu, Gaowei; Sun, Fei; Lin, Rongxiao

    2016-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) is an important diagenetic redox boundary within marine sediments where the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction, can promote sulfur isotopic enrichments in several solid phase minerals including pyrite (FeS2). Authigenic pyrite can form in concentrated abundances within the SMTZ and as such, can be used as a proxy to identify paleo-SMTZs. This study uses enrichments in 34S and anomalously high abundances of authigenic pyrites in 287 samples from the northern South China Sea (SCS) to determine the paleo-SMTZ. The pyrite samples were collected from sediment cores acquired at three sites, each of which are known to be located in natural gas hydrate-bearing regions. We assess the relative abundances of authigenic pyrites, the types of pyrite morphologies recovered in the cored sediments, and the sulfur isotopic values of recovered pyrite samples using two methods: (1) handpicked sample analysis using a binocular microscope, and (2) the chromium reduction method. Our results show that pyrite concentrations and sulfur isotopic compositions exhibit synchronous fluctuations, particularly from 6.8 m below seafloor (mbsf) to 8.4 mbsf at all three study sites. There is a significant increase in the occurrence of rod-like pyrite morphology within this key interval. We define the position of the paleo-SMTZ by the presence of anomalously high accumulations of pyrites at greater than 5.0 wt.% using the handpicking method or greater than 0.5 wt.% via the chromium reduction method, along with positive Δδ34S excursions greater than 10.0‰ VCDT. We discovered a regional paleo-SMTZ that is shallower than the modern SMTZ, suggesting a previous period of elevated methane flux from depth, possibly related to widespread gas hydrate dissociation.

  20. Improved Lg attenuations maps in the central U.S.-Rocky Mountain transition zone: New insight from induced seismicity in Oklahoma, Kansas, and the Raton Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdelHameid, D.; Levandowski, W. B.; Boyd, O. S.; McNamara, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Regional-scale differences in seismic attenuation exist across the continental United States, and it is well established that attenuation of Lg-phase waves is greater west of the Rocky Mountains than east of the Rocky Mountains. Yet there is less clarity in defining the transition in attenuation, as few near-field strong motion observations have been available in the central United States. A recent abundance of induced earthquakes in Oklahoma, southern Kansas, and the Raton Basin have provided unprecedented coverage. Utilizing Lg-phase waves recorded at regional distances (200-1500 km) at 300 seismic stations from Oklahoma to central Nevada, we compute the path-averaged apparent Q, source terms, and local amplification factors at one-octave frequency bands centered at 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Amplification correlates better with km-scale topographic relief than local slope on the Great Plains and Gulf Coast, and is generally greater east of the Rocky Mountain Front than west. We do not observe any difference between magnitude-source term scaling for induced events and for natural seismicity, suggesting that either source term is not a proxy for stress drop or that the stress drops of induced events are not lower than for natural events. Subsequently subdividing the study area into distinct physiographic regions, we quantify the average path-averaged Q in the Basin and Range, Colorado Plateau, Rocky Mountains, Gulf Coast, and Great Plains. As in previous work, we find roughly 50-100% greater Q in the Plains and Plateau than in the Rockies and Basin and Range. Preliminary 2-D tomography delineates a sharp (100-200 km-wide) boundary between adjacent Q-provinces. Our refined Q(f) model supplements the attenuation component of the USGS National Crustal Model and provides improved ground motion characterization in the USGS National Seismic Hazard map, particularly in the central United States in which shaking from induced seismicity is of increasing concern.

  1. Multiple boron-boron bonds in neutral molecules: an insight from the extended transition state method and the natural orbitals for chemical valence scheme.

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Michalak, Artur

    2011-03-21

    We have analyzed the character of B═B and B≡B bonds in the neutral molecules of general form: LHB═BHL (2-L) and LB≡BL (3-L), for various ancillary ligands L attached to the boron center, based on a recently developed method that combines the extended transition state scheme with the theory of natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). In the case of molecules with the B═B bond, 2-L, we have included L = PMe(3), PF(3), PCl(3), PH(3), C(3)H(4)N(2)═C(NHCH)(2), whereas for molecules containing the B≡B connection, 3-L, the following ligands were considered L = CO, PMe(3), PCl(3), (Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2)O)(2)Ge. The results led us to conclude that use of phosphorus ligands leads to strengthening of the B═B bond by 6.4 kcal/mol (for 2-PMe(3)), by 4.4 (for 2-PF(3)) and by 9.2 (for 2-PH(3)), when compared to a molecule developed on the experimental basis, 2-C(3)H(4)N(2) (ΔE(total) = -118.3 kcal/mol). The ETS scheme has shown that all contributions, that is, (i) orbital interaction ΔE(orb), (ii) Pauli repulsion ΔE(Pauli), and (iii) electrostatic stabilization ΔE(elstat), are important in determining the trend in the B═B bond energies, ΔE(total). ETS-NOCV results revealed that both σ(B═B) and π(B═B) contributions are responsible for the changes in ΔE(orb) values. All considered molecules of the type LB≡BL, 3-L, exhibit a stronger B≡B bond when compared to a double B═B connection in 2-L (|ΔE(total)| is lower by 11.8-42.5 kcal/mol, depending on the molecule). The main reason is a lower Pauli repulsion contribution noted for 3-CO, 3-PMe(3), and 3-PCl(3) molecules. In addition, in the case of 3-PMe(3) and 3-PCl(3), the orbital interaction term is more stabilizing; however, the effect is less pronounced compared to the drop in the Pauli repulsion term. In all of the systems with double and triple boron-boron bonds, the electronic factor (ΔE(orb)) dominates over the electrostatic contribution (ΔE(elstat)). Finally, the strongest B

  2. Insights on the origin of the structural phase transition in BaV{sub 10}O{sub 15} from electronic structure calculations and the effect of Ti-doping on its structure and electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, C.A.; Greedan, J.E. . E-mail: greedan@mcmaster.ca; Kleinke, Holger

    2004-12-01

    Band structure calculations at the level of LMTO-ASA provide insight into the electronic structure of BaV{sub 10}O{sub 15} and the origin of the structural phase transition. A crystal orbital Hamiltonian population/integrated crystal orbital Hamiltonian population analysis provides evidence that the crystallographic phase transition is driven by V-V bond formation. As well, the energy bands near the Fermi level are very narrow, <1eV, consistent with the fact that the observed insulating behavior can be due to electron localization via either Mott-Hubbard correlation and/or Anderson disorder. The partial solid solution, BaV{sub 10-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 15}, was examined to study the effect of Ti-doping at the V sites on the structure and electronic transport properties. In spite of the non-existence of 'BaTi{sub 10}O{sub 15}', the limiting x=8, as indicated by a monotonic increase in the cell volume and systematic changes in properties. This limit may be due to the difficulty of stabilizing Ti{sup 2+} in this structure. For x=0.5 both the first order structural phase transition and the magnetic transition at 40K are quenched. The samples obey the Curie-Weiss law to x=3 with nearly spin only effective moments along with {theta} values which range from -1090K (x=0.5) to -1629K (x=3). For x>3 a very large, {approx}2x10{sup -3}emu/mol, temperature independent (TIP) contribution dominates. Conductivity measurements on sintered, polycrystalline samples show semiconducting behavior for all compositions. Activation energies for Mott hopping derived from high temperature data range from {approx}0.1eV for x=0-1 and fall to a plateau of 0.06eV for x=3-7. Low temperature data for x=3, 5 and 7 show evidence for Mott variable range hoping (VRH) with a T1/4 law and in one case between 5 and 17K, a Efros-Shklovskii correlated hopping, T1/2 law, was seen, in sharp contrast to BaV{sub 10}O{sub 15} where only the E-S law was observed up to 75K. Seebeck coefficients are small (<35{mu

  3. Transitioning from AOP to IATA - Exploiting mechanistic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. . Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. .

  4. Insights on STEM Careers

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  5. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  6. Network observability transitions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E

    2012-12-21

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network's community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to "observability attacks." Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  7. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation.

  8. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  9. Quantum mechanics and the second law of thermodynamics: an insight gleaned from magnetic hysteresis in the first order phase transition of an isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Peter D.

    2012-11-01

    J Bardeen proposed that the adiabatic phase transition of mesoscopic-size type I superconductors must be accompanied by magnetic hysteresis in the critical magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to satisfy the second law of thermodynamics, herein referred to as ‘Bardeen Hysteresis’. Bardeen Hysteresis remains speculative in that it has not been reported in the literature. This paper investigates Bardeen Hysteresis as a possible accompaniment to the adiabatic phase transition of isolated mesoscopic-size type I superconductors and its implications with respect to the second law of thermodynamics. A causal mechanism for Bardeen Hysteresis is discussed which contrasts with the long accepted causal mechanism of magnetic hysteresis, as first summarized by Pippard, herein referred to as ‘Pippard Hysteresis’. The paper offers guidance for an experimental verification and comments on how the existence of Bardeen Hysteresis has relation to a quantum mechanical basis for the second law of thermodynamics.

  10. Electronic structure, optical properties and the mechanism of the B3-B8 phase transition of BeSe: insights from hybrid functionals, lattice dynamics and NPH molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rajkrishna; Alptekin, Sebahaddin; Mandal, Nibir

    2013-03-27

    We have investigated the electronic structure and the mechanism of the pressure induced phase transition of beryllium selenide (BeSe) by employing a first-principles pseudopotential method within the framework of density functional theory. Our study demonstrates that use of the hybrid PBE0 functional (PBE stands for Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) leads to significant improvement in the band gap calculations, compared to those using either of the common density functionals (local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA)), which severely underestimate the band gap of BeSe. The band gap obtained from the hybrid PBE0 functional shows excellent agreement with available experimental data. A constant-pressure (NPH) first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) approach has been adopted to characterize the first-order pressure induced phase transition from the zinc blende (ZB) to the nickel arsenide (NiAs) structure. We have shown that the FPMD simulation overestimates the transition pressure P(T) (compared to static enthalpy and experimental data) due to overpressure in the simulation box. The MD simulation reveals the structural pathway (cubic → orthorhombic → monoclinic → hexagonal), leading from the ZB phase to the NiAs phase. To find an explanation for the phase transition we calculated the vibrational and elastic properties under pressure. Negative Grüneisen parameters were obtained for the transverse acoustic phonon modes at the X and L high symmetry points. However, no mechanical instability or imaginary frequencies were found at pressures near P(T). Thus the transition results from a thermodynamic instability rather than an elastic/dynamical one. We have also calculated the optical properties of both the B3 and B8 phases, such as the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, reflectivity, loss function and refractive index, and compared them with the existing experimental and theoretical data. An abrupt decrease is

  11. Electronic structure, optical properties and the mechanism of the B3-B8 phase transition of BeSe: insights from hybrid functionals, lattice dynamics and NPH molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rajkrishna; Alptekin, Sebahaddin; Mandal, Nibir

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure and the mechanism of the pressure induced phase transition of beryllium selenide (BeSe) by employing a first-principles pseudopotential method within the framework of density functional theory. Our study demonstrates that use of the hybrid PBE0 functional (PBE stands for Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) leads to significant improvement in the band gap calculations, compared to those using either of the common density functionals (local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA)), which severely underestimate the band gap of BeSe. The band gap obtained from the hybrid PBE0 functional shows excellent agreement with available experimental data. A constant-pressure (NPH) first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) approach has been adopted to characterize the first-order pressure induced phase transition from the zinc blende (ZB) to the nickel arsenide (NiAs) structure. We have shown that the FPMD simulation overestimates the transition pressure PT (compared to static enthalpy and experimental data) due to overpressure in the simulation box. The MD simulation reveals the structural pathway (cubic → orthorhombic → monoclinic → hexagonal), leading from the ZB phase to the NiAs phase. To find an explanation for the phase transition we calculated the vibrational and elastic properties under pressure. Negative Grüneisen parameters were obtained for the transverse acoustic phonon modes at the X and L high symmetry points. However, no mechanical instability or imaginary frequencies were found at pressures near PT. Thus the transition results from a thermodynamic instability rather than an elastic/dynamical one. We have also calculated the optical properties of both the B3 and B8 phases, such as the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, reflectivity, loss function and refractive index, and compared them with the existing experimental and theoretical data. An abrupt decrease is obtained

  12. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    It appeared that New Yorkers were not going to be able to see the transit of the planet Venus across the Sun, but just before the transit was over the sun broke through the clouds and Yvette Lee Kang was able to catch a glimpse of the transit on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 in New York. A transit of Venus occurs when the planet passes directly between the sun and earth. This alignment is rare, coming in pairs that are eight years apart but separated by over a century. The next Venus transit will be in December 2117. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    It appeared that New Yorkers were not going to be able to see the transit of the planet Venus across the Sun, but just before the transit was over the sun broke through the clouds and Liz Heller and Andriel Mesznik were able to catch a glimpse of the transit on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 in New York. A transit of Venus occurs when the planet passes directly between the sun and earth. This alignment is rare, coming in pairs that are eight years apart but separated by over a century. The next Venus transit will be in December 2117. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  15. Dynamics of a Quantum Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Dorner, Uwe; Zoller, Peter

    2005-09-02

    We present two approaches to the dynamics of a quench-induced phase transition in the quantum Ising model. One follows the standard treatment of thermodynamic second order phase transitions but applies it to the quantum phase transitions. The other approach is quantum, and uses Landau-Zener formula for transition probabilities in avoided level crossings. We show that predictions of the two approaches of how the density of defects scales with the quench rate are compatible, and discuss the ensuing insights into the dynamics of quantum phase transitions.

  16. New insights for the Late Pleistocene to Mid Holocene landscape reconstruction in the Western part of the Thessaloniki Plain (Greece): evidence for an abrupt transition and consequences on the settling history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psomiadis, D.; Ghilardi, M.; Demory, F.; Delanghe-Sabatier, D.

    2012-04-01

    The Neolithic site of Nea Nikomideia is located at the western limit of the Thessaloniki Plain, Northern Greece and the archaeological excavations conducted in the 1960s suggested that the settlement was located close to an ancient coastline during its early occupation. Recently published results indicated that palaeoenvironmental transitions in the area influenced the human occupation from the early Holocene (6000/5800 cal. B.C.). It was also established that a freshwater lake occupied the vicinity of the Neolithic settlement at the early stages (Ghilardi et al., under press). However, the Late Pleistocene landscape configuration has not been clearly established, despite of some attempts (Lykousis, 2001). This study presents new data, which are correlated with more densely dated proxies in order to thoroughly investigate the Late Pleistocene - Holocene transition as well as the impact of following environmental alterations on the settlement. Special attention is given on periods of soil coverage which are considered indicative of periods with favourable conditions for human occupation. A new sequence is used, based on 3 new boreholes, for laser grain size analysis, loss-on-ignition and carbonate content, magnetic susceptibility measurements, microfaunal inspection and radiocarbon datings (A.M.S.) and it is intercorrelated with other sequences from the area. The synthesis of the proxies reveals distinct events of palaeoenvironmental alterations in a very well constructed chronostratigraphic framework of more than 10.000 years. The Pleistocene subsurface is found in circa 9 meters deep and clearly indicates the presence of a large alluvial fan deposition (calm environment) from Aliakmon River. The abrupt transition with early Holocene sediments reveals that an important influx of fresh water helped in creating a limnic environment of deposition. From Neolithic times to the present day, the area turned into a marine bay and subsequently into a freshwater lake where

  17. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  18. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  19. Modeling of transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Thomas S.

    1988-01-01

    An effort directed at developing improved transitional models was initiated. The focus of this work was concentrated on the critical assessment of a popular existing transitional model developed by McDonald and Fish in 1972. The objective of this effort was to identify the shortcomings of the McDonald-Fish model and to use the insights gained to suggest modifications or alterations of the basic model. In order to evaluate the transitional model, a compressible boundary layer code was required. Accordingly, a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer code was developed. The program was based on a three-point fully implicit finite difference algorithm where the equations were solved in an uncoupled manner with second order extrapolation used to evaluate the non-linear coefficients. Iteration was offered as an option if the extrapolation error could not be tolerated. The differencing scheme was arranged to be second order in both spatial directions on an arbitrarily stretched mesh. A variety of boundary condition options were implemented including specification of an external pressure gradient, specification of a wall temperature distribution, and specification of an external temperature distribution. Overall the results of the initial phase of this work indicate that the McDonald-Fish model does a poor job at predicting the details of the turbulent flow structure during the transition region.

  20. Insights on semiconductor-metal transition in indium-doped zinc oxide from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, K. G.; Aznan, N. M.; Yam, F. K.; Ng, S. S.; Pung, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO thin films doped with various amounts of In impurities were prepared by magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature of 150°C. The shift in optical bandgap of the In-doped ZnO films is studied as a function of carrier concentration. Nominally doped ZnO films exhibit an increase in the measured optical band gap known as the Burstein-Moss effect. Dominant band gap narrowing is observed with increased doping. XPS and TOFSIMS analyses confirm that In is incorporated in the ZnO material. The In 3d peaks show that no metallic In is present as a result of heavy doping. The XRD phase analysis shows a preferential c-axis growth but a shift of the ZnO (002) peak to lower 2-theta values with increasing FWHM as the carrier concentration increases indicates the decline in the quality of crystallinity. An elongation of the c lattice constant is also observed and is likely to be caused by intersitital In as the amount of In dopants increases. The incorporation of In induces a semiconductor-metal transition between the carrier concentrations of 3.58 - 5.61×1019 cm-3 and structural changes in the ZnO host material.

  1. Insights on semiconductor-metal transition in indium-doped zinc oxide from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, K. G. Aznan, N. M.; Yam, F. K. Ng, S. S.; Pung, S. Y.

    2016-07-06

    ZnO thin films doped with various amounts of In impurities were prepared by magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature of 150°C. The shift in optical bandgap of the In-doped ZnO films is studied as a function of carrier concentration. Nominally doped ZnO films exhibit an increase in the measured optical band gap known as the Burstein-Moss effect. Dominant band gap narrowing is observed with increased doping. XPS and TOFSIMS analyses confirm that In is incorporated in the ZnO material. The In 3d peaks show that no metallic In is present as a result of heavy doping. The XRD phase analysis shows a preferential c-axis growth but a shift of the ZnO (002) peak to lower 2-theta values with increasing FWHM as the carrier concentration increases indicates the decline in the quality of crystallinity. An elongation of the c lattice constant is also observed and is likely to be caused by intersitital In as the amount of In dopants increases. The incorporation of In induces a semiconductor-metal transition between the carrier concentrations of 3.58 – 5.61×10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} and structural changes in the ZnO host material.

  2. Sleep inspires insight.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ullrich; Gais, Steffen; Haider, Hilde; Verleger, Rolf; Born, Jan

    2004-01-22

    Insight denotes a mental restructuring that leads to a sudden gain of explicit knowledge allowing qualitatively changed behaviour. Anecdotal reports on scientific discovery suggest that pivotal insights can be gained through sleep. Sleep consolidates recent memories and, concomitantly, could allow insight by changing their representational structure. Here we show a facilitating role of sleep in a process of insight. Subjects performed a cognitive task requiring the learning of stimulus-response sequences, in which they improved gradually by increasing response speed across task blocks. However, they could also improve abruptly after gaining insight into a hidden abstract rule underlying all sequences. Initial training establishing a task representation was followed by 8 h of nocturnal sleep, nocturnal wakefulness, or daytime wakefulness. At subsequent retesting, more than twice as many subjects gained insight into the hidden rule after sleep as after wakefulness, regardless of time of day. Sleep did not enhance insight in the absence of initial training. A characteristic antecedent of sleep-related insight was revealed in a slowing of reaction times across sleep. We conclude that sleep, by restructuring new memory representations, facilitates extraction of explicit knowledge and insightful behaviour.

  3. Low-grade metastases in high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinomas: A clinicopathologic study of 4 cases with an insight into the role of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition process.

    PubMed

    López, José I; Mosteiro, Lorena; Guarch, Rosa; Larrinaga, Gorka; Pulido, Rafael; Angulo, Javier C

    2016-02-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) frequently develops distant metastases. However, high-grade primary CCRCC rarely leads to low-grade metastases. Cellular changes occurring during neoplastic progression known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions explain this apparent contradiction. Four high-grade CCRCCs, which lead to low-grade metastases, are analyzed in this study, with the focus on epithelial-to-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-to-epithelial processes. Clinicopathologic data have been collected retrospectively and immunohistochemistry has been performed with E-cadherin, N-cadherin, vimentin, and WT-1. Three cases had organ-confined disease (2 pT2 and 1 pT1b). Three cases were G3 and 1 case was G4. Lung (3 cases), bone (2 cases), and pancreas (1 case) were the metastatic organs (2 patients developed multiple metastases). Metastases were G1 in all the cases. Average elapsed time between the primary tumor and the metastasis was 35.5 months. Three patients died of disease after 36, 120, and 180 months of follow-up, respectively. One patient is alive without disease after 75 months of follow-up. E-cadherin and N-cadherin showed concordant immunostaining patterns between primaries and metastases but inverse when correlated with Fuhrman grade. Hence, E-cadherin was positive in G3 cases and negative in G4, whereas N-cadherin was negative in G3 and positive in G4. Vimentin was positive in primaries and metastases only in 2 cases. WT-1 was consistently negative in all cases. In conclusion, pathologists must remember that high-grade CCRCC may develop low-grade metastases. Cadherin switching seems to be related to Fuhrman grade in this group of cases. This preliminary observation must be confirmed in longer studies.

  4. Geological Transition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-11

    This image, taken by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the transition between the Murray Formation, in which layers are poorly expressed and difficult to trace from orbit, and the hematite ridge, which is made up of continuous layers.

  5. Transit Timing Study with Kepler and its synergy with LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST: http://www.lamost.org) provides mass and radius measurements of the stars thus helps with modeling transit timing. Here, we will show two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties by combining Kepler and LAMOST.

  6. Types of Insight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadler, Holly

    1984-01-01

    Presents a conceptual model of insight that is distinct from any theory or philosophy. Six types of insight are described: associative, aggregate, discrete process, ontogenetic process, phylogenetic process, and transcendent process. The model offers counselors a method for the enhancement of empathy and the development of client insight…

  7. Tectonic transition from Late Carboniferous subduction to Early Permian post-collisional extension in the Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Insights from geochronology and geochemistry of mafic-intermediate intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Zhao, Guochun; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Sun, Min; Han, Yigui; Hou, Wenzhu; Liu, Dongxing; Wang, Bo; Liu, Qian; Xu, Bing; Zhu, Chloe Yanlin

    2016-07-01

    a tectonic transition from oceanic subduction to post-collisional extension during Late Carboniferous to Early Permian time, probably triggered by the closure of the Junggar Ocean and subsequent arc-continent collision between the Central Tianshan and Junggar terranes that gave rise to the final assembly of the Eastern Tianshan.

  8. William Crabtree's Venus transit observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    The close collaboration between the two North-country astronomers Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree gave them special insight into the new astronomy published by the recently-deceased Kepler, whereby Horrocks became the only person to apprehend that the Rudolphine tables were in fact predicting a Venus transit in 1639. This paper focuses especially upon William Crabtree's role and contribution. A comparison is made with an earlier, unsuccessful endeavour by these two concerning a possible transit of Mercury. Much of the record of their work was lost during the civil war. Finally, thanks to Christiaan Huygens, Horrock's manuscript was published by Johannes Hevelius in Danzig, in 1662.

  9. Semiautomated model building for RNA crystallography using a directed rotameric approach.

    PubMed

    Keating, Kevin S; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2010-05-04

    Structured RNA molecules play essential roles in a variety of cellular processes; however, crystallographic studies of such RNA molecules present a large number of challenges. One notable complication arises from the low resolutions typical of RNA crystallography, which results in electron density maps that are imprecise and difficult to interpret. This problem is exacerbated by the lack of computational tools for RNA modeling, as many of the techniques commonly used in protein crystallography have no equivalents for RNA structure. This leads to difficulty and errors in the model building process, particularly in modeling of the RNA backbone, which is highly error prone due to the large number of variable torsion angles per nucleotide. To address this, we have developed a method for accurately building the RNA backbone into maps of intermediate or low resolution. This method is semiautomated, as it requires a crystallographer to first locate phosphates and bases in the electron density map. After this initial trace of the molecule, however, an accurate backbone structure can be built without further user intervention. To accomplish this, backbone conformers are first predicted using RNA pseudotorsions and the base-phosphate perpendicular distance. Detailed backbone coordinates are then calculated to conform both to the predicted conformer and to the previously located phosphates and bases. This technique is shown to produce accurate backbone structure even when starting from imprecise phosphate and base coordinates. A program implementing this methodology is currently available, and a plugin for the Coot model building program is under development.

  10. Anomeric and rotameric preferences of glucopyranose in vacuo, water and organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Sedat; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-09-01

    Glucopyranose is the most stable form of glucose in solution. Identification of molecular structure of glucopyranose is very important because of its biological and synthetic significance; it is not an easy task because of the large number of possible configurations. Relative energies of exocyclic hydroxymethyl rotamers and α-β anomers of D-glucopyranose have been determined at the reference MP2/6-31G(d,p) level geometry by ab initio calculations at the infinite basis set limit of MP2 approach and with inclusion of CCSD(T) correction term evaluated with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set in vacuum, water, dimethylsulfoxide, tetrahydrofurane and ethanol. The infinite basis set limit of MP2 level was determined by two point extrapolation using aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets. Solvent effects, relative energies and binding energies have been considered applying explicit calculations and implicit solvent models.

  11. Transition operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock-Zeilinger, J.; Weigert, H.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we give a generic algorithm of the transition operators between Hermitian Young projection operators corresponding to equivalent irreducible representations of 𝖲𝖴 (N ) , using the compact expressions of Hermitian Young projection operators derived in the work of Alcock-Zeilinger and Weigert [eprint arXiv:1610.10088 [math-ph

  12. Presidential Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-09

    Podesta for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, “Presidential Transition Guidance,” Nov. 13, 2000. 89 U.S. General Services Administration...2000, presidential election, White House Chief of Staff John Podesta issued a November 13, 2000, memorandum to executive branch agencies stating that

  13. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  14. Venus transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    Leslie Lowes from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., views the June 5, 2012, Venus transit through a solar telescope. Lowes participated in an education workshop at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center and joined others to view the rare celestial event when Venus traverses the face of the sun.

  15. Venus transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    Guests at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center use special solar sunglasses to catch a lifetime view of the Venus transit June 5, 2012. The rare celestial event in which the planet Venus traverses the face of the sun will not be visible from Earth again until 2117.

  16. Muted Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kofoed, Jette

    2008-01-01

    This analysis concentrates on the case of a child, Jenny. The paper suggests that the concept of liminality may hold the key to an understanding of muted subject positions like the one assumed by Jenny in a school class. Liminality is proposed as a way of conceptualizing transitions where the subject in question transgresses established rules and…

  17. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  18. Kepler Systems That Show Multiple Transiting Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Exoplanetary systems that have multiple transiting planets provide unique and important insight into the formation, evolution, and dynamics of exoplanetary systems. Kepler has announced the discovery of a confirmed planetary system with multiple transiting planets (Kepler 9, Holman et al. 2010) as well as several candidate planetary systems that show multiple transiting objects (Steffen et al. 2010). Kepler 9 shows deviations from a constant period due to the ongoing dynamical interactions between the confirmed planets. From these transit timing variations (TTV) one can measure the planetary masses from the photometric data alone. The presence of several systems with multiple transiting candidates from the first quarter of data indicate that Kepler should continue to find systems with multiple transiting planets. Such systems will provide important, general information about the histories of planetary systems.

  19. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Aneta L; Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-02-28

    The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers. The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices.

  20. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  1. Dreaming and insight

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher L.; Ruby, Perrine M.; Malinowski, Josie E.; Bennett, Paul D.; Blagrove, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish “aha” experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from “aha” experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  2. Dreaming and insight.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christopher L; Ruby, Perrine M; Malinowski, Josie E; Bennett, Paul D; Blagrove, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish "aha" experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from "aha" experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared.

  3. Implementation of Insight Responsibilities in Process Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Deborah M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes an approach for evaluating flight readiness (COFR) and contractor performance evaluation (award fee) as part of the insight role of NASA Process Engineering at Kennedy Space Center. Several evaluation methods are presented, including systems engineering evaluations and use of systems performance data. The transition from an oversight function to the insight function is described. The types of analytical tools appropriate for achieving the flight readiness and contractor performance evaluation goals are described and examples are provided. Special emphasis is placed upon short and small run statistical quality control techniques. Training requirements for system engineers are delineated. The approach described herein would be equally appropriate in other directorates at Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Implementation of Insight Responsibilities in Process Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Deborah M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes an approach for evaluating flight readiness (COFR) and contractor performance evaluation (award fee) as part of the insight role of NASA Process Engineering at Kennedy Space Center. Several evaluation methods are presented, including systems engineering evaluations and use of systems performance data. The transition from an oversight function to the insight function is described. The types of analytical tools appropriate for achieving the flight readiness and contractor performance evaluation goals are described and examples are provided. Special emphasis is placed upon short and small run statistical quality control techniques. Training requirements for system engineers are delineated. The approach described herein would be equally appropriate in other directorates at Kennedy Space Center.

  5. New Insights into Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronck, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents insights on the controversial issues regarding evolution. This article partitions into the following sections: (1) Mechanisms explaining how evolution happened; (2) Creationist Confusion; (3) Literal Interpretation of the Bible; (4) Public demand for Creationism; (5) No Basis for Debating; and (6) Scientific Creationism is Bible Study.…

  6. Insight to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Dennis P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development and field-testing of Insight to Science, a science program for ages 11-13 developed by the Inner London Education Authority and published by Addison-Wesley. The program includes physical and life sciences and is intended as an introductory science experience. (CP)

  7. Changing Schools: Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Policy and Planning (ED), Washington, DC.

    Over 1,000 communities in 45 states, territories, and the District of Columbia, are mobilized under the AMERICA 2000 banner to reach the 6 National Education Goals. This collection of papers, written by those who have wrestled with the process of school reform, offers useful insights to communities as they begin their process of transforming…

  8. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    A "transit of Venus" occurs when the planet Venus passes directly between the sun and the Earth. During the event, Venus will be seen from Earth as a small black sphere moving across the face of the sun. Such an event won’t occur again until the year 2117. The Goddard Visitor Center hosted a watch party that included near real-time images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, coverage of the event from several locations via NASA TV, in-person presentations by NASA experts, hands-on activities for children of all ages. Heavy cloud cover did not allow viewing opportunities of the transit via solar telescopes. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. New approaches to demystifying insight.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Edward M; Jung-Beeman, Mark; Fleck, Jessica; Kounios, John

    2005-07-01

    After a person has become stuck on a problem, they sometimes achieve a clear and sudden solution through insight--the so-called Aha! experience. Because of its distinctive experience, the origins and characteristics of insight have received considerable attention historically in psychological research. However, despite considerable progress in characterizing insight, the underlying mechanisms remain mysterious. We argue that research on insight could be greatly advanced by supplementing traditional insight research, which depends on a few complex problems, with paradigms common in other domains of cognitive science. We describe a large set of mini-insight problems to which multiple methods can be applied, together with subjective reports to identify insight problem-solving. Behavioral priming and neuroimaging methods are providing evidence about what, where, and how neural activity occurs during insight. Such evidence constrains theories of component processes, and will help to demystify insight.

  10. Adaptation to Transition: Implications for Working with Cult Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Beth; Bradley, Loretta J.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that because individuals experiencing transitions seem to be particularly susceptible to cult membership, developing insight and resources to cope with transition must be an integral part of strategies to prevent cult membership. Discusses interventions focusing on treatment of former cult members are . (Author/MKA)

  11. Smooth Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a transition from one of the many layered troughs in the north polar region of Mars to the relatively homogeneous-looking upper surface of the polar cap. The difference in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors, one of which is the amount of dust versus that of ice in any given location. The bright material that dominates the scene is largely water ice.

    Location near: 83.2oN, 297.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower right Season: Northern Summer

  12. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  13. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  14. The politics of insight

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs. PMID:26810954

  15. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-06

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail.

  16. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  17. Modeling for Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  18. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  19. Topological Lifshitz transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Different types of Lifshitz transitions are governed by topology in momentum space. They involve the topological transitions with the change of topology of Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, nodal lines, and also the transitions between the fully gapped states.

  20. Transition to Adulthood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Workspaces Workspaces Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Transition to Adulthood Link-checked, June ... reading… Back to top IDEA’s Definition of Transition Services Any discussion of transition services must begin with ...

  1. Osho - Insights on sex

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of “Tantra” which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment. PMID:23858266

  2. Osho - Insights on sex.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of "Tantra" which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment.

  3. Nurse practitioner role transition: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Lorna; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-07-01

    Transitioning from registered nurse to nurse practitioner (NP) can be challenging personally and professionally. Insight into transition experiences may help validate the experiences of new NPs and provide greater understanding of the challenges faced during their professional journey. The purpose of this article is to report a concept analysis of transition from registered nurse to NP. The article provides new knowledge, understanding, and clarity about the concept of transition. Walker and Avants' framework for concept analysis was used to identify the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of the concept. A literature review of refereed journals was undertaken. Model cases from an ethnographic study conducted in Australia provide real life examples of the attributes of transition. Transitioning to the role of NP is complex and dependent on the individual and the attitudes of healthcare colleagues. Change and adaptation are required of both the NP and members of the healthcare team. Failure to adapt by either party undermines the potential for NPs to deliver improved health care. Mentorship along with a nurturing environment may be effective strategies for increasing the NP's self-confidence and ensuring a smooth and successful transition period. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan, Comp.; Morningstar, Mary E., Comp.

    2009-01-01

    The Tips for Transition contains 134 Transition Tips submitted from all over the country by practitioners. The purpose of the Tips was to identify grassroots transition practices being used by practitioners. Tips are categorized into the following domains: (1) Transition Planning; (2) Student Involvement; (3) Family Involvement; (4) Curriculum and…

  5. Searching for Insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald

    2010-09-01

    Is space-time only brought into being by its energy content? The jury is still out, but other questions that have been with me for much of my life—giant black holes in galactic nuclei, the formation of the Galaxy, the connection between first-order phase transitions and negative specific heats, the cause of the large-scale flow of galaxies relative to the cosmic microwave background—have all received reasonable answers. I have found great fun in understanding the dynamical mechanisms underlying such phenomena as magnetohydrodynamic jets, relativistic disks, and the bars, spirals, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The great challenges for future astronomers will be the exploration of the 96% of the Universe now believed to be neither atomic nor baryonic but perhaps partially leptonic. However, most advances do not come via frontal attack but from “bread-and-butter” investigations in related areas where observation is possible today!

  6. Cognitive insight: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van Camp, L S C; Sabbe, B G C; Oldenburg, J F E

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive insight is the ability to re-evaluate thoughts and beliefs in order to make thoughtful conclusions. It differs from clinical insight, as it focuses on more general metacognitive processes. Therefore, it could be relevant to diverse disorders and non-clinical subjects. There is a growing body of research on cognitive insight in individuals with and without psychosis. This review has summarised the current state of the art regarding this topic. We conclude that while cognitive insight in its current form seems valid for use in individuals with psychosis, it is less so for individuals without psychosis. Additionally, higher cognitive insight not always leads to better psychological functioning. For instance, higher levels of self-reflection are often associated with depressive mood. We therefore recommend the sub-components of cognitive insight to be studied separately. Also, it is unclear what position cognitive insight takes within the spectrum of metacognitive processes and how it relates to other self-related concepts that have been defined previously in literature. Combining future and past research on cognitive insight and its analogue concepts will help in the formation of a uniform definition that fits all subjects discussed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Grigor Narekatsi's astronomical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Samvel

    2015-07-01

    What stand out in the solid system of Gr. Narekatsi's naturalistic views are his astronomical insights on the material nature of light, its high speed and the Sun being composed of "material air". Especially surprising and fascinating are his views on stars and their clusters. What astronomers, including great Armenian academician V. Ambartsumian (scattering of stellar associations), would understand and prove with much difficulty thousand years later, Narekatsi predicted in the 10th century: "Stars appear and disappear untimely", "You who gather and scatter the speechless constellations, like a flock of sheep". Gr. Narekatsti's reformative views were manifested in all the spheres of the 10th century social life; he is a reformer of church life, great language constructor, innovator in literature and music, freethinker in philosophy and science. His ideology is the reflection of the 10th century Armenian Renaissance. During the 9th-10th centuries, great masses of Armenians, forced to migrate to the Balkans, took with them and spread reformative ideas. The forefather of the western science, which originated in the period of Reformation, is considered to be the great philosopher Nicholas of Cusa. The study of Gr. Narekatsti's logic and naturalistic views enables us to claim that Gr. Narekatsti is the great grandfather of European science.

  8. Systemic sclerosis: Recent insights.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Kahan, André; Allanore, Yannick

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an orphan connective tissue disease characterized by alterations of the microvasculature, disturbances of the immune system and massive deposition of collagen and other matrix substances in the skin and internal organs. A major achievement of the recent years has been the validation of new classification criteria, allowing earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment of systemic sclerosis, before irreversible fibrosis and organ damage appeared ("window of opportunity"). Raynaud's phenomenon is usually the first sign of the disease and is considered as the main sentinel sign for the identification of very early systemic sclerosis. Systemic sclerosis is clinically heterogeneous and disease course remains unpredictable. Its prognosis depends on cardiopulmonary involvement and recent studies aim to identify serum or genetic biomarkers predictive of severe organ involvement. Moreover, the prospective follow-up of large cohorts has provided and will offer critical material to identify strong prognostic factors. Whereas the outcomes of vascular manifestations of the disease has been recently improved due to targeted therapy, recent data have highlighted that mortality has not changed over the past 40 years. This reflects the absence of efficacy of current available drugs to counteract the fibrotic process. Nevertheless, several targeted immunity therapies, commonly with proven efficacy in other immune diseases, are about to be investigated in systemic sclerosis. Indeed, promising results in small and open studies have been reported. This article deals with recent insights into classification criteria, pathogenesis, organ involvements, outcome and current and possible future therapeutic options in systemic sclerosis.

  9. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  10. Partners in Transition: Preparing Transition Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sample, Pat; And Others

    Colorado rural special educators are experiencing tremendous challenges in providing mandated transition services to students with special needs. The School of Education and the Department of Occupational Therapy at Colorado State University have developed a program to create rural transition specialists through preservice and inservice training…

  11. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  12. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  13. On transition rates in surface hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartín, J. M.; Romaniello, P.; Stella, L.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2012-12-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) is one of the most widely used quantum-classical algorithms for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Despite its empirical effectiveness and popularity, a rigorous derivation of TSH as the classical limit of a combined quantum electron-nuclear dynamics is still missing. In this work, we aim to elucidate the theoretical basis for the widely used hopping rules. Naturally, we concentrate thereby on the formal aspects of the TSH. Using a Gaussian wave packet limit, we derive the transition rates governing the hopping process at a simple avoided level crossing. In this derivation, which gives insight into the physics underlying the hopping process, some essential features of the standard TSH algorithm are retrieved, namely (i) non-zero electronic transition rate ("hopping probability") at avoided crossings; (ii) rescaling of the nuclear velocities to conserve total energy; (iii) electronic transition rates linear in the nonadiabatic coupling vectors. The well-known Landau-Zener model is then used for illustration.

  14. Recent Neurobiological Insights into the Concept of Insight in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y

    2016-01-01

    The concept of insight in psychosis has been an interesting area in clinical psychiatry for well over a century with a surge in research interest over the past 25 years. Moreover, the past 5 years have been particularly fruitful in deciphering its neurobiological underpinnings. This article presents the development of the concept of insight in psychosis and reviews the current neurobiological research findings in this area. PMID:27335512

  15. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. Methods In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers.   Results The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. Conclusions The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices. PMID:25725207

  16. Prediction and Analysis of the Nonsteady Transition and Separation Processes on an Oscillating Wind Turbine Airfoil using the \\gamma-Re_\\theta Transition Model.

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Taraj; Brasseur, James; Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    2016-01-04

    This study is aimed at gaining insight into the nonsteady transitional boundary layer dynamics of wind turbine blades and the predictive capabilities of URANS based transition and turbulence models for similar physics through the analysis of a controlled flow with similar nonsteady parameters.

  17. Communication: Protein dynamical transition vs. liquid-liquid phase transition in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fomina, Margarita; Cupane, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we compare experimental data on myoglobin hydrated powders from elastic neutron scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Our aim is to obtain new insights on the connection between the protein dynamical transition, a fundamental phenomenon observed in proteins whose physical origin is highly debated, and the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) possibly occurring in protein hydration water and related to the existence of a low temperature critical point in supercooled water. Our results provide a consistent thermodynamic/dynamic description which gives experimental support to the LLPT hypothesis and further reveals how fundamental properties of water and proteins are tightly related.

  18. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  19. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  20. The Managerial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneeland, Steven J.

    1980-01-01

    Having identified the problem of managerial transition in a previous article (CE 510 277), the author outlines a strategy for change which includes performance appraisal, definition of the management structure, and counselling for the individual in transition. (SK)

  1. Giving Voice to Student and Alumnae Opposition during the Transition to Coeducation by a College for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Rebecca Jean Grandstaff

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provides insight into students' and alumnae's experiences during the transition and legal proceedings as their former college for women transitioned to coeducation. Previous research on the transition of single-sex colleges to coeducation has primarily examined the process from an organizational perspective. This study focuses on…

  2. Giving Voice to Student and Alumnae Opposition during the Transition to Coeducation by a College for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Rebecca Jean Grandstaff

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provides insight into students' and alumnae's experiences during the transition and legal proceedings as their former college for women transitioned to coeducation. Previous research on the transition of single-sex colleges to coeducation has primarily examined the process from an organizational perspective. This study focuses on…

  3. Insight and analysis problem solving in microbes to machines.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2015-11-01

    A key feature for obtaining solutions to difficult problems, insight is oftentimes vaguely regarded as a special discontinuous intellectual process and/or a cognitive restructuring of problem representation or goal approach. However, this nearly century-old state of art devised by the Gestalt tradition to explain the non-analytical or non-trial-and-error, goal-seeking aptitude of primate mentality tends to neglect problem-solving capabilities of lower animal phyla, Kingdoms other than Animalia, and advancing smart computational technologies built from biological, artificial, and composite media. Attempting to provide an inclusive, precise definition of insight, two major criteria of insight, discontinuous processing and problem restructuring, are here reframed using terminology and statistical mechanical properties of computational complexity classes. Discontinuous processing becomes abrupt state transitions in algorithmic/heuristic outcomes or in types of algorithms/heuristics executed by agents using classical and/or quantum computational models. And problem restructuring becomes combinatorial reorganization of resources, problem-type substitution, and/or exchange of computational models. With insight bounded by computational complexity, humans, ciliated protozoa, and complex technological networks, for example, show insight when restructuring time requirements, combinatorial complexity, and problem type to solve polynomial and nondeterministic polynomial decision problems. Similar effects are expected from other problem types, supporting the idea that insight might be an epiphenomenon of analytical problem solving and consequently a larger information processing framework. Thus, this computational complexity definition of insight improves the power, external and internal validity, and reliability of operational parameters with which to classify, investigate, and produce the phenomenon for computational agents ranging from microbes to man-made devices.

  4. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  5. Cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. |

    1993-10-01

    If modern ideas about the role of spontaneous symmetry breaking in fundamental physics are correct, then the Universe should have undergone a series of phase transitions early in its history. The study of cosmological phase transitions has become an important aspect of early-Universe cosmology. In this lecture I review some very recent work on three aspects of phase transitions: the electroweak transition, texture, and axions.

  6. Transition. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of a quarterly bulletin on community integration addresses the topic of transition services for preparing youth with disabilities for adult community living. It contains articles with the following titles and authors: "Transition: The Next Five Years" (David R. Johnson and others); "Transition Policy in the 1990s:…

  7. Transition: Preschool to Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Transition is movement or change without interruption. It should be a smooth flow from one place or condition to another. While the transition plan for a student receiving special education services is designed to prepare him or her for life after high school, transition can start when a child enters preschool. The second of six distinct stages of…

  8. Transit pricing and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pickerell, D.H.; Abkowitz, M.; Tozzi, J.; McCord, M.R.; Cheng, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 9 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Federal operating assistance for urban mass transit; a decade of experience; transit route characteristics and headway-based reliability control; day-of-week and part-of-month variation in bus ridership; job satisfaction and transit operator recognition programs; results of a survey of muni operators; bus marketing costs: the experience of 18 section 15 reporters from 1981 to 1983; prospects for differential transit pricing in the United States; an initial analysis of total factor productivity for public-transit coordination of transportation resources: the Georgia experience; absenteeism, accidents, and attrition: part-time versus full-time bus drivers.

  9. Exotic phase transitions of k -cores in clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Uttam; Shrestha, Munik; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The giant k -core—maximal connected subgraph of a network where each node has at least k neighbors—is important in the study of phase transitions and in applications of network theory. Unlike Erdős-Rényi graphs and other random networks where k -cores emerge discontinuously for k ≥3 , we show that transitive linking (or triadic closure) leads to 3-cores emerging through single or double phase transitions of both discontinuous and continuous nature. We also develop a k -core calculation that includes clustering and provides insights into how high-level connectivity emerges.

  10. Phase Transition to Bundles of Flexible Supramolecular Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, B. A. H.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Fasolino, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly of supramolecular polymers based on a model of patchy particles. We find a first-order phase transition, characterized by hysteresis and nucleation, toward a solid bundle of polymers, of length much greater than the average gas phase length. We argue that the bundling transition is the supramolecular equivalent of the sublimation transition, which results from a weak chain-chain interaction. We provide a qualitative equation of state that gives physical insight beyond the specific values of the parameters used in our simulations.

  11. Gifts from Exoplanetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Norio

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of transiting extrasolar planets has enabled us to do a number of interesting studies. Transit photometry reveals the radius and the orbital inclination of transiting planets, which allows us to learn the true mass and density of the respective planets by the combined information from radial velocity (RV) measurements. In addition, follow-up observations of transiting planets, looking at such things as secondary eclipses, transit timing variations, transmission spectroscopy, and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, provide us information about their dayside temperatures, unseen bodies in systems, planetary atmospheres, and the obliquity of planetary orbits. Such observational information, which will provide us a greater understanding of extrasolar planets, is available only for transiting planets. Here, I briefly summarize what we can learn from transiting planets and introduce previous studies.

  12. Graduating into Start-up: Exploring the Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Ghulam; Holden, Rick; Walmsley, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the exploratory research discussed in this paper was to generate insights into the complexity of the career-making processes involved in the transition from being a student to starting up a business. Using story-telling interviews, data were collected from fifteen graduates based in the Yorkshire region of the UK. Qualitative…

  13. Deconstructing insight: EEG correlates of insightful problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sandkühler, Simone; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2008-01-23

    Cognitive insight phenomenon lies at the core of numerous discoveries. Behavioral research indicates four salient features of insightful problem solving: (i) mental impasse, followed by (ii) restructuring of the problem representation, which leads to (iii) a deeper understanding of the problem, and finally culminates in (iv) an "Aha!" feeling of suddenness and obviousness of the solution. However, until now no efforts have been made to investigate the neural mechanisms of these constituent features of insight in a unified framework. In an electroencephalographic study using verbal remote associate problems, we identified neural correlates of these four features of insightful problem solving. Hints were provided for unsolved problems or after mental impasse. Subjective ratings of the restructuring process and the feeling of suddenness were obtained on trial-by-trial basis. A negative correlation was found between these two ratings indicating that sudden insightful solutions, where restructuring is a key feature, involve automatic, subconscious recombination of information. Electroencephalogram signals were analyzed in the space x time x frequency domain with a nonparametric cluster randomization test. First, we found strong gamma band responses at parieto-occipital regions which we interpreted as (i) an adjustment of selective attention (leading to a mental impasse or to a correct solution depending on the gamma band power level) and (ii) encoding and retrieval processes for the emergence of spontaneous new solutions. Secondly, we observed an increased upper alpha band response in right temporal regions (suggesting active suppression of weakly activated solution relevant information) for initially unsuccessful trials that after hint presentation led to a correct solution. Finally, for trials with high restructuring, decreased alpha power (suggesting greater cortical excitation) was observed in right prefrontal area. Our results provide a first account of cognitive

  14. DNA Overstretching Transition: Ionic Strength Effects

    PubMed Central

    Punkkinen, Olli; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Miao, Ling; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2005-01-01

    As double-stranded DNA is stretched to its B-form contour length, models of polymer elasticity can describe the dramatic increase in measured force. When the molecule is stretched beyond the contour length, it further shows a highly cooperative overstretching transition. We have developed a theoretical description for this transition by coupling the two-state model and the elasticity theory proposed earlier by others. Furthermore, we have extended this model to account for monovalent salt effects on elastic moduli during the transition. We find that this theoretical description is in very good agreement with recent measurements for the salt dependence of the overstretching transition, allowing us to gain insight into the mechanisms that govern the transition. In double-stranded DNA, the effective length per unit charge varies with salt in agreement with the Manning and Poisson-Boltzmann models for thin polyelectrolyte rods, whereas the other model parameters describing structural features have barely any salt dependence. The results thus suggest that the electrostatic component of force-induced overstretching is mediated mesoscopically via elasticity. PMID:15923227

  15. Quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2003-12-01

    In recent years, quantum phase transitions have attracted the interest of both theorists and experimentalists in condensed matter physics. These transitions, which are accessed at zero temperature by variation of a non-thermal control parameter, can influence the behaviour of electronic systems over a wide range of the phase diagram. Quantum phase transitions occur as a result of competing ground state phases. The cuprate superconductors which can be tuned from a Mott insulating to a d-wave superconducting phase by carrier doping are a paradigmatic example. This review introduces important concepts of phase transitions and discusses the interplay of quantum and classical fluctuations near criticality. The main part of the article is devoted to bulk quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. Several classes of transitions will be briefly reviewed, pointing out, e.g., conceptual differences between ordering transitions in metallic and insulating systems. An interesting separate class of transitions is boundary phase transitions where only degrees of freedom of a subsystem become critical; this will be illustrated in a few examples. The article is aimed at bridging the gap between high-level theoretical presentations and research papers specialized in certain classes of materials. It will give an overview on a variety of different quantum transitions, critically discuss open theoretical questions, and frequently make contact with recent experiments in condensed matter physics.

  16. "I Take Engineering with Me": Epistemological Transitions across an Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winberg, Christine; Winberg, Simon; Jacobs, Cecilia; Garraway, James; Engel-Hills, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study epistemological transitions across an intended engineering curriculum and recommend strategies to assist students in attaining the increasingly complex concepts and insights that are necessary for transition to advanced levels of study. We draw on Legitimation Code Theory [Maton, Karl. 2014, "Knowledge and Knowers:…

  17. "I Take Engineering with Me": Epistemological Transitions across an Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winberg, Christine; Winberg, Simon; Jacobs, Cecilia; Garraway, James; Engel-Hills, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study epistemological transitions across an intended engineering curriculum and recommend strategies to assist students in attaining the increasingly complex concepts and insights that are necessary for transition to advanced levels of study. We draw on Legitimation Code Theory [Maton, Karl. 2014, "Knowledge and Knowers:…

  18. Understanding Insight in the Context of Q

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coghlan, David

    2012-01-01

    In Revans' learning formula, L = P + Q, Q represents "questioning insight", by which Revans means that insight comes out of the process of questioning programmed knowledge (P) in the light of experience. We typically focus on the content of an insight rather than on the act of insight. Drawing primarily on the work of Bernard Lonergan this paper…

  19. Understanding Insight in the Context of Q

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coghlan, David

    2012-01-01

    In Revans' learning formula, L = P + Q, Q represents "questioning insight", by which Revans means that insight comes out of the process of questioning programmed knowledge (P) in the light of experience. We typically focus on the content of an insight rather than on the act of insight. Drawing primarily on the work of Bernard Lonergan this paper…

  20. Pattern transitions in spatial epidemics: Mechanisms and emergent properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Jusup, Marko; Jin, Zhen; Wang, Yi; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Infectious diseases are a threat to human health and a hindrance to societal development. Consequently, the spread of diseases in both time and space has been widely studied, revealing the different types of spatial patterns. Transitions between patterns are an emergent property in spatial epidemics that can serve as a potential trend indicator of disease spread. Despite the usefulness of such an indicator, attempts to systematize the topic of pattern transitions have been few and far between. We present a mini-review on pattern transitions in spatial epidemics, describing the types of transitions and their underlying mechanisms. We show that pattern transitions relate to the complexity of spatial epidemics by, for example, being accompanied with phenomena such as coherence resonance and cyclic evolution. The results presented herein provide valuable insights into disease prevention and control, and may even be applicable outside epidemiology, including other branches of medical science, ecology, quantitative finance, and elsewhere.

  1. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals.

    PubMed

    Pogatscher, S; Leutenegger, D; Schawe, J E K; Uggowitzer, P J; Löffler, J F

    2016-04-22

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a 'real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  2. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a `real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  3. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  4. Modeling Verwey transition temperature of Fe3O4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao bao; Xiao, Bei bei; Yang, Hong yu; Gu, Xiao yan; Sheng, Hong chao; Zhang, Xing hua

    2016-11-01

    The Verwey transition in nanoscale is an important physical property for Fe3O4 nanocrystals and has attracted extensive attention in recent years. In this work, an analytic thermodynamic model without any adjusting parameters is developed to estimate the size and shape effects on modulating the Verwey transition temperature of Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The results show that the Verwey transition temperature reduces with increasing shape parameter λ or decreasing size D. A good agreement between the prediction and the experimental data verified our physical insight that the Verwey transition of Fe3O4 can be directly related to the atomic thermal vibration. The results presented in this work will be of benefit to the understanding of the microscopic mechanism of the Verwey transition and the design of future generation switching and memory devices.

  5. Shedding light on insight: Priming bright ideas

    PubMed Central

    Slepian, Michael L.; Weisbuch, Max; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Newman, Leonard S.; Ambady, Nalini

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has characterized insight as the product of internal processes, and has thus investigated the cognitive and motivational processes that immediately precede it. In this research, however, we investigate whether insight can be catalyzed by a cultural artifact, an external object imbued with learned meaning. Specifically, we exposed participants to an illuminating lightbulb – an iconic image of insight – prior to or during insight problem-solving. Across four studies, exposing participants to an illuminating lightbulb primed concepts associated with achieving an insight, and enhanced insight problem-solving in three different domains (spatial, verbal, and mathematical), but did not enhance general (non-insight) problem-solving. PMID:20652087

  6. Shedding light on insight: Priming bright ideas.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Michael L; Weisbuch, Max; Rutchick, Abraham M; Newman, Leonard S; Ambady, Nalini

    2010-07-01

    Previous research has characterized insight as the product of internal processes, and has thus investigated the cognitive and motivational processes that immediately precede it. In this research, however, we investigate whether insight can be catalyzed by a cultural artifact, an external object imbued with learned meaning. Specifically, we exposed participants to an illuminating lightbulb - an iconic image of insight - prior to or during insight problem-solving. Across four studies, exposing participants to an illuminating lightbulb primed concepts associated with achieving an insight, and enhanced insight problem-solving in three different domains (spatial, verbal, and mathematical), but did not enhance general (non-insight) problem-solving.

  7. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  8. Gradual meiosis-to-mitosis transition in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Aurélien; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The transition from meiosis to mitosis is a fundamental process to guarantee the successful development of the embryo. In the mouse, the transition includes extensive reorganisation of the division machinery, centrosome establishment and changes in spindle proprieties and characteristic. Recent findings indicate that this transition is gradual and lasts until the late blastocyst stage. In-depth knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the transition would provide new insight into de novo centrosome formation and regulation of spindle size and proprieties. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of acentrosomal spindle formation, centriole establishment and the meiosis-to-mitosis transition in the mouse pre-implantation embryo.

  9. Transition Region Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansteen, V.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The SOLAR TRANSITION REGION comprises the PLASMA between the CHROMOSPHERE and the CORONA. In both of these regions the temperature is fairly uniform. The transition region, by contrast, is believed to be characterized by a very steep temperature rise from a chromospheric temperature of slightly less than 104 K to coronal temperatures on the order of 106 K. The goal of modeling the transition regi...

  10. Disabled Readers: Insight, Assessment, Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Diane J., Ed.

    Focusing on helping teachers to understand and help children who have reading disabilities, the 13 papers in this volume were prepared by practitioners at various levels from public school, community, and university settings. The papers included in part one offer insights into the concomitant aspects of reading difficulties. Specific topics…

  11. Investigating Insight as Sudden Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Ivan K.; Jee, Benjamin D.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt psychologists proposed two distinct learning mechanisms. Associative learning occurs gradually through the repeated co-occurrence of external stimuli or memories. Insight learning occurs suddenly when people discover new relationships within their prior knowledge as a result of reasoning or problem solving processes that re-organize or…

  12. Investigating Insight as Sudden Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Ivan K.; Jee, Benjamin D.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt psychologists proposed two distinct learning mechanisms. Associative learning occurs gradually through the repeated co-occurrence of external stimuli or memories. Insight learning occurs suddenly when people discover new relationships within their prior knowledge as a result of reasoning or problem solving processes that re-organize or…

  13. Insights from a Math Phobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Anne Wescott

    1992-01-01

    The author's personal experiences in overcoming mathematics anxiety provide insights into how teachers can create a classroom environment to help students develop self-confidence by assessing students' feelings, using cooperative-learning techniques, showing more patience, and having students write about their experiences. (MDH)

  14. Psychology of Sport. Issues & Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig, Ed.

    This book is designed to provide instructors and students in sport psychology courses with a learning instrument that combines the continuity of a textbook with the range of opinion, in-depth treatment of selected issues, and insight into research methods of a book of readings. The subject is divided into four topical categories. Under the heading…

  15. New insights into Drosophila vision.

    PubMed

    Dolph, Patrick

    2008-01-10

    Studies of the Drosophila visual system have provided valuable insights into the function and regulation of phototransduction signaling pathways. Much of this work has stemmed from or relied upon the genetic tools offered by the Drosophila system. In this issue of Neuron, Wang and colleagues and Acharya and colleagues have further exploited the Drosophila genetic system to characterize two new phototransduction players.

  16. Early Work on Defect Driven Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosterlitz, J. Michael; Thouless, David J.

    2016-12-01

    This article summarizes the early history of the theory of phase transitions driven by topological defects, such as vortices in superfluid helium films or dislocations and disclinations in two-dimensional solids. We start with a review of our two earliest papers, pointing out their errors and omissions as well as their insights. We then describe the work, partly done by Kosterlitz but mostly done by other people, which corrected these oversights, and applied these ideas to experimental systems, and to numerical and experimental simulations.

  17. Electrothermal design aspects of transitioning solid armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoolderman, A. J.; de Zeeuw, W. A.; Koops, M.

    1993-01-01

    To optimize erosion-free rail accelerator launch of solid brush armatures, a 2D model and an analytical model are used to study the temperature distribution, the coefficient of friction and the transitioning behavior of U-shaped solid armatures made of Cu, Al, Mo, and Ti during electromagnetic launch. In order to experimentally verify the insights gained from these theoretical studies, recently developed diagnostics are applied. The growth potential of solid armatures for weapons applications is highlighted by considering such materials as Ti and Mo.

  18. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espaillat, C.; Muzerolle, J.; Najita, J.; Andrews, S.; Zhu, Z.; Calvet, N.; Kraus, S.; Hashimoto, J.; Kraus, A.; D'Alessio, P.

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)millimeter and infrared. We note the limitations of these techniques, particularly with respect to the sizes of the clearings currently detectable, and highlight the need for pairing broadband SEDs with multi-wavelength images to paint a more detailed picture of transitional disk structure. We review the gas in transitional disks, keeping in mind that future observations with ALMA will give us unprecedented access to gas in disks, and also observed infrared variability pointing to variable transitional disk structure, which may have implications for disks in general. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk-clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and

  19. Scaling ansatz for the jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Carl P; Liu, Andrea J; Sethna, James P

    2016-08-30

    We propose a Widom-like scaling ansatz for the critical jamming transition. Our ansatz for the elastic energy shows that the scaling of the energy, compressive strain, shear strain, system size, pressure, shear stress, bulk modulus, and shear modulus are all related to each other via scaling relations, with only three independent scaling exponents. We extract the values of these exponents from already known numerical or theoretical results, and we numerically verify the resulting predictions of the scaling theory for the energy and residual shear stress. We also derive a scaling relation between pressure and residual shear stress that yields insight into why the shear and bulk moduli scale differently. Our theory shows that the jamming transition exhibits an emergent scale invariance, setting the stage for the potential development of a renormalization group theory for jamming.

  20. Scaling ansatz for the jamming transition

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Carl P.; Liu, Andrea J.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a Widom-like scaling ansatz for the critical jamming transition. Our ansatz for the elastic energy shows that the scaling of the energy, compressive strain, shear strain, system size, pressure, shear stress, bulk modulus, and shear modulus are all related to each other via scaling relations, with only three independent scaling exponents. We extract the values of these exponents from already known numerical or theoretical results, and we numerically verify the resulting predictions of the scaling theory for the energy and residual shear stress. We also derive a scaling relation between pressure and residual shear stress that yields insight into why the shear and bulk moduli scale differently. Our theory shows that the jamming transition exhibits an emergent scale invariance, setting the stage for the potential development of a renormalization group theory for jamming. PMID:27512041

  1. Elasticity and Inverse Temperature Transition in Elastin

    DOE PAGES

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Jalarvo, Niina; ...

    2015-09-22

    Structurally, elastin is protein and biomaterial that provides elasticity and resilience to a range of tissues. This work provides insights into the elastic properties of elastin and its peculiar inverse temperature transition (ITT). These features are dependent on hydration of elastin and are driven by a similar mechanism of hydrophobic collapse to an entropically favorable state. Moreover, when using neutron scattering, we quantify the changes in the geometry of molecular motions above and below the transition temperature, showing a reduction in the displacement of water-induced motions upon hydrophobic collapse at the ITT. Finally, we measured the collective vibrations of elastinmore » gels as a function of elongation, revealing no changes in the spectral features associated with local rigidity and secondary structure, in agreement with the entropic origin of elasticity.« less

  2. Elasticity and Inverse Temperature Transition in Elastin

    SciTech Connect

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Jalarvo, Niina; Katsaras, John; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-22

    Structurally, elastin is protein and biomaterial that provides elasticity and resilience to a range of tissues. This work provides insights into the elastic properties of elastin and its peculiar inverse temperature transition (ITT). These features are dependent on hydration of elastin and are driven by a similar mechanism of hydrophobic collapse to an entropically favorable state. Moreover, when using neutron scattering, we quantify the changes in the geometry of molecular motions above and below the transition temperature, showing a reduction in the displacement of water-induced motions upon hydrophobic collapse at the ITT. Finally, we measured the collective vibrations of elastin gels as a function of elongation, revealing no changes in the spectral features associated with local rigidity and secondary structure, in agreement with the entropic origin of elasticity.

  3. The Maternal to Zygotic Transition in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Lu, Xukun; Dean, Jurrien

    2013-01-01

    Prior to activation of the embryonic genome, the initiating events of mammalian development are under maternal control and include fertilization, the block to polyspermy and processing sperm DNA. Following gamete union, the transcriptionally inert sperm DNA is repackaged into the male pronucleus which fuses with the female pronucleus to form a 1-cell zygote. Embryonic transcription begins during the maternal to zygotic transfer of control in directing development. This transition occurs at species-specific times after one or several rounds of blastomere cleavage and is essential for normal development. However, even after activation of the embryonic genome, successful development relies on stored maternal components without which embryos fail to progress beyond initial cell divisions. Better understanding of the molecular basis of maternal to zygotic transition including fertilization, the activation of the embryonic genome and cleavage-stage development will provide insight into early human development that should translate into clinical applications for regenerative medicine and assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:23352575

  4. Transitions: The Evolution of Linguistic Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Simon

    Maynard Smith and Szathmáry (1995) propose a series of major transitions in the evolutionary history of life. Their work provides a rich framework for thinking about replication. They identified the importance of language in this light, but language is a new system of replication in more than one sense: it is both an enabler of cultural replicators with unlimited heredity, and also a new kind of evolutionary system itself. Iterated learning is the process of linguistic transmission, and it drives both language change and the transitions to qualitatively new kinds of linguistic system. By seeing language as an evolutionary system, the biggest payoff we get may be the ability to take biologists' insights into the evolution of life and apply them to the evolution of language.

  5. Scaling ansatz for the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Carl P.; Liu, Andrea J.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a Widom-like scaling ansatz for the critical jamming transition. Our ansatz for the elastic energy shows that the scaling of the energy, compressive strain, shear strain, system size, pressure, shear stress, bulk modulus, and shear modulus are all related to each other via scaling relations, with only three independent scaling exponents. We extract the values of these exponents from already known numerical or theoretical results, and we numerically verify the resulting predictions of the scaling theory for the energy and residual shear stress. We also derive a scaling relation between pressure and residual shear stress that yields insight into why the shear and bulk moduli scale differently. Our theory shows that the jamming transition exhibits an emergent scale invariance, setting the stage for the potential development of a renormalization group theory for jamming.

  6. Insights into Parochial School Leadership from a New Generation of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benscoter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gather insights from current parochial school administrators who experience the day-to-day operations and expectations of the position. The role of the parochial principal has transitioned over the past decades to be a position requiring a variety of skills and abilities. Data collection occurred…

  7. Transitive and Pseudo-Transitive Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Geoffrey P.; Johnson-Laird, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    Given that A is longer than B, and that B is longer than C, even 5-year-old children can infer that A is longer than C. Theories of reasoning based on formal rules of inference invoke simple axioms ("meaning postulates") to capture such transitive inferences. An alternative theory proposes instead that reasoners construct mental models of the…

  8. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  9. [From epidemiological transition to health transition].

    PubMed

    Meslé, F; Vallin, J

    2007-12-01

    The "Epidemiological Transition" concept proposed by Abdel Omran in 1971 was the first theory attempting to explain the extraordinary progess that industrialized countries have achieved in health since the 18th century. Within the broader framework of the demographic transition, an important implication of this concept was that life expectancy in modern societies would converge toward limits determined by the new epidemiological conditions. In the ensuing decades, however the convergence process appears to have stopped as a result of a number of setbacks including the health crisis in Eastern Europe and AIDS in Africa. These setbacks do not fundamentally contradict the theory. A much greater contradiction was the unexpected dramatic decrease in cardiovascular disease that began as early as the 70s and had a major positive impact on life expectancy. Based on the concept of "Health Transition" described by Julio Frenk et al., we propose a complete revision of the health implications of the demographic transition based the idea of successive cycles of divergences/convergences induced by the appearance and generalization of major breakthroughs in health technologies and strategies. Three such cycles can be clearly identified on an international level corresponding to control of infectious then cardiovascular diseases, and perhaps most recently to the initial successes achieved in the field of ageing.

  10. GENERAL: Insight into Phenomena of Symmetry Breaking Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tong; Zhang, Ying

    2008-08-01

    We show that symmetry-breaking (SB) bifurcation is just a transition of different forms of symmetry, while still preserving system's symmetry SB bifurcation always associates with a periodic saddle-node bifurcation, identifiable by a zero maximum of the top Lyapunov exponent of the system. In addition, we show a significant phase portrait of a newly born periodic saddle and its stable and unstable invariant manifolds, together with their neighbouring flow pattern of Poincare mapping points just after the periodic saddle-node bifurcation, thus gaining an insight into the mechanism of SB bifurcation.

  11. Issues in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNair, Jeff, Ed.; Kronick, Nancy, Ed.

    Six papers address issues in the transition of students with disabilities into the adult world of work. In "Workplace Support," Jeff McNair defines "support," differentiates types of support, and considers various foci of intervention. The second paper titled, "Cross-Cultural Transition: An Exigent Topic for Study" by Nancy Kronick, reviews…

  12. School Transition Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pautler, Albert

    This bibliography on school transition includes 240 entries of books, journal articles, papers, reports, bibliographies, and dissertations. These entries deal with transitions of the following populations: adult learners, youth, Plains Indian women, high school students, people with learning disabilities, disadvantaged youth, high school…

  13. Transition Coordinators: Define Yourselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asselin, Susan B.; Todd-Allen, Mary; deFur, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Describes a technique that was used successfully to identify the changing roles and responsibilities of special educators as transition coordinators. The Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) model uses people who are currently working in the occupation to define job responsibilities. The duties of a transition coordinator are identified. (CR)

  14. Good Transitions = Great Starts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The smooth transition of outgoing and incoming board members and officers is of vital importance and can determine the PTA's success for years to come. The transition process is the responsibility of both incoming and outgoing officers and board members. It gives closure to those leaving their positions and allows those coming in to be properly…

  15. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to…

  16. Matter in transition

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  17. Seamless Transition for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Postschool outcomes for students with disabilities have been dismal for quite some time now. Although recent data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 indicate some improvement, students with severe intellectual disabilities continue to transition into segregated employment at unacceptable rates in spite of a multitude of studies,…

  18. Expanding Views on Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Correa, Vivian I.

    1996-01-01

    This position paper proposes an expanded definition of transition, based on common components of early childhood and secondary perspectives. It advocates for a seamless model of transition service delivery for students with disabilities, including program planning, from birth through age 21. The model addresses curriculum, location of services,…

  19. Transition to Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of transition for students with disabilities emphasizes transition skills needed for life beyond work. The importance of assisting students in planning for their life roles as workers, family members, friends, consumers, and community members is discussed. Suggestions are offered to better prepare students for all their life roles by…

  20. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  1. Modeling the transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Bart A.

    1994-04-01

    The calculation of engineering flows undergoing laminar-turbulent transition presents special problems. Mean-flow quantities obey neither the fully laminar nor the fully turbulent correlations. In addition, local maxima in skin friction, wall temperature, and heat transfer often occur near the end of the transition region. Traditionally, modeling this region has been important for the design of turbine blades, where the transition region is long in relation to the chord length of the blade. More recently, the need for better transition-region models has been recognized by designers of hypersonic vehicles where the high Mach number, the low Reynolds number, and the low-disturbance flight environment emphasize the importance of the transition region. Needless to say, a model that might work well for the transitional flows typically found in gas turbines will not necessarily work well for the external surface of a hypersonic vehicle. In Section 2 of this report, some of the important flow features that control the transition region will be discussed. In Section 3, different approaches to the modeling problem will be summarized and cataloged. Fully turbulent flow models will be discussed in detail in Section 4; models specifically designed for transitional flow, in Section 5; and the evaluation of models, in Section 6.

  2. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses five predictable stages of development in transition counseling. They include comfort (reassurances about self-worth and identity); reflection (exploration and understanding); clarification (with respect to career and self); direction (exploring possible life/career directions); and perspective shift (putting the transition in…

  3. Transitions in Spousal Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynda C.; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Jackson, Sharon; Hirsch, Calvin

    2003-01-01

    Describes transitions over 5 years among community-dwelling elderly spouses into and within caregiving roles and associated health outcomes. The trajectory of health outcomes associated with caregiving was generally downward. Those who transitioned to heavy caregiving had more symptoms of depression, and poorer self-reported health and health…

  4. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to…

  5. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  6. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower center of image, as it transits across the face of the sun, Monday, May 9, 2016, as viewed from Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower third of image, as it transits across the face of the sun Monday, May 9, 2016, as viewed from Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower left of image, as it transits across the face of the sun, Monday, May 9, 2016, as viewed from Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower left, as it transits across the face of the sun Monday, May 9, 2016, as viewed from Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Novel percolation transitions and coupled catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Raissa

    Collections of interdependent networks are at the core of modern society, spanning physical, biological and social systems. Simple mathematical models of the structure and function of networks can provide important insights into real-world systems, enhancing our ability to steer and control them. Here our focus is on abrupt changes in networks, due both to phase transitions and to jumping between bi-stable equilibria. We begin with an overview of novel classes of percolation phase transitions that result from repeated, small interventions intended to delay the transition. These new phenomena allow us to extend percolation approaches to modular networks, Brownian motion, and cluster growth dynamics. We then focus on abrupt transitions due to a system jumping between bi-stable equilibria, modeled as a cusp catastrophe in nonlinear dynamics. We show that when systems that each undergo a cusp catastrophe interact, we can observe a new phenomena of catastrophe-hopping leading to non-local cascading failures. Here an intermediate system facilitates the propagation of a sudden change or collapse, and we show that catastrophe hopping is consistent with the outbreak of protests observed during the Arab Spring of 2011.

  11. Polymorphic phase transition mechanism of compressed coesite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q Y; Shu, J-F; Cadien, A; Meng, Y; Yang, W G; Sheng, H W; Mao, H-K

    2015-03-20

    Silicon dioxide is one of the most abundant natural compounds. Polymorphs of SiO₂ and their phase transitions have long been a focus of great interest and intense theoretical and experimental pursuits. Here, compressing single-crystal coesite SiO₂ under hydrostatic pressures of 26-53 GPa at room temperature, we discover a new polymorphic phase transition mechanism of coesite to post-stishovite, by means of single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment and first-principles computational modelling. The transition features the formation of multiple previously unknown triclinic phases of SiO₂ on the transition pathway as structural intermediates. Coexistence of the low-symmetry phases results in extensive splitting of the original coesite X-ray diffraction peaks that appear as dramatic peak broadening and weakening, resembling an amorphous material. This work sheds light on the long-debated pressure-induced amorphization phenomenon of SiO₂, but also provides new insights into the densification mechanism of tetrahedrally bonded structures common in nature.

  12. Polymorphic phase transition mechanism of compressed coesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q. Y.; Shu, J.-F.; Cadien, A.; Meng, Y.; Yang, W. G.; Sheng, H. W.; Mao, H.-K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon dioxide is one of the most abundant natural compounds. Polymorphs of SiO2 and their phase transitions have long been a focus of great interest and intense theoretical and experimental pursuits. Here, compressing single-crystal coesite SiO2 under hydrostatic pressures of 26-53 GPa at room temperature, we discover a new polymorphic phase transition mechanism of coesite to post-stishovite, by means of single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment and first-principles computational modelling. The transition features the formation of multiple previously unknown triclinic phases of SiO2 on the transition pathway as structural intermediates. Coexistence of the low-symmetry phases results in extensive splitting of the original coesite X-ray diffraction peaks that appear as dramatic peak broadening and weakening, resembling an amorphous material. This work sheds light on the long-debated pressure-induced amorphization phenomenon of SiO2, but also provides new insights into the densification mechanism of tetrahedrally bonded structures common in nature.

  13. High flux film and transition boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting, the transition region is good, and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  14. Simple models for shear flow transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2011-11-01

    I will discuss recent developments in modeling transitional shear flows with simple two-variable models. Both pipe flow and plane Couette flow are considered. The essential insight is that most large-scale features of these shear flows can be traced to a change from excitability to bistability in the local dynamics. Models are presented in two variables, turbulence intensity and mean shear. A PDE model of pipe flow captures the essence of the puff-slug transition as a change from excitability to bistability. Extended models with turbulence as deterministic transient chaos or multiplicative noise reproduce almost all large-scale features of transitional pipe flow. In particular they capture metastable localized puffs, puff splitting, slugs, localized edge states, a continuous transition to sustained turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency (directed percolation), and a subsequent increase in turbulence fraction towards uniform, featureless turbulence. A model that additionally takes into account the symmetries of plane Couette flow reproduces localized turbulence and periodic turbulent-laminar bands.

  15. Transition path sampling of protein conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juraszek, Jarek; Vreede, Jocelyne; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2012-03-01

    Conformational changes in proteins often take place on long time scales compared to the molecular timescale. These long time scales, related to high free energy barriers, make such processes difficult to access with a straightforward molecular dynamics approach. The transition path sampling technique has been developed to overcome such timescale differences without assuming a predefined reaction coordinate. We review the transition path sampling methodology with the application of protein conformational change in mind. Using three case studies, based on previous work, we elucidate the strengths and pitfalls of the method. First, the extensive work on the folding of Trp-cage reveals how to sample parallel pathways, how to obtain rate constants, and how to extract reaction coordinates. The second case-study, on the folding of Trpzip4 β-hairpin, illustrates how to treat long-lived intermediates in a conformational change. The final example showcases the light-triggered conformational transition of Photo-active Yellow Protein into its signaling state, highlighting the wealth of insight that can be gathered from a transition path sampling approach, including new hypotheses for reaction mechanisms. We end with an outlook discussing future developments and application of the methodology.

  16. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two methods to teach radioactive decay to secondary students with wide ranging abilities. Activities are designed to follow classroom discussions of atomic structure, transmutation, half life, and nuclear decay. Includes "The Tasmanian Empire: A Radioactive Dating Activity" and an exercise to teach concepts of half life without…

  17. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a method for solving problems related to gas laws, the mole concept, molarity, heats of reactions, and other chemical concepts. Also presents another method which was devised to simplify the teaching of stoichiometric calculations using conversion factors. (JN)

  18. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two methods to teach radioactive decay to secondary students with wide ranging abilities. Activities are designed to follow classroom discussions of atomic structure, transmutation, half life, and nuclear decay. Includes "The Tasmanian Empire: A Radioactive Dating Activity" and an exercise to teach concepts of half life without…

  19. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides suggestions for two exercises designed to assist and involve students in understanding chemical concepts. Includes a laboratory experiment for determining the Ksp of a saturated solution of calcium sulfate and a scheme for naming oxyacids and their salts. (ML)

  20. Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogner, Donna, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an approach to solving oxidation-reduction reactions. The advantage of this procedure for both acidic and basic equations is stressed and emphasizes the electrical nature of redox equations. (KR)

  1. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  2. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  3. Transition Implementation Guide. Instructor Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer-Stephens, Arden, Ed.

    This transition model, called Guiding Education toward Adult Roles for Success (GEARS), provides a comprehensive framework from which transition services and programs can evolve. Three components of transition services are considered: transition partners, the transition process, and adult outcomes. After an introduction, the report's second…

  4. Biological insights through nontargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Sévin, Daniel C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Metabolomics is increasingly employed to investigate metabolism and its reciprocal crosstalk with cellular signaling and regulation. In recent years, several nontargeted metabolomics methods providing substantial metabolome coverage have been developed. Here, we review and compare the contributions of traditional targeted and nontargeted metabolomics in advancing different research areas ranging from biotechnology to human health. Although some studies demonstrated the power of nontargeted profiling in generating unexpected and yet highly important insights, we found that most mechanistic links were still revealed by hypothesis-driven targeted methods. Novel computational approaches for formal interpretation of complex metabolic patterns and integration of complementary molecular layers are required to tap the full potential of nontargeted metabolomics for data-driven, discovery-oriented research and rapidly nucleating novel biological insights. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  6. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  7. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  8. An integrated perspective on insight.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, Øyvind L; Furnham, Adrian; Hærem, Thorvald

    2016-10-01

    The present study on insight is based on an integration of Kaplan and Simon's (1990) information processing theory of insight, a cognitive style theory, and achievement motivation theory. The style theory is the Assimilator (rule oriented, familiarity seeking)-Explorer (novelty seeking, explorative) styles (Kaufmann, 1979). Our hypothesis is that the effectiveness of 2 types of search constraints (prior experience and solution hints) for solving insight problems is moderated by both cognitive style and achievement needs, and depending on optimal levels of achievement motivation for different task conditions. We tested the hypothesis in a randomized experiment in which 3 levels of achievement needs and 1 type of search constraint (solution hints were available or not available) were experimentally manipulated. In addition, participants completed a cognitive style test, a measure of prior problem-solving experience (the second type of search constraint), and controls for intelligence. There were 476 participants (the mean age was 18.4 years). Results revealed 2 similar and significant 3-way interactions between styles, achievement needs, and the 2 types of search constraints. The pattern of interaction supported the idea that stylistic competence for the task characteristics (with and without search constraints available), when combined with manipulated achievement needs, predicted performance in counterintuitive ways but in line with the classic achievement motivation theory. With appropriate stylistic competence for the task characteristics elevated achievement needs led to poorer performance. With less appropriate stylistic competence, performance improved with increasing motivation. Implications for information processing theory are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Milestoning with transition memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawk, Alexander T.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2011-12-01

    Milestoning is a method used to calculate the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular processes occurring on time scales that are not accessible to brute force molecular dynamics (MD). In milestoning, the conformation space of the system is sectioned by hypersurfaces (milestones), an ensemble of trajectories is initialized on each milestone, and MD simulations are performed to calculate transitions between milestones. The transition probabilities and transition time distributions are then used to model the dynamics of the system with a Markov renewal process, wherein a long trajectory of the system is approximated as a succession of independent transitions between milestones. This approximation is justified if the transition probabilities and transition times are statistically independent. In practice, this amounts to a requirement that milestones are spaced such that trajectories lose position and velocity memory between subsequent transitions. Unfortunately, limiting the number of milestones limits both the resolution at which a system's properties can be analyzed, and the computational speedup achieved by the method. We propose a generalized milestoning procedure, milestoning with transition memory (MTM), which accounts for memory of previous transitions made by the system. When a reaction coordinate is used to define the milestones, the MTM procedure can be carried out at no significant additional expense as compared to conventional milestoning. To test MTM, we have applied its version that allows for the memory of the previous step to the toy model of a polymer chain undergoing Langevin dynamics in solution. We have computed the mean first passage time for the chain to attain a cyclic conformation and found that the number of milestones that can be used, without incurring significant errors in the first passage time is at least 8 times that permitted by conventional milestoning. We further demonstrate that, unlike conventional milestoning, MTM permits

  10. From Hot Flashes to Cool Insights: Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Menopause From Hot Flashes to Cool Insights: Menopause Past Issues / Winter 2017 Table of ... Read More "Menopause" Articles From Hot Flashes to Cool Insights: Menopause / Treatment Tips From the National Institute ...

  11. Variational Transition State Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  12. Transition nozzle combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Maldonado, Jaime Javier

    2016-11-29

    The present application provides a combustion system for use with a cooling flow. The combustion system may include a head end, an aft end, a transition nozzle extending from the head end to the aft end, and an impingement sleeve surrounding the transition nozzle. The impingement sleeve may define a first cavity in communication with the head end for a first portion of the cooling flow and a second cavity in communication with the aft end for a second portion of the cooling flow. The transition nozzle may include a number of cooling holes thereon in communication with the second portion of the cooling flow.

  13. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  14. Simulation of structural phase transitions in NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, Daniel; Nielaba, Peter

    2010-12-01

    By means of molecular-dynamics simulations, temperature-driven diffusionless structural phase transitions in equiatomic and nearly equiatomic ordered nickel-titanium alloys were investigated. For this purpose, a model potential from the literature was adopted [W. S. Lai and B. X. Liu, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 12, L53 (2000)10.1088/0953-8984/12/5/101], which is based on the tight-binding model in second moment approximation. The model predicts a stable B19' phase at low temperatures and a nearly cubic B2 phase at high temperatures. After an analysis of crystallography and energetics of the emerging structures, the experimentally known strong dependence of transition temperatures on composition is confirmed and related to lattice instability. Free-energy calculations finally give insight into the driving forces of the phase transitions and reveal free energy barriers inhibiting them below the transition temperatures.

  15. A Density-Independent Flocking Transition in Confluent Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael; Bi, Dapeng; Manning, M. Lisa; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Some of us recently demonstrated a density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. To explore the influence of cell shape on collective states, we have constructed continuum equations that couple a scalar field describing cell-shape anisotropy to cell polarization. The model displays a density independent transition to a polarized state of elongated cells driven by a cellular ``shape-index'' parameter. We map out the phase diagram using linear stability analysis and numerical solution of the nonlinear hydrodynamic equations. The proposed transition constitutes a density-independent flocking transition. We acknowledge support from The Simons Foundation and NSF-DGE-1068780.

  16. Computation of temperature induced phase transitions at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonoshko, Anatoly

    2014-03-01

    Phase transitions at high pressure and temperature is perhaps one of the most controversial topics in high pressure science. There is a number of theoretical methods developed recently to address this problem. Unfortunately, none of them is fully satisfactory, considering stringent requirements to accuracy of the computed free energies of the involved phases. This, in part, explains the variety of the suggested methods. The experimental data is rather controversial as well, probably because the experiments at extreme conditions are difficult. I will provide overview of the theoretical methods that are applied for the computation and simulation of T-induced phase transitions. Both liquid-solid and solid-solid transitions will be covered. Possible sources of the disagreement between theoretical methods as well as between theory and experiment will be illustrated by examples. Insight from simulations will be used to suggest alternative explanations of experimental data. The optimal, at present, method to compute the transitions will be suggested.

  17. Quantifying the Qualitative: Measuring the Insight Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    No scales currently exist that measure variability in the insight experience. Two scales were created to measure two factors hypothesized to be key drivers of the insight experience: insight radicality (i.e., perceived deviation between previous and new problem representations) and restructuring experience (i.e., the subjective experience of the…

  18. Quantifying the Qualitative: Measuring the Insight Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    No scales currently exist that measure variability in the insight experience. Two scales were created to measure two factors hypothesized to be key drivers of the insight experience: insight radicality (i.e., perceived deviation between previous and new problem representations) and restructuring experience (i.e., the subjective experience of the…

  19. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  20. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  1. Coping with Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendersky, Nora; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a workshop for nine South American students at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The two-day session focussed on exploring coping behaviors that could help students adjust to transitions. (JAC)

  2. Coping with Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendersky, Nora; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a workshop for nine South American students at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The two-day session focussed on exploring coping behaviors that could help students adjust to transitions. (JAC)

  3. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  5. Palaeontology: turtles in transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y

    2013-06-17

    One of the major remaining gaps in the vertebrate fossil record concerns the origin of turtles. The enigmatic little reptile Eunotosaurus could represent an important transitional form, as it has a rudimentary shell that resembles the turtle carapace.

  6. Urban guideway transit workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, H. )

    1992-03-01

    On March 20--21, 1991, EPRI sponsored a workshop on urban guideway transit. The purpose of this workshop was to provide utility managers with increased knowledge about urban guideway transit options, public policy regarding transit, and the effect of transit options on utility operations. With this information utilities should be better prepared to make decisions about transit development in their service areas. The workshop also provided EPRI with ideas and information for developing an R D project plan for urban guideway transit.

  7. Quantum Phase Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Thoery Phase transitions Subir Sachdev Harvard University Office of Sponsored Research 1350...magnetism, and solvable models obtained from string theory. After introducing the basic theory, it moves on to a detailed description of the canonical...students and researchers in condensed matter physics and particle and string theory. Print | Close Quantum Phase Transitions 2nd Edition Subir Sachdev

  8. Matter in transition

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; ...

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, wheremore » a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.« less

  9. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    Boyertown Area High School astronomy teacher Peter Detterline prepares high powered binoculars with a solar filter so that his students may view the planet Mercury as it transits across the face of the sun , Monday, May 9, 2016, Boyertown Area High School, Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    Boyertown Area High School students, 12th grader Bransen Mackey, left, and 11th grader Nick Cioppi wear solar safety glasses and attempt to see the planet Mercury as it transits across the face of the sun, Monday, May 9, 2016, Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    Boyertown Area High School 12th grade student Ben Maurer uses his smartphone and a photographers lens with a solar filter to make a photograph of the planet Mercury transitting the sun, Monday, May 9, 2016, Boyertown area High School, Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Mercury Solar Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    Boyertown Area High School 12th grade student Jay Hallman looks through a photographers lens and solar filter to see the planet Mercury as it transits across the face of the sun , Monday, May 9, 2016, Boyertown area High School, Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures:

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C; Maddox, B; Lazicki, A; Iota, V; Klepeis, J P; McMahan, A

    2007-02-08

    This study was to investigate unusual phase transitions driven by electron correlation effects that occur in many f-band transition metals and are often accompanied by large volume changes: {approx}20% at the {delta}-{alpha} transition in Pu and 5-15% for analogous transitions in Ce, Pr, and Gd. The exact nature of these transitions has not been well understood, including the short-range correlation effects themselves, their relation to long-range crystalline order, the possible existence of remnants of the transitions in the liquid, the role of magnetic moments and order, the critical behavior, and dynamics of the transitions, among other issues. Many of these questions represent forefront physics challenges central to Stockpile materials and are also important in understanding the high-pressure behavior of other f- and d-band transition metal compounds including 3d-magnetic transition monoxide (TMO, TM=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). The overarching goal of this study was, therefore, to understand the relationships between crystal structure and electronic structure of transition metals at high pressures, by using the nation's brightest third-generation synchrotron x-ray at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Significant progresses have been made, including new discoveries of the Mott transition in MnO at 105 GPa and Kondo-like 4f-electron dehybridization and new developments of high-pressure resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray emission spectroscopy. These scientific discoveries and technology developments provide new insights and enabling tools to understand scientific challenges in stockpile materials. The project has broader impacts in training two SEGRF graduate students and developing an university collaboration (funded through SSAAP).

  14. Insights into the origin of cooperative effects in the spin transition of [Fe(NH2trz)3](NO3)2: the role of supramolecular interactions evidenced in the crystal structure of [Cu(NH2trz)3](NO3)2.H2O.

    PubMed

    Dîrtu, Marinela M; Neuhausen, Christine; Naik, Anil D; Rotaru, Aurelian; Spinu, Leonard; Garcia, Yann

    2010-06-21

    The thermally induced hysteretic spin transition (ST) that occurs in the polymeric chain compound [Fe(NH(2)trz)(3)](NO(3))(2) (1) above room temperature (T(c)(upward arrow) = 347 K, T(c)(downward arrow) = 314 K) has been tracked by (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, SQUID magnetometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray powder diffraction (XPRD) at variable temperatures. From the XRPD pattern indexation, an orthorhombic primitive cell was observed with the following cell parameters: a = 11.83(2) A, b = 9.72(1) A, c = 6.361(9) A at 298 K (low-spin state) and a = 14.37(2) A, b = 9.61(4) A, c = 6.76(4) A at 380 K (high-spin state). The enthalpy and entropy variation associated to the ST of 1, have been evaluated by DSC as DeltaH = 23(1) kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS = 69.6(1) J mol(-1) K(-1). These thermodynamic data were used within a two-level Ising like model for the statistical analysis of First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) diagram that was recorded for 1, in the cooling mode. Strong intramolecular cooperative effects are witnessed by the derived interaction parameter of J = 496 K. The crystal structure of [Cu(NH(2)trz)(3)](NO(3))(2).H(2)O (2) was obtained thanks to high quality single crystals prepared by slow evaporation after hydrothermal pretreatment. The catena poly[mu-tris(4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-N1,N2) copper(II)] dinitrate monohydrate (2) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, with a = 16.635(6) A, b = 13.223(4) A, c = 7.805(3) A, beta = 102.56(3) degrees, Z = 4. Complex 2 is a 1D infinite chain containing triple N1,N2-1,2,4-triazole bridges with an intra-chain distance of Cu...Cu = 3.903(1) A. A dense H-bonding network with the nitrate counteranion involved in intra-chain and inter-chain interactions is observed. Such a supramolecular network could be at the origin of the unusually large hysteresis loop displayed by 1 (DeltaT approximately 33 K), as a result of an efficient propagation of elastic interactions through the network. This

  15. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  16. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, J.; Sucher, J.; Bhatia, A. K.; Feinberg, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in He in order to gain insight into the reliability of approximate calculations which are carried out for transitions in many-electron atoms. The contributions of the nearest-lying states are computed with a variety of wave functions, including very simple product wave functions, Hartree-Fock functions and Hylleraas-type wave functions with up to 84 parameters. It is found that values of the matrix elements of the parity-violating interaction can differ considerably from the values obtained from the good wave functions, even when these simple wave functions give accurate values for the matrix elements in question

  17. Theoretical insights into interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Hean, Sarah; Craddock, Deborah; Hammick, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the need for theory in the practice of interprofessional education. It highlights the range of theories available to interprofessional educators and promotes the practical application of these to interprofessional learning and teaching. It summarises the AMEE Guides in Medical Education publication entitled Theoretical Insights into Interprofessional Education: AMEE Guide No. 62, where the practical application of three theories, social capital, social constructivism and a sociological perspective of interprofessional education are discussed in-depth through the lens of a case study. The key conclusions of these discussions are presented in this article.

  18. Takotsubo Syndrome: Insights from Japan.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ishihara, Masaharu

    2016-10-01

    We report the history and new insights of takotsubo syndrome based on the achievements that Japanese researchers have contributed and summarize the evidence originally presented from Japan. Takotsubo syndrome is a newly described heart failure characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction. We should be aware of this entity as a syndrome, not actual cardiomyopathy. Japanese researchers focus on the experimental approaches for clinical diagnosis and treatment of takotsubo syndrome. As representatives from a country originally naming this syndrome takotsubo, a global registry for takotsubo syndrome including Japan should be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Huygens provides insights about Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2005-01-01

    Huygens provides insights about Titan Following the Huygens probe's successful 14 January soft landing on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, scientists at a 21 January European Space Agency (ESA) news briefing announced that the moon has Earth-like meteorology and geology, and that there is evidence for liquid methane. Martin Tomasko, principal investigator for the Huygens Descent Imager-Spectral Radiometer, said, ``Geological evidence for precipitation, erosion, mechanical abrasion and other fluvial activity says that the physical processes shaping Titan are much the same as those shaping Earth.''

  20. English: Progress and Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Dwight L.

    The assessments of the work of the curriculum study centers and the insights of the Dartmouth Seminar in the past decade have given rise to six major directions in the teaching of English: (1) increased relevance and vitality in literature study through attention to student response to literature and elimination of censorship and moral bias, (2)…

  1. English: Progress and Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Dwight L.

    The assessments of the work of the curriculum study centers and the insights of the Dartmouth Seminar in the past decade have given rise to six major directions in the teaching of English: (1) increased relevance and vitality in literature study through attention to student response to literature and elimination of censorship and moral bias, (2)…

  2. Evidence of a glass transition in a ten-state non-mean-field Potts glass.

    PubMed

    Andrist, Ruben S; Larson, Derek; Katzgraber, Helmut G

    2011-03-01

    Potts glasses are prototype models that have been used to understand the structural glass transition. However, in finite space dimensions a glass transition remains to be detected in the 10-state Potts glass. Using a one-dimensional model with long-range power-law interactions we present evidence that a glass transition below the upper critical dimension can exist for short-range systems at low enough temperatures. Gaining insights into the structural glass transition for short-range systems using spin models is thus potentially possible, yet difficult.

  3. Venus Transit 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Odenwald, S. F.

    2002-09-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the astronomical unit, calculation of longitudes on the earth, and detection of Venus' atmosphere. The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum in partnership with the Solar System Exploration Forum, DPS, and a number of NASA space missions is developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in the US and Europe will offer real time viewing of the transit and conduct educational programs through professional development seminars, public lectures, and planetarium shows. We are interested in soliciting advice from the research community to coordinate professional research interests with this program.

  4. Strong dependence of fluorescence quenching on the transition metal in layered transition metal dichalcogenide nanoflakes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-08-07

    In recent years, the application of transition metal dichalcogenides for the development of biosensors has been receiving widespread attention from researchers, as demonstrated by the surge in studies present in the field. While different transition metal dichalcogenide materials have been employed for the fabrication of fluorescent biosensors with superior performance, no research has been conducted to draw comparisons across materials containing different transition metals. Herein, the performance of MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes for the fluorescence detection of nucleic acids is assessed. It is discovered that, at the optimal amount, MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes exhibit a similar degree of fluorescence quenching, at 75% and 71% respectively. However, MoS2 nanoflakes have better performance in the areas of detection range and selectivity than WS2 nanoflakes. The detection range achieved with MoS2 nanoflakes is 9.60-366 nM while 13.3-143 nM with WS2 nanoflakes. In the context of selectivity, MoS2 nanoflakes display a signal difference of 97.8% between complementary and non-complementary DNA targets, whereas WS2 nanoflakes only exhibit 44.3%. Such research is highly beneficial as it delivers vital insights on how the performance of a fluorescent biosensor can be affected by the transition metal present. Furthermore, these insights can assist in the selection of suitable transition metal dichalcogenide materials for utilization in biosensor development.

  5. Theory of mind correlates with clinical insight but not cognitive insight in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Xu; Parker, Giverny J; Hong, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Yi; Lui, Simon S Y; Neumann, David L; Cheung, Eric F C; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-03-30

    Research on the relationship between insight and social cognition, in particular Theory of Mind (ToM), in schizophrenia has yielded mixed findings to date. Very few studies, however, have assessed both clinical insight and cognitive insight when examining their relationships with ToM in schizophrenia. The current study thus investigated the relationship between clinical insight, cognitive insight, and ToM in a sample of 56 patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls. Twenty-seven patients were classified as low in clinical insight according to their scores on the 'insight' item (G12) of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Moreover, cognitive insight and ToM were assessed with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) and the Yoni task, respectively. The results indicated that patients with poor clinical insight performed worse on tasks of second-order cognitive and affective ToM, while the ToM performance of patients with high clinical insight was equivalent to that of healthy controls. Furthermore, while clinical insight was correlated with ToM and clinical symptoms, cognitive insight did not correlate with clinical insight, ToM, or clinical symptoms. Clinical insight thus appears to be an important factor related to ToM in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New geochemical insights into volcanic degassing.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Marie

    2008-12-28

    Magma degassing plays a fundamental role in controlling the style of volcanic eruptions. Whether a volcanic eruption is explosive, or effusive, is of crucial importance to approximately 500 million people living in the shadow of hazardous volcanoes worldwide. Studies of how gases exsolve and separate from magma prior to and during eruptions have been given new impetus by the emergence of more accurate and automated methods to measure volatile species both as volcanic gases and dissolved in the glasses of erupted products. The composition of volcanic gases is dependent on a number of factors, the most important being magma composition and the depth of gas-melt segregation prior to eruption; this latter parameter has proved difficult to constrain in the past, yet is arguably the most critical for controlling eruptive style. Spectroscopic techniques operating in the infrared have proved to be of great value in measuring the composition of gases at high temporal resolution. Such methods, when used in tandem with microanalytical geochemical investigations of erupted products, are leading to better constraints on the depth at which gases are generated and separated from magma. A number of recent studies have focused on transitions between explosive and effusive activity and have led to a better understanding of gas-melt segregation at basaltic volcanoes. Other studies have focused on degassing during intermediate and silicic eruptions. Important new results include the recognition of fluxing by deep-derived gases, which buffer the amount of dissolved volatiles in the melt at shallow depths, and the observation of gas flow up permeable conduit wall shear zones, which may be the primary mechanism for gas loss at the cusp of the most explosive and unpredictable volcanic eruptions. In this paper, I review current and future directions in the field of geochemical studies of volcanic degassing processes and illustrate how the new insights are beginning to change the way in

  7. GOES-R: Satellite Insight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Leon, Nancy J.; Novati, Alexander; Lincoln, Laura K.; Fisher, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    GOES-R: Satellite Insight seeks to bring awareness of the GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite -- R Series) satellite currently in development to an audience of all ages on the emerging medium of mobile games. The iPhone app (Satellite Insight) was created for the GOES-R Program. The app describes in simple terms the types of data products that can be produced from GOES-R measurements. The game is easy to learn, yet challenging for all audiences. It includes educational content and a path to further information about GOESR, its technology, and the benefits of the data it collects. The game features action-puzzle game play in which the player must prevent an overflow of data by matching falling blocks that represent different types of GOES-R data. The game adds more different types of data blocks over time, as long as the player can prevent a data overflow condition. Points are awarded for matches, and players can compete with themselves to beat their highest score.

  8. Insight with hands and things.

    PubMed

    Vallée-Tourangeau, Frédéric; Steffensen, Sune Vork; Vallée-Tourangeau, Gaëlle; Sirota, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments examined whether different task ecologies influenced insight problem solving. The 17 animals problem was employed, a pure insight problem. Its initial formulation encourages the application of a direct arithmetic solution, but its solution requires the spatial arrangement of sets involving some degree of overlap. Participants were randomly allocated to either a tablet condition where they could use a stylus and an electronic tablet to sketch a solution or a model building condition where participants were given material with which to build enclosures and figurines. In both experiments, participants were much more likely to develop a working solution in the model building condition. The difference in performance elicited by different task ecologies was unrelated to individual differences in working memory, actively open-minded thinking, or need for cognition (Experiment 1), although individual differences in creativity were correlated with problem solving success in Experiment 2. The discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for the prevailing metatheoretical commitment to methodological individualism that places the individual as the ontological locus of cognition.

  9. Insights into electromagnetic interaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Reba; Blank, Martin

    2002-07-01

    Low frequency (< 300 Hz) electromagnetic (EM) fields induce biological changes that include effects ranging from increased enzyme reaction rates to increased transcript levels for specific genes. The induction of stress gene HSP70 expression by exposure to EM fields provides insight into how EM fields interact with cells and tissues. Insights into the mechanism(s) are also provided by examination of the interaction of EM fields with moving charges and their influence on enzyme reaction rates in cell-free systems. Biological studies with in vitro model systems have focused, in general, on the nature of the signal transduction pathways involved in response to EM fields. It is likely, however, that EM fields also interact directly with electrons in DNA to stimulate biosynthesis. Identification of an EM field-sensitive DNA sequence in the heat shock 70 (HSP70) promoter, points to the application of EM fields in two biomedical applications: cytoprotection and gene therapy. EM field induction of the stress protein hsp70 may also provide a useful biomarker for establishing a science-based safety standard for the design of cell phones and their transmission towers.

  10. The Work of Cultural Transition: An Emerging Model.

    PubMed

    Ryba, Tatiana V; Stambulova, Natalia B; Ronkainen, Noora J

    2016-01-01

    In today's uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes' psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers' adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing.

  11. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.

  12. General Trends of Dihedral Conformational Transitions in a Globular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and Adaptive Biasing Force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions ~2 times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the Bend, Coil and Turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein sidechains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Sidechains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  13. The Work of Cultural Transition: An Emerging Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryba, Tatiana V.; Stambulova, Natalia B.; Ronkainen, Noora J.

    2016-01-01

    In today’s uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes’ psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers’ adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing. PMID:27047436

  14. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; ...

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed bymore » the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. In conclusion, these general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.« less

  15. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. In conclusion, these general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.

  16. RTGs on Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassoulas, John; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Transit, the US Navy's Navigation Satellite System was conceived at the Applied Physics Laboratory in 1957 by observing the Doppler shift while tracking Sputnik I. As spacecraft development proceeded there was concern about the ability of batteries to maintain the hermetic seal over a 5-year operational life requirement; therefore, alternate energy sources were investigated. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) concept was pursued and resulted in the launch of SNAP 3s, providing partial power on both Transit 4A and 4B. SNAP 9s provided full power on three Transit 5BNs. All launches occurred in the early 1960s. When the U.S. conducted the high altitude nuclear test from Johnson Island, several spacecraft were lost due to artificial enhancement of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere resulting in rapid degradation of solar cell power production. This led to the decision to have both an RTG and Solar cell/battery design for Transit power systems; hence, a new RTG design, with a separable heat source and radiative coupling to the thermoelectric elements, was flown on TRIAD. This pioneering effort provided the impetus for future RTGs on interplanetary spacecraft. This paper describes the origin and purpose of the Transit program and provides details on the five satellites in that program that were powered by the first American RTGs used in space. The rationale and some of the challenges inherent in that use are also described.

  17. High Energy Exoplanet Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet transits of exoplanets allow us to probe the atmospheres of these worlds. High energy transits have been shown to be deeper but also more variable than in the optical. By simulating exoplanet transits using high-energy observations of the Sun, we can test the limits of our ability to accurately measure the properties of these planets in the presence of stellar activity. We use both disk-resolved images of the Solar disk spanning soft X-rays, the ultraviolet, and the optical and also disk-integrated Sun-as-a-star observations of the Lyα irradiance to simulate transits over a wide wavelength range. We find that for stars with activity levels similar to the Sun, the planet-to-star radius ratio can be overestimated by up to 50% if the planet occults an active region at high energies. We also compare our simulations to high energy transits of WASP-12b, HD 189733, 55 Cnc b, and GJ 436b.

  18. The demographic transition.

    PubMed

    Coale, A J

    1984-01-01

    Demographic transition is a set of changes in reproductive behavior that are experienced as a society is transformed from a traditional pre-industrial state to a highly developed, modernized structure. The transformation is the substitution of slow growth achieved with low fertility and mortality for slow growth maintained with relatively high fertility and mortality rates. Contrary to early descriptions of the transition, fertility in pre-modern societies was well below the maximum that might be attained. However, it was kept at moderate levels by customs (such as late marriage or prolonged breastfeeding) not related to the number of children already born. Fertility has been reduced during the demographic transition by the adoption of contraception as a deliberate means of avoiding additional births. An extensive study of the transition in Europe shows the absence of a simple link of fertility with education, proportion urban, infant mortality and other aspects of development. It also suggests the importance of such cultural factors as common customs associated with a common language, and the strength of religious traditions. Sufficient modernization nevertheless seems always to bring the transition to low fertility and mortality.

  19. Perspective: The glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biroli, Giulio; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2013-03-01

    We provide here a brief perspective on the glass transition field. It is an assessment, written from the point of view of theory, of where the field is and where it seems to be heading. We first give an overview of the main phenomenological characteristics, or "stylised facts," of the glass transition problem, i.e., the central observations that a theory of the physics of glass formation should aim to explain in a unified manner. We describe recent developments, with a particular focus on real space properties, including dynamical heterogeneity and facilitation, the search for underlying spatial or structural correlations, and the relation between the thermal glass transition and athermal jamming. We then discuss briefly how competing theories of the glass transition have adapted and evolved to account for such real space issues. We consider in detail two conceptual and methodological approaches put forward recently, that aim to access the fundamental critical phenomenon underlying the glass transition, be it thermodynamic or dynamic in origin, by means of biasing of ensembles, of configurations in the thermodynamic case, or of trajectories in the dynamic case. We end with a short outlook.

  20. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  1. Determining Exoplanetary Oblateness Using Transit Depth Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biersteker, John; Schlichting, Hilke

    2017-10-01

    The measurement of an exoplanet’s oblateness and obliquity provides insights into the planet’s internal structure and formation history. Previous work using small differences in the shape of the transit light curve has been moderately successful, but was hampered by the small signal and extreme photometric precision required. The measurement of changes in transit depth, caused by the spin precession of an oblate planet, was proposed as an alternative method. Here, we present the first attempt to measure these changes. Using Kepler photometry, we examined the brown dwarf Kepler-39b and the warm Saturn Kepler-427b. We could not reliably constrain the oblateness of Kepler-39b. We find transit depth variations for Kepler-427b at 90.1 % significance (1.65σ ) consistent with a precession period of {P}{prec}={5.45}-0.37+0.46 {years} and an oblateness of f={0.19}-0.16+0.32. This oblateness is comparable to solar system gas giants and would raise questions about the dynamics and tidal synchronization of Kepler-427b.

  2. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  3. Nuclear Binding Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Li, Ning; Rokash, Alexander; Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Du, Dechuan; Klein, Nico; Lu, Bing-nan; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    How do protons and neutrons bind to form nuclei? This is the central question of ab initio nuclear structure theory. While the answer may seem as simple as the fact that nuclear forces are attractive, the full story is more complex and interesting. In this work we present numerical evidence from ab initio lattice simulations showing that nature is near a quantum phase transition, a zero-temperature transition driven by quantum fluctuations. Using lattice effective field theory, we perform Monte Carlo simulations for systems with up to twenty nucleons. For even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons, we discover a first-order transition at zero temperature from a Bose-condensed gas of alpha particles (4He nuclei) to a nuclear liquid. Whether one has an alpha-particle gas or nuclear liquid is determined by the strength of the alpha-alpha interactions, and we show that the alpha-alpha interactions depend on the strength and locality of the nucleon-nucleon interactions. This insight should be useful in improving calculations of nuclear structure and important astrophysical reactions involving alpha capture on nuclei. Our findings also provide a tool to probe the structure of alpha cluster states such as the Hoyle state responsible for the production of carbon in red giant stars and point to a connection between nuclear states and the universal physics of bosons at large scattering length.

  4. Nuclear Binding Near a Quantum Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Li, Ning; Rokash, Alexander; Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Du, Dechuan; Klein, Nico; Lu, Bing-Nan; Meißner, Ulf-G; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-23

    How do protons and neutrons bind to form nuclei? This is the central question of ab initio nuclear structure theory. While the answer may seem as simple as the fact that nuclear forces are attractive, the full story is more complex and interesting. In this work we present numerical evidence from ab initio lattice simulations showing that nature is near a quantum phase transition, a zero-temperature transition driven by quantum fluctuations. Using lattice effective field theory, we perform Monte Carlo simulations for systems with up to twenty nucleons. For even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons, we discover a first-order transition at zero temperature from a Bose-condensed gas of alpha particles (^{4}He nuclei) to a nuclear liquid. Whether one has an alpha-particle gas or nuclear liquid is determined by the strength of the alpha-alpha interactions, and we show that the alpha-alpha interactions depend on the strength and locality of the nucleon-nucleon interactions. This insight should be useful in improving calculations of nuclear structure and important astrophysical reactions involving alpha capture on nuclei. Our findings also provide a tool to probe the structure of alpha cluster states such as the Hoyle state responsible for the production of carbon in red giant stars and point to a connection between nuclear states and the universal physics of bosons at large scattering length.

  5. Transition dipole moments of the Qy band in photosynthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2011-11-10

    From studying the time evolution of the single electron density matrix within a density functional tight-binding formalism we calculate the Q(y) transition dipole moments vector direction and strength for a series of important photosynthetic pigments. We obtain good agreement with first-principles and experimental results and provide insights into the detailed nature of these excitations from the time evolving populations of molecular orbitals involved as well as correlations between pigment chemistry and dipole strength.

  6. Workshop on the Transition from Speech Sounds to Spoken Words

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-06

    origins of such abilities in young infants and the transition between infant and adult perception over the course cf language acquisition . Over the past...two decades, it has become increasingly clear that infants come to the task of language acquisition with highly sophisticated processing systems for...of Childhood to Language Acquisition : Insights from American Sign Language Rachel Mayberry McGill University The circumstances under which deaf people

  7. The Concept of Transition System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffe, David

    2008-01-01

    The term "transition system" describes features of a country's institutional arrangements which shape young people's education-work transitions. It explains why national differences in transition processes and outcomes persist despite apparent pressures for convergence. This paper asks how the concept of transition system has been…

  8. Insight in schizophrenia: from conceptualization to neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ouzir, Mounir; Azorin, Jean Michel; Adida, Marc; Boussaoud, Driss; Battas, Omar

    2012-04-01

    Lack of insight into illness is a prevalent and distinguishing feature of schizophrenia, which has a complex history and has been given a variety of definitions. Currently, insight is measured and treated as a multidimensional phenomenon, because it is believed to result from psychological, neuropsychological and organic factors. Thus, schizophrenia patients may display dramatic disorders including demoralization, depression and a higher risk of suicide, all of which are directly or indirectly related to a lack of insight into their illness, and make the treatment difficult. To improve the treatment of people with schizophrenia, it is thus crucial to advance research on insight into their illness. Insight is studied in a variety of ways. Studies may focus on the relationship between insight and psychopathology, may view behavioral outcomes or look discretely at the cognitive dysfunction versus anatomy level of insight. All have merit but they are dispersed across a wide body of literature and rarely are the findings integrated and synthesized in a meaningful way. The aim of this study was to synthesize findings across the large body of literature dealing with insight, to highlight its multidimensional nature, measurement, neuropsychology and social impact in schizophrenia. The extensive literature on the cognitive consequences of lack of insight and the contribution of neuroimaging techniques to elucidating neurological etiology of insight deficits, is also reviewed. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Navajo childbirth in transition.

    PubMed

    Waxman, A G

    1990-03-01

    For the Navajo Indians, the transition from home-centered childbearing practices based on religious ritual to biomedically directed childbirth in hospitals was completed over a relatively short time in the middle decades of this century. For Anglo-American society, the acceptance of medically oriented childbirth occurred during an equally short period earlier in the century. The transition was driven for both by many common factors. For Navajo women it was additionally influenced by the social and economic changes that affected the Reservation following the beginning of the Second World War. This paper examines the changes in Navajo childbearing practices and, for comparison, those of the dominant American society. It reviews factors that permitted the acceptance of biomedical childbirth by Navajo women and explores the health implications of the transition.

  10. Quantum interface unbinding transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubczyk, P.

    2012-08-01

    We consider interfacial phenomena accompanying bulk quantum phase transitions in the presence of surface fields. On general grounds we argue that the surface contribution to the system free energy involves a line of singularities characteristic of an interfacial phase transition, occurring below the bulk transition temperature Tc down to T=0. This implies the occurrence of an interfacial quantum critical regime extending into finite temperatures and located within the portion of the phase diagram where the bulk is ordered. Even in situations where the bulk order sets in discontinuously at T=0, the system's behavior at the boundary may be controlled by a divergent length scale if the tricritical temperature is sufficiently low. Relying on an effective interfacial model we compute the surface phase diagram in bulk spatial dimensionality d⩾2 and extract the values of the exponents describing the interfacial singularities in d⩾3.

  11. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  12. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  13. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  14. Metal-insulator transition in epitaxial NdNiO3 thin film: A structural, electrical and optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Qi, Zeming; Wang, Yuyin; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mei; Hu, Chuansheng

    2017-03-01

    NdNiO3 thin film has been prepared by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 (001) single crystalline substrate. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurement shows a sharp metal-insulator transition in such thin film. The phase transition temperature can be tuned from 90 K to 121 K by changing the thickness of thin film. The structure evolution during phase transition is studied by Raman spectroscopy. Optical conductivity reveals that the variation carrier density in the process of phase transition. The results of structural, electrical and optical studies provide useful insights to understand the mechanism of metal-insulator transition of NdNiO3 thin film.

  15. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  16. The second insight: Radionuclide diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentle, Brian C.; Hooper, Richard

    Nuclear medicine has been defined as the use of radionuclides (unsealed sources of radiation) in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is a predominantly diagnostic speciality. Of the two aspects of disease, disordered structure and disordered function, nuclear medicine or radionuclide diagnosis has been unique in consistently providing information about disordered function. The method has applications both in life ( in vivo examinations, often involving imaging radionuclide distributions in the body) and in the test-tube ( in vivo). The tracer principle has allowed insights in respect of both patient care and research across a broad spectrum of diseases. Although nuclear medicine is a specialty which continues to evolve, it already has an established role in health care, predicated on its ability to study function.

  17. Genetic insights in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Karolien; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new genes in Alzheimer's disease, classic linkage-based and candidate-gene-based association studies have been supplanted by exome sequencing, genome-wide sequencing (for mendelian forms of Alzheimer's disease), and genome-wide association studies (for non-mendelian forms). The identification of new susceptibility genes has opened new avenues for exploration of the underlying disease mechanisms. In addition to detecting novel risk factors in large samples, next-generation sequencing approaches can deliver novel insights with even small numbers of patients. The shift in focus towards translational studies and sequencing of individual patients places each patient's biomaterials as the central unit of genetic studies. The notional shift needed to make the patient central to genetic studies will necessitate strong collaboration and input from clinical neurologists.

  18. On insight and psychosis: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    David, A S

    1990-01-01

    The concept of insight into psychosis has received scant attention in the psychiatric literature. Various types of insight are described after drawing on such sources as phenomenology, clinical observation and experimental psychology. It is proposed that insight is far from an all or none phenomenon but comprises three overlapping dimensions, namely, the recognition that one has a mental illness, compliance with treatment and the ability to re-label unusual mental events (delusions and hallucinations) as pathological. PMID:2199672

  19. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  20. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  1. Learning for Life Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmecky, Jane Hyde

    2012-01-01

    Many adults return to formal learning situations to pursue lifelong learning goals because their lives are in transition from dealing with real-life problems such as divorce and re-marriage. The purpose of this study was to describe what couples learned that contributed to the success of their subsequent marriages and how they learned it. The…

  2. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  3. The contact percolation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tianqi; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Typical quasistatic compression algorithms for generating jammed packings of athermal, purely repulsive particles begin with dilute configurations and then apply successive compressions with relaxation of the elastic energy allowed between each compression step. It is well-known that during isotropic compression athermal systems with purely repulsive interactions undergo a jamming transition at packing fraction φJ from an unjammed state with zero pressure to a jammed, rigid state with nonzero pressure. Using extensive computer simulations, we show that a novel second-order-like, contact percolation, which signals the formation of a system-spanning cluster of mutually contacting particles, occurs at φP< φJ, preceding the jamming transition. By measuring the number of non-floppy modes of the dynamical matrix, the displacement field between successive compression steps, and the overlap between the adjacency matrix, which represents the network of contacting grains, at φ and φJ, we find that the contact percolation transition also heralds the onset of nontrivial response to applied stress. Highly heterogeneous, cooperative, and non-affine particle motion occurs in unjammed systems significantly below the jamming transition for φP< φ< φJ,

  4. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  5. Military Lives: Coaching Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, Nick; Gold, Jeff; Beech, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to first consider how veterans use talk to shape interpretations of personal and social identity. Second, this paper seeks to gain an understanding of how veterans see themselves in a civilian world, their ability to re-conceptualise and realign their perspective on life to support their transition in to a…

  6. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  7. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  8. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) states that transition planning should begin at the earliest age appropriate and no later than age 16. IDEA requires schools to make collaborative efforts to provide students access to an array of postschool activities including integrated employment, postsecondary…

  9. exorings: Exoring Transit Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Kipping, David M.; Sucerquia, Mario; Alvarado, Jaime A.

    2017-03-01

    Exorings is suitable for surveying entire catalogs of transiting planet candidates for exoring candidates, providing a subset of objects worthy of more detailed light curve analysis. Moreover, it is highly suited for uncovering evidence of a population of ringed planets by comparing the radius anomaly and PR-effects in ensemble studies.

  10. Families in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Patti O., Ed.; McGee, Michael, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This issue of "Emphasis" deals with families in transition, providing some model programs for the new family and some historical perspectives on how families have developed over time. Articles include: (1) "Nostalgia on the Right" (Nancy Theriot); (2) "Heart to Heart" (Nancy Harrington-MacLennan); (3) "The Media Get the Message" (Janet Alyn); (4)…

  11. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes outplacement counseling as a process that enables management to deal with the problem of the employee who must be released or the staff that must be reduced. Discusses the process of outplacement counseling, the stages of transition counseling, and techniques to be implemented. (BH)

  12. The TRANSITION Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Operated on a voluntary, decentralized basis at 215 military bases (58 overseas), the TRANSITION Program is designed to provide maximum guidance and training or educational opportunities for servicemen during their last six months of duty to prepare them for productive reentry into civilian life. Public and private placement services are also…

  13. A Survey Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, William; McAllister, Alex M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful outcomes for a "Transition Course in Mathematics" have resulted from two unique design features. The first is to run the course as a "survey course" in mathematics, introducing sophomore-level students to a broad set of mathematical fields. In this single mathematics course, undergraduates benefit from an introduction of proof…

  14. Structural transitions in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J.-C. S.

    1997-02-01

    Monatomic clusters are studied by Monte Carlo relaxation using generalized Lennard-Jones potentials. A transition from an icosahedral symmetry to a crystalline symmetry with stacking faults is always observed. Bcc-based soft atom clusters are found to have a lower energy than the corresponding hcp and fcc ones below the melting point.

  15. Transitions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussey, Trevor; Smith, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers ideas towards a solution of some of the problems that arise due to the extension of higher education to an ever wider range of students: especially student drop-out. It suggests that, as far as is practical, the design and delivery of higher education should be based upon the major changes or transitions which the students…

  16. A Survey Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, William; McAllister, Alex M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful outcomes for a "Transition Course in Mathematics" have resulted from two unique design features. The first is to run the course as a "survey course" in mathematics, introducing sophomore-level students to a broad set of mathematical fields. In this single mathematics course, undergraduates benefit from an introduction of proof…

  17. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  18. Is Mass Transit Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Mass transit is possible in the United States, but only if the form it takes offers americans the quality of ride--cheap, private and rapid--they now have in the automobile. If these criteria are not achieved, Americans will continue to drive. (BT)

  19. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  20. Managing Adult Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Alice G.; Schlossberg, Nancy K.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests basic truths about adult behavior: (1) adult behavior is determined by transition, not age; (2) adults are motivated to learn and change by a need to control, belong, matter, master, renew, and take stock; and (3) adult readiness for change depends on situation, support, self, and strategies. (JOW)

  1. Venus Transit From ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Transit of Venus as seen at 762nm in the CO Module. This image is from NASA Astronaut Don Petttit shot from onboard the International Space Station on June 5, 2012. Petttit, who had the foresight to bring a solar filter for his camera, will be capturing the June 5 Venus Transit from the International Space Station with the images downloading in almost real-time. He will photograph through the European Space Agency-built "cupola", removing the scratch panes to get crisp, clear images. Credit: NASA To read more about the 2012 Venus Transit go to: sunearthday.nasa.gov/transitofvenus Add your photos of the Transit of Venus to our Flickr Group here: www.flickr.com/groups/venustransit/ NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Phobos in Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-19

    Mars has two small, asteroid-sized moons named Phobos and Deimos. This frame from an animation shows the point of view of the rover, located near the equator of Mars, as these moons occasionally pass in front of, or transit, the disk of the sun.

  3. Youth Policy in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A study team was commissioned to critically review three independent reports on youth and schooling: "Youth: Transition to Adulthood"; "The Education of Adolescents"; and "The Reform of Secondary Education." The study team examined the reports in light of the most recent available social science evidence. The three reports, presenting similar…

  4. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  5. Transition Is Everyone's Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jill Z.; Osborn, Sandra R.

    Vocationally at-risk students have one or a combination of handicaps affecting mobility, coordination, communication, self-care and/or cognition which may significantly interfere with the goals of successful student-to-adult transition, namely employment, productive work, and independent community living. A program for students with physical…

  6. Transition Path Sampling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellago, C.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Geissler, P. L.

    Transition path sampling, based on a statistical mechanics in trajectory space, is a set of computational methods for the simulation of rare events in complex systems. In this chapter we give an overview of these techniques and describe their statistical mechanical basis as well as their application.

  7. Administrative Theory in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Daniel E.

    This monograph analyzes transition in educational administrative theory. A brief introductory section describes the theoretical movement, the substance and repercussions of Thomas Greenfield's critique of educational administrative theory in 1974, and emerging qualitative approaches. Seven readings, all written by the volume's author, view…

  8. Selected Readings in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnisch, Delwyn L.; And Others

    This collection of readings covers critical issues related to transition of youth with disabilities from school to post-school experiences. The first paper, titled "'Cognitive Return' of Schooling for Students with Disabilities: Preliminary Findings from 'High School and Beyond'" by Delwyn L. Harnisch and Ian A. G. Wilkinson, applies…

  9. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  10. Otherness within: aspects of insight in psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M

    1998-01-01

    In this paper I consider moments of insight in which the subject consciously experiences the emergence of something alien within the self, usually of a drive-related, affective, and at times uncanny nature. These are crucial, yet neglected, experiences of insight within the therapeutic process. Such experiences do not fit easily into our theory, because usual descriptions of insight stress the ego's integrative capacities. I attempt to demonstrate how aspects of our theory that emphasize rational, narrative explanations, or the social construction of clinical facts, as well as those that emphasize the ego's integrative functions, may prevent our fully appreciating these experiences of insight in our patients.

  11. Transit of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Laurance R.

    1998-01-01

    During the past five years we have pursued the detection of extrasolar planets by the photometric transit method, i.e. the detection of a planet by watching for a drop in the brightness of the light as it crosses in front of a star. The planetary orbit must cross the line-of-sight and so most systems will not be lined up for such a transit to ever occur. However, we have looked at eclipsing binary systems which are already edge-on. Such systems must be very small in size as this makes the differential light change due to a transit much greater for a given planet size (the brightness difference will be proportional to the area of the transiting planet to the disc area of the star). Also, the planet forming region should be closer to the star as small stars are generally less luminous (that is, if the same thermal regime for planet formation applies as in the solar system). This led to studies of the habitable zone around other stars, as well. Finally, we discovered that our data could be used to detect giant planets without transits as we had been carefully timing the eclipses of the stars (using a GPS antenna for time) and this will drift by being offset by any giant planets orbiting around the system, as well. The best summary of our work may be to just summarize the 21 refereed papers produced during the time of this grant. This will be done is chronological order and in each section separately.

  12. Quantum Transition State Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waalkens, Holger

    2009-03-01

    The main idea of Wigner's transition state theory (TST) is to compute reaction rates from the flux through a dividing surface placed between reactants and products. In order not to overestimate the rate the dividing surface needs to have the no- recrossing property, i.e. reactive trajectories cross the dividing surface exactly once, and nonreactive trajectories do not cross it at all. The long standing problem of how to construct such a diving surface for multi-degree-of-freedom systems was solved only recently using ideas from dynamical systems theory. Here a normal form allows for a local decoupling of the classical dynamics which leads to the explicit construction of the phase space structures that govern the reaction dynamics through transition states. The dividing surface is spanned by a normally hyperbolic manifold which is the mathematical manifestation of the transition state as an unstable invariant subsystem of one degree of freedom less than the full system. The mere existence of a quantum version of TST is discussed controversially in the literature. The key isssue is the presence of quantum mechanical tunneling which prohibits the existence of a local theory analogous to the classical case. Various approaches have been devloped to overcome this problem by propagating quantum wavefunctions through the transition state region. These approaches have in common that they are computationally very expensive which seriously limits their applicability. In contrast the approach by Roman Schubert, Stephen Wiggins and myself is local in nature. A quantum normal form allows us to locally decouple the quantum dynamics to any desired order in Planck's constant. This yields not only the location of the scattering and resonance wavefunctions relative to the classical phase space structures, but also leads to very efficient algorithms to compute cumulative reaction probabilities and Gamov-Siegert resonances which are the quantum imprints of the transition state.

  13. Water's second glass transition.

    PubMed

    Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Handle, Philip H; Seidl, Markus; Nelson, Helge; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas

    2013-10-29

    The glassy states of water are of common interest as the majority of H2O in space is in the glassy state and especially because a proper description of this phenomenon is considered to be the key to our understanding why liquid water shows exceptional properties, different from all other liquids. The occurrence of water's calorimetric glass transition of low-density amorphous ice at 136 K has been discussed controversially for many years because its calorimetric signature is very feeble. Here, we report that high-density amorphous ice at ambient pressure shows a distinct calorimetric glass transitions at 116 K and present evidence that this second glass transition involves liquid-like translational mobility of water molecules. This "double Tg scenario" is related to the coexistence of two liquid phases. The calorimetric signature of the second glass transition is much less feeble, with a heat capacity increase at Tg,2 about five times as large as at Tg,1. By using broadband-dielectric spectroscopy we resolve loss peaks yielding relaxation times near 100 s at 126 K for low-density amorphous ice and at 110 K for high-density amorphous ice as signatures of these two distinct glass transitions. Temperature-dependent dielectric data and heating-rate-dependent calorimetric data allow us to construct the relaxation map for the two distinct phases of water and to extract fragility indices m = 14 for the low-density and m = 20-25 for the high-density liquid. Thus, low-density liquid is classified as the strongest of all liquids known ("superstrong"), and also high-density liquid is classified as a strong liquid.

  14. Transition States and transition state analogue interactions with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Vern L

    2015-04-21

    Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of a few femtoseconds (fs). Computational analysis of enzyme motions leading to transition state formation suggests that local catalytic site motions on the fs time scale provide the mechanism to locate transition states. An experimental test of protein fs motion and its relation to transition state formation can be provided by isotopically heavy proteins. Heavy enzymes have predictable mass-altered bond vibration states without altered electrostatic properties, according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. On-enzyme chemistry is slowed in most heavy proteins, consistent with altered protein bond frequencies slowing the search for the transition state. In other heavy enzymes, structural changes involved in reactant binding and release are also influenced. Slow protein motions associated with substrate binding and catalytic site preorganization are essential to allow the subsequent fs motions to locate the transition state and to facilitate the efficient release of products. In the catalytically competent geometry, local groups move in stochastic atomic motion on the fs time scale, within transition state-accessible conformations created by slower protein motions. The fs time scale for the transition state motions does not permit thermodynamic equilibrium between the transition state and stable enzyme states. Isotopically heavy enzymes provide a diagnostic tool for fast coupled protein motions to transition state formation and mass-dependent conformational changes. The binding of transition state analogue inhibitors is the opposite in catalytic time scale to formation of the transition state but is related by similar geometries of the enzyme-transition state and enzyme-inhibitor interactions. While enzymatic transition states have lifetimes as short as 10(-15) s, transition state analogues can bind tightly to enzymes with release rates greater than 10(3) s. Tight-binding transition state analogues stabilize the rare but

  15. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a

  16. The Mongolia experience: transitioning within transition.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Richard G

    2009-12-01

    Although Mongolia has a long and distinguished history, as a new and emerging democracy it is experiencing the pains of transition-one that is moving the country from its pastoral and nomadic past into the 21st century. Confounded by its previous dependence on socialist Soviet Russia, the concept of a market economy seems opportunistic for some, while for those living within the traditional lifestyle of the herdsman in the countryside it is confusing and threatening to family structure and values. Adolescents and young adults are caught at the interface-not only of their own development, but by the disparities between tradition and Western values, new technology, and freedoms granted by the emerging democracy, and by the civic practice of democracy itself. Conceptually the new belongs to the young, and yet limited health and educational resources are available to modulate and focus both threats and opportunities. Using the analogy of the spirit banner of the warrior, it is the young as the warriors of the 21st century who have the energy and investment in the future that will be needed to shepherd this change. Both personal and public health, within the context of development, the psychobiological model, and the political and social ecology will be strong determinants of success. It is a parallel investment in both youth and the ideals they represent that will ensure success for the new Mongolia.

  17. MHD shocks and the origin of the solar transition region.

    PubMed

    Ryutova, Margarita; Tarbell, Theodore

    2003-05-16

    Simultaneous observations of the solar atmosphere from its surface to the corona obtained with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) show a ubiquitous sequence of events that start from cancellation of photospheric magnetic fields, pass through shock formation, and result in transition region supersonic jets and microflares. These results support a novel view of the energy buildup in the solar atmosphere associated with a cascade of shock waves produced by interacting network magnetic elements in the photosphere and provide insight into the origin of the solar transition region. The findings account for the general mechanisms of energy production, transfer, and release throughout the Sun's and stellar atmospheres.

  18. Experimental Evidence for a Structural-Dynamical Transition in Trajectory Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchaipat, Rattachai; Campo, Matteo; Turci, Francesco; Hallett, James E.; Speck, Thomas; Royall, C. Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Among the key insights into the glass transition has been the identification of a nonequilibrium phase transition in trajectory space which reveals phase coexistence between the normal supercooled liquid (active phase) and a glassy state (inactive phase). Here, we present evidence that such a transition occurs in experiments. In colloidal hard spheres, we find a non-Gaussian distribution of trajectories leaning towards those rich in locally favored structures (LFSs), associated with the emergence of slow dynamics. This we interpret as evidence for a nonequilibrium transition to an inactive LFS-rich phase. Reweighting trajectories reveals a first-order phase transition in trajectory space between a normal liquid and a LFS-rich phase. We also find evidence for a purely dynamical transition in trajectory space.

  19. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  20. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-06-21

    We observed complex materials in electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. We demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. Furthermore, these findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change.

  1. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  2. FIVE KEPLER TARGET STARS THAT SHOW MULTIPLE TRANSITING EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-12-10

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities-two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  3. CSTEA: a webserver for the Cell State Transition Expression Atlas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanghui; Yang, Hui; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-05-09

    Cell state transition is one of the fundamental events in the development of multicellular organisms, and the transition trajectory path has recently attracted much attention. With the accumulation of large amounts of "-omics" data, it is becoming possible to get insights into the molecule mechanisms underlying the transitions between cell states. Here, we present CSTEA (Cell State Transition Expression Atlas), a webserver that organizes, analyzes and visualizes the time-course gene expression data during cell differentiation, cellular reprogramming and trans-differentiation in human and mouse. In particular, CSTEA defines gene signatures for uncharacterized stages during cell state transitions, thereby enabling both experimental and computational biologists to better understand the mechanisms of cell fate determination in mammals. To our best knowledge, CSTEA is the first webserver dedicated to the analysis of time-series gene expression data during cell state transitions. CSTEA is freely available at http://comp-sysbio.org/cstea/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  5. Transition to management -- A personal perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    This paper explores one woman`s journey through her recent promotion into management, and will identify key factors that helped prepare and position her to be ready to exercise leadership through a formal management role. It discusses assessment of qualifications and skills, acquisition of needed skills, the influence of luck and timing, and the use of mentors and delegation as survival skills to get through the transition period and become fully functional as a manager. It also includes insights into sensitive issues such as how to relate to former peers, how to gain credibility as the junior member of the management team, and how to juggle family responsibilities with increased time commitments at work. It emphasizes the importance of acknowledging the help the authors receive in reaching their own career goals and offering the same kind of help and support to those in the early stages of their careers.

  6. Conservation genetics in transition to conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Ouborg, N Joop; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker; Bijlsma, R Kuke; Hedrick, Phil W

    2010-04-01

    Over the past twenty years conservation genetics has progressed from being mainly a theory-based field of population biology to a full-grown empirical discipline. Technological developments in molecular genetics have led to extensive use of neutral molecular markers such as microsatellites in conservation biology. This has allowed assessment of the impact of genetic drift on genetic variation, of the level of inbreeding within populations, and of the amount of gene flow between or within populations. Recent developments in genomic techniques, including next generation sequencing, whole genome scans and gene-expression pattern analysis, have made it possible to step up from a limited number of neutral markers to genome-wide estimates of functional genetic variation. Here, we focus on how the transition of conservation genetics to conservation genomics leads to insights into the dynamics of selectively important variation and its interaction with environmental conditions, and into the mechanisms behind this interaction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment for Transitions Planning. PRO-ED Series on Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Gary M.

    Part of a series designed to provide practical resources for transition personnel on a variety of topics essential to the process of preparing individuals with disabilities for adulthood, this guide focuses on assessment for transition planning. Chapter 1, "Transitions Assessment: What Do We Need To Know about Students and Why?," discusses the…

  8. Trajectory description of the quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-08-01

    The quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum-classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum-classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference.

  9. Trajectory description of the quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-08-15

    The quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum–classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum–classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference.

  10. Axially chiral imidodiphosphoric Acid catalyst for asymmetric sulfoxidation reaction: insights on asymmetric induction.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-04-22

    Insights into chiral induction for an asymmetric sulfoxidation reaction involving a single oxygen atom transfer are gained through analyzing the stereocontrolling transition states. The fitting of the substrate into the chiral cavity of a new class of imidodiphosphoric Brønsted acids, as well as weak CH⋅⋅⋅π and CH⋅⋅⋅O noncovalent interactions, are identified as responsible for the observed chiral induction.

  11. Twenty Years in Maine: Integrating Insights from Developmental Biology into Translational Medicine in a Small State.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I give my personal reflections on more than 30 years of studying developmental biology in the mouse model, spending 20 of those years doing research in Maine, a small rural state. I also give my thoughts on my recent experience transitioning to a large medical center in Maine, and the issues involved with integrating insights from developmental biology and regenerative medicine into the fabric of translational and clinical patient care in such an environment.

  12. Insight Into Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Medalia, Alice; Thysen, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Insight into psychotic symptoms is typically poor in schizophrenia; however, it is not known whether insight into neurocognitive impairment is similarly impaired. Most people with schizophrenia experience cognitive dysfunction, and the deficits in attention, memory, and critical thinking have been associated with poor functional outcome. As new treatments are developed for the cognitive impairments, it will be important to know whether patients will be receptive to yet another therapy. Insight is an important factor in treatment compliance and treatment outcome; however, it is not known if patients have insight into their cognitive dysfunction. In order to assess insight into neuro cognitive dysfunction, 75 subjects were administered the Measure of Insight into Cognition–Clinician Rated, a newly created measure based on the Scale to Access the Unawareness of Mental Disorder, that assesses insight into cognitive impairment. Subjects were also administered the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia and Independent Living Scale–Problem Solving to objectively assess neuropsychological status and problem-solving skills needed for independent living. Results demonstrated that virtually all subjects had cognitive impairment, yet insight into their neuro cognitive symptoms was limited. This finding has potential implications for treatment programs seeking to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia PMID:18199632

  13. Mining Login Data for Actionable Student Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnihotri, Lalitha; Aghababyan, Ani; Mojarad, Shirin; Riedesel, Mark; Essa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Student login data is a key resource for gaining insight into their learning experience. However, the scale and the complexity of this data necessitate a thorough exploration to identify potential actionable insights, thus rendering it less valuable compared to student achievement data. To compensate for the underestimation of login data…

  14. Working wonders? investigating insight with magic tricks.

    PubMed

    Danek, Amory H; Fraps, Thomas; von Müller, Albrecht; Grothe, Benedikt; Ollinger, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new approach to differentiate between insight and noninsight problem solving, by introducing magic tricks as problem solving domain. We argue that magic tricks are ideally suited to investigate representational change, the key mechanism that yields sudden insight into the solution of a problem, because in order to gain insight into the magicians' secret method, observers must overcome implicit constraints and thus change their problem representation. In Experiment 1, 50 participants were exposed to 34 different magic tricks, asking them to find out how the trick was accomplished. Upon solving a trick, participants indicated if they had reached the solution either with or without insight. Insight was reported in 41.1% of solutions. The new task domain revealed differences in solution accuracy, time course and solution confidence with insight solutions being more likely to be true, reached earlier, and obtaining higher confidence ratings. In Experiment 2, we explored which role self-imposed constraints actually play in magic tricks. 62 participants were presented with 12 magic tricks. One group received verbal cues, providing solution relevant information without giving the solution away. The control group received no informative cue. Experiment 2 showed that participants' constraints were suggestible to verbal cues, resulting in higher solution rates. Thus, magic tricks provide more detailed information about the differences between insightful and noninsightful problem solving, and the underlying mechanisms that are necessary to have an insight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer.

  16. Mechanistic insights into nicotine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Michael; De Biasi, Mariella

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is responsible for over 400,000 premature deaths in the United States every year, making it the leading cause of preventable death. In addition, smoking-related illness leads to billions of dollars in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity annually. The public is increasingly aware that successfully abstaining from smoking at any age can add years to one’s life and reduce many of the harmful effects of smoking. Although the majority of smokers desire to quit, only a small fraction of attempts to quit are actually successful. The symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal are a primary deterrent to cessation and they need to be quelled to avoid early relapse. This review will focus on the neuroadaptations caused by chronic nicotine exposure and discuss how those changes lead to a withdrawal syndrome upon smoking cessation. Besides examining how nicotine usurps the endogenous reward system, we will discuss how the habenula is part of a circuit that plays a critical role in the aversive effects of high nicotine doses and nicotine withdrawal. We will also provide an updated summary of the role of various nicotinic receptor subtypes in the mechanisms of withdrawal. This growing knowledge provides mechanistic insights into current and future smoking cessation therapies. PMID:21782803

  17. Transitions: exploring the frontier.

    PubMed

    Corless, Inge B

    End-of-life experiences go by various terms, including near-death experiences (NDEs), death bed visions, death bed phenomena, death bed coincidences, and nearing death awareness. Death bed escorts is the term applied to the vision of deceased family members or friends who inform the dying person that they will be accompanied in the transition from life. In this article, I examine the subject of NDEs and death bed escorts, starting with the rich body of work provided by Robert and Beatrice Kastenbaum. A subject of some interest to Robert Kastenbaum, he explored this frontier in his many writings on dying, death, and bereavement. Ever the pioneer and having made the ultimate transition, he may yet be exploring new frontiers.

  18. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, maintain and exercise state-of-the-art methods for transition prediction in supersonic flow fields. Basic state and stability codes, acquired during the last work period, were exercised and applied to calculate the properties of various flowfields. The development of a code for the prediction of transition location using a currently novel method (the PSE or Parabolized Stability Equation method), initiated during the last work period and continued during the present work period, was cancelled at mid-year for budgetary reasons. Other activities during this period included the presentation of a paper at the APS meeting in Tallahassee, Florida entitled 'Stability of Two-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers', as well as the initiation of a paper co-authored with H. Reed of the Arizona State University entitled 'Stability of Boundary Layers'.

  19. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  20. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  1. Current insights into the biology and pathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charles F; Limper, Andrew H

    2007-04-01

    The fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia is the most prevalent opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS. Although the analysis of this opportunistic fungal pathogen has been hindered by the inability to isolate it in pure culture, the use of molecular techniques and genomic analysis have brought insights into its complex cell biology. Analysis of the intricate relationship between Pneumocystis and the host lung during infection has revealed that the attachment of Pneumocystis to the alveolar epithelium promotes the transition of the organism from the trophic to the cyst form. It also revealed that Pneumocystis infection elicits the production of inflammatory mediators, culminating in lung injury and impaired gas exchange. Here we discuss these and other recent findings relating to the biology and pathogenesis of this intractable fungus.

  2. Internet Protocol Transition Workbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    i~yif.al Pi.y~iiy wi -! b , ..aye meaning. U [Page il March 1982 Internet Protocol Transition Workbook CONTACTS ARPANET MANAGEMENT. POLICY, AND SERVICE...C) September 1981 Internet Protocol Example 2: In this example, we show fi -st a moderate size internet datagram (452 data octets), then two...00111100. fI Note that the assumed maximum segment lifetime is two minutes. Here we explicitly ask that a segment be destroyed if it cannot be delivered by

  3. Nigeria in Political Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-03

    General Sani Abacha, the military leader who took power in Nigeria in 1993, died of a reported heart attack and was replaced by General Abdulsalam...Abubakar. On July 7, 1998, Moshood Abiola, the believed winner of the 1993 presidential election, also died of a heart attack during a meeting with U.S...as the most serious and effective effort in decades. Transition to Civilian Rule Abacha died, reportedly of a heart attack , on June 8, 1998. The

  4. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, acquire and apply state-of-the-art tools for the prediction of transition at high speeds at NASA Ames. Although various stability codes as well as basic state codes were acquired, the development of a new Parabolized Stability Equation (PSE) code was minimal. The time that was initially allocated for development was used on other tasks, in particular for the Leading Edge Suction problem, in acquiring proficiency in various graphics tools, and in applying these tools to evaluate various Navier-Stokes and Euler solutions. The second objective of this work period was to attend the Transition and Turbulence Workshop at NASA Langley in July and August, 1991. A report on the Workshop follows. From July 8, 1991 to August 2, 1991, the author participated in the Transition and Turbulence Workshop at NASA Langley. For purposes of interest here, analysis can be said to consist of solving simplified governing equations by various analytical methods, such as asymptotic methods, or by use of very meager computer resources. From the composition of the various groups at the Workshop, it can be seen that analytical methods are generally more popular in Great Britain than they are in the U.S., possibly due to historical factors and the lack of computer resources. Experimenters at the Workshop were mostly concerned with subsonic flows, and a number of demonstrations were provided, among which were a hot-wire experiment to probe the boundary layer on a rotating disc, a hot-wire rake to map a free shear layer behind a cylinder, and the use of heating strips on a flat plate to control instability waves and consequent transition. A highpoint of the demonstrations was the opportunity to observe the rather noisy 'quiet' supersonic pilot tunnel in operation.

  5. Transition Region Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Ultraviolet emission lines emitted from the SOLAR TRANSITION REGION are often shifted from their expected rest wavelengths. Shifts of spectral lines are due to the so-called DOPPLER EFFECT, where the source of emission is moving either away from or towards the observer, causing a change in the apparent wavelength. The shifted emission lines are most often interpreted as a flow of plasma along ...

  6. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  7. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  8. Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. Amelia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter considers how transitions to adulthood have been historically represented and presents alternative ways of thinking about transitions to adulthood through the context of adult basic education programs.

  9. Psychological Aspects of Transitive Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; Rohrman, Nicholas L.

    1970-01-01

    The experiments reported here confirmed the findings of earlier researchers that transitive verbs are more difficult to recall than intransitive ones and furthermore established a close relationship between transitive verbs and nouns. Implications for linguistic theory are discussed. (FB)

  10. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  11. Transitional Programs: Boom or Bane?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Jo Ann

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the maturationist, behaviorist, and cognitive interactionist views of transitional programs. Research on transitional programs and possible effects of such programs on kindergarten and first grade classes is discussed. (BG)

  12. Dynamic rigidity transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Latva-Kokko, M.; Timonen, J.

    2003-01-01

    An inflated closed loop (or membrane) is used to demonstrate a dynamic rigidity transition that occurs when impact energy is added to the loop in static equilibrium at zero temperature. The only relevant parameter in this transition is the ratio of the energy needed to collapse the loop and the impact energy. When this ratio is below a threshold value close to unity, the loop collapses into a high-entropy floppy state, and it does not return to the rigid state unless the impact energy can escape. The internal oscillations are in the floppy state dominated by 1/f2 noise. When the ratio is above the threshold, the loop does not collapse, and the internal oscillations resulting from the impact are dominated by the eigenfrequencies of the stretched membrane. In this state, the loop can bounce for a long time. It is still an open question whether bouncing will eventually vanish or whether a stationary bouncing state will be reached. The dynamic transition between the floppy and the rigid state is discontinuous.

  13. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  14. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  15. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  16. Structural transitions in clusters.

    PubMed

    Hartke, Bernd

    2002-05-03

    If one adds more particles to a cluster, the energetically optimal structure is neither preserved nor does it change in a continuous fashion. Instead, one finds several cluster size regions where one structural principle dominates almost without exception, and rather narrow boundary regions in-between. The structure of the solid is usually reached only at relatively large sizes, after more than one structural transition. The occurrence of this general phenomenon of size-dependent structural transitions does not seem to depend on the nature of the particles, it is found for atomic, molecular, homogeneous, and heterogeneous clusters alike. Clearly, it is a collective many-body phenomenon which can in principle be calculated but not understood in a fully reductionistic manner. Actual calculations with sufficient accuracy are not feasible today, because of the enormous computational expense, even when unconventional evolutionary algorithms are employed for global geometry optimization. Therefore, simple rules for cluster structures are highly desirable. In fact, we are dealing here not just with the academic quest for linkages between cluster structure and features of the potential energy surface, but structural transitions in clusters are also of immediate relevance for many natural and industrial processes, ranging from crystal growth all the way to nanotechnology. This article provides an exemplary overview of research on this topic, from simple model systems where first qualitative explanations start to be successful, up to more realistic complex systems which are still beyond our understanding.

  17. Entranced by a Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-31

    Saturn's moon Dione crosses the face of the giant planet in this view, a phenomenon astronomers call a transit. Transits play an important role in astronomy and can be used to study the orbits of planets and their atmospheres, both in our solar system and in others. By carefully timing and observing transits in the Saturn system, like that of Dione (698 miles or 1123 kilometers across), scientists can more precisely determine the orbital parameters of Saturn's moons. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 0.3 degrees below the ring plane. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 21, 2015. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.3 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 119 degrees. Image scale is 9 miles (14 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18330

  18. Column continuous transition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangrong

    2007-04-01

    A column continuous transition function is by definition a standard transition function P(t) whose every column is continuous for t[greater-or-equal, slanted]0 in the norm topology of bounded sequence space l[infinity]. We will prove that it has a stable q-matrix and that there exists a one-to-one relationship between column continuous transition functions and increasing integrated semigroups on l[infinity]. Using the theory of integrated semigroups, we give some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the minimal q-function is column continuous, in terms of its generator (of the Markov semigroup) as well as its q-matrix. Furthermore, we will construct all column continuous Q-functions for a conservative, single-exit and column bounded q-matrix Q. As applications, we find that many interesting continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs), say Feller-Reuter-Riley processes, monotone processes, birth-death processes and branching processes, etc., have column continuity.

  19. Mechanistic insights on acrylate insertion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guironnet, Damien; Caporaso, Lucia; Neuwald, Boris; Göttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Cavallo, Luigi; Mecking, Stefan

    2010-03-31

    Complexes [{(PwedgeO)PdMe}(n)] (1(n); PwedgeO = kappa(2)-P,O-Ar(2)PC(6)H(4)SO(2)O with Ar = 2-MeOC(6)H(4)) are a single-component precursor of the (PwedgeO)PdMe fragment devoid of additional coordinating ligands, which also promotes the catalytic oligomerization of acrylates. Exposure of 1(n) to methyl acrylate afforded the two diastereomeric chelate complexes [(PwedgeO)Pd{kappa(2)-C,O-CH(C(O)OMe)CH(2)CH(C(O)OMe)CH(2)CH(3)}] (3-meso and 3-rac) resulting from two consecutive 2,1-insertions of methyl acrylate into the Pd-Me bond with the same or opposite stereochemistry, respectively, in a 3:2 ratio as demonstrated by comprehensive NMR spectroscopic studies and single crystal X-ray diffraction. These six-membered chelate complexes are direct key models for intermediates of acrylate insertion polymerization, and also ethylene-acrylate copolymerization to high acrylate content copolymers. Studies of the binding of various substrates (pyridine, dmso, ethylene and methyl acrylate) to 3-meso and 3-rac show that hindered displacement of the chelating carbonyl moiety by pi-coordination of incoming monomer significantly retards, but does not prohibit, polymerization. For 3-meso,3-rac + C(2)H(4) right arrow over left arrow 3-meso-C(2)H(4,) 3-rac-C(2)H(4) an equilibrium constant K(353 K) approximately 2 x 10(-3) L mol(-1) was estimated. Reaction of 3-meso, 3-rac with methyl acrylate afforded higher insertion products [(PwedgeO)Pd(C(4)H(6)O(2))(n)Me] (n = 3, 4) as observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Theoretical studies by DFT methods of consecutive acrylate insertion provide relative energies of intermediates and transition states, which are consistent with the aforementioned experimental observations, and give detailed insights to the pathways of multiple consecutive acrylate insertions. Acrylate insertion into 3-meso,3-rac is associated with an overall energy barrier of ca. 100 kJ mol(-1).

  20. Insight in schizophrenia: associations with empathy.

    PubMed

    Pijnenborg, G H M; Spikman, J M; Jeronimus, B F; Aleman, A

    2013-06-01

    Many people with schizophrenia (50-80%) demonstrate impaired insight, something which has been associated with a poorer outcome. Two types of empathy can be distinguished: affective empathy via shared emotions and cognitive empathy, also referred to as Theory of Mind (ToM). ToM can be subdivided into cognitive ToM (knowledge about beliefs of other people via perspective taking) and affective ToM (knowledge about other people's emotions via perspective taking). Recent studies show a relationship between Theory of Mind (ToM) and insight. However, the relationship between affective empathy and insight in schizophrenia was not examined previously. This was the aim of the present study. We expected that affective empathy would show a stronger relationship with insight than both cognitive and affective ToM. We assessed forty-six patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and fifty-three healthy controls were assessed with a test battery consisting of tests of social cognition (a self-rating scale for affective empathy, a ToM task assessing both cognitive and affective ToM, and two tests of emotion perception), verbal memory, executive functioning, psychomotor speed, and intelligence. Insight was assessed with item G12 of the PANSS-interview. A regression equation showed that affective empathy made the strongest unique contribution to insight, followed closely by affective ToM. Together, they explained 45% of the variance in insight. None of the other independent variables made a unique contribution to the prediction of insight. Both affective ToM and affective empathy are associated with insight in schizophrenia. Being able to take empathize with other peoples feeling at both the affective and cognitive level may enhance insight in schizophrenia.

  1. The transition to agricultural sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    1999-01-01

    The transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production during the 21st century will take place within the context of a transition to a stable population and a possible transition to a stable level of material consumption. If the world fails to successfully navigate a transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production, the failure will be due more to a failure in the area of institutional innovation than to resource and environmental constraints. PMID:10339524

  2. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  3. Analyses of some exoplanets' transits and transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püsküllü, ćaǧlar; Soydugan, Faruk

    2017-02-01

    We present solutions of the transit light curves and transit timing variations (TTVs) analyses of the exoplanets HAT-P-5b, HAT-P-9b and HAT-P-25b. Transit light curves were collected at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory and TUBITAK National Observatory. The models were produced by WINFITTER program and stellar, planetary and orbital properties were obtained and discussed. We gave new transit times and generated TTVs with them by appending additional data based on Exoplanet Transit Database (ETD). Significant signals at the TTVs were also investigated.

  4. The Community Vocational Transition Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botterbusch, Karl F.; Smith, Christopher A.

    This monograph outlines a model procedure for developing and running a community vocational transition center that would assist workers in making various planned and unplanned vocational transitions throughout their lives by offering a comprehensive array of vocational assessment and transition services. The first chapter addresses the question of…

  5. Reconstructing Transition Knowledge in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chen-chen

    2012-01-01

    Taking a post-colonial stand and using school to work transition as an example, the author re-examines the special education discourses in Taiwan and attempts to construct alternate understandings of transition from sociological and cultural perspectives. A review of past transition literature and a survey of the educational background of the…

  6. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  7. Cyclone Center: Insights on Historical Tropical Cyclones from Citizen Volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, P.; Hennon, C. C.; Knapp, K. R.; Schreck, C. J., III; Stevens, S. E.; Kossin, J. P.; Rennie, J.; Hennon, P. A.; Kruk, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cyclonecenter.org project started in fall 2012 and has been collecting citizen scientist volunteer tropical cyclone intensity estimates ever since. The project is hosted by the Citizen Science Alliance (zooniverse) and the platform is supported by a range of scientists. We have over 30 years of satellite imagery of tropical cyclones but the analysis to date has been done on an ocean-basin by ocean-basin basis and worse still practices have changed over time. We therefore do not, presently, have a homogeneous record relevant for discerning climatic changes. Automated techniques can classify many of the images but have a propensity to be challenged during storm transitions. The problem is fundamentally one where many pairs of eyes are invaluable as there is no substitute for human eyes in discerning patterns. Each image is classified by ten unique users before it is retired. This provides a unique insight into the uncertainty inherent in classification. In the three years of the project much useful data has accrued. This presentation shall highlight some of the results and analyses to date and touch on insights as to what has worked and what perhaps has not worked so well. There are still many images left to complete so its far from too late to jump over to www.cyclonecenter.org and help out.

  8. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  9. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  10. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions.

  11. Mesoproterozoic - Tonian Paleogeography: New Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoproterozic - Tonian (1600-850 Ma) times are generally associated with a significant part of supercontinental cycle: assembly and breakup of Nuna followed by assembly of Rodinia, The understanding of these processes is hampered by a deficit of reliable geochronological, paleomagnetic and other datasets. Consequently there is a variety of opinions about paleogeographic locations of many Precambrian cratons and terranes and about their kinematics. Almost every new well-dated paleomagnetic pole, or re-dated old paleopole, or discovered LIP event causes significant reconsideration of existing paleogeographic models. Many new exiting results have been reported in last few years from Baltica, Siberia, North China, Australia, Congo-São Francisco and other parts of Nuna and Rodinia. Recent testings of some popular paleogeographic reconstructions (e.g. SAMBA) and re-interpretation of orogenic histories (e.g. Grenville and Sveconorwegian) also require some revisiting of Mesoproterozoic - Tonian paleogeography. This study summarises these new data and new ideas. Proposed updated positions of some continents are now better justified. Most changes are associated with North China and Congo-São Francisco cratons. Kinematics of the transitional period between the breakup of Nuna and the assembly of Rodinia is now better understood and better constrained, but some aspects are still enigmatic and controversial.

  12. Multifractality and Network Analysis of Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Chunbin; Han, Jihui; Su, Zhu; Zou, Yijiang

    2017-01-01

    Many models and real complex systems possess critical thresholds at which the systems shift dramatically from one sate to another. The discovery of early-warnings in the vicinity of critical points are of great importance to estimate how far the systems are away from the critical states. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and visibility graph method have been employed to investigate the multifractal and geometrical properties of the magnetization time series of the two-dimensional Ising model. Multifractality of the time series near the critical point has been uncovered from the generalized Hurst exponents and singularity spectrum. Both long-term correlation and broad probability density function are identified to be the sources of multifractality. Heterogeneous nature of the networks constructed from magnetization time series have validated the fractal properties. Evolution of the topological quantities of the visibility graph, along with the variation of multifractality, serve as new early-warnings of phase transition. Those methods and results may provide new insights about the analysis of phase transition problems and can be used as early-warnings for a variety of complex systems. PMID:28107414

  13. Combining Transit and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie A.

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission, combined with ground based radial velocity (RV) follow-up, has revolutionized the observational constraints on sub-Neptune-size planet compositions. Kepler's unprecedentedly large and homogeneous samples of planets with both mass and radius constraints open the possibility of statistical studies of the underlying planet composition distribution. This presentation describes the application of hierarchical Bayesian models to constrain the underlying planet composition distribution from a sample of noisy mass-radius measurements. This approach represents a promising avenue toward a quantitative measurement of the amount of physical scatter in small planet compositions, the identification of planet sub-populations that may be tied to distinct formation pathways, and empirical constraints on the dominant compositional trends in the planet sample. Both the transit and radial velocity techniques are subject to selection effects, and approaches to mitigate the resulting biases will be addressed. In addition to distilling composition-distribution insights from the current sample of Kepler planets with RV masses, this framework may be used to optimize the target selection for future transiting planet RV follow-up surveys.

  14. The maternal to zygotic transition in mammals.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Lu, Xukun; Dean, Jurrien

    2013-10-01

    Prior to activation of the embryonic genome, the initiating events of mammalian development are under maternal control and include fertilization, the block to polyspermy and processing sperm DNA. Following gamete union, the transcriptionally inert sperm DNA is repackaged into the male pronucleus which fuses with the female pronucleus to form a 1-cell zygote. Embryonic transcription begins during the maternal to zygotic transfer of control in directing development. This transition occurs at species-specific times after one or several rounds of blastomere cleavage and is essential for normal development. However, even after activation of the embryonic genome, successful development relies on stored maternal components without which embryos fail to progress beyond initial cell divisions. Better understanding of the molecular basis of maternal to zygotic transition including fertilization, the activation of the embryonic genome and cleavage-stage development will provide insight into early human development that should translate into clinical applications for regenerative medicine and assisted reproductive technologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insight, psychopathology, and interpersonal relationships in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Francisco J; Béjar, Agustín; Casado, Mariano

    2002-01-01

    Insight of patients with schizophrenia seems to be a complex phenomenon that includes elements of a psychological, psychopathological, neurocognitive, and interactional nature. The purpose of this research was to study two of these areas (psychopathology and interpersonal relationships) in order to determine their influence on insight and their interrelation. Eighty-two outpatients fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia were studied using the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight (SAI), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Social Cognitions and Object Relations Scale (SCORS). Bivariate correlations and multiple regression tests were performed. The positive component of the PANSS and the understanding of social causality (SCORS) appeared as the most significant variables related to level of insight. Positive symptoms were inversely related to insight, whereas understanding of social causality was directly associated with an appropriate awareness of illness. These results support the idea that insight is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. In this respect, the study of the psychopathological dimension of insight should be accompanied by the consideration of interactional and social factors, because awareness of illness can be considered ultimately as an index of concordance between patients' views of the illness and cultural standards regarding mental disorders.

  16. Condensation phase transitions in ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iskakova, L Yu; Smelchakova, G A; Zubarev, A Yu

    2009-01-01

    Experiments show that under suitable conditions magnetic particles in ferrofluids and other polar suspensions undergo condensation phase transitions and form dense liquidlike or solidlike phases. The problem of fundamental features and scenarios of the phase transitions is one of the central problems of the physics of these systems. This work deals with the theoretical study of scenarios of condensation phase transitions in ferrofluids, consisting of identical magnetic particles. Our results show that, unlike the classical condensation phase transitions, the appearance of the linear chains precedes the magnetic particle bulk condensation. The effect of the chains on the diagrams of the equilibrium phase transitions is studied.

  17. Transition in Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    1998-01-01

    We have further developed our capabilities to analyze transition in turbine boundary layers from first principles by integrating the nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE) with improved initial and boundary conditions. With modified iteration schemes, we are able to proceed deeper into the transition region where skin friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient significantly increase. Initial and boundary conditions at elevated turbulence levels can be derived by receptivity analysis. Test runs for ERCOFTAC test case T3A at 2.4\\% turbulence level provide results in good agreement with the experimental data. The sharper minimum of the skin coefficient also shown by DNS results is likely due to the missing intermittency. The method has been applied to various experimentally studied turbine blades (UTRC, VKI, Zierke, Langston, Hippensteele, and others). The PSE results, though physically reasonable, do not agree as well as expected with the experimental findings. We have, therefore, performed an extensive search for the reasons of the seemingly systematic deviations. A first source of uncertainty has been found in the often insufficient documentation of the experiments (e.g. on blockage by end-wall boundary layers). However, variation of the relevant parameters does not lead to more satisfactory agreement. A second reason has been found in the "standard procedure" which considers a 2D flow at midspan and uses a panel code and subsequent boundary-layer code to obtain the laminar basic flow for the transition analysis. Comparison with the pressure distribution obtained with a 3D design code (RVC3D) shows significant three-dimensionality of the flow (e.g. in the UTRC experiments). The spanwise variation has been neglected in our original PSE code. To overcome this problem, we have developed the PSE/3D for fully 3D boundary layers to account for streamwise and spanwise variations. Since the design code does not provide the boundary-layer flow with

  18. Illustration of transition path theory on a collection of simple examples.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Philipp; Schütte, Christof; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2006-08-28

    Transition path theory (TPT) has been recently introduced as a theoretical framework to describe the reaction pathways of rare events between long lived states in complex systems. TPT gives detailed statistical information about the reactive trajectories involved in these rare events, which are beyond the realm of transition state theory or transition path sampling. In this paper the TPT approach is outlined, its distinction from other approaches is discussed, and, most importantly, the main insights and objects provided by TPT are illustrated in detail via a series of low dimensional test problems.

  19. A translational evaluation of transitions.

    PubMed

    Jessel, Joshua; Hanley, Gregory P; Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid

    2016-06-01

    Transitions with nonhuman animals are typically framed as inescapable changes in signaled reinforcement schedules that result in a pause in responding unique to switches from rich to lean schedules. Pausing is considered to be a function of the aversive qualities of the contrasting reinforcement schedules. Transitions are typically framed in applied research as physical changes in location that evoke problem behavior maintained by the escape of an aversive event or resumption of a preferred event. We attempted to extend the basic framing of transitions to behaviors and contexts of social significance and evaluate a novel treatment for the problem of dawdling by 3 boys who had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder during rich-to-lean transitions. Dawdling during physical transitions was most readily observed when transitioning to lean contexts in Experiment 1. We then shortened transition duration in Experiment 2 by programming unsignaled and probabilistic rich reinforcement in the upcoming context.

  20. Pivotal Transitions - Historical and Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, M.

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to enable readers to better "design" successful transitions that move Science and Technology or Research and Development (S&T/R&D) technologies and systems into operational capabilities for users. Transitions from S&T/R&D into acquisition and operations are challenging and critical to providing capab ilities to end users. Two historical examples, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), are explored. Two current examples are also explored, including one from Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) which is in th e early stages of transition. While transitions are necessary, transition periods are inherently challenging and dynamically changing situations. These situations must be carefully managed and led in order to succeed. Characteristics, approaches, and incentives that foster effective transitions are discussed. Understanding the transition process and the communities involved allows one to maximize the chance of successfully moving an S&T/R&D development into an operational capability supporting end users.

  1. Structural insights and functional implications of inter-individual variability in β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tandale, Aditi; Joshi, Manali; Sengupta, Durba

    2016-01-01

    The human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and due to its central role in bronchodilation, is an important drug target. The inter-individual variability in β2AR has been implicated in disease susceptibility and differential drug response. In this work, we identified nine potentially deleterious non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) using a consensus approach. The deleterious nsSNPs were found to cluster near the ligand binding site and towards the G-protein binding site. To assess their molecular level effects, we built structural models of these receptors and performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Most notably, in the Phe290Ser variant we observed the rotameric flip of Trp2866.48, a putative activation switch that has not been reported in β2AR thus far. In contrast, the variant Met82Lys was found to be the most detrimental to epinephrine binding. Additionally, a few of the nsSNPs were seen to cause perturbations to the lipid bilayer, while a few lead to differences at the G-protein coupling site. We are thus able to classify the variants as ranging from activating to damaging, prioritising them for experimental studies. PMID:27075228

  2. Artist Rendition of InSight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    Artist rendition of the InSight (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Lander. InSight is based on the proven Phoenix Mars spacecraft and lander design with state-of-the-art avionics from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory missions. Note: After thorough examination, NASA managers have decided to suspend the planned March 2016 launch of the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission. The decision follows unsuccessful attempts to repair a leak in a section of the prime instrument in the science payload. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16079

  3. Empirical Transition Matrices. Educational Planning Occasional Papers No. 6/71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracz, G. S.; O'Mahony, J. T.

    This monograph is concerned with the uses to which an individualized student information system could be put for obtaining valuable insights into the progress of a variety of students through the educational system. In chapter 1, the concepts and terminology required for an understanding of transition matrixes are introduced, and a mathematical…

  4. Agile in Large-Scale Development Workshop: Coaching, Transitioning and Practicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Thomas; Larsson, Andreas

    Agile in large-scale and complex development presents its own set of problems, both how to practice, transition and coaching. This workshop aims at bringing persons interested in this topic together to share tools, techniques and insights. The workshop will follow the increasingly popular “lightning talk + open space” format.

  5. Passages: Rafting the Green River as an Analogy to the Mid-Life Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenhart, Myra W.

    To help adults develop an awareness of midlife issues, to encourage personal acceptance of the transition, and to introduce appropriate coping skills, a speech communication course was designed that relied on river trip activities to develop insights about this passage. The vehicle for the seminar was a four-day raft trip down the Green River,…

  6. Factors Affecting Students' Information Literacy as They Transition from High School to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlejs, Jana; Stec, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable attention paid to the need to increase the information literacy of high school students in preparation for the transition to college, poor research skills still seem to be the norm. To gain insight into the problem, library instruction environments of nineteen high schools were explored. The schools were selected based on…

  7. MINEHOUND: transition to production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, David J.; Curtis, Paul; Hunt, Nigel; Braunstein, Jürgen; Merz, Armin

    2007-04-01

    The UK Department for International Development (DfID), in collaboration with the German Foreign Ministry (Auswärtiges Amt), contracted ERA Technology to carry out extensive field trials in Cambodia, Bosnia and Angola of an advanced technology, dual sensor, and hand-held landmine detector system called MINEHOUND TM. This detector combines a metal detector with a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). As a result of extremely successful trials MINEHOUND TM was developed as a product by ERA Technology and Vallon GmbH and has been available for sale since late 2006. This paper describes the transition to production of the detector.

  8. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  9. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  10. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  11. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  12. Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanden-Eijnden, E.

    The dynamical behavior of many systems arising in physics, chemistry, biology, etc. is dominated by rare but important transition events between long lived states. For over 70 years, transition state theory (TST) has provided the main theoretical framework for the description of these events [17,33,34]. Yet, while TST and evolutions thereof based on the reactive flux formalism [1, 5] (see also [30,31]) give an accurate estimate of the transition rate of a reaction, at least in principle, the theory tells very little in terms of the mechanism of this reaction. Recent advances, such as transition path sampling (TPS) of Bolhuis, Chandler, Dellago, and Geissler [3, 7] or the action method of Elber [15, 16], may seem to go beyond TST in that respect: these techniques allow indeed to sample the ensemble of reactive trajectories, i.e. the trajectories by which the reaction occurs. And yet, the reactive trajectories may again be rather uninformative about the mechanism of the reaction. This may sound paradoxical at first: what more than actual reactive trajectories could one need to understand a reaction? The problem, however, is that the reactive trajectories by themselves give only a very indirect information about the statistical properties of these trajectories. This is similar to why statistical mechanics is not simply a footnote in books about classical mechanics. What is the probability density that a trajectory be at a given location in state-space conditional on it being reactive? What is the probability current of these reactive trajectories? What is their rate of appearance? These are the questions of interest and they are not easy to answer directly from the ensemble of reactive trajectories. The right framework to tackle these questions also goes beyond standard equilibrium statistical mechanics because of the nontrivial bias that the very definition of the reactive trajectories imply - they must be involved in a reaction. The aim of this chapter is to

  13. Atomistic insights into rhodopsin activation from a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Irina G; Best, Robert B; Engel, Stanislav; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Hummer, Gerhard; Costanzi, Stefano

    2008-08-06

    Rhodopsin, the light sensitive receptor responsible for blue-green vision, serves as a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Upon light absorption, it undergoes a series of conformational changes that lead to the active form, metarhodopsin II (META II), initiating a signaling cascade through binding to the G protein transducin (G(t)). Here, we first develop a structural model of META II by applying experimental distance restraints to the structure of lumi-rhodopsin (LUMI), an earlier intermediate. The restraints are imposed by using a combination of biased molecular dynamics simulations and perturbations to an elastic network model. We characterize the motions of the transmembrane helices in the LUMI-to-META II transition and the rearrangement of interhelical hydrogen bonds. We then simulate rhodopsin activation in a dynamic model to study the path leading from LUMI to our META II model for wild-type rhodopsin and a series of mutants. The simulations show a strong correlation between the transition dynamics and the pharmacological phenotypes of the mutants. These results help identify the molecular mechanisms of activation in both wild type and mutant rhodopsin. While static models can provide insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and predict ligand affinity, a dynamic model of activation could be applicable to study the pharmacology of other GPCRs and their ligands, offering a key to predictions of basal activity and ligand efficacy.

  14. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  15. Homogeneous Characterization of Transiting Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Faedi, Francesca; Hebb, Leslie; Pollacco, Don; Stassun, Keivan; Ghezzi, Luan; Cargile, Phillip; Barros, Susana; Smalley, Barry; Mack, Claude

    2012-02-01

    We aim to obtain a homogeneous set of high resolution, high signal- to-noise (S/N) spectra for a large and diverse sample of stars with transiting planets, using the Kitt Peak 4-m echelle spectrograph for bright Northern targets (7.7transit photometry. % to derive a homogeneous set of properties for the transiting systems. The resulting consistent set of physical properties will allow us to further explore known correlations, e.g., core-size of the planet and stellar metallicity, and to newly identify subtle relationships providing insight into our understanding of planetary formation, structure, and evolution. Our pilot study analyzing our WASP-13 HIRES spectrum (R 48 000, S/N>150) in combination with high precision light curves shows an improvement in the precision of the stellar parameters of 60% in Teff, 75% in FeH, 82% in mstar, and 73% in rstar, which translates into a 64% improvement in the precision of rpl, and more than 2% on mpl, relative to the discovery paper's values.

  16. Understanding Transitions Toward Sustainable Urban Water Management: Miami, Las Vegas, Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Manago, K. F.; Treuer, G.; Deslatte, A.; Koebele, E.; Ernst, K.

    2016-12-01

    Cities in the United States face numerous threats to their long-term water supplies including preserving ecosystems, competing uses, and climate change. Yet, it is unclear why only some cities have transitioned toward more sustainable water management. These transitions include strategies such as water conservation, water supply portfolio diversification, long-term planning, and integrated resource management. While the circumstances that motivate or moderate transition may vary greatly across cities' physical and institutional contexts, identifying common factors associated with transition can help resource managers capitalize on windows of opportunity for change. To begin the process of identifying such factors, we ask two questions: 1) what combinations of conditions are associated with water management transitions?, and 2) what are the outcomes of these transitions? We examine three cases of utility-level water management in Miami, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles to create data-driven narratives detailing each city's transition. These narratives systematically synthesize multiple data sources to enable cross-case comparison and provide insights into how and why cities transition. Using the foundational concepts from the exposure-based theory of urban change, we focus our analysis on three broad categories of variables that influence urban water management transition: biophysical, political, and regulatory exposures. First, we compare these factors across time and across cities using metrics that standardize diverse data sources. Next, we incorporate qualitative factors that capture a city's unique conditions by integrating these metrics with salient contextual information. Then, through cross-city comparison, we identify factors associated with transition.

  17. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  18. Nonuniversal scaling of the magnetocaloric effect as an insight into spin-lattice interactions in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anders; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Bez, Henrique N.; Bahl, Christian R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We measure the magnetocaloric effect of the manganite series La0.67Ca0.33 -xSrxMnO3 by determining the isothermal entropy change upon magnetization, using variable-field calorimetry. The results demonstrate that the field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to the critical temperature is not given uniquely by the critical exponents of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition, i.e., the scaling is nonuniversal. A theoretical description based on the Bean-Rodbell model and taking into account compositional inhomogeneities is shown to be able to account for the observed field dependence. In this way the determination of the nonuniversal field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to a phase transition can be used as a method to gain insight into the strength of the spin-lattice interactions of magnetic materials. The approach is shown also to be applicable to first-order transitions.

  19. Insight Is Not in the Problem: Investigating Insight in Problem Solving across Task Types

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Margaret E.; Little, Daniel R.; Cropper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    The feeling of insight in problem solving is typically associated with the sudden realization of a solution that appears obviously correct (Kounios et al., 2006). Salvi et al. (2016) found that a solution accompanied with sudden insight is more likely to be correct than a problem solved through conscious and incremental steps. However, Metcalfe (1986) indicated that participants would often present an inelegant but plausible (wrong) answer as correct with a high feeling of warmth (a subjective measure of closeness to solution). This discrepancy may be due to the use of different tasks or due to different methods in the measurement of insight (i.e., using a binary vs. continuous scale). In three experiments, we investigated both findings, using many different problem tasks (e.g., Compound Remote Associates, so-called classic insight problems, and non-insight problems). Participants rated insight-related affect (feelings of Aha-experience, confidence, surprise, impasse, and pleasure) on continuous scales. As expected we found that, for problems designed to elicit insight, correct solutions elicited higher proportions of reported insight in the solution compared to non-insight solutions; further, correct solutions elicited stronger feelings of insight compared to incorrect solutions. PMID:27725805

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: Mediator of vertebrate life stage transitions?

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yugo; Grommen, Sylvia V H; De Groef, Bert

    2016-03-01

    Hormones, particularly thyroid hormones and corticosteroids, play critical roles in vertebrate life stage transitions such as amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in precocial birds, and smoltification in salmonids. Since they synergistically regulate several metabolic and developmental processes that accompany vertebrate life stage transitions, the existence of extensive cross-communication between the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes is not surprising. Synergies of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones are based on effects at the level of tissue hormone sensitivity and gene regulation. In addition, in representative nonmammalian vertebrates, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates hypophyseal thyrotropin secretion, and thus functions as a common regulator of both the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes to release corticosteroids and thyroid hormones. The dual function of CRH has been speculated to control or affect the timing of vertebrate life history transitions across taxa. After a brief overview of recent insights in the molecular mechanisms behind the synergic actions of thyroid hormones and corticosteroids during life stage transitions, this review examines the evidence for a possible role of CRH in controlling vertebrate life stage transitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.