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Sample records for rotating nuclei studied

  1. Dynamics of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcias, F.; de La Mota, V.; Remaud, B.; Royer, G.; Sébille, F.

    1991-02-01

    The deexcitation of hot rotating nuclei is studied within a microscopic semiclassical transport formalism. This framework allows the study of the competition between the fission and evaporation channels of deexcitation, including the mean-field and two-body interactions, without shape constraint for the fission channel. As a function of initial angular momenta and excitation energies, the transitions between three regimes is analyzed [particle evaporation, binary (ternary) fussion and multifragmentation], which correspond to well-defined symmetry breakings in the inertia tensor of the system. The competition between evaporation and binary fission is studied, showing the progressive disappearance of the fission process with increasing excitation energies, up to a critical point where nuclei pass directly from evaporation to multifragmentation channels.

  2. A high-speed target-rotation system (taro) for the study of short-lived nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatake, H.; Hama, H.; Kamiya, T.; Yoshii, M.; Shinozuka, T.; Fujioka, M.

    1986-05-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high-speed target-rotation system for the study of nuclei far from stability, by which targets can be transported to the detector position in 60 ms after irradiation (90° rotation). The rotor movement and the cyclotron beam pulsing, as well as the data acquisition, are controlled by a microcomputer. Using this device 54Co (T {1}/{2} = 193 ms) and 58Cu (T {1}/{2} = 3.2 s) were observed in a test experiment with a transport efficiency of 71 and 98%, respectively (180° rotation).

  3. Velocity distributions for fast rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Zhang, X.; Zhuo, Y.; Feng, R.

    1982-01-01

    The velocity field is calculated on the basis of the exact wave functions of the cranked deformed harmonic oscillator by including the term of ..delta..N = 2 subject to the conditions of isotropic velocity distribution and self-consistency between potential and density distribution. We study the characteristics of velocity distributions of nuclei with the large rotational frequencies. We also discuss the effects of two types of self-consistency conditions on the velocity distributions.

  4. Compound And Rotational Damping In Warm Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Grassi, C.; Million, B.; Paleni, A.; Pignanelli, M.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Matsuo, M.; Doessing, T.; Herskind, B.; Hagemann, G.B.; Wilson, J.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; LoBianco, G.; Petrache, C.M.

    2005-04-05

    The {gamma}-decay from excited nuclei is used to study the interplay between rotational motion and compound nucleus formation in deformed nuclei. A new analysis technique is presented which allows for the first time to directly measure the rotational and compound damping widths {gamma}rot and {gamma}{mu} from {gamma}-coincidence spectra. The method is first tested on simulated spectra and then applied to high-statistics EUROBALL data on the nucleus 163Er. Experimental values of {approx_equal}200 and 20 keV are obtained for {gamma}rot and {gamma}{mu}, respectively, in the spin region I {approx_equal} 30-40 ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), in good agreement with microscopic cranked shell model calculations for the specific nucleus. A dependence of rotational damping on the K-quantum number of the nuclear states is also observed, both in experiment and theory, resulting in a {approx_equal}30% reduction of {gamma}rot for high-K states. This points to a delayed onset of rotational damping in high-K configurations.

  5. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, K.; Dossing, T.

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface and volume delta two-body forces, the authors discuss the onset of rotational damping in normal- and super-deformed nuclei. Calculation for a typical normal deformed nucleus {sup 168}Yb indicates that the rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and about 30 rotational bands of various length exists at a given rotational frequency, in overall agreement with experimental findings. It is predicted that the onset of rotational damping changes significantly in different superdeformed nuclei due to the variety of the shell gaps and single-particle orbits associated with the superdeformed mean-field.

  6. Onset of rotational damping in superdeformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsuo, M.

    1997-02-01

    We discuss damping of the collective rotational motion in A ˜ 150 superdeformed nuclei by means of a shell-model combining the cranked Nilsson mean field and the surface and volume delta two-body residual forces. It is shown that, because of the shell structure associated with the superdeformed mean field, onset energy of the rotational damping becomes Ex ˜ 1.5-3 MeV above the yrast line, with significant variation for different neutron and proton numbers. The mechanism of the shell structure effect is investigated through detailed analysis of level densities in superdeformed nuclei. The variation in onset of damping is associated with variation in the single-particle structure at the Fermi surface.

  7. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.; Yoshida, K.

    1997-04-01

    In order to provide a microscopic description of levels and E2 transitions in rapidly rotating nuclei with internal excitation energy up to a few MeV, use is made of a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface delta two-body force. The damping of collective rotational motion is investigated in the case of a typical rare-earth nucleus, namely 168Yb. It is found that rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and the number of levels which form rotational band structures is thus limited. We predict at a given rotational frequency the existence of about 30 rotational bands of various lengths, in overall agreement with the experimental findings. The onset of the rotational damping proceeds quite gradually as a function of the internal excitation energy. The transition region extends up to around 2 MeV above yrast and it is characterized by the presence of scars of discrete rotational bands which extend over few spin values and stand out among the damped transitions, and by a two-component profile in the Eγ- Eγ correlation. The important role played by the high-multipole components of the two-body residual interaction is emphasized.

  8. Rotational spacings in superdeformed bands of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Farhan, A.

    1995-08-01

    An unexpected result of the experimental investigation of superdeformed rotational bands is the observation of near-identical dynamic moments of inertia in different nuclei. This phenomenon was also noted in normally deformed rotational bands. A priori, the BCS method is suspect at I = 0 for the treatment of superdeformed nuclear shapes because the single-particle level density near the nuclear surface is small. If it were large, there would be no superdeformed minimum. At high spin, pairing correlations are further weakened, and the BCS method becomes even worse.

  9. A Study of the Jacobi Shape Transition in Light, Fast Rotating Nuclei with the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Brekiesz, M.; Grebosz, J.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Zuber, K.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Million, B.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Pignanelli, M.; Wieland, O.; Airoldi, A.; Herskind, B.; Bednarczyk, P.

    2004-02-27

    The high-energy and discrete {gamma}-ray spectra, as well as the charged particle angular distribution have been measured in the reaction 105 MeV 18O+28Si using the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES arrays in order to investigate the predicted Jacobi shape transition in light nuclei. A comparison of the GDR line shape data with the predictions of the thermal shape fluctuation model, based on the most recent rotating liquid drop LSD calculations, shows evidence for such Jacobi shape transition in hot, rapidly rotating 46Ti. The found narrow low-energy component in the GDR line shape is interpreted as the consequence both of the elongated shape and of the Coriolis effect.

  10. Hopf bifurcation in rapidly rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, G.; Dankova, T.

    1995-04-01

    Bifurcation to triaxial shapes is investigated as a function of the nuclear fissility, angular momentum, and circulation. The Kelvin circulation determines the character of the rotation in the continuum from rigid body rotation to irrotational droplet flow. The bifurcation point for a given fissility depends sensitively upon the ratio of the circulation to the angular momentum, and, hence, its identification is an experimental signature of rotational dynamics. Hopf bifurcation to stable periodic orbits is investigated. The potential for a rapidly rotating nucleus is modeled in this study by the sum of repulsive Coulomb and attractive surface energies.

  11. Rotation of warm nuclei and superdeformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, S.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) has played a leading role in the development of nuclear spectroscopy at high spin and more particularly the study of rotational motion. Indeed, it laid the theoretical foundation stone and contributed to the birth of the workhorse of the field: the Compton-suppressed Ge array. In this article, we will focus, with special emphasis on the contribution of the NBI, on the properties of rotational motion at high excitation energy and on chaotic phenomena associated with nuclear superdeformation.

  12. How do nuclei really vibrate or rotate

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, H.G.; Kunz, J.; Mosel, U.; Mueller, M.; Schuh, A.; Wust, U.

    1983-01-01

    By means of the adiabatic cranking model the properties of the current and velocity fields of nuclear quadrupole vibrations for even-even nuclei in the rare-earth region are investigated. BCS correlated wave functions based on the Nilsson single particle Hamiltonian have been used. The current fields are analyzed in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The realistic microscopic currents show a vortex structure not present in the classical irrotational flow. The microscopic origin of the vortex structure is investigated.

  13. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  14. Order-to-chaos transition in rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Clark, R.M.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.

    2004-05-13

    The authors have studied the narrow (valley-ridge) structure in the {gamma}-ray spectrum following a heavy-ion fusion reaction that produces several ytterbium nuclei. The intensity of this structure can be quantitatively related to the average chaotic behavior in these nuclei and they have traced this behavior from nearly fully ordered to nearly fully chaotic.

  15. Current analysis for rotating and vibrating heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, J.; Schuh, A.; Mosel, U.; Wuest, E.

    Microscopic current distributions are calculated for rotations and quadrupole vibrations of heavy nuclei in the cranking model using the Nilsson Hamiltonian and pairing correlations. The currents are analyzed in terms of vector spherical harmonics; symmetry relations are taken into account. In the case of collective rotations magnetic and electric current contributions occur. The two dominant contributions correspond to rigid and irrotational flow. The strong influence of pairing on the rotational currents is demonstrated. It can be understood by investigating the delta N = 0 and delta N = 2 contributions to the currents. For collective quadrupole vibrations only electric current contributions occur. In contrast to the irrotational Bohr-Tassie flow the realistic current fields show a vortex structure.

  16. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson–Nambu–Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  17. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson-Nambu-Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  18. Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.T. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic- angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-{1/2} nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

  19. Rotation and wobbling motion in triaxially deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K. )

    1992-06-01

    A quantum mechanical method of rotation and wobbling motion in triaxially deformed nuclei is represented within the framework of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. For such systems, the intrinsic frame is defined by imposing constraints of principal-axis frame. With aid of the canonical formulation of the constrained system, the Dirac quantization of the classical system is performed. It is shown that the commutation relations of angular momentum in the intrinsic frame then exactly satisfy the body-fixed frame. Furthermore, a method of describing large amplitude collective motion in the constrained system is proposed by extending the self-consistent collective-coordinate method.

  20. Competition in rotation-alignment between high-j neutrons and protons in transfermium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khudair, Falih; Long Guilu; Sun Yang

    2009-03-15

    The study of rotation-alignment of quasiparticles probes sensitively the properties of high-j intruder orbits. The distribution of very-high-j orbits, which are consequences of the fundamental spin-orbit interaction, links with the important question of single-particle levels in superheavy nuclei. With the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential, we perform Projected Shell Model calculations for transfermium nuclei where detailed spectroscopy experiments are currently possible. Specifically, we study the systematical behavior of rotation-alignment and associated band-crossing phenomenon in Cf, Fm, and No isotopes. Neutrons and protons from the high-j orbits are found to compete strongly in rotation-alignment, which gives rise to testable effects. Observation of these effects will provide direct information on the single-particle states in the heaviest nuclear mass region.

  1. Pairing and rotational properties of actinides and superheavy nuclei in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abdurazakov, O.

    2013-07-01

    The cranked relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory has been applied for a systematic study of pairing and rotational properties of actinides and light superheavy nuclei. Pairing correlations are taken into account by the Brink-Booker part of finite-range Gogny D1S force. For the first time, in the covariant density functional theory (CDFT) framework, the pairing properties of deformed nuclei are studied via the quantities (such as three-point Δ(3) indicators) related to odd-even mass staggerings. The investigation of the moments of inertia at low spin and the Δ(3) indicators shows the need for an attenuation of the strength of the Brink-Booker part of the Gogny D1S force in pairing channel. The investigation of rotational properties of even-even and odd-mass nuclei at normal deformation, performed in the density functional theory framework in such a systematic way for the first time, reveals that in the majority of the cases the experimental data are well described. These include the evolution of the moments of inertia with spin, band crossings in the A≥242 nuclei, the impact of the particle in specific orbital on the moments of inertia in odd-mass nuclei. The analysis of the discrepancies between theory and experiment in the band crossing region of A≤240 nuclei suggests the stabilization of octupole deformation at high spin, not included in the present calculations. The evolution of pairing with deformation, which is important for the fission barriers, has been investigated via the analysis of the moments of inertia in the superdeformed minimum. The dependence of the results on the CDFT parametrization has been studied by comparing the results of the calculations obtained with the NL1 and NL3* parametrizations.

  2. Nuclei at extreme conditions. A relativistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, Anatoli

    2014-11-14

    The major goals of the current project were further development of covariant density functional theory (CDFT), better understanding of its features, its application to different nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics phenomena and training of graduate and undergraduate students. The investigations have proceeded in a number of directions which are discussed in detail in the part “Accomplishments” of this report. We have studied the role of isovector and isoscalar proton-neutron pairings in rotating nuclei; based on available experimental data it was concluded that there are no evidences for the existence of isoscalar proton-neutron pairing. Generalized theoretical approach has been developed for pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crust of neutron stars and interior of white dwarfs. Using this approach, extensive database for considerable number of pycnonuclear reactions involving stable and neutron-rich light nuclei has been created; it can be used in future for the study of various nuclear burning phenomena in different environments. Time-odd mean fields and their manifestations in terminating states, non-rotating and rotating nuclei have been studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory. Contrary to non-relativistic density functional theories these fields, which are important for a proper description of nuclear systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, are uniquely defined in the CDFT framework. Hyperdeformed nuclear shapes (with semi-axis ratio 2.5:1 and larger) have been studied in the Z = 40-58 part of nuclear chart. We strongly believe that such shapes could be studied experimentally in the future with full scale GRETA detector.

  3. Study of strange nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-12-08

    A brief history of the discovery of hypernuclei is given and some recent hypernuclei studies are described. Topics include the study of p-shell hypernuclei, /sup 12/C (K/sup -/, ..pi../sup -/) experiment, and hypernuclear gamma rays. 13 references. (WHK)

  4. Rotational behavior of comet nuclei under gravitational perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberti, Pascal; Bois, E.; Froeschle, Claude

    1992-01-01

    A dynamical qualitative study of the rotational motion for cometary-type bodies submitted to gravitational perturbations has been performed by numerical simulations, including the Sun and Jupiter's disturbing torques in the model. Results show small gravitational disturbing effects from the Sun on Halley-type orbits, as well as from Jupiter on most close-approach configurations. Only a very close-approach induces notable effects, presenting then some interesting sensitivity to initial conditions.

  5. Broad-line active galactic nuclei rotate faster than narrow-line ones.

    PubMed

    Kollatschny, Wolfram; Zetzl, Matthias

    2011-02-17

    The super-massive black holes of 10(6)M(⊙) to 10(9)M(⊙) that reside in the nuclei of active galaxies (AGN) are surrounded by a region emitting broad lines, probably associated with an accretion disk. The diameters of the broad-line regions range from a few light-days to more than a hundred light-days, and cannot be resolved spatially. The relative significance of inflow, outflow, rotational or turbulent motions in the broad-line regions as well as their structure (spherical, thin or thick accretion disk) are unknown despite intensive studies over more than thirty years. Here we report a fundamental relation between the observed emission linewidth full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the emission line shape FWHM/σ(line) in AGN spectra. From this relation we infer that the predominant motion in the broad-line regions is Keplerian rotation in combination with turbulence. The geometry of the inner region varies systematically with the rotation velocity: it is flattest for the fast-rotating broad-line objects, whereas slow-rotating narrow-line AGN have a more spherical structure. Superimposed is the trend that the line-emitting region becomes geometrically thicker towards the centre within individual galaxies. Knowing the rotational velocities, we can derive the central black-hole masses more accurately; they are two to ten times smaller than has been estimated previously.

  6. Transition from collective to noncollective rotation at high spin in N approx. = 87 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1982-01-01

    The systematics of the (E2) ..gamma.. ray transition energies and the available lifetime data are used to characterize the excitation modes of the light rare-earth nuclei (N greater than or equal to 82) at different spins. The results, which include our recently obtained data on /sup 149/Gd, /sup 154/Ho, /sup 155/Er, /sup 157/Yb and /sup 158/Yb nuclei, indicate that, at low spins, the nuclear excitation mode (shapes) change from single-particle excitations (weakly oblate) in N less than or equal to 85 nuclei to quasi-vibrational (soft triaxial) in N = 86, weakly rotational (prolate) in N = 87, and rotational (prolate) in the N greater than or equal to 88 systems. At higher angular momenta, all these nuclei show a general tendency to traverse the (epsilon,..gamma..) plane towards the oblate axis, and to eventually adopt the aligned coupling mode of excitation.

  7. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  8. Pair truncation for rotational nuclei: j =(17/2 model

    SciTech Connect

    Halse, P.; Jaqua, L.; Barrett, B.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The suitability of the pair condensate approach for rotational states is studied in a single {ital j}=17/2 shell of identical nucleons interacting through a quadrupole-quadrupole Hamiltonian. The ground band and a {ital K}=2 excited band are both studied in detail. A direct comparison of the exact states with those constituting the {ital SD} and {ital SDG} subspaces is used to identify the important degrees of freedom for these levels. The range of pairs necessary for a good description is found to be highly state dependent; {ital S} and {ital D} pairs are the major constituents of the low-spin ground-band levels, while {ital G} pairs are needed for those in the {gamma} band. Energy spectra are obtained for each truncated subspace. {ital SDG} pairs allow accurate reproduction of the binding energy and {ital K}=2 excitation energy, but still give a moment of inertia which is about 30% too small even for the lowest levels.

  9. Octupole shaps in nuclei, and some rotational consequences thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.; Olanders, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Dudek, J.; Leander, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a large number of experimental papers presenting spectroscopic evidence for collective dipole and octupole deformations have appeared. Many theoretical attempts have been made to explain the observed spectroscopic properties in terms of stable octupole deformations. The coupling by the octupole potential, being proportional to Y/sub 30/, is strongest for those subshells for which ..delta..1 = 3. Therefore the tendency towards octupole deformation occurs just beyond closed shells where the high-j intruder subshells (N,1,j) lie very close to the normal parity subshells (N-1,1-3,j-3), i.e. for the particle numbers 34 (g/sub 9/2/-p/sub 3/2/), 56 (h/sub 11/2/-d/sub 5/2/). 9C (i/sub 13/2/-f/sub 7/2/) and 134 (j/sub 15/2/-g/sub 9/2/). Empirically, it is specifically for the particle numbers listed above that negative parity states are observed at relatively low energies in doubly even nuclei. From the different combinations of octupole-driving particle numbers four regions of likely candidates for octupole deformed equilibrium shapes emerge, namely the neutron-deficient nuclei with Z approx. = 90, N approx. = 134 (light actinides) and Z approx. = 34, N approx. = 34 (A approx. = 70) and the neutron-rich nuclei with Z approx. = 56, N approx. = 90 (heavy Ba) and Z approx. = 34, N/sup 56/ (A approx. = 90). In our calculations we searched for octupole unstable nuclei in these four mass regions. The Strutinsky method with the deformed Woods-Saxon potential was employed. The macroscopic part consists of a finite-range liquid drop energy, where both the surface and Coulomb terms contain a diffuseness correction.

  10. Barrier penetration and rotational damping of thermally excited superdeformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.

    2001-12-01

    We construct a microscopic model of thermally excited superdeformed states that describes both the barrier penetration mechanism, leading to the decay-out transitions to normal deformed states, and the rotational damping causing fragmentation of rotational E2 transitions. We describe the barrier penetration by means of a tunneling path in the two-dimensional deformation energy surface, which is calculated with the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model. The individual excited superdeformed states and associated E2 transition strengths are calculated by the shell-model diagonalization of the many-particle-many-hole excitations interacting with the delta-type residual two-body force. The effects of the decay-out on the excited superdeformed states are discussed in detail for 152Dy, 143Eu and 192Hg. The model predicts that the decay-out brings about a characteristic decrease in the effective number of excited superdeformed rotational bands.

  11. Joint Evolution of Spinning Supermassive Black Holes and Rotating Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Vasiliev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A rotating supermassive black hole (SBH) interacts with stars in a galactic nucleus via torques due to dragging of inertial frames. If the stars orbit preferentially about an axis that is misaligned with the SBH's spin, the SBH will experience a net torque and its spin vector will precess; individual stellar orbits also precess about the instantaneous SBH spin vector, although at different rates depending on their orbital elements. Solution of the coupled, post-Newtonian equations describing this interaction reveals two evolutionary modes: sustained precession of the SBH; and damped precession, leading to alignment of the SBH spin with the nuclear angular momentum. Beyond a certain radius, stars interact gravitationally with each other in a time shorter than the Lense-Thirring time. Long-term evolution in this case is well described as uniform precession of the SBH about the cluster's rotational axis, with a stochastic contribution due to star-star interactions.

  12. Exact diagonalization of the Bohr Hamiltonian for rotational nuclei: Dynamical {gamma} softness and triaxiality

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, M. A.

    2011-06-15

    Detailed quantitative predictions are obtained for phonon and multiphonon excitations in well-deformed rotor nuclei within the geometric framework, by exact numerical diagonalization of the Bohr Hamiltonian in an SO(5) basis. Dynamical {gamma} deformation is found to significantly influence the predictions through its coupling to the rotational motion. Basic signatures for the onset of rigid triaxial deformation are also obtained.

  13. Properties of rotational bands at the spin limit in A {approximately} 50, A {approximately} 65 and A {approximately} 110 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, V.P.; Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    There is now widespread evidence for the smooth termination of rotational bands in A {approx_equal} 110 nuclei at spins of 40-to-50{Dirac_h}s. The characteristics of these bands are compared to those of bands recently observed to high spin in {sup 64}Zn and {sup 48}Cr, studied with the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer coupled to the Chalk River miniball charged-particle-detector array.

  14. The fate of ultrahigh energy nuclei in the immediate environment of young fast-rotating pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Kotera, Kumiko; Amato, Elena; Blasi, Pasquale E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2015-08-01

    Young, fast-rotating neutron stars are promising candidate sources for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The interest in this model has recently been boosted by the latest chemical composition measurements of cosmic rays, that seem to show the presence of a heavy nuclear component at the highest energies. Neutrons stars, with their metal-rich surfaces, are potentially interesting sources of such nuclei, but some open issues remain: 1) is it possible to extract these nuclei from the star's surface? 2) Do the nuclei survive the severe conditions present in the magnetosphere of the neutron star? 3) What happens to the surviving nuclei once they enter the wind that is launched outside the light cylinder? In this paper we address these issues in a quantitative way, proving that for the most reasonable range of neutron star surface temperatures (T<10{sup 7} K), a large fraction of heavy nuclei survive photo-disintegration losses. These processes, together with curvature losses and acceleration in the star's electric potential, lead to injection of nuclei with a chemical composition that is mixed, even if only iron is extracted from the surface. We show that under certain conditions the chemical composition injected into the wind region is compatible with that required in previous work based on purely phenomenological arguments (typically ∼50% protons, ∼30% CNO and ∼20% Fe), and provides a reasonable explanation of the mass abundance inferred from ultra high energy data.

  15. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important

  16. Fission barriers of hot rotating nuclei: Theoretical predictions and experimental tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M.G.

    1987-07-07

    Recent theoretical developments in calculating fission barriers of hot rotating nuclei and their experimental tests are reviewed. The discussions are limited to macroscopic fission models (no shell effects), since experimental tests come primarily from heavy-ion induced reactions involving large angular momenta and internal excitation energies. The physics of the rotating finite range models with temperature is emphasized and the predictions of our model are compared with those of other macroscopic models and with statistically deduced experimental results. The difficulties associated with the statistical model analysis at high temperatures are discussed. 43 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Rotation Rates and Spin Changes of Jupiter Family Comet Nuclei: New optical lightcurves and an update on the population properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Green, Simon F.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we revise the physical characteristics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) by expanding the sample of nuclei with known rotational and shape properties.The study provides a review of the properties of all JFCs with known rotation rates derived from optical, radar or spacecraft measurements. This sample is complemented by newly obtained lightcurves of eight comets which are used to improve the precision of some known spin rates as well as to add new objects to the sample. We derive the new lightcurves from archival data partially taken within the framework of the Survey of Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei (SEPPCoN) and from devoted phase function observing campaigns. The lightcurves are produced with a specially-developed pipeline which enables data from various instruments at different epochs and geometries to be analyzed together. All lightcurves are absolutely calibrated using PanSTARRs photometric standards. Combining photometric measurements from different epochs allows us to achieve high precision in the period determinations and to constrain the phase functions of the comets. For three of the comets - 8P/Tuttle, 110P/Hartley 3 and 162P/Siding Spring - we obtain well-sampled phase functions which we compare to these of other well-studied JFCs.The newly added data provide us with a better-constrained sample which we use to compare JFC characteristics with the rotation rates, shapes and surface properties of other small-body populations.A special focus is put on the handful of JFCs which are known to demonstrate spin changes on orbital timescales. We are expanding this sample by adding new lightcurves derived from archival data as well as from our targeted survey using 2-4m telescopes. The rotational changes are obtained by comparison of the comets' current spin rates to those from previous apparitions. Using the new extended sample, we study the relation between the measured period changes and the physical properties of the nuclei.

  18. Systematics of Giant Electric Dipole Resonances in Hot, Rotating Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, Katherine; Schiller, Andreas; Thoennessen, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The dependence of hot Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) widths on spin, temperature, and mass is an exciting field of study. In 2001, Kusnezov et al. [1] developed a scaling law to predict the width as a function of these parameters. The law is a reliable description of their data set. Recently, Schiller and Thoennessen [2] prepared a compilation of GDR parameters built on excited states. The scaling law is tested over this larger data set, about five times the number of entries utilized by Kusnezov. Beyond a more detailed study of the dependence of the width on temperature and spin, the compiled data can be broken into subsets with common characteristics. By analyzing subsets of the data, we hope to gain a clearer understanding of the influence of shell effects, deformation, and gating conditions on the GDR width.[0mm] [1] D. Kusnezov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81,42 (1998).[0mm] [2] A. Schiller and M. Thoennessen, nucl-ex/0605004.

  19. Static and Statistical Properties of Hot Rotating Nuclei in a Macroscopic Temperature-Dependent Finite-Range Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D.

    2005-09-01

    A macroscopic temperature-dependent model that takes into account nuclear forces of finite range is used to calculate the static and statistical properties of hot rotating compound nuclei. The level-density parameter is approximated by an expression of the leptodermous type. The resulting expansion coefficients are in good agreement with their counterparts proposed previously by A.V. Ignatyuk and his colleagues. The effect of taking simultaneously into account the temperature of a nucleus and its angular momentum on the quantities under study, such as the heights and positions of fission barriers and the effective moments of inertia of nuclei at the barrier, is considered, and the importance of doing this is demonstrated. The fissility parameter (Z{sup 2}/A){sub crit} and the position of the Businaro-Gallone point are studied versus temperature. It is found that, with increasing temperature, both parameters are shifted to the region of lighter nuclei. It is shown that the inclusion of temperature leads to qualitatively the same effects as the inclusion of the angular momentum of a nucleus, but, quantitatively, thermal excitation leads to smaller effects than rotational excitation.

  20. A microscopic derivation of nuclear collective rotation-vibration model and its application to nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulshani, P.

    2016-07-01

    We derive a microscopic version of the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for collective rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude. The nuclear Schrodinger equation is canonically transformed to collective co-ordinates, which is then linearized using a constrained variational method. The associated constraints are imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for excitation energy, cut-off angular momentum, and other nuclear properties for the ground-state rotational band in some deformed nuclei. The results are compared with measured data.

  1. Effects of pairing correlations on the inverse level density parameter of hot rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Quynh Huong, Le; Quang Hung, Nguyen; Thi Quynh Trang, Le

    2016-06-01

    Angular momentum dependence of the inverse level density parameter K in the excitation-energy region of ˜ 30 - 40 MeV is studied within the finite-temperature Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (FTBCS) theory and the FTBCS theory that includes the effect due to quasiparticle-number fluctuations (FTBCS1). The two theories take into account the noncollective rotation of the nucleus at nonzero values of z-projection M of the total angular momentum. The comparison between the results obtained within the FTBCS and FTBCS1 as well as the case without pairing correlations and the experimental data for two medium-mass even-even nuclei 108Cd and 122Te shows that by including the pairing corrections the FTBCS and FTBCS1 reproduces quite well all the experimental data, whereas the non-pairing case always overestimates the data. Due to the effect of quasiparticle-number fluctuations, the FTBCS1 gaps at different M values do not collapse at critical temperature TC as in the FTBCS ones but monotonously decrease with increasing T and being finite even at high T. As the result, the values of K obtained within the FTBCS1 are always closer to the experimental data than those obtained within the FTBCS.

  2. A primer on rotational collective enhancements in even-even nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2004-07-15

    The enhancement of the level density for deformed nuclei relative to the level density in spherical nuclei is calculated. The qualitative behavior of the enhancement factor as a function of excitation energy is explained, and a prescription for a more quantitative description of this behavior is suggested. The results presented here can be found elsewhere in the literature, however the treatments of this topic are dispersed in the literature, are often terse, and require some familiarity with disparate branches of physics. The emphasis of this paper is on step-by-step derivations of the physics and mathematics used in the calculation of level densities and rotational enhancement factors. Pertinent techniques from thermodynamics and group theory are introduced. Appendices provide detailed introductions to the principal mathematical tools.

  3. Systematics of Rotational Bands in Odd-Mass Nuclei on the Basis of the Variable Moment of Inertia Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mitropolsky, I.

    2005-05-24

    On the grounds of a file of the evaluated nuclear data ENSDF, the most complete compilation of rotational bands in odd-A nuclei with mass numbers 43{<=}A{<=}253 is presented. The processing of experimental data has been carried out on the basis of generalization of the variable moment of inertia model for axial strong deformed nuclei, which is taking into account the decoupling effect for bands with K=1/2. The good description of rotational energies for the majority of rotational bands is obtained and the systematic behavior of the model parameters in all areas of the deformed nuclei is shown. The theoretical description was used for association of fragments of rotational bands, exclusion of 'superfluous' levels and prediction of a placement of 'missed' levels.

  4. Theoretical study of the nuclear spin-molecular rotation coupling for relativistic electrons and non-relativistic nuclei. II. Quantitative results in HX (X = H,F,Cl,Br,I) compounds.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gómez, Sergio S; Melo, Juan I; Giribet, Claudia C; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, numerical results of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) tensor in the series of compounds HX (X = H,F,Cl,Br,I) within relativistic 4-component expressions obtained by Aucar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 204119 (2012)] are presented. The SR tensors of both the H and X nuclei are discussed. Calculations were carried out within the relativistic Linear Response formalism at the Random Phase Approximation with the DIRAC program. For the halogen nucleus X, correlation effects on the non-relativistic values are shown to be of similar magnitude and opposite sign to relativistic effects. For the light H nucleus, by means of the linear response within the elimination of the small component approach it is shown that the whole relativistic effect is given by the spin-orbit operator combined with the Fermi contact operator. Comparison of "best estimate" calculated values with experimental results yield differences smaller than 2%-3% in all cases. The validity of "Flygare's relation" linking the SR tensor and the NMR nuclear magnetic shielding tensor in the present series of compounds is analyzed.

  5. Projected Shell Model Study of Yrast States of Neutron-Deficient Odd-Mass Pr Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanes, A.; Ortiz, Mark E; Velazquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A = 130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the 125,127,129,131,133Pr isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J (2), kinetic moment of inertia J (1), the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  6. Projected shell model study of yrast states of neutron-deficient odd-mass Pr nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez-Sandoval, A.; Ortiz, M. E.; Velazquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-03-15

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A=130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the {sup 125,127,129,131,133}Pr isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J{sup (2)}, kinetic moment of inertia J{sup (1)}, the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  7. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  8. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  9. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  10. Level statistics of near-yrast states in rapidly rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Vigezzi, E.; Åberg, S.

    1997-02-01

    The nearest neighbour level spacing distribution and the Δ3 statistic of level fluctuations associated with very high spin states ( I ≳ 30) in rare-earth deformed nuclei are analysed by means of a cranked shell model. The many particle-many hole configurations created in the rotating Nilsson potential are mixed by the surface-delta two-body residual interaction. The levels in the near-yrast region show a Poisson-like level spacing distribution. As the intrinsic excitation energy U increases, the level statistics shows a gradual transition from order to chaos, reaching at U ≳ 2 MeV the Wigner distribution typical-of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. This transition is caused by the residual two-body interaction. On the other hand, the level spacings between the yrast and the first excited state show a peculiar behaviour, displaying a Wigner-like distribution instead of the Poisson-like distribution seen for the other near-yrast rotational states. The lowest spacings reflect the properties of the single-particle orbits in the mean-field, and are only weakly affected by the residual two-body interaction.

  11. Violation and persistence of the K-quantum number in warm rotating nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M.; Døssing, T.; Bracco, A.; Hagemann, G. B.; Herskind, B.; Leoni, S.; Vigezzi, E.

    2004-05-01

    The validity of the K-quantum number in rapidly rotating warm nuclei is investigated as a function of thermal excitation energy U and angular momentum I, for the rare-earth nucleus 163Er. The quantal eigenstates are described with a shell model which combines a cranked Nilsson mean-field and a residual two-body interaction, together with a term which takes into account the angular momentum carried by the K-quantum number in an approximate way. K-mixing is produced by the interplay of the Coriolis interaction and the residual interaction; it is weak in the region of the discrete rotational bands ( U≲1 MeV), but it gradually increases until the limit of complete violation of the K-quantum number is approached around U˜2-2.5 MeV. The calculated matrix elements between bands having different K-quantum numbers decrease exponentially as a function of Δ K, in qualitative agreement with recent data.

  12. Rotational-vibrational Description of Nucleon Scattering on Actinide Nuclei Using a Dispersive Coupled-channel Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, J. M.; Capote, R.; Soukhovitskiı˜, E. Sh.; Chiba, S.

    2014-04-01

    Tamura's coupling formalism has been extended to consider low-lying rotational bands built on vibrational (single-particle) band heads in well-deformed even-even (odd) actinides. These additional excitations are introduced as a perturbation to the underlying rigid rotor structure that is known to describe well the ground state rotational band of major actinides. Coupling matrix elements needed in extended Tamura's formalism are derived for both even-even and odd actinides. Employed dispersive optical model (DCCOMP) replaces the incident proton energy Ep (for proton induced reactions) by the equivalent Coulomb subtracted energy in all potential terms including both the imaginary and real potentials with the corresponding dispersive corrections. Therefore, the optical potential becomes fully symmetric for protons and neutrons. This potential is used to fit simultaneously all the available optical experimental databases (including neutron strength functions) for nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th (even even) nuclei. Quasi-elastic (p,n) scattering data to the isobaric analogue states of the target nuclei are also used to constrain the isovector part of the optical potential. Derived Lane-consistent DCCOMP is based on coupling of almost all levels below 1 MeV of excitation energy. The ground state, octupole, beta, gamma and non-axial rotational bands are considered for even nuclei, and rotational bands built on single-particle levels - for odd nuclei. Application of derived potential to odd targets based on a new coupling scheme is foreseen.

  13. Studies of active galactic nuclei with CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, A.; Böttcher, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we review the prospects for studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the envisioned future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). This review focuses on jetted AGN, which constitute the vast majority of AGN detected at gamma-ray energies. Future progress will be driven by the planned lower energy threshold for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray detections to ∼10 GeV and improved flux sensitivity compared to current-generation Cherenkov Telescope facilities. We argue that CTA will enable substantial progress on gamma-ray population studies by deepening existing surveys both through increased flux sensitivity and by improving the chances of detecting a larger number of low-frequency peaked blazars because of the lower energy threshold. More detailed studies of the VHE gamma-ray spectral shape and variability might furthermore yield insight into unsolved questions concerning jet formation and composition, the acceleration of particles within relativistic jets, and the microphysics of the radiation mechanisms leading to the observable high-energy emission. The broad energy range covered by CTA includes energies where gamma-rays are unaffected from absorption while propagating in the extragalactic background light (EBL), and extends to an energy regime where VHE spectra are strongly distorted. This will help to reduce systematic effects in the spectra from different instruments, leading to a more reliable EBL determination, and hence will make it possible to constrain blazar models up to the highest energies with less ambiguity.

  14. Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Oliver K.

    2013-08-20

    Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

  15. Jet Cooled Rotational Studies of Dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, M. Varela S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Rotational spectra of Gly-Pro and Pro-Gly dipeptides have been examined with laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy. Three conformers for Gly-Pro and one for Pro-Gly have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion by the comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N (I=1) nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with those predicted by ab initio methods. The quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved and it allows to experimentally characterize the main intramolecular forces which stabilize the assigned conformers. The biomimetic molecule Ac-Ala-NH_2 has been also studied. The C_7 and C_5 peptide conformations (intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded seven- or five-membered cycle, respectively) have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion. The ability to identify peptide conformations suggest that it soon may be possible to explore the structures of larger peptides using LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  16. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  17. Relation between the mass coefficients for rotational and {gamma}-vibrational modes in well-deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V. Shirikova, N. Yu. Sushkov, A. V.

    2013-05-15

    The ratio of the mass coefficients for the {gamma}-vibrational and rotational motion for the well-deformed axially symmetric nuclei is calculated basing on the Cranking model and the Random Phase Approximation. The results obtained show that the calculated ratio is equal to 2-3, i.e., significantly larger than unit. This is in a qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  19. Spectroastrometry of rotating gas disks for the detection of supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei. I. Method and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnerucci, A.; Marconi, A.; Capetti, A.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.

    2010-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we study the application of spectroastrometry in the context of gas kinematical studies aimed at measuring the mass of supermassive black holes. The spectroastrometrical method consists in measuring the photocenter of light emission in different wavelength or velocity channels. In particular we explore the potential of spectroastrometry of gas emission lines in galaxy nuclei to constrain the kinematics of rotating gas disks and to measure the mass of putative supermassive black holes. By means of detailed simulations and test cases, we show that the fundamental advantage of spectroastrometry is that it can provide information on the gravitational potential of a galaxy on scales significantly smaller (~1/10) than the limit imposed by the spatial resolution of the observations. We then describe a simple method to infer detailed kinematical informations from spectroastrometry in longslit spectra and to measure the mass of nuclear mass concentrations. Such method can be applied straightforwardly to integral field spectra, which do not have the complexities due to a partial spatial covering of the source in the case of longslit spectra.

  20. A microscopic study on shape transition and shape coexistence in superdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanthimathi, G.; Boomadevi, N.; Rajasekaran, T. R.

    2012-08-15

    Superdeformed nuclei at high-spin states in several mass regions are investigated within a microscopic approach using cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism to explore the equilibrium deformations in the ground state and their evolution with spin. Shape transition from normal deformed to superdeformed states with increasing spin is studied and a clear picture of shape coexistence is provided. Detailed information on spin, rotational energy, dynamical moment of inertia, and rotational frequency of superdeformed rotational bands is presented and the general features of superdeformed bands in certain mass regions are outlined. Rotational energy and dynamical moment of inertia are compared with available experimental data and the impact of temperature and pairing on superdeformed configuration are discussed.

  1. N = 151Pu ,Cm and Cf nuclei under rotational stress: Role of higher-order deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hota, S. S.; Chowdhury, P.; Khoo, T. L.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Qiu, Y.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Tandel, S. K.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Bertone, P. F.; Chiara, C. J.; Deo, A. Y.; D'Olympia, N.; Gros, S.; Guess, C. J.; Harrington, T.; Hartley, D. J.; Henning, G.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jackson, E. G.; Kondev, F. G.; Lakshmi, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Moran, K.; Nair, C.; Peterson, D.; Shirwadkar, U.; Stefanescu, I.

    2014-12-01

    Fast-rotating N = 151 isotones 245Pu, 247Cm and 249Cf have been studied through inelastic excitation and transfer reactions with radioactive targets. While all have a ground-state band built on a νj15/2 [ 734 ] 9 /2- Nilsson configuration, new excited bands have also been observed in each isotone. These odd-N excited bands allow a comparison of the alignment behavior for two different configurations, where the νj15/2 alignment is either blocked or allowed. The effect of higher order deformations is explored through cranking calculations, which help clarify the elusive nature of νj15/2 alignments.

  2. Reaction Studies with Exotic Nuclei in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Muenzenberg, Gottfried; Schrieder, Gerhard

    2000-12-31

    The first experiments to explore nuclear ground-state properties of exotic nuclei with heavy-ion storage rings have already proved the research potential of precision experiments with the new experimental technique. In this contribution the perspectives for reaction studies in storage rings with energetic exotic nuclei at internal targets and in a small electron -- heavy ion collider are addressed. The feasibility of such experiments is discussed.

  3. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  4. Synthesis and study of atomic nuclei with Z > 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flerov, G. N.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.

    The studies of atomic nuclei with Z > 100 are closely related to the synthesis of new chemical elements and to the investigation of stability limits for the heaviest nuclides. From the mid-50s these studies have been carried out using intense heavy-ion beams and highly sensitive techniques designed for the physical and chemical identification of rare short-lived nuclei. The studies proceeded in two stages, the first one being characterized by the use of hot-fusion reactions between the U, Pu, Am, Cm and Cf target nuclei and the C, N, O, and Ne projectiles and the second being based on the use of the cold-fusion reactions induced by Cr, Mn, and Fe projectiles on Pb and Bi target nuclei. As a result, the chemical elements with atomic numbers from 102 to 109 have first been synthesized. The radioactive properties of over 40 isotopes of these elements have been investigated and unambiguous evidence has been obtained that shell effects play a decisive role for the stability of the Z ≳ 104 nuclei against spontaneous fission. This provides an experimental substantiation for the known hypothesis that the island of nuclear stability should lie around Z ⋍ 114 and N ⋍ 178 or 184. It has been proposed to synthesize elements with Z ≥ 110 by the complete fusion reactions of uranium and adjacent element nuclei with projectile nuclei such as Ar and Ca. The spontaneous fission of a product nucleus (a total of 26 events) has been observed in Dubna experiments with the 232Th + 44Ca and 236U + 40Ar reactions. The authors of those studies tentatively assigned this activity to the decay of the nuclei of element 110.

  5. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvár, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Heil, M.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of γ rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei weremeasured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength ΣB(M1)↑, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum ΣB(M1)↑ increases with A and for 157,159Gd it is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  6. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  7. Relation between the mass coefficients for rotational and γ-vibrational motion in axially symmetric deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; Shirikova, N. Yu.; Sushkov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the ratio of the mass coefficients for the γ-vibrational and rotational motion for the well deformed axially symmetric nuclei is calculated. Calculations are performed based on the Cranking model approach. The results obtained show that the microscopic model based on the Woods-Saxon nuclear mean field potential and the pairing forces with a constant strength coefficient qualitatively explain the existing experimental data on the ratio of the mass coefficients. The important role of the blocking effect in the calculation of the mass coefficients is demonstrated.

  8. A self-consistent study of triaxial black hole nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ming Yan

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional shapes of elliptical galaxies has not advanced much since the time of Edwin Hubble. Elliptical galaxies are still classified according to their luminosity distributions and the isophotal contour shapes of their two-dimensional images projected on the sky. Their intrinsic shapes could be oblate, prolate, or fully triaxial, since all such shapes produce perfectly elliptical contours on projection. One way to constrain the possible 3D shapes of elliptical galaxies is to attempt to construct self-consistent dynamical models with various shapes. In this study, models were constructed of the central regions (“nuclei”) of elliptical galaxies. Observed nuclei have a power-law dependence of stellar density on radius, and universally contain a single supermassive black hole at their center, with mass ˜106 109 M⊙ . At low energies in such nuclei, the motion was found to be essentially regular, i.e. non-chaotic; the gravitational potential can be considered as a perturbation to the integrable Keplerian potential. At higher energies, where the enclosed stellar mass is a few times the black hole mass, the black hole renders those orbits that come close to the black hole stochastic. This transition to global stochasticity is rapid and occurs at lower energies in more elongated nuclei. The self-consistency of triaxial models of black hole nuclei was demonstrated by using Schwarzschild's method to construct self-consistent orbital superpositions representing nuclei with different shapes. N-body integrations of Monte-Carlo realizations of the Schwarzschild solutions showed that some of these nuclei are stable; nearly prolate nuclei were found to be unstable, and they evolve rapidly to axisymmetric shapes. The possibility that nuclei may be triaxial in shape complicates the interpretation of stellar kinematical data from the centers of galaxies and may alter the inferred interaction rates between stars and supermassive black holes.

  9. Possible conservation of the K-quantum number in excited rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, A.; Bosetti, P.; Leoni, S. |

    1996-12-31

    The {gamma}-cascades feeding into low-K and high-K bands in the nucleus {sup 163}Er are investigated by analyzing variances and covariances of the spectrum fluctuations. The study of the covariance between pairs of gated spectra reveals that the cascades feeding into the low-K bands are completely different from those feeding the high-K bands. In addition, the number of decay paths obtained analyzing the ridge and the valley in spectra gated by high-K transitions is different than that deduced from the total spectrum. This result is well reproduced with microscopic calculations of strongly interacting bands. It is concluded that the K-selection rules are effective for the excited rotational bands within the angular momentum region probed by the experiment, 30{Dirac_h} {le} I {le} 40{Dirac_h}.

  10. Rotational properties of nuclei around No254 investigated using a spectroscopic-quality Skyrme energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Dobaczewski, J.; Greenlees, P. T.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Nuclei in the Z ≈100 mass region represent the heaviest systems where detailed spectroscopic information is experimentally available. Although microscopic-macroscopic and self-consistent models have achieved great success in describing the data in this mass region, a fully satisfying precise theoretical description is still missing. Purpose: By using fine-tuned parametrizations of the energy density functionals, the present work aims at an improved description of the single-particle properties and rotational bands in the nobelium region. Such locally optimized parametrizations may have better properties when extrapolating towards the superheavy region. Methods: Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov and Lipkin-Nogami methods were used to calculate the quasiparticle energies and rotational bands of nuclei in the nobelium region. Starting from the most recent Skyrme parametrization, UNEDF1, the spin-orbit coupling constants and pairing strengths have been tuned, so as to achieve a better agreement with the excitation spectra and odd-even mass differences in 251Cf and 249Bk. Results: The quasiparticle properties of 251Cf and 249Bk were very well reproduced. At the same time, crucial deformed neutron and proton shell gaps open up at N =152 and Z =100, respectively. Rotational bands in Fm, No, and Rf isotopes, where experimental data are available, were also fairly well described. To help future improvements towards a more precise description, small deficiencies of the approach were carefully identified. Conclusions: In the Z ≈100 mass region, larger spin-orbit strengths than those from global adjustments lead to improved agreement with data. Puzzling effects of particle-number restoration on the calculated moment of inertia, at odds with the experimental behavior, require further scrutiny.

  11. The emergence of deformation and rotational states in the many-nucleon quantum theory of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.

    2016-02-01

    The many-nucleon quantum mechanics of a nucleus is infinite-dimensional and, although simply defined, it has the potential for unlimited complexity. Nevertheless, the low-energy states of heavy open-shell nuclei exhibit properties that are remarkably well described by simple collective models. This paper examines this emergent simplicity from a perspective that closely parallels the emergence of shell structure in the Mayer-Jensen model. The result is an expression of the many-nucleon Hilbert space of a nucleus as an energy-ordered sum of subspaces each of which carries a microscopic version of the Bohr-Mottelson unified model. Each of the subspaces is characterized by nuclear states with a common intrinsic shape defined by its quadrupole moments. An emergence of simplicity and shape-coexistence in nuclei is then explained if it can be demonstrated that there is a relatively small and coherent mixing of the states of different collective subspaces.

  12. Recent studies of heavy nuclei far from stability at JYFL

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, R.; Enqvist, T.; Helariutta, K.

    1996-12-31

    The new K=130 Cyclotron + ECR facility of the Physics Department of the University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL) provides stable beams from protons up to krypton ions for nuclear structure studies. Two instruments designed especially for in-beam spectroscopic studies of heavy nuclei at JYFL are introduced in this contribution. Some results from recent measurements with them are reported.

  13. A number-projected model with generalized pairing interaction in application to rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Satula, W. |||; Wyss, R.

    1996-12-31

    A cranked mean-field model that takes into account both T=1 and T=0 pairing interactions is presented. The like-particle pairing interaction is described by means of a standard seniority force. The neutron-proton channel includes simultaneously correlations among particles moving in time reversed orbits (T=1) and identical orbits (T=0). The coupling between different pairing channels and nuclear rotation is taken into account selfconsistently. Approximate number-projection is included by means of the Lipkin-Nogami method. The transitions between different pairing phases are discussed as a function of neutron/proton excess, T{sub z}, and rotational frequency, {Dirac_h}{omega}.

  14. Rotational properties of N {approx} Z nuclei in the presence of neutron-proton correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov, A. S. Nikitin, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.

    2008-02-15

    In the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation, the cranking model is formulated with allowance for residual neutron-proton correlations whose interaction has a Gaussian form. The behavior of quasiparticle levels versus the frequency of rotation of the even-even isotopes {sup 72-76}Kr is investigated within this approach.

  15. Deformed rotational bands in the doubly odd nuclei [sup 134]Pr and [sup 132]Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Wadsworth, R.; Clark, R.M.; Hibbert, I.M. ); Beausang, C.W.; Forbes, S.A.; Nolan, P.J.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Wilson, J.N. ); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Santos, D. ); Simpson, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The nuclei [sup 132,134]Pr have been investigated using the [sup 100]Mo([sup 37]Cl,[ital xn]) reactions at a beam energy of 155 MeV. Gamma rays were detected with the Eurogam array. Analysis of the data has revealed the presence of two new weakly populated decoupled bands in [sup 134]Pr. One of these bands has been linked into the normal-deformed states and is thought to be built on a [pi]([ital h][sub 11/2])[sup 2][direct product][nu]([ital f][sub 7/2],[ital h][sub 9/2]) configuration. The second band has been interpreted as being based on a [pi]([ital h][sub 11/2])[sup 3][direct product][nu][ital i][sub 13/2] intruder configuration within the second [beta][sub 2][congruent]0.3 prolate minimum. The known decoupled band in [sup 132]Pr (5[ital n] reaction channel) and the highly deformed band in [sup 130]La A([alpha]3[ital n]) have also been extended. The structure of all of these bands is discussed together with similar bands in nieghboring odd-odd nuclei.

  16. Studies of fission hindrance in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-06-01

    The study of dissipation in hot nuclear systems is a subject of great current interest. Different experimental techniques and observables have recently been utilized which axe sensitive to the dissipation in large-scale shape rearrangements, such as those encountered in heavy-ion fusion, fission and quasifission reactions. To study the dynamical shape evolution of hot nuclear systems it is necessary to measure properties (or processes) that are sensitive to the time-scale on which these shape changes occur. Several methods, such as the emission of prescission particles (n, p and {alpha}) and {gamma}-rays, have been used to study the fission time-scale in relation to these (well known) decay processes. Recently it has also been pointed out that measurements of the evaporation residue cross section, which are very sensitive to the competition between particle emission and fission, probe the fission time-scale. This paper will present recent studies of the evaporation residue cross section in the {sup 32}S+{sup 184} system carried out at the ATLAS Fragment Mass Analyzer, including the methods for obtaining absolute cross sections.

  17. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aucar, I. Agustín Gomez, Sergio S.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH{sup +} (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH{sup +} systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  18. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH(+) (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH(+) systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  19. Magnetic rotation (MR) band crossing in N=78 odd-Z nuclei: Tilted axis cranking (TAC) calculations to explore the role of nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Suresh

    2014-08-14

    Magnetic Rotation (MR) band crossing is studied systematically in N=78 isotones (La, Pr, Pm and Eu) using Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) model. The observables such as I(¯h) vs ¯hω, excitation energy E(MeV) vs spin I(¯h), and the B(M1)/B(E2) vs I(¯h) were considered to pinpoint MR crossing in these nuclei. The results of tilted axis cranking were compared with these experimental observables. The B(M1) and B(E2) values were also reported and used to understand the crossing behaviour of these MR bands. The systematic evolution of this phenomenon in N=78 odd-Z istotones leads to understand the role of nucleons in MR band crossing.

  20. Recent developments in the study of nuclei far from stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in accelerators and experimental techniques have led to an enormous increase in the ability of scientists to synthesize and study new isotopes, particularly isotopes far from stability. Some of the recent results on nuclei far from stability which fall into the categories of new decay modes, shell closure away from stability, deformation and reinforcing shell gaps, and intruder states and shape coexistence are reviewed. 102 references.

  1. Fine structure of alpha decay to rotational states of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.; Zhang, H. F.

    2010-06-15

    To gain a better insight into alpha-decay fine structure, we calculate the relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} rotational states in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula. The calculated relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} states are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the relative intensities of alpha decay to 4{sup +} states, a good agreement with experimental data is achieved for Th and U isotopes. The formula we obtain is useful for the analysis of experimental data of alpha-decay fine structure. In addition, some predicted relative intensities which are still not measured are provided for future experiments.

  2. Fissile Nuclei Rotation Effect in 235U(n,γf) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, Gevorg; Granz, Peter; Klenke, Jens; Krakhotin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Valery; Mezei, Ferenz; Novitsky, Vadim; Pavlov, Valery; Russina, Margarita; Shatalov, Pavel; Wilpert, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A small shift of an angular distribution of prompt γ-rays relative to the fission axis of 236U* 235U(n,γf) process is presented. This effect has been observed in the experiment at BER-II reactor of BENSC/HMI (Berlin). The sign of the shift depends on the direction of the incident neutron beam polarization. This phenomena can be explained by the rotation of fissile nucleus 236U*, like the effect that has been observed recently at ILL in ternary fission of 235U by cold polarized neutrons. The main surprise of this result is the detection of scission gamma-rays radiated by a fissile nucleus during the time interval of the order of 10-21 s before or after the moment of the neck rupture. Detailed measurements of trigger γ-rays energy dependence are in progress at the neutron beam "MEPHISTO" of FRM-II reactor (Garching).

  3. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (anasen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H. E.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Mondello, L. L.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bardayan, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental information about most reactions involving short-lived nuclei is limited. New facilities aim to provide wider access to unstable isotopes, but the limited intensities require more efficient and selective techniques and devices. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array designed primarily for studies of reactions important in the αp- and rp- processes with proton-rich exotic nuclei. The array consists of 40 silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators. The detectors cover an area of about 1300 cm2 providing essentially complete solid angle coverage for the reactions of interest with good energy and position resolution. ANASEN also includes a position-sensitive annular gas proportional counter that allows it to be used as an active gas target/detector. ANASEN is designed for direct measurement of (α,p) re-actions in inverse kinematics as well as for studies of proton elastic and inelastic scattering, (p, γ) reactions and transfer reactions. The array is being developed by Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Presently it is located at the RESOLUT radioacitve ion beam facility at FSU, where the first experiments are being performed. In the future, the array will be used at the ReA3 facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  4. Studies of 44Ti and 48Cr Nuclei Within Variational Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prianka; Dhiman, Shashi K.

    We have studied the nuclear structure properties of high angular momentum states in N = Z, 44Ti, and 48Cr nuclei by using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method with variation after angular momentum projection (VAP-HFB) technique. Effect of Kuo-Brown "KB" and its modified effective interactions has been studied using four sets of single-particle energies (SPEs) on rotational bands of these nuclei. It is seen that the HFB theory with projected wave functions by employing the VAP method describes well the overall trends of the experimental yrast level spectrum and the transition probabilities in these nuclei. The backbending of the 48Cr nucleus has been well reproduced by the present VAP-HFB calculations with the original "KB" effective interaction at J = 12ℏ. The modified effective interaction also gives backbending for 48Cr but at J = 10ℏ. The shape change associated with backbending effect in 48Cr is due to the large decrease in B(E2↓) values beyond J = 12ℏ state.

  5. Rotational Spectroscopy of CF_2ClCCl_3 and Analysis of Hyperfine Structure from Four Quadrupolar Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Bialkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Uriarte, Iciar; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2016-06-01

    CF_2ClCCl_3 has recently been identified among several new ozone- depleting substances in the atmosphere. There are no literature reports concerning rotational spectroscopy of this molecule, although we were recently able to report its first chirped pulse, supersonic expansion spectrum. CF_2ClCCl_3 has a rather small dipole moment so that the spectrum is weak and each transition displays very complex nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure resulting from the presence of four chlorine nuclei. We have presently been able to carry out a complete analysis of the hyperfine structure by combining the information from chirped pulse spectra with dedicated higher resolution measurements made with a cavity supersonic expansion instrument. The hyperfine analysis was carried out with Pickett's SPFIT/SPCAT package and the sizes of Hamiltonian matrices are sufficiently large to require the use of 64-bit compilation of these programs (made available for both Windows and Linux systems on the PROSPE website). The resulting fit is to within experimental accuracy and is supported by ab initio calculations. The precise values of off-diagonal hyperfine constants for all nuclei lead to useful angular information that is complementary to direct structural information from moments of inertia. J.C.Laube, M.J.Newland, C.Hogan, et al., Nature Geoscience 7, 266 (2014). Z.Kisiel, E.Białkowska-Jaworska, L.Pszczółkowski, I.Uriarte, P.Ejica, F.J.Basterretxea, E.J.Cocinero, 70th ISMS, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, RF-11 (2015). Z.Kisiel, E.Białkowska-Jaworska, L.Pszczółkowski, J.Chem.Phys. 109, 10263 (1998).

  6. Analytical and phenomenological studies of rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    A framework, which combines mathematical analysis, closure theory, and phenomenological treatment, is developed to study the spectral transfer process and reduction of dimensionality in turbulent flows that are subject to rotation. First, we outline a mathematical procedure that is particularly appropriate for problems with two disparate time scales. The approach which is based on the Green's method leads to the Poincare velocity variables and the Poincare transformation when applied to rotating turbulence. The effects of the rotation are now reflected in the modifications to the convolution of a nonlinear term. The Poincare transformed equations are used to obtain a time-dependent analog of the Taylor-Proudman theorem valid in the asymptotic limit when the non-dimensional parameter mu is identical to Omega(t) approaches infinity (Omega is the rotation rate and t is the time). The 'split' of the energy transfer in both direct and inverse directions is established. Secondly, we apply the Eddy-Damped-Quasinormal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure to the Poincare transformed Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. This closure leads to expressions for the spectral energy transfer. In particular, an unique triple velocity decorrelation time is derived with an explicit dependence on the rotation rate. This provides an important input for applying the phenomenological treatment of Zhou. In order to characterize the relative strength of rotation, another non-dimensional number, a spectral Rossby number, which is defined as the ratio of rotation and turbulence time scales, is introduced. Finally, the energy spectrum and the spectral eddy viscosity are deduced.

  7. Rotation and shape changes in {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb: Probes of nuclear structure and tunneling process in warm nuclei. II. Microscopic Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Million, B.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Mason, P.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Kmiecik, M.

    2009-06-15

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the {gamma} decay of superdeformed nuclei has been developed. It is based on microscopic calculations for the energy levels, E2 decay probabilities, collective mass parameters, and potential energy barriers. The use of microscopically calculated quantities largely reduces the parameters of the simulation, allowing one to focus on the basic ingredients of the physical processes. Calculations are performed for the warm rotating superdeformed nuclei {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb, for which high statistics Euroball IV data are available. The dependence on the simulation parameters is investigated, together with the basic features of the microscopic calculations.

  8. Giant dipole resonance built on hot rotating nuclei produced during evaporation of light particles from the 88Mo compound nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Bracco, A.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Chbihi, A.; Chiari, M.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Gramegna, F.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Marchi, T.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; Meczyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Myalski, S.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Schmitt, Ch.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Valdré, S.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Ziebliński, M.; Dudek, J.; Dinh Dang, N.

    2015-05-01

    High-energy giant dipole resonance (GDR) γ rays were measured following the decay of the hot, rotating compound nucleus of 88Mo, produced at excitation energies of 124 and 261 MeV. The reaction 48Ti + 40Ca at 300 and 600 MeV bombarding energies has been used. The data were analyzed using the statistical model Monte Carlo code gemini++. It allowed extracting the giant dipole resonance parameters by fitting the high-energy γ -ray spectra. The extracted GDR widths were compared with the available data at lower excitation energy and with theoretical predictions based on (i) The Lublin-Strasbourg drop macroscopic model, supplemented with thermal shape fluctuations analysis, and (ii) The phonon damping model. The theoretical predictions were convoluted with the population matrices of evaporated nuclei from the statistical model gemini++. Also a comparison with the results of a phenomenological expression based on the existing systematics, mainly for lower temperature data, is presented and discussed. A possible onset of a saturation of the GDR width was observed around T =3 MeV.

  9. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  10. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benzoni, G.; Montanari, D.; Bracco, A.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Zalite, A.; Zocca, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Stefan, I.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Battacharyya, S.; De France, G.

    2008-05-12

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are useful tools to populate exotic nuclei, particularly the neutron-rich ones. In this view, two different experiments have been performed employing a stable ({sup 22}Ne) and a radioactive ({sup 24}Ne) beam, both impinging on a {sup 208}Pb target. The first reaction has been studied using the CLARA-PRISMA-DANTE set-up at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro-Italy), while the second reaction was performed at Ganil (Caen-France) employing a SPIRAL radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne. In this case recoils and coincident {gamma} rays were detected with the VAMOS-EXOGAM set-up.The data show that MNT reactions can selectively populate states of different nature and, therefore, are a good tool to study nuclear structure further away from stability.

  11. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  12. Commissioning a Rotating Target Wheel Assembly for Heavy Element Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, L. D.; Bennett, M. E.; Mayorov, D. A.; Folden, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    The heaviest elements are produced artificially by fusing nuclei of light elements within an accelerator to form heavier nuclei. The most direct method to increase the production rate of nuclei is to increase the beam intensity, necessitating the use of a rotating target to minimize damage to the target by deposited heat. Such a target wheel was constructed for heavy element research at Texas A&M University, Cyclotron Institute, consisting of a wheel with three banana-shaped target cutouts. The target is designed to rotate at 1700 rpm, and a fiber optic cable provides a signal to trigger beam pulsing in order to avoid irradiating the spokes between target segments. Following minor mechanical modifications and construction of a dedicated electrical panel, the rotating target assembly was commissioned for a beam experiment. A 15 MeV/u beam of 20Ne was delivered from the K500 cyclotron and detected by a ruggedized silicon detector. The beam pulsing response time was characterized as a function of the rational frequency of the target wheel. Preliminary analysis suggests that the K500 is capable of pulsing at rates of up to 250 Hz, which is sufficient for planned future experiments. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  13. MOJAVE: MONITORING OF JETS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH VLBA EXPERIMENTS. VIII. FARADAY ROTATION IN PARSEC-SCALE AGN JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Lister, Matthew L.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Homan, Daniel C.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.

    2012-10-01

    We report observations of Faraday rotation measures for a sample of 191 extragalactic radio jets observed within the MOJAVE program. Multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array observations were carried out over 12 epochs in 2006 at four frequencies between 8 and 15 GHz. We detect parsec-scale Faraday rotation measures in 149 sources and find the quasars to have larger rotation measures on average than BL Lac objects. The median core rotation measures are significantly higher than in the jet components. This is especially true for quasars where we detect a significant negative correlation between the magnitude of the rotation measure and the de-projected distance from the core. We perform detailed simulations of the observational errors of total intensity, polarization, and Faraday rotation, and concentrate on the errors of transverse Faraday rotation measure gradients in unresolved jets. Our simulations show that the finite image restoring beam size has a significant effect on the observed rotation measure gradients, and spurious gradients can occur due to noise in the data if the jet is less than two beams wide in polarization. We detect significant transverse rotation measure gradients in four sources (0923+392, 1226+023, 2230+114, and 2251+158). In 1226+023 the rotation measure is for the first time seen to change sign from positive to negative over the transverse cuts, which supports the presence of a helical magnetic field in the jet. In this source we also detect variations in the jet rotation measure over a timescale of three months, which are difficult to explain with external Faraday screens and suggest internal Faraday rotation. By comparing fractional polarization changes in jet components between the four frequency bands to depolarization models, we find that an external purely random Faraday screen viewed through only a few lines of sight can explain most of our polarization observations, but in some sources, such as 1226+023 and 2251+158, internal

  14. Studies of Nuclear Structure and Decay Properties of Actinide Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Moore, E. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Kellett, M. A.; Nichols, A. L.

    2009-01-28

    The identification of single-particle states in heavy actinide nuclei by means of studying their decay schemes plays a seminal role in understanding the structure of the heaviest elements and testing the predictive power of modern theoretical models. The heaviest odd-mass nuclides available in sufficient quantity for detailed decay spectroscopic studies are 20-h {sup 255} Fm(for neutrons) and 20-d {sup 253}Es(for protons). Decay spectra of these isotopes, together with those for the odd-odd 276-d {sup 254}Es nuclide, were measured using a variety of {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy techniques. Well-defined decay data are also essential pre-requisites for the detection and accurate characterization of fissile radionuclides. The parameters of greatest relevance include actinide half-lives, branching fractions, and {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray energies and emission probabilities. Their quantification to good accuracy provides the means of monitoring their presence, behavior and transport in nuclear facilities as well as any clandestine movement and usage. As a consequence of recommendations made at recent IAEA research coordination meetings on 'Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides,' measurements were undertaken to determine specific decay data of the more inadequately defined radionuclides.

  15. Fractionation of nuclei from brain by zonal centrifugation and a study of the ribonucleic acid polymerase activity in the various classes of nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Austoker, J.; Cox, D.; Mathias, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The nuclei of the cells of the whole rat brain have been fractionated in a B-XIV zonal rotor with a discontinuous gradient of sucrose. Five fractions were obtained. Zone (I) contained neuronal nuclei (70%) and astrocytic nuclei (23%). Zone (II) contained astrocytic nuclei (81%) and neuronal nuclei (15%). Zone (III) contained astrocytic nuclei (84%) and oligodendrocytic nuclei (15%). Zone (IV) contained oligodendrocytic nuclei (92%) and zone (V) contained only oligodendrocytic nuclei. 2. The content of DNA, RNA and protein per nucleus was determined for each zone. Although the amount of DNA per nucleus is constant (7pg) the RNA varies from 4.5 to 2.5pg/nucleus and the protein from 38 to 17.6pg/nucleus. The neuronal nuclei have the greatest amounts of protein. The oligodendrocytic nuclei have the least content of RNA and protein. 3. The effects of pH, ionic strength, and Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentration on the activity of the nuclear system for synthesis in vitro of RNA have been investigated for unfractionated nuclei. From these studies a standard set of conditions for the assay of nuclear RNA polymerase has been established. 4. The activity of the RNA polymerase in each of the zonal fractions has been determined in the presence and in the absence of α-amanitin. Zone (II) is the most active, followed by zone (I). The nuclei of zones (IV) and (V) have comparable activity, which is 40% of that of zone (II). 5. The extent of incorporation of each of the four labelled nucleoside triphosphates by the nuclei from each zone has been measured. These values have been used to calculate the base composition of the RNA synthesized in vitro in each class of nucleus. 6. The effect of changes in the condition of assay of RNA polymerase in the different classes of nuclei has been investigated. Significant differences in the response to concentrations of metal ions and ammonium sulphate have been observed. 7. Homopolymer formation in each zone of brain nuclei has been determined. The

  16. Climate model studies of synchronously rotating planets.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manoj

    2003-01-01

    M stars constitute 75% of main sequence stars though, until recently, their star systems have not been considered suitable places for habitable planets to exist. In this study the climate of a synchronously rotating planet around an M dwarf star is evaluated using a three-dimensional global atmospheric circulation model. The presence of clouds and evaporative cooling at the surface of the planet result in a cooler surface temperature at the subsolar point. Water ice forms at the polar regions and on the dark side, where the minimum temperature lies between -30 degrees C and 0 degrees C. As expected, rainfall is extremely high on the starlit side and extremely low on the dark side. The presence of a dry continent causes higher temperatures on the dayside, and allows accumulation of snow on the nightside. The absence of any oceans leads to higher day-night temperature differences, consistent with previous work. The present study reinforces recent conclusions that synchronously rotating planets within the circumstellar habitable zones of M dwarf stars should be habitable, and therefore M dwarf systems should not be excluded in future searches for exoplanets.

  17. α -decay chains of recoiled superheavy nuclei: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic theoretical study of α -decay half-lives in the superheavy mass region of the periodic table of elements is carried out by extending the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory based on the preformed cluster model (PCM) to include temperature (T ) dependence in its built-in preformation and penetration probabilities of decay fragments. Earlier, the α -decay chains of the isotopes of Z =115 were investigated by using the standard PCM for spontaneous decays, with"hot-optimum" orientation effects included, which required a constant scaling factor of 104 to approach the available experimental data. In the present approach of the PCM (T ≠0 ), the temperature effects are included via the recoil energy of the residual superheavy nucleus (SHN) left after x -neutron emission from the superheavy compound nucleus. The important result is that the α -decay half-lives calculated by the PCM (T ≠0 ) match the experimental data nearly exactly, without using any scaling factor of the type used in the PCM. Note that the PCM (T ≠0 ) is an equivalent of the dynamical cluster-decay model for heavy-ion collisions at angular momentum ℓ =0 . The only parameter of model is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which for the calculated half-lives of α -decay chains of various isotopes of Z =113 to 118 nuclei formed in "hot-fusion" reactions is found to be nearly constant, i.e., Δ R ≈0.95 ±0.05 fm for all the α -decay chains studied. The use of recoiled residue nucleus as a secondary heavy-ion beam for nuclear reactions has also been suggested in the past.

  18. Superheavy Nuclei: Which Regions of Nuclear Map are Accessible for the Nearest Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, A. V.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Greiner, W.

    2015-11-01

    Use of fusion reactions for synthesis and studying new superheavy nuclei is considered in the paper. Perspectives of synthesis of new elements with Z > 118 are discussed. The gap of unknown SH nuclei, located between the isotopes which were produced earlier in the cold and hot fusion reactions, can be filled in fusion reactions of 48Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. Cross sections for the production of these nuclei are predicted to be rather large. The found area of β+-decaying SH nuclei with 111 ≤ Z ≤ 115 located to the "right" (more neutron-rich) to those synthesized recently in Dubna in 48Ca-induced fusion reactions gives a unique chance to synthesize in fusion reactions the most stable SH nuclei located at the center of the island of stability.

  19. Studies of the Shapes of Heavy Nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Peter A.

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). In this talk I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  20. Spectroscopic studies on light proton-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Kubono, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Nomura, T.; Katayama, I.; Kato, S.

    2007-02-12

    A systematic for the light proton rich nuclei with constant TZ = -3/2 isospin is proposed, where a survey on their structure have shown interesting features. Preliminary results of a re-analysis on the sctructure of 13O nucleus is also presented. This 13O nucleus have been investigated by the 3-neutron pick up (3He,6He) reaction, and new levels have been assigned for this nucleus.

  1. Cloud condensation nuclei closure study on summer arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Sierau, B.; Sjogren, S.; Swietlicki, E.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Leck, C.; Lohmann, U.

    2011-11-01

    We present an aerosol - cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure study on summer high Arctic aerosol based on measurements that were carried out in 2008 during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) on board the Swedish ice breaker Oden. The data presented here were collected during a three-week time period in the pack ice (>85° N) when the icebreaker Oden was moored to an ice floe and drifted passively during the most biological active period into autumn freeze up conditions. CCN number concentrations were obtained using two CCN counters measuring at different supersaturations. The directly measured CCN number concentration was then compared with a CCN number concentration calculated using both bulk aerosol mass composition data from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and aerosol number size distributions obtained from a differential mobility particle sizer, assuming κ-Köhler theory, surface tension of water and an internally mixed aerosol. The last assumption was supported by measurements made with a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) for particles >70 nm. For the two highest measured supersaturations, 0.73 and 0.41%, closure could not be achieved with the investigated settings concerning hygroscopicity and density. The calculated CCN number concentration was always higher than the measured one for those two supersaturations. This might be caused by a relative larger insoluble organic mass fraction of the smaller particles that activate at these supersaturations, which are thus less good CCN than the larger particles. On average, 36% of the mass measured with the AMS was organic mass. At 0.20, 0.15 and 0.10% supersaturation, closure could be achieved with different combinations of hygroscopic parameters and densities within the uncertainty range of the fit. The best agreement of the calculated CCN number concentration with the observed one was achieved when the organic fraction of the aerosol was treated as nearly water insoluble

  2. Studies of chondrogenesis in rotating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Daane, E. L.; Montufar-Solis, D.

    1993-01-01

    A great deal of energy has been exerted over the years researching methods for regenerating and repairing bone and cartilage. Several techniques, especially bone implants and grafts, show great promise for providing a remedy for many skeletal disorders and chondrodystrophies. The bioreactor (rotating-wall vessel, RWV) is a cell culture system that creates a nurturing environment conducive to cell aggregation. Chondrocyte cultures have been studied as implants for repair and replacement of damaged and missing bone and cartilage since 1965 [Chesterman and Smith, J Bone Joint Surg 50B:184-197, 1965]. The ability to use large, tissue-like cartilage aggregates grown in the RWV would be of great clinical significance in treating skeletal disorders. In addition, the RWV may provide a superior method for studying chondrogenesis and chondrogenic mutations. Because the RWV is also reported to simulate many of the conditions of microgravity it is a very useful ground-based tool for studying how cell systems will react to microgravity.

  3. Neutron-Proton Pairing Correlation for the Rotational Motion of N = Z 72Kr, 76Sr, and 80Zr Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prianka; Dhiman, Shashi K.

    The high-spin state properties of the neutron-proton (np) residual effective interaction are analyzed in N = Z 72Kr, 76Sr, and 80Zr nuclei. The self-consistent microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) equations have been solved by employing monopole corrected two-body effective interaction. A band crossing is observed in 72Kr nucleus at J = 14ℏ state with monopole corrected "HPU1" and "HPU2" effective interactions. The VAP-HFB theory suggests that the "4p-4h" excitations by np residual interaction are the essential ingredients of the mean-field description of the occurence of backbending in 72Kr nucleus.

  4. Fission Study of Actinide Nuclei Using Multi-nucleon Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Léguillon, R.; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Smallcombe, James; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    We have developed a set up to measure fission properties of excited compound nuclei populated by multi-nucleon transfer reactions. This approach has an advantage that we can study fission of neutron-rich nuclei which cannot be accessed by particle or charged-particle capture reactions. Unique feature in our setup is that we can produce fission data for many nuclei depending on different transfer channels. Also wide excitation energy range can be covered in this set up, allowing us to measure the excitation energy dependence of the fission properties. Preliminary data obtained in the 18O + 238U reaction will be presented.

  5. Rotational properties of N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei in the presence of neutron-proton correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov, A. S. Nikitin, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.

    2008-02-15

    In the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation, the cranking model is formulated with allowance for residual neutron-proton correlations whose interaction has a Gaussian form. The behavior of quasiparticle levels versus the frequency of rotation of the even-even isotopes {sup 72-76}Kr is investigated within this approach.

  6. Rotation and shape changes in {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb: Probes of nuclear structure and tunneling process in warm nuclei. I. Experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Million, B.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Mason, P.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Kmiecik, M.

    2009-06-15

    The {gamma} decay associated with the warm rotation of the superdeformed nuclei {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb has been measured with the Euroball IV array. Several experimental quantities are presented, putting strong constraints on the decay dynamics in the superdeformed well. The data are successfully reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation of the {gamma} decay based on microscopically calculated energy levels, E2 decay probabilities, collective mass parameters, and potential energy barriers between the wells associated with normal and super deformation. This allows one to test the basic ingredients of the physical process, such as the strength of the two-body residual interaction and the potential barriers as a function of spin and excitation energy. We also show that the data probe the E1 strength function, indicating an enhancement around 1-2 MeV {gamma} rays, which might be related to octupole vibrations.

  7. The study of the physics of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.; Marsden, B. G.; Sekanina, Z.

    1976-01-01

    A semiannual progress report describing the work completed during the period 1 September 1975 to 29 February 1976 on the physics of cometary nuclei was given. The following items were discussed: (1) a paper entitled ""A speculation about comets and the earth'', (2) a chapter entitled"" The physics of comets'' for ""Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics'', (3) continuing work on split comets, and (4) results dealing with a new application of nongravitational solar-radial forces as a measure of comet nucleus dimensions and activity.

  8. Constrained Hartree-Fock Theory and Study of Deformed Structures of Closed Shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praharaj, Choudhury

    2016-03-01

    We have studied some N or Z = 50 nuclei in a microscopic model with effective interaction in a reasonably large shell model space. Excitation of particles across 50 shell closure leads to well-deformed excited prolate configurations. The potential energy surfaces of nuclei are studied using Hartree-Fock theory with quadrupole constraint to explore the various deformed configurations of N = 50 nuclei 82Ge , 84Se and 86Kr . Energy spectra are calculated from various intrinsic states using Peierls-Yoccoz angular momentum projection technique. Results of spectra and electromagnetic moments and transitions will be presented for N = 50 nuclei and for Z = 50 114Sn nucleus. Supported by Grant No SB/S2/HEP-06/2013 of DST.

  9. Study of Analytic Statistical Model for Decay of Light and Medium Mass Nuclei in Nuclear Fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1996-01-01

    The angular momentum independent statistical decay model is often applied using a Monte-Carlo simulation to describe the decay of prefragment nuclei in heavy ion reactions. This paper presents an analytical approach to the decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60, which is important for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) studies. This decay problem of nuclei with mass number less than 60 incorporates well-known levels of the lightest nuclei (A less than 11) to improve convergence and accuracy. A sensitivity study of the model level density function is used to determine the impact on mass and charge distributions in nuclear fragmentation. This angular momentum independent statistical decay model also describes the momentum and energy distribution of emitted particles (n, p, d, t, h, and a) from a prefragment nucleus.

  10. Comparative study of icy patches on comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklay, Nilda; Pommerol, Antoine; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Sunshine, Jessica; Sierks, Holger; Pajola, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    Cometary missions Deep Impact, EPOXI and Rosetta investigated the nuclei of comets 9P/Tempel 1, 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko respectively. Bright patches were observed on the surfaces of each of these three comets [1-5]. Of these, the surface of 67P is mapped at the highest spatial resolution via narrow angle camera (NAC) of the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS, [6]) on board the Rosetta spacecraft. OSIRIS NAC is equipped with twelve filters covering the wavelength range of 250 nm to 1000 nm. Various filters combinations are used during surface mapping. With high spatial resolution data of comet 67P, three types of bright features were detected on the comet surface: Clustered, isolated and bright boulders [2]. In the visible spectral range, clustered bright features on comet 67P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [2, 4] while isolated bright features on comet 67P have flat spectra [4]. Icy patches observed on the surface of comets 9P and 103P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [1, 5]. Clustered and isolated bright features are blue in the RGB composites generated by using the images taken in NIR, visible and NUV wavelengths [2, 4]. This is valid for the icy patches observed on comets 9P and 103P [1, 5]. Spectroscopic observations of bright patches on comets 9P and 103P confirmed the existence of water [1, 5]. There were more than a hundred of bright features detected on the northern hemisphere of comet 67P [2]. Analysis of those features from both multispectral data and spectroscopic data is an ongoing work. Water ice is detected in eight of the bright features so far [7]. Additionally, spectroscopic observations of two clustered bright features on the surface of comet 67P revealed the existence of water ice [3]. The spectral properties of one of the icy patches were studied by [4] using OSIRIS NAC images and compared with the spectral properties of the active regions observed

  11. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei Studied with Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been used for many years to understand the shell structure of nuclei. Recent studies with rare-isotope beams extend this work and make it possible to probe the evolution of shell structure far beyond the valley of stability, requiring measurements in inverse kinematics. We present a novel technical approach to measurements in inverse kinematics, and apply this method to different transfer reactions, each of which probes different properties of light, neutron-rich nuclei.

  12. Interplay between tilted and principal axis rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradip

    2014-08-14

    At IUAC-INGA, our group has studied four neutron rich nuclei of mass-110 region, namely {sup 109,110}Ag and {sup 108,110}Cd. These nuclei provide the unique platform to study the interplay between Tilted and Principal axis rotation since these are moderately deformed and at the same time, shears structures are present at higher spins. The salient features of the high spin behaviors of these nuclei will be discussed which are the signatures of this interplay.

  13. Systematic study of iodine nuclei in A∼125 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H. P.; Chakraborty, S.; Kumar, A.; Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Kumar, A.; Kaur, N.; Kumar, S.; Chaturvedi, L.; Jain, A. K.; Laxminarayan, S.

    2014-08-14

    Excited states of {sup 127}I were populated via {sup 124}Sn({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}nγ){sup 127}I fusion-evaporation reaction at beam energy of 33 MeV. Multipolarities of several transitions were determined and spins of corresponding states have been confirmed. The band-head spin and parity of an already reported band at 2901.2 keV has been confirmed. Based on the observed characteristic features and by comparing with the systematics of odd mass iodine nuclei, a πg{sub 7/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2}{sup 2} configuration has been proposed for this band. The experimental B(M1)/B(E2) values for πg{sub 7/2} band were compared with the theoretical results of semi classical model of Frauendorf and Donau and found in well agreement.

  14. THE KEPLER CLUSTER STUDY: STELLAR ROTATION IN NGC 6811

    SciTech Connect

    Meibom, Soeren; Latham, David W.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Furesz, Gabor; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew H.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Barnes, Sydney A.; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Haas, Michael R.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Basri, Gibor; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Janes, Kenneth A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2011-05-20

    We present rotation periods for 71 single dwarf members of the open cluster NGC 6811 determined using photometry from NASA's Kepler mission. The results are the first from The Kepler Cluster Study, which combines Kepler's photometry with ground-based spectroscopy for cluster membership and binarity. The rotation periods delineate a tight sequence in the NGC 6811 color-period diagram from {approx}1 day at mid-F to {approx}11 days at early-K spectral type. This result extends to 1 Gyr similar prior results in the {approx}600 Myr Hyades and Praesepe clusters, suggesting that rotation periods for cool dwarf stars delineate a well-defined surface in the three-dimensional space of color (mass), rotation, and age. It implies that reliable ages can be derived for field dwarf stars with measured colors and rotation periods, and it promises to enable further understanding of various aspects of stellar rotation and activity for cool stars.

  15. Neural basis for eye velocity generation in the vestibular nuclei of alert monkeys during off-vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisine, H.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Activity of "vestibular only" (VO) and "vestibular plus saccade" (VPS) units was recorded in the rostral part of the medial vestibular nucleus and caudal part of the superior vestibular nucleus of alert rhesus monkeys. By estimating the "null axes" of recorded units (n = 79), the optimal plane of activation was approximately the mean plane of reciprocal semicircular canals, i.e., lateral canals, left anterior-right posterior (LARP) canals or right anterior-left posterior (RALP) canals. All units were excited by rotation in a direction that excited a corresponding ipsilateral semicircular canal. Thus, they all displayed a "type I" response. With the animal upright, there were rapid changes in firing rates of both VO and VPS units in response to steps of angular velocity about a vertical axis. The units were bidirectionally activated during vestibular nystagmus (VN), horizontal optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) and off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR). The rising and falling time constants of the responses to rotation indicated that they were closely linked to velocity storage. There were differences between VPS and VO neurons in that activity of VO units followed the expected time course in response to a stimulus even during periods of drowsiness, when eye velocity was reduced. Firing rates of VPS units, on the other hand, were significantly reduced in the drowsy state. Lateral canal-related units had average firing rates that were linearly related to the bias or steady state level of horizontal eye velocity during OVAR over a range of +/- 60 deg/s. These units could be further divided into two classes according to whether they were modulated during OVAR. Non-modulated units (n = 5) were VO types and all modulated units (n = 5) were VPS types. There was no significant difference between the bias level sensitivities relative to eye velocity of the units with and without modulation (P > 0.05). The modulated units had no sustained change in

  16. Job Rotation at Cardiff University Library Service: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earney, Sally; Martins, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents case study research of a job rotation pilot involving six library assistants in Cardiff University Library Service (ULS). Firstly, it investigates whether job rotation improves motivation and secondly, whether there is an improvement in skills, both technical and "soft". Following a review of the literature, semi-structured…

  17. Continuum radiation from active galactic nuclei: A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, T.; Feigelson, E. D.; Singh, K. P.; Kembhavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of the continuum spectrum of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was examined using a large data set and rigorous statistical methods. A data base was constructed for 469 objects which include radio selected quasars, optically selected quasars, X-ray selected AGNs, BL Lac objects, and optically unidentified compact radio sources. Each object has measurements of its radio, optical, X-ray core continuum luminosity, though many of them are upper limits. Since many radio sources have extended components, the core component were carefully selected out from the total radio luminosity. With survival analysis statistical methods, which can treat upper limits correctly, these data can yield better statistical results than those previously obtained. A variety of statistical tests are performed, such as the comparison of the luminosity functions in different subsamples, and linear regressions of luminosities in different bands. Interpretation of the results leads to the following tentative conclusions: the main emission mechanism of optically selected quasars and X-ray selected AGNs is thermal, while that of BL Lac objects is synchrotron; radio selected quasars may have two different emission mechanisms in the X-ray band; BL Lac objects appear to be special cases of the radio selected quasars; some compact radio sources show the possibility of synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) in the optical band; and the spectral index between the optical and the X-ray bands depends on the optical luminosity.

  18. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Multifrequency study of the nuclei of SBC galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, M. B.; Davies, R. D.; Pedlar, A.; Axon, D. J.; Hummel, E.

    1989-07-01

    A sample of 100 Sbc galaxies has been observed at different wavelengths and resolutions. The ultimate aim of the project is to probe the origin of their nuclear activity (e.g., blackhole, starbust, etc.). The results from radio observations with the VLA (New Mexico) at 20 and 6 cm wavelength, with a resolution of 1-2 arc sec, for the inner kpc of nineteen sources are presented. Six of the galaxies show extended emission consistent with starburst activity. The remaining thirteen are unresolved or marginally resolved compact sources. Their steep spectra indicate synchrotron emission. They show total nuclear energies similar to those found for a sample of Seyfert galaxies. Optical spectroscopic observations with a similar resolution to the radio data have been made for approximately 90 galaxies. A sample of the derived rotation curves is included.

  20. Study of Exotic Weakly Bound Nuclei Using Magnetic Analyzer Mavr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. A.; Kazacha, V. I.; Kolesov, I. V.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Melnikov, V. N.; Osipov, N. F.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Skobelev, N. K.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Voskoboinik, E. I.

    2016-06-01

    A project of the high-resolution magnetic analyzer MAVR is proposed. The analyzer will comprise new magnetic optical and detecting systems for separation and identification of reaction products in a wide range of masses (5-150) and charges (1-60). The magnetic optical system consists of the MSP-144 magnet and a doublet of quadrupole lenses. This will allow the solid angle of the spectrometer to be increased by an order of magnitude up to 30 msr. The magnetic analyzer will have a high momentum resolution (10-4) and high focal-plane dispersion (1.9 m). It will allow products of nuclear reactions at energies up to 30 MeV/nucleon to be detected with the charge resolution ∼1/60. Implementation of the project is divided into two stages: conversion of the magnetic analyzer proper and construction of the nuclear reaction products identification system. The MULTI detecting system is being developed for the MAVR magnetic analyzer to allow detection of nuclear reaction products and their identification by charge Q, atomic number Z, and mass A with a high absolute accuracy. The identification will be performed by measuring the energy loss (ΔE), time of flight (TOF), and total kinetic energy (TKE) of reaction products. The particle trajectories in the analyzer will also be determined using the drift chamber developed jointly with GANIL. The MAVR analyzer will operate in both primary beams of heavy ions and beams of radioactive nuclei produced by the U400 - U400M acceleration complex. It will also be used for measuring energy spectra of nuclear reaction products and as an energy monochromator.

  1. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei far from stability at TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The ISOL facility, TRISTAN, is a user facility located at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor. Short-lived, neutron-rich nuclei, far from stability, are produced by thermal neutron fission of /sup 235/U. An extensive array of experimental end stations are available for nuclear structure studies. These studies are augmented by a variety of long-lived ion sources suitable for use at a reactor facility. Some recent results at TRISTAN are presented as examples of using an ISOL facility to study series of nuclei, whereby an effective means of conducting nuclear structure investigations is available.

  2. Study of Isoscalar Giant Resonances in Exotic Nuclei by Means of Inverse Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in exotic nuclei can be studied using inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics. In particular, the compression modes, i.e. isoscalar giant monopole and dipole resonances, are very interesting because they can furnish information on the different terms of the nuclear incompressibility, especially if measured in long isotopic chains including nuclei far from the valley of stability. As beams of exotic nuclei have relatively low intensities thick targets have to be used in order to get a reasonable yield. However, this leads to degradation of the energy resolution and stops low-energy recoil particles. Two good alternatives exist. The first method is to use an active target, such as MAYA, which is a time-projection chamber and therefore can be used for detection of low-energy recoil particles. Furthermore, its thickness can be increased by increasing the length of the detection volume or the gas pressure without severe loss of energy resolution. The second method is to use a storage ring for storing the exotic nuclei, which then interact with target nuclei from a gas-jet target. Here, the luminosity and hence the yield are increased because the exotic nuclei circulate in the ring at a frequency of around 106 turns/s. Low-energy recoil particles traverse the gas-jet with little loss of energy and can be detected in solid-state detectors. Pioneering experiments with both methods have been performed for inelastic scattering of secondary 56Ni beam off helium nuclei. Here, preliminary results of the experiment with the active target MAYA will be presented.

  3. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  4. The study of the physics of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    The observations of comet P/Holmes 1892III, exhibiting two 8 to 10 magnitude bursts, were carefully analyzed. The phenomena are consistent with the grazing encounter of a small satellite with the nucleus. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3 hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the final encounter, the spin period was essentially unchanged, but two areas became active, separated some 164 deg in longitude on the nucleus. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes, while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst (barely naked eye at maximum) while the nucleus frequently stellar after the first day. It seems reasonable to conclude that the grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  5. Fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei: a general method for studying nuclei from specific cell populations that preserves post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Marion-Poll, Lucile; Montalban, Enrica; Munier, Annie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Long-lasting brain alterations that underlie learning and memory are triggered by synaptic activity. How activity can exert long-lasting effects on neurons is a major question in neuroscience. Signalling pathways from cytoplasm to nucleus and the resulting changes in transcription and epigenetic modifications are particularly relevant in this context. However, a major difficulty in their study comes from the cellular heterogeneity of brain tissue. A promising approach is to directly purify identified nuclei. Using mouse striatum we have developed a rapid and efficient method for isolating cell type-specific nuclei from fixed adult brain (fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei; FAST-FIN). Animals are quickly perfused with a formaldehyde fixative that stops enzymatic reactions and maintains the tissue in the state it was at the time of death, including nuclear localisation of soluble proteins such as GFP and differences in nuclear size between cell types. Tissue is subsequently dissociated with a Dounce homogeniser and nuclei prepared by centrifugation in an iodixanol density gradient. The purified fixed nuclei can then be immunostained with specific antibodies and analysed or sorted by flow cytometry. Simple criteria allow distinction of neurons and non-neuronal cells. Immunolabelling and transgenic mice that express fluorescent proteins can be used to identify specific cell populations, and the nuclei from these populations can be efficiently isolated, even rare cell types such as parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. FAST-FIN allows the preservation and study of dynamic and labile post-translational protein modifications. It should be applicable to other tissues and species, and allow study of DNA and its modifications.

  6. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in {alpha}-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyvaeskylae) are also highlighted.The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region - spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  7. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-01

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in α-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyväskylä) are also highlighted. The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region — spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  8. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock Study of Octupole Vibrations in doubly magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simenel, C.; Buete, J.; Vo-Phuoc, K.

    2016-09-01

    Octupole vibrations are studied in some doubly magic nuclei using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. Through the use of the linear response theory, the energies and transition amplitudes of the low-lying vibrational modes for each of the nuclei were determined. Energies were found to be close to experimental results. However, transition amplitudes, quantified by the deformation parameter β3, are underestimated by TDHF. A comparison with single-particle excitations on the Hartree-Fock ground-state shows that the collective octupole vibrations have their energy lowered due to attractive RPA residual interaction.

  9. Calculation of the Transition from Pairing Vibrational to Pairing Rotational Regimes between Magic Nuclei {sup 100}Sn and {sup 132}Sn via Two-Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Potel, G.; Barranco, F.; Marini, F.; Idini, A.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2011-08-26

    Absolute values of two-particle transfer cross sections along the Sn-isotopic chain are calculated. They agree with measurements within errors and without free parameters. Within this scenario, the predictions concerning the absolute value of the two-particle transfer cross sections associated with the excitation of the pairing vibrational spectrum expected around the recently discovered closed shell nucleus {sub 50}{sup 132}Sn{sub 82} and the very exotic nucleus {sub 50}{sup 100}Sn{sub 50} can be considered quantitative, opening new perspectives in the study of pairing in nuclei.

  10. Alternating-parity collective states of yrast and nonyrast bands in lanthanide and actinide nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nadirbekov, M. S. Yuldasheva, G. A.; Denisov, V. Yu.

    2015-03-15

    Excited collective states of even-even nuclei featuring quadrupole and octupole deformations are studied within a nonadiabatic collective model with a Gaussian potential energy. Rotational states of the yrast band and vibrational-rotational states of nonyrast bands are considered in detail. The energies of alternating-parity excited states of the yrast band in the {sup 164}Er, {sup 220}Ra, and {sup 224}Th nuclei; the yrast and first nonyrast bands in the {sup 154}Sm and {sup 160}Gd nuclei; and the yrast, first nonyrast, and second nonyrast bands in the {sup 224}Ra and {sup 240}Pu nuclei are described well on the basis of the proposed model.

  11. Round Robin Study of Rotational Strain Rheometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, M.J.

    2000-02-16

    A round robin of testing was performed to compare the performance of rotational dynamic mechanical spectrometers being used within the nuclear weapons complex. Principals from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico; Lockheed Martin Y12 Plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (polycarbonate only); and Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T), Kansas City, MO, performed identical testing of hydrogen blown polysiloxane S5370 and bisphenol-A polycarbonate. Over an oscillation frequency sweep from 0.01 Hz to 15.9 Hz at 135 C, each site produced shear storage modulus values with standard deviations of less than 5%. The data from Sandia, Y12, and Kansas City agreed to within 4%, while the Los Alamos data differed by as much as 13%. Storage modulus values for a frequency sweep of the S5370 at 35 C had standard deviations between 6% and 8%, and site-to-site agreement averaged 3%. The shear loss modulus values had standard deviations of 5%, 7%, and 52% for the sites participating, while the results differed by 12% on average.

  12. Numerical studies of Siberian snakes and spin rotators for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1995-04-17

    For the program of polarized protons in RHIC, two Siberian snakes and four spin rotators per ring will be used. The Snakes will produce a complete spin flip. Spin Rotators, in pairs, will rotate the spin from the vertical direction to the horizontal plane at a given insertion, and back to the vertical after the insertion. Snakes, 180{degrees} apart and with their axis of spin precession at 90{degrees} to each other, are an effective means to avoid depolarization of the proton beam in traversing resonances. Classical snakes and rotators are made with magnetic solenoids or with a sequence of magnetic dipoles with fields alternately directed in the radial and vertical direction. Another possibility is to use helical magnets, essentially twisted dipoles, in which the field, transverse the axis of the magnet, continuously rotates as the particles proceed along it. After some comparative studies, the authors decided to adopt for RHIC an elegant solution with four helical magnets both for the snakes and the rotators proposed by Shatunov and Ptitsin. In order to simplify the construction of the magnets and to minimize cost, four identical super conducting helical modules will be used for each device. Snakes will be built with four right-handed helices. Spin rotators with two right-handed and two left-handed helices. The maximum field will be limited to 4 Tesla. While small bore helical undulators have been built for free electron lasers, large super conducting helical magnets have not been built yet. In spite of this difficulty, this choice is dictated by some distinctive advantages of helical over more conventional transverse snakes/rotators: (i) the devices are modular, they can be built with arrangements of identical modules, (ii) the maximum orbit excursion in the magnet is smaller, (iii) orbit excursion is independent from the separation between adjacent magnets, (iv) they allow an easier control of the spin rotation and the orientation of the spin precession axis.

  13. Quantitative experimental studies of spontaneous rotations of bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Er, Avraham; Kofman, Richard; Phillipp, Fritz; Lereah, Yossi

    2006-12-01

    A phenomenon of spontaneous rotations of Bi nanoparticles is reported. Fourier transform (FT) analysis of the high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) images indicates that the rotations occur by plane after plane gliding rather than a collective movement of the entire particle as a rigid body. The phenomenon rate was studied quantitatively by time resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The origin of the phenomenon as a radiation effect of the high voltage electron beam was excluded by finding the same rates at 200kV and 1250kV electron beams, below and above the threshold for the knock-on process. The dependence of phenomenon rate on the particles’ size was found to be inversely proportional to the particle volume, with a threshold at particle radius of 5nm . The temperature was found to activate both the probability for a particle to be in the rotating state, and the rotation rate.

  14. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, S.

    2014-08-14

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ≃ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  15. Study on frozen nuclei in the winter season in the northern mountains of Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, J. L.; Sánchez, J. L.; Posada, R.; Gascón, E.; Fernández, S.; Hermida, L.; García-Ortega, E.; López, L.

    2012-04-01

    In the Framework of Studies that the Group for Atmospheric Physics from the University of León has been developing about winter precipitation in the mountains of Madrid, one of the experimental objectives consists of the measurement of concentration (L-1) of frozen nuclei (IN) at the ground level, using an isothermal cloud chamber. The Experimental Center is found in the reservoir in Sierra Guadarrama, located about 50 km north of Madrid, at a height of 1294 meters above sea level. The sample is of 234 days, of which 119 showed precipitation, corresponding to three winter seasons (2008/2009, 2009/2010 and 2010/2011). The chamber is capable of operating at different temperatures. Making use of past experiences, we set the working temperature at -23°C. The principle objectives of the study were, on one hand, to determine the distribution of nuclei concentrations, and on the other, to analyze if this distribution presented similar behaviour, extracting days with precipitation from the sample. The results show that the concentration of nuclei is low. To be exact, on 75% of the days analyzed, this statistic did not exceed 25 L-1. With respect to the second objective described, we saw that the distribution of the concentration stayed very similar in those days in which ground precipitation was registered. In other words, precipitation was not associated with an increase in the number of nuclei. Finally, given the relative proximity of the Experimental Center to the city of Madrid, we took measurements of aerosols to analyze their possible influence on the presence of the nuclei. The results did not allow us to infer a statistically significant relationship between both concentrations. Acknowledgements This study was supported by the following grants: CEN20091028; GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22 ) and LE220A11-2 (Junta de Castilla y León).

  16. Multiwavelength Studies of Rotating Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joshua J.

    Seven years ago, a new class of pulsars called the Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) was discovered with the Parkes radio telescope in Australia (McLaughlin et al., 2006). These neutron stars are characterized by strong radio bursts at repeatable dispersion measures, but not detectable using standard periodicity-search algorithms. We now know of roughly 100 of these objects, discovered in new surveys and re-analysis of archival survey data. They generally have longer periods than those of the normal pulsar population, and several have high magnetic fields, similar to those other neutron star populations like the X-ray bright magnetars. However, some of the RRATs have spin-down properties very similar to those of normal pulsars, making it difficult to determine the cause of their unusual emission and possible evolutionary relationships between them and other classes of neutron stars. We have calculated single-pulse flux densities for eight RRAT sources observed using the Parkes radio telescope. Like normal pulsars, the pulse amplitude distributions are well described by log-normal probability distribution functions, though two show evidence for an additional power-law tail. Spectral indices are calculated for the seven RRATs which were detected at multiple frequencies. These RRATs have a mean spectral index of = -3.2(7), or = -3.1(1) when using mean flux densities derived from fitting log-normal probability distribution functions to the pulse amplitude distributions, suggesting that the RRATs have steeper spectra than normal pulsars. When only considering the three RRATs for which we have a wide range of observing frequencies, however, and become --1.7(1) and --2.0(1), respectively, and are roughly consistent with those measured for normal pulsars. In all cases, these spectral indices exclude magnetar-like flat spectra. For PSR J1819--1458, the RRAT with the highest bursting rate, pulses were detected at 685 and 3029

  17. Application of the string method to the study of critical nuclei in capillary condensation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunyin; Qian, Tiezheng; Ren, Weiqing

    2008-10-21

    We adopt a continuum description for liquid-vapor phase transition in the framework of mean-field theory and use the string method to numerically investigate the critical nuclei for capillary condensation in a slit pore. This numerical approach allows us to determine the critical nuclei corresponding to saddle points of the grand potential function in which the chemical potential is given in the beginning. The string method locates the minimal energy path (MEP), which is the most probable transition pathway connecting two metastable/stable states in configuration space. From the MEP, the saddle point is determined and the corresponding energy barrier also obtained (for grand potential). Moreover, the MEP shows how the new phase (liquid) grows out of the old phase (vapor) along the most probable transition pathway, from the birth of a critical nucleus to its consequent expansion. Our calculations run from partial wetting to complete wetting with a variable strength of attractive wall potential. In the latter case, the string method presents a unified way for computing the critical nuclei, from film formation at solid surface to bulk condensation via liquid bridge. The present application of the string method to the numerical study of capillary condensation shows the great power of this method in evaluating the critical nuclei in various liquid-vapor phase transitions.

  18. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N.; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects.

  19. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2012-06-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects.

  20. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  1. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N.; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects. PMID:22755665

  2. The study of the physics of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Fred L.

    1987-01-01

    The numerical calculations of stability for many possible orbits of the double nucleus for P/Holmes showed that the likelihood of such a precollision history was quite high. A number of investigations were made of hypothetical orbits for particles about the asteroid Amphitrite to test for stability. The purpose was to establish more favorable fly-by orbits close to the asteroid for the Galileo missions en-route to Jupiter, reducing the collisional hazards. A statistical study was made of the orbits of long-period comets with small original semi-major axes recently perturbed from the great Opik-Oort Cloud. The results from the space missions to Halley's comet are partially reported in the two papers in the appendices.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of relativistic effects in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Forest; V. R. Pandharipande; A. Arriaga

    1998-05-01

    Relativistic Hamiltonians are defined as the sum of relativistic one-body kinetic energy, two- and three-body potentials and their boost corrections. In this work the authors use the variational Monte Carlo method to study two kinds of relativistic effects in the binding energy of {sup 3}H and {sup 4}He. The first is due to the nonlocalities in the relativistic kinetic energy and relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and the second is from boost interaction. The OPEP contribution is reduced by about 15% by the relativistic nonlocality, which may also have significant effects on pion exchange currents. However, almost all of this reduction is canceled by changes in the kinetic energy and other interaction terms, and the total effect of the nonlocalities on the binding energy is very small. The boost interactions, on the other hand, give repulsive contributions of 0.4 (1.9) MeV in {sup 3}H ({sup 4}He) and account for 37% of the phenomenological part of the three-nucleon interaction needed in the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians.

  4. Studies of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei with Monte Carlo and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, Guy Louis

    Results from several studies are presented which detail explorations of the physical and spectral properties of low luminosity active galactic nuclei. An initial Sagittarius A* general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation and Monte Carlo radiation transport model suggests accretion rate changes as the dominant flaring method. A similar study on M87 introduces new methods to the Monte Carlo model for increased consistency in highly energetic sources. Again, accretion rate variation seems most appropriate to explain spectral transients. To more closely resolve the methods of particle energization in active galactic nuclei accretion disks, a series of localized shearing box simulations explores the effect of numerical resolution on the development of current sheets. A particular focus on numerically describing converged current sheet formation will provide new methods for consideration of turbulence in accretion disks.

  5. Fluxes and spectra of quasimonochromatic annihilation photons for studying E1 giant resonances in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z.

    2014-12-15

    The fluxes and spectra of quasimonochromatic photons originating from the in-flight annihilation of positrons interacting with electrons of targets are analyzed in the energy region characteristic of the excitation of E1 giant resonances in nuclei. Targets of small thickness and low atomic number are used. The dependences of the spectra on the energy and angle (and their scatter) for positrons incident to the target, on the collimation angle for photons, and on the target thickness are studied.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  7. The Study of Leukocyte Functions in a Rotating Wall Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trial, JoAnn

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the behavior of leukocytes under free-fall conditions in a rotating wall vessel. In such a vessel, the tendency of a cell to fall in response to gravity is opposed by the rotation of the vessel and the culture medium within, keeping the cells in suspension without fluid shear. Previous reports indicated that such functions as lymphocyte migration through collagen matrix or monocyte cytokine secretion are altered under these conditions, and these changes correlate with similar functional defects of cultured cells seen during spaceflight.

  8. Sports Medicine. Clinical Rotation. Instructor's Packet and Student Study Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    The materials in this packet are for a course designed to provide individualized classroom study for a specific area of clinical rotation--sports medicine. The instructor's manual describes the learning objectives together with a list of reference materials that should be provided for completion of the student worksheets, and lists suggested…

  9. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biopysical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-08-02

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.

  10. Critical-point nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-10-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple {Delta}K = 0 and {Delta}K = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested.

  11. Secondary structure of protamine in sperm nuclei: an infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protamines are small basic proteins that condense the DNA in mature spermatozoa. Typical protamines are of simple composition and very arginine-rich, usually in the range of 60-80%. Arginine residues are distributed in a number of stretches separated by neutral amino acids. We have used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to gain access for the first time to the secondary structure of protamines in sperm nuclei. This technique is particularly well suited to the study of DNA-bound protamine in whole nuclei since it is not affected by turbidity. Results We show that DNA -bound salmon (salmine) and squid protamines contain α-helix, β-turns and a proportion of other structures not stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. No β-sheet was observed. In salmine, the α-helix amounted to ~20%, while in squid protamine it reached ~40%. In contrast, the structure not stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding was more abundant in salmine (~40%) than in squid protamine (~20%). Both protamines contained ~40% β-turns. The different helical potential of salmine and squid protamine was confirmed by structure predictions and CD in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Conclusion DNA-bound protamine in sperm nuclei contains large amounts of defined secondary structure stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Both salmine and squid protamine contain similar amounts of β-turns, but differ in the proportions of α-helix and non-hydrogen bonded conformations. In spite of the large differences in the proportions of secondary structure motifs between salmon and squid protamines, they appear to be equally efficient in promoting tight hexagonal packing of the DNA molecules in sperm nuclei. PMID:21435240

  12. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1983-09-15

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo.

  13. An assessment of some methodological criticisms of studies of RNA efflux from isolated nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Agutter, P S

    1983-01-01

    RNA efflux from isolated nuclei can be studied either as a means of elucidating the general mechanism of nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport, or as part of an investigation of the processing and utilization of particular gene transcripts. The present paper describes an assessment of three methodological criticisms of RNA-efflux measurements that are made for the former reason: for such measurements, it is sufficient to show that the post-incubation supernatant RNA is similar overall to homologous cytoplasmic mRNA, rather than to nuclear RNA, that is nevertheless of intranuclear origin, and that alterations to the medium during experiments do not markedly perturb this general nuclear restriction. The results seem to justify the following conclusions. (1) Although degradation of the nuclear RNA occurs during incubation in vitro, this process does not account for the appearance of RNA in the postnuclear supernatant. The degradation can be largely prevented by the addition of serine-proteinase inhibitors without altering the RNA efflux rate. (2) Some adsorption of labelled cytoplasmic RNA to the nuclear surface occurs during both isolation and incubation of the nuclei, and some desorption occurs during incubation. However, these effects introduce errors of less than 10% into the measurements of efflux rates. (3) Exogenous acidic polymers, including polyribonucleotides, disrupt nuclei and increase the apparent RNA efflux rate by causing leakage of nuclear contents. However, this effect can largely be overcome by including the nuclear stabilizers spermidine, Ca2+ and Mn2+ in the medium. In terms of this assessment, it appears that RNA efflux from isolated nuclei in media containing nuclear stabilizers serves as a reasonable model for transport in vivo. PMID:6194787

  14. Numerical Study of Rotating Turbulence with External Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation at 256(exp 3) resolution have been carried out to study the response of isotropic turbulence to the concurrent effects of solid-body rotation and numerical forcing at the large scales. Because energy transfer to the smaller scales is weakened by rotation, energy input from forcing gradually builds up at the large scales, causing the overall kinetic energy to increase. At intermediate wavenumbers the energy spectrum undergoes a transition from a limited k(exp -5/3) inertial range to k(exp -2) scaling recently predicted in the literature. Although the Reynolds stress tensor remains approximately isotropic and three-components, evidence for anisotropy and quasi- two-dimensionality in length scales and spectra in different velocity components and directions is strong. The small scales are found to deviate from local isotropy, primarily as a result of anisotropic transfer to the high wavenumbers. To understand the spectral dynamics of this flow we study the detailed behavior of nonlinear triadic interactions in wavenumber space. Spectral transfer in the velocity component parallel to the axis of rotation is qualitatively similar to that in non-rotating turbulence; however the perpendicular component is characterized by a greatly suppressed energy cascade at high wavenumber and a local reverse transfer at the largest scales. The broader implications of this work are briefly addressed.

  15. Single particle versus collectivity, shapes of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In this article some selected topics of nuclear structure research will be discussed as illustration of the progress reached in this field during the last thirty years. These examples evidence the improvement of our understanding of the atomic nucleus reached on the basis of countless experiments, performed to study both exotic nuclei (nuclei far-off the valley of stability) as well as nuclei under exotic conditions (high excitation energy/temperature or large angular momentum/rotational frequency), using stable and radioactive ion beams. The experimental progress, in parallel to the advancement of modern theoretical descriptions, led us to a much richer view of this fundamental many-body system.

  16. Study of nuclear structure of odd mass 119-127I nuclei in a phenomenological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhanvir; Gupta, Anuradha; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    By using the phenomenological approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), the positive and negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich 119-127I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of backbending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work. Besides this, the reduced transition probabilities, i.e. B (E 2) and B (M 1), are obtained from the PSM wavefunction for the first time for yrast bands of these isotopes.

  17. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three supplementary movies and an experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02254d

  18. Study of the interannual variations of the Earth's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, V. L.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we investigate the variations of the Earth's rotation in the interval of periods from 2 to 8 years using the longest available observational series obtained both by means of astrometry and space geodesy. We found an abrupt change of the variation pattern in the middle of the 1980s, when classical ground-based astrometric facilities for studying the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) were replaced with space geodesy methods. Variations with a 6-year periodicity and ˜0.2-ms amplitude practically disappeared (space geodesy instruments did not detect these variations right from the start), but the 2- to 4-year periodicities increased in amplitude and began to dominate in this frequency range under consideration. In this study, we analyze some possible excitation sources and possible causes of the change in the variability pattern.

  19. Microwave Rotational Spectral Study of SO2-CO

    PubMed Central

    Lovas, F. J.; Sprague, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The microwave spectrum of the molecular complex of sulfur dioxide (SO2) with carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied with a pulsed-beam Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer (FTMW) from a pair of gas samples of 1 % by volume of SO2 and CO in Ar, and introduced via separate capillary inputs to the flow nozzle. The frequency coverage was about 7 GHz to 16 GHz for various isotopomers. The molecular structure was determined with the aid of spectral studies of isotopically substituted monomers containing 13C, 18O and 34S. The rotational analyses provide the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for all of the isotopomers analyzed. The structure determination is compared to detailed ab initio structural calculations. The electric dipole moment components along the a- and c-axis were determined from Stark effect measurements. PMID:27239070

  20. Ultracold Rotational Quenching Study of CO with H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2016-05-01

    Cooling and trapping of polar molecules have stimulated research in precise monitoring and controlling dynamics in ultracold regime. There has been considerable interest in the study of molecular inelastic collision processes at cold and ultracold temperatures. Collisional study of polar interstellar species CO, adds an additional astrophysical importance to model interstellar medium. Present work focuses on rotational quenching of abundant interstellar species, CO with H+ using quantum-mechanical scattering calculation. Rate coefficients for molecular rotational transitions of CO due to collision with H+ are obtained in the range of 10-5 K to 200 K from cross sections which are computed using close coupling calculations as implemented in MOLSCAT. The data generated from ultracold to higher temperatures assist in investigating the chemistry of interstellar clouds. Calculations are performed on ground state ab initio potential energy surface using MRCI/cc-pVTZ method. Rotational transitions are studied in the rigid-rotor approximation with CO bond length fixed at an equilibrium value of 2.138 a.u. Asymptotic potentials are computed using the dipole and quadrupole moments, and the dipole polarizability components.

  1. Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha

    2012-06-27

    The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

  2. Theoretical study of evaporation cross sections in the synthesis of very neutron-deficient nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengbin; Zhang Jinjuan; Ren, Z. Z.

    2011-07-15

    The synthesis of rare-earth neutron-deficient nuclei with large Z/N ratio {approx_equal}0.88 is studied within the framework of the standard statistical model. The fusion cross sections are calculated on the basis of the nuclear reaction video model. The deexcitation process is calculated with the help of the statistical code alice. It is found that the excitation functions can be predicted using a few exited experimental data by carefully choosing the input parameters in the statistical model. The results obtained show that a satisfactory description of the experimental evaporation cross sections requires a great reduction in the theoretical fission barriers.

  3. SuperB: An opportunity to study baryons with beauty and bottom super-nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliciello, A.

    2012-05-01

    SuperB is an INFN flagship project for a new high-luminosity heavy-flavor factory. Along with its companion detector, it is dedicated to the search for CP violation effects in the B meson sector with the aim of looking for direct and indirect signals of new physics, beyond the Standard Model. However it could offer as well the opportunity for a systematic, high-statistics study of b baryon properties and for a search for bottom super-nuclei, that is bound nuclear systems with an explicit content of beauty.

  4. Studies for slowly rotating asteroids (168) Sibylla and (346) Hermentaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobin; Muinonen, Karri; Han, Xianming L.; Kwok, Chi-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Studies for spin parameters and shapes of asteroids provide us with important information about the interior structure of asteroids and the physical processes they have undergone. A large sample of basic physical parameters can help us also understand the evolution of asteroids. There is scarce information for slowly-rotating larger asteroids because more effort is required for observing them. Because of this, we have established an international collaboration to study slowly-rotating asteroids. As the first step of this project, we have observed asteroids (168) Sibylla and (346) Hermentaria in 2014 and 2015 using several telescopes located in China, Chile, and U.S.A. Combining previous photometric data with our new data, we have performed preliminary analyses and obtained spin parameters and shapes with their uncertainties for these two slowly-rotating asteroids for the first time, using the convex inversion method and the virtual photometry Monte Carlo method. A pair of pole solutions for (168) Sibylla are found around (4.3°, 53.5°) and (183.5°, 52.6°) with a period of 47.0000 h. We have found that the shape of Sibylla resembles an oblate spheroid. For (346) Hermentaria, we have also found a pair of pole solutions around (134.5°, 16.7°) and (321.5°, 14.5°) with comparable rms-values with a spin period of about 17.79000 h, and a shape resembling a prolate spheroid.

  5. Experimental studies of magnetorotational instability in differentially rotating cylindrical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawn, Barbara; Lathrop, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Given the ubiquity of rotating disks in the observable universe (e.g., galaxies, planetary rings, protoplanetary disks and accretion disks around compact objects), understanding differentially rotating, electrically conducting flows is of considerable astrophysical interest. Theoretical and numerical studies indicate that infall and accretion of orbiting material can result from a so-called magnetorotational instability (MRI) arising in such flows. Recent experimental work suggests that MRI is observable in a laboratory setting; inspired by these observations, we are building a sodium Taylor-Couette experiment, comprised of a stationary 30 cm diameter outer cylinder and a rotating 15 cm diameter inner cylinder, with liquid sodium filling the gap between the cylinders. Numerical studies indicate that MRI arises in this geometry in the presence of an external magnetic field; we will impose on the sodium flow a uniform axial magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils at either end of the experiment. We will use ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to examine the turbulent sodium flow, and a Hall probe array to examine the induced magnetic field of the system, and will relate our observations to theoretical and numerical expectations.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  7. Study of RNA Polymerase II Clustering inside Live-Cell Nuclei Using Bayesian Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanze; Wei, Mian; Zheng, M Mocarlo; Zhao, Jiaxi; Hao, Huiwen; Chang, Lei; Xi, Peng; Sun, Yujie

    2016-02-23

    Nanoscale spatiotemporal clustering of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) plays an important role in transcription regulation. However, dynamics of individual Pol II clusters in live-cell nuclei has not been measured directly, prohibiting in-depth understanding of their working mechanisms. In this work, we studied the dynamics of Pol II clustering using Bayesian nanoscopy in live mammalian cell nuclei. With 50 nm spatial resolution and 4 s temporal resolution, Bayesian nanoscopy allows direct observation of the assembly and disassembly dynamics of individual Pol II clusters. The results not only provide quantifications of Pol II clusters but also shed light on the understanding of cluster formation and regulation. Our study suggests that transcription factories form on-demand and recruit Pol II molecules in their pre-elongation phase. The assembly and disassembly of individual Pol II clusters take place asynchronously. Overall, the methods developed herein are also applicable to studying a wide realm of real-time nanometer-scale nuclear processes in live cells.

  8. Changes in the structure of nuclei between the magic neutron numbers 50 and 82 as indicated by a rotating-cluster analysis of the energy values of the first 2j excited states of isotopes of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1981-09-01

    Values of R, the radius of rotation of the rotating cluster, are calculated from the observed values of the energy of the lowest 2/sup +/ states of the even isotopes of Cd, Sn, and Te with the assumption that the cluster is ..cap alpha.., pb, and ..cap alpha.., respectively. R shows a maximum at approx. N = 58, a minimum at approx. N = 62, and a second maximum at approx. N = 70. The increase to the first maximum is interpreted as resulting from the overcrowding of spherons (alphas and tritons) in the mantle (outer layer) of the nuclei, causing the cluster to change from rotating in the mantle to skimming over its surface; the decrease to the minimum results from the addition of three dineutrons to the core, expanding the mantle and permitting the rotating cluster to begin to drop back into it; and the increase to the second maximum results from the overcrowding of the larger mantle surrounding the core containing the semimagic number 14 of neutrons rather than the magic numbers 8 for N = 50. The decrease after the second maximum results from the further increase in the number of core neutrons to 20, corresponding to the magic number 82. Some additional evidence for the change to an intermediate structure between N = 50 and N = 82 is also discussed.

  9. Number and spatial distribution of nuclei in the muscle fibres of normal mice studied in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bruusgaard, J C; Liestøl, K; Ekmark, M; Kollstad, K; Gundersen, K

    2003-01-01

    We present here a new technique with which to visualize nuclei in living muscle fibres in the intact animal, involving injection of labelled DNA into single cells. This approach allowed us to determine the position of all of nuclei within a sarcolemma without labelling satellite cells. In contrast to what has been reported in tissue culture, we found that the nuclei were immobile, even when observed over several days. Nucleic density was uniform along the fibre except for the endplate and some myotendinous junctions, where the density was higher. The perijunctional region had the same number of nuclei as the rest of the fibre. In the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, the extrajunctional nuclei were elongated and precisely aligned to the long axis of the fibre. In the soleus, the nuclei were rounder and not well aligned. When comparing small and large fibres in the soleus, the number of nuclei varied approximately in proportion to cytoplasmic volume, while in the EDL the number was proportional to surface area. Statistical analysis revealed that the nuclei were not randomly distributed in either the EDL or the soleus. For each fibre, actual distributions were compared with computer simulations in which nuclei were assumed to repel each other, which optimizes the distribution of nuclei with respect to minimizing transport distances. The simulated patterns were regular, with clear row-like structures when the density of nuclei was low. The non-random and often row-like distribution of nuclei observed in muscle fibres may thus reflect regulatory mechanisms whereby nuclei repel each other in order to minimize transport distances. PMID:12813146

  10. Neogene rotations in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau: a synthesis of paleomagnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M.; Fang, X.; Song, C.; Zhang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism can quantitative determine tectonic rotations around a vertical axis and test geodynamic models concerning the kinematics of the India-Asia collision. However, so far paleomagnetic studies in the northeastern (NE) Tibetan Plateau are still difficult to relate tectonic rotations to regional geodynamics, due to poor age control and some discordant paleomagnetic results on the studied rocks. Recent three magnetostratigraphic based rotation studies around the NE Tibetan Plateau have successfully revealed rotation variations through time, all indicating the existences of multiple rotation patterns during the late Neogene. Given recent large numbers of magnetostratigraphic studies and the possible existence of multiple changes in the sense and magnitude of rotations, the averaging of which possibly have resulted in the discordant paleomagnetic rotations, to better understand the Neogene rotations of the NE Tibetan Plateau, we report here new rotation studies through synthesizing available well dated magnetostratigraphic results of the region. A total of eight basin magnetostratigraphic results are utilized. These are the Kunlun, Qaidam, Jiuquan, Chaka, Guide, Linxia, Tianshui and Liupanshan basins. The analyses of paleomagnetic declination variations through time of these basins indicate that significant rotations have occurred around the NE Tibetan Plateau: although rotations close to the major faults are complicated, (1) within the NE Tibetan Plateau, it indicates an overall pattern of insignificant rotations before 11 Ma, significant clockwise rotations since ~11-8 Ma, with accelerated rotations or switch of rotation patterns since ~5-3 Ma; and the magnitude of clockwise rotations decreases from the west (Qaidam and Guide Basins) of ~30 degree to the east (Linxia and Tianshui Basins) of ~10 degree; (2) outside of the plateau, it in general shows a trend of clockwise rotations before 11 Ma, and significant counterclockwise rotations after that.

  11. A numerical study of rapidly rotating magneto-convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmach, S.; Raabe, W.; Hansen, U.

    2006-12-01

    Convective flows of low viscosity fluids under the combined influence of strong rotational and Lorentz forces are believed to generate the magnetic fields of the Earth and other terrestrial planets. We investigate the dynamics of such flows in a simple, idealized model. Convection currents are generated in an electrically conducting fluid layer by a fixed temperature difference between the lower and the upper boundary. A horizontal, homogenous magnetic field is externally imposed. The whole system rapidly rotates about a vertical axis. Direct numerical simulations are carried out for a wide range of control parameter values. The simulations reveal that the amplitude and the spatial and temporal scales of the convective flow strongly depend on the imposed field strength. We demonstrate that states of relatively ordered, small scale convection which emerge for weak imposed fields undergo a transition to turbulent, high amplitude states as the imposed field strength is increased. Large convection cells develop which allow for an efficient heat transport and organize the magnetic field into an approximate Taylor state. We present a systematic parameter study and discuss the influence of the various control parameters on the transition described above. The dynamics of the strong field states is studied in detail. We further analyze the strength of the α-effect in our system and study its quenching behavior. An attempt is made to compare the efficiency of spectral and finite volume codes for this problem.

  12. Using oocyte nuclei for studies on chromatin structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, John

    2010-05-01

    The giant nucleus of amphibian oocytes is generally referred to as the germinal vesicle (GV). Its size allows relatively easy manual isolation from the rest of the oocyte and also presents a large target in situ for microinjection of macromolecules including plasmid DNA, RNA species, antibodies and other proteins and even whole organelles, including somatic cell nuclei. Thus the use of GVs is excellent for two major types of study: the function of endogenous nuclear processes such as gene transcription, RNA processing and intra-nuclear dynamics; and the use of the nuclear components to effect processes such as chromatin assembly, expression of foreign genes and nucleocytoplasmic transport of injected biomolecules. This article outlines some basic techniques appropriate for GV studies, particularly the preparation of oocytes for microinjection and the isolation of germinal vesicles into an oil phase. As an aid to the targeting of the GV within the nucleus, descriptions are given of the use of oocytes from albino animals.

  13. Quantal radiation from macroscopic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V.; Plujko, V.

    1988-09-01

    Macroscopic rotation of deformed excited nuclei may under certain conditions be accompanied by radiation of quasi-discrete gamma rays which resemble the cascade of transitions between nuclear rotational states.

  14. The joint observation and study project for slowly rotating asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobin; Muninonen, karri; Han, Xianming L.; Wang, Yibo

    2015-08-01

    The study for the spin rates and shapes of asteroids provides us important information to understand asteroids' structure and their physical processes. For example, a single Maxwellian distribution of the spin rates of larger asteroids (e.g. larger than 50km in diameter) reflects they had undergone collison history; a more dispersed distribution of smaller asteroids may be associated with the affect of radiation pressure torques( Pravec& Harris2000). Therefore, larger samples of spin parameters are needed for understanding deeply the evolution of asteroids. Meanwhile, some special subsets of asteroids, such as the slow rotators which probably represent a different physical process for asteroids, can open other windows to understand asteroids. Here we focus on a subset of larger asteroids with spin rates around 1 or 0.5 revolution per day. For these asteroids, the same rotational phases are observed repeatly by a telescope in different time. Under such cases, some ambigous spin periods are guessed, and it is impossible to determine their shapes. For determining the accurate spin parameters and shapes of these asteroids, a collaboration among several countries was established in 2014. Till now, the joint observations for a few of slow rotators have been made by several different telescopes distributed in China, USA and Chile. As samples, here we present new jiont observations in 2014 and analysis results for asteroids (346) Hermentaria and (168) Sibylla.Considering reasonable shapes of asteroids, the spin parameters of the two asteroids are analyzed carefully. Firstly, the procedure of analysis involves the MCMC method to find the initial spin parameters, which is based on a triaxial ellipsoid shape and a Lommel-Seeliger surface scattering law(Muinonen et al.2014). Then, the fine spin parameters accompanying with uncertainties and convex shapes of the asteroids are derived using the light curve inversion method(Kaasalainen et al 2002) and virtual photometric method

  15. A systematic study of brainstem motor nuclei in a mouse model of ALS, the effects of lithium.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Michela; Spalloni, Alida; Bartalucci, Alessia; Cantafora, Emanuela; Fulceri, Federica; Nutini, Michele; Longone, Patrizia; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1) mutant at position 93 (G93A) develop a phenotype resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In fact, G93A mice develop progressive motor deficits which finally lead to motor palsy and death. This is due to the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Although a similar loss is reported for specific cranial motor nuclei, only a few studies so far investigated degeneration in a few brainstem nuclei. We recently reported that chronic lithium administration delays onset and duration of the disease, while reducing degeneration of spinal motor neuron. In the present study, we extended this investigation to all somatic motor nuclei of the brain stem in the G93A mice and we evaluated whether analogous protective effects induced by lithium in the spinal cord were present at the brain stem level. We found that all motor but the oculomotor nuclei were markedly degenerated in G93A mice, and chronic treatment with lithium significantly attenuated neurodegeneration in the trigeminal, facial, ambiguus, and hypoglossal nuclei. Moreover, in the hypoglossal nucleus, we found that recurrent collaterals were markedly lost in G93A mice while they were rescued by chronic lithium administration.

  16. Study of resonances in light nuclei for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz Calderon, Sergio Jesus

    Resonances in exotic nuclei play a central role in the nucleosynthesis processes occurring in the stars. Nuclear reactions proceed through resonance states in exotic nuclei. This dissertation reports on measurements of resonances in 18Ne, 30S and 9Be. The radioactive nucleus 18Ne was studied via the 16O(3He, n) reaction. These resonances are relevant in understanding one of the two breakout paths from the Hot Carbon-Oxygen-Nitrogen (HCNO) cycle. Neutrons from this reaction were measured in coincidence with charged particles from the decay of resonances in 18Ne to directly extract the charged particle branching ratios of the populated resonance states. Significant alpha branching ratios coming from the resonances at Eex = 7.95 MeV and Eex = 8.09 MeV were measured for the first time. Evidence of an exotic 2p decay is indicated from the state at Eex = 6.15 MeV. The results from this work allows for a more reliable calculation of the 14O( alpha, p)17F reaction rate, central in the breakout of the HCNO cycle and in the direct competition between alphap-process and the rp-process for the flow of nuclear material in the proton rich side of the valley of stability. The exotic nucleus 30S was studied via the 28 Si(3He, n) transfer reaction. Neutrons from this reaction were measured in coincidence with charged particle decays from the populated resonance states in 30S. Several states above Eex = 8.5 MeV are reported for the first time. For the states measured between the proton decay threshold and the alpha decay threshold, the branching ratios were extracted and used to tentatively assign spins and parities. The results led to the determination of the first experimental 26Si(alpha, p) 29P reaction rate. The calculated reaction rate is compared with statistical methods traditionally used in the calculations of such reaction rate. The results of the present work will be combined with the results of the 32S(p, t) experiment carried out by O'Brien. Resonance states with Isospin

  17. Experimental studies of turbulence lifetimes in differentially rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, E. M.; Yan, Z.; Spence, E. J.; Roach, A. H.; Rhoads, J.; Ji, H.

    2012-11-01

    Inference of accretion rates from observations of stellar systems suggests inward mass fluxes which can only be reasonably explained by a turbulent transport process. While the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is likely active in systems above a critical ionization, there remains some question as to whether the MRI can be active in cooler bodies such as proto-planetary systems, and if not, what mechanism is then responsible for angular momentum transport? Keplerian rotation profiles are hydrodynamically linearly stable in the inviscid limit, however, it is not known if there exists a subcritical transition. A series of studies in the Hydrodynamic Turbulence Experiment (HTX), a modified Taylor-Couette device, have explored quiescent flows in the quasi-Keplerian regime. Operating in the wide-gap limit and with split axial boundaries to control the Ekman circulation, azimuthal flows in HTX can be brought very close to ideal Couette. These flows are subjected to external perturbations to test their ability to sustain incompressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Under no circumstances has a subcritical transition to turbulence been observed. Turbulence decay lifetimes are measured and compared to theoretical models.

  18. Conversion electron spectroscopy at the FMA focal plane: Decay studies of proton-rich N {approximately} 82 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    The FMA has proven to be an ideal instrument for the detailed study of the decay of microsecond isomers behind the focal plane following mass selection. In reactions leading to the population of nuclei with isomeric lifetimes longer than their flight time through the device, decay gamma rays and conversion electrons can be detected in an environment free from the backgrounds of prompt radiation and delta electrons. This was a very successful technique to study proton (h{sub 11/2}){sup n} seniority isomers in nuclei with Z > 64 and N {approximately} 82. Since isomeric decay gamma rays are emitted isotropically, conversion electrons are essential for the assignment of multipolarities in these nuclei. Furthermore, the low-energy transitions that depopulate isomeric states are typically highly converted and can escape gamma-ray detection, but they can be identified by their conversion electrons.

  19. New approach for alpha-decay calculations of deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2010-06-15

    We present a new theoretical approach to evaluate alpha-decay properties of deformed nuclei, namely the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). The deformed alpha-nucleus potential is taken into full account, and the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions is employed for quasibound states. Systematic calculations are carried out for well-deformed even-even nuclei with Z>=98 and isospin dependence of nuclear potentials is included in the calculations. Fine structure observed in alpha decay is well described by the four-channel microscopic calculation, which is performed for the first time in alpha-decay studies. The good agreement between experiment and theory is achieved for both total alpha-decay half-lives and branching ratios to the ground-state rotational band of daughter nuclei. Predictions on the branching ratios to high-spin daughter states are presented for superheavy nuclei, which may be important to interpret future observations.

  20. Possibilities of studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions of quasifree proton scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zuyev, S. V. Kasparov, A. A.; Konobeevski, E. S.

    2015-07-15

    The possibility of experimentally studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions induced by quasifree proton scattering on clusters of these nuclei is considered. Quasifree proton scattering on {sup 6}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 4}n, {sup 2}n, and n clusters in inverse kinematics is considered for the example of the {sup 8}He nucleus. Angular and energy distributions of secondaries are obtained for various representations of the cluster structure of the {sup 8}He nucleus. It is clearly shown that, in the angular and energy distributions of secondaries, one can single out regions that receive dominant contributions from reactions on specific clusters and which correspond to concrete cluster configurations of halo nuclei. Possible relevant experiments are proposed.

  1. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of well deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-06-15

    We formulate a theoretical model for the {alpha} decay of well-deformed even-even nuclei based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation. The {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures observed in {alpha} decay are well described by the five-channel microscopic calculations. Since the branching ratios to high-spin states are hard to understand in the traditional {alpha}-decay theories, this success could be important to interpret future observations of heavier nuclei. It is also found that the {alpha} transition to high-spin states is a powerful tool to probe the energy spectrum and deformation of daughter nuclei.

  2. Studies of multi-quasiparticle k-isomers in rare-earth and trans-fermium nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Khoo, T. L.; Lane, G. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Kibedi, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritzen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Tandel, S. K.; Australian National Univ.; Univ. of Massachusetts Lowell

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear K-isomers play an important role in understanding the structure of deformed axially symmetric nuclei. Examples are presented of recent studies in the rare-earth region (A {approx} 180) using deep-inelastic and multi-nucleon transfer reactions, and in the trans-fermium region (A {approx} 250) using fusion-evaporation reactions. A specific two-level mixing scenario is invoked to explain the unusual decay of the K{sup {pi}} = 13{sup +} isomer in {sup 174}Lu. The identification of 2- and 4-quasiparticle isomers in {sup 254}No is discussed and predictions of similar isomers in neighboring No and Rf nuclei are presented.

  3. Enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of rotational isomers on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, B. H.; Lee, Y. G.; Frazier, D. O.

    1986-01-01

    Surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rotational isomers of succinonitrile and N-methyl-thioacetamide on Cu and Ag surfaces. Both the gauche and trans conformers of succinonitrile are found to chemisorb on the metal surface. The doubly degenerate nu(C-triple bond-N) in the free molecules is removed when succinonitrile adsorbs on copper, which indicates that the two (C-triple bond-N) groups are no longer chemically equivalent. Both conformers are found to coordinate to the copper surface through the pi system of one of the two (C-triple bond-N) groups. In the case of N-methyl-thioacetamide, the population of the cis isomer is greatly increased on Cu and Ag surfaces. This is probably due to surface-induced cis-trans isomerization, in which the predominant trans isomer is converted to the cis isomer.

  4. Studies of rotating liquid floating zones on Skylab IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, J. R.; Gibson, E. G.; Klett, M. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid zones of water, soap solution and soap foam were deployed between two aligned circular disks which were free to rotate about the zone axis in the microgravity environment of Skylab IV. Such a configuration is of interest in the containerless handling of melts for possible future space processing crystal growth experiments. Three basic types of zone surface deformation and instability were observed for these rotational conditions; axisymmetric shape changes under single disk rotation, nonaxisymmetric, whirling, C-modes for long zones with equal rotation of both disks, and capillary wave phenomena for short zones with equal rotation of both disks. The sources of these instabilities and the conditions promoting them are analyzed in detail from video tape recordings of the Skylab experiments.

  5. The rotational profile: A study of lower limb axial torsion, hip rotation, and the foot progression angle in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hudson, David

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the rotational profile of adults with higher versus lower foot progression angles (FPA). Tibial torsion, femoral torsion, hip internal and external rotation and FPA data were collected on one hundred two healthy volunteers. Data were stratified into Low, Mid, and High FPA groups to study relationships among the components of the rotational profile and if there were group differences in the magnitude of torsion angles. Direction of torsion was also studied as an attempt to look at the incidence of offsetting between the tibia and femur. Tibial torsion was significantly higher in the High FPA group (p<0.001) and was significantly related to the FPA (p≤0.01). Femoral torsion was related to hip internal rotation (p<0.05). Offsetting tibial and femoral torsions occurred in 59% of subjects with low FPA and 56% of subjects with high FPA. All subjects in the low FPA group with offsetting had tibial torsion that followed the FPA and the femurs that were directed opposite. In the High FPA group, 68% of subjects with offsetting had tibias that followed the FPA. Stratifying the data by FPA revealed there were significant differences in tibial torsion among the groups and provided evidence that tibial torsion influences the direction and magnitude of the FPA. Offsetting torsions between the tibia and femur were more common in people with higher and lower FPA and had clearer patterns where the tibia tended to follow the direction of the FPA.

  6. Study of inelastic interactions of 340-GeV/c pions with emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrar, H.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Results from a study of interactions of a 340-GeV/c beam with emulsion nuclei at the CERN SPS are presented. Some characteristics of heavy- and shower-particle multiplicity distributions are reported. The Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling hypothesis has been tested. Single-particle pseudorapid- ity distributions and rapidity-gap distributions have been studied in detail. The pseudorapidity distributions show a bimodal structure in all A interactions and the rapidity-gap distributions indicate the production of clusters during the multiparticle production process. The production of heavy clusters has also been studied using the rapidity-interval method proposed by Adamovich et al. The result shows that 340 GeV is belgical-model predictions for this ratio in nuclear matter are approx. =10 . Any comparison of these two values assumes no mass fractionation has occurred in the geophysical disposition and subsequent extraction of the sodium forming the atomic beam and also no differences in the distribution of heavy isotopes among the elements, compared to normal isotopes, during their astrophysical formation. Making these assumptions enables limits to be placed on the heavy-particle annihilation cross sections in the formation process.

  7. Rotating Detonation Combustion: A Computational Study for Stationary Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Sergio

    The increased availability of gaseous fossil fuels in The US has led to the substantial growth of stationary Gas Turbine (GT) usage for electrical power generation. In fact, from 2013 to 2104, out of the 11 Tera Watts-hour per day produced from fossil fuels, approximately 27% was generated through the combustion of natural gas in stationary GT. The thermodynamic efficiency for simple-cycle GT has increased from 20% to 40% during the last six decades, mainly due to research and development in the fields of combustion science, material science and machine design. However, additional improvements have become more costly and more difficult to obtain as technology is further refined. An alternative to improve GT thermal efficiency is the implementation of a combustion regime leading to pressure-gain; rather than pressure loss across the combustor. One concept being considered for such purpose is Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC). RDC refers to a combustion regime in which a detonation wave propagates continuously in the azimuthal direction of a cylindrical annular chamber. In RDC, the fuel and oxidizer, injected from separated streams, are mixed near the injection plane and are then consumed by the detonation front traveling inside the annular gap of the combustion chamber. The detonation products then expand in the azimuthal and axial direction away from the detonation front and exit through the combustion chamber outlet. In the present study Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the performance of Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC) at operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As part of this study, a modeling strategy for RDC simulations was developed. The validation of the model was performed using benchmark cases with different levels of complexity. First, 2D simulations of non-reactive shock tube and detonation tubes were performed. The numerical predictions that were obtained using different modeling parameters were compared with

  8. Isomer Studies for Nuclei near the Proton Drip Line in the Mass 130-160 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A. M.; Varley, B. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P.; Rahkila, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A. P.; Nyman, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Grahn, T.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.

    2007-11-30

    This report details the status of an experimental research programme which has studied isomeric states in the mass 130-160 region of the nuclear chart. Several new isomers have been established and characterised near the proton drip line using a recoil isomer tagging technique at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The latest experiments have been performed with a modified setup where the standard GREAT focal-plane double-sided silicon-strip detector was changed to a dual multi-wire proportional-counter arrangement. This new setup has improved capability for short-lived isomer studies where high focal-plane rates can be tolerated. The results of key recent experiments for nuclei situated above ({sup 153}Yb,{sup 152}Tm) and below ({sup 136}Pm,{sup 142}Tb) the N = 82 shell gap were presented along with an interpretation for the isomers. Finally, the future prospects of the technique, using an isomer-tagged differential-plunger setup, were discussed. This technique will be capable of establishing the deformation of the states above the isomers and will aid in the process of assigning underlying single-particle configurations to the isomeric states.

  9. Evidence for {open_quotes}magnetic rotation{close_quotes} in nuclei: New results on the M1-bands of {sup 198,199}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Lifetimes of states in four of the M1-bands in {sup 198,199}Pb have been determined through a Doppler Shift Attenuation Method measurement performed using the Gammasphere array. The deduced B(M1) values, which are a sensitive probe of the underlying mechanism for generating these sequences, show remarkable agreement with Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) calculations. Evidence is also presented for the possible termination of the bands. The results represent clear evidence for a new concept in nuclear excitations: {open_quote}magnetic rotation{close_quote}.

  10. Cloud condensation nuclei closure study on long-term observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Julia; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Henzing, Bas; Kos, Gerard; Schlag, Patrick; Holzinger, Ruprecht; Aalto, Pasi; Keskinen, Helmi; Paramonov, Mikhail; Poulain, Laurent; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Krüger, Mira; Carbone, Samara; Brito, Joel; Fröhlich, Roman; Herrmann, Erik; Hammer, Emanuel; Baltensperger, Urs; Gysel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) are currently the least understood influence on climate change (IPCC, 2013). ACI are largely controlled by the relative change in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations. As direct CCN and IN measurements are not always at hand, being able to predict their concentrations is important. Focusing on CCN, we use monitoring type data from 5 stations within the ACTRIS network in Europe (http://www.actris.net/) and the ATTO site in Brazil to compare measured CCN concentrations at various supersaturations with predicted concentrations based on kappa-Köhler theory. The locations represent a variety of different environments including the rain and boreal forests, and continental-remote, marine and high-alpine conditions. At all sites, at least one full year of CCN concentrations, size distribution and chemical composition data were available for the period between 2012 and 2014. Submicron particle chemical composition data were provided by either Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) or aerosol chemical speciation monitors (ACSM) and used to derive the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. We explore how well standard kappa-Köhler theory can be applied in the different environments. We find kappa ranging between 0.2 (median) for forest environments, 0.35 for continental-remote and high-alpine conditions, and 0.75 for the marine site. Generally, theory can predict actual CCN concentration within ± 25 % with relatively high correlation coefficients > 0.8 for all supersaturations and throughout all seasons. Applying a fixed kappa of 0.3 instead of hourly derived values yields similarly good results in most cases, while it leads to a discrepancy mismatch for the marine site and a slight difference for the rain forest aerosol. In addition, we find a number of mismatches that can be explained by data quality issues rather than deficiencies in the theory. A sensitivity study shows that only unrealistic assumptions

  11. Hydrated forms of fluoroacetic acid: a rotational study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gang; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Spada, Lorenzo; Blanco, Susana; Caminati, Walther

    2016-09-14

    The rotational spectra of two conformers of the 1 : 1 adduct of fluoroacetic acid with water have been assigned by pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Their shapes differ according to the trans and cis forms of the fluoroacetic acid moiety. This is in contrast to the rotational spectrum of the monomer, for which the cis form has not been observed. Details of the hydrogen bond, structure, dynamics and energetic features of the two species are given.

  12. In-beam studies of high-spin states of actinide nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A. . Nuclear Science Div. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-11-15

    High-spin states in the actinides have been studied using Coulomb- excitation, inelastic excitation reactions, and one-neutron transfer reactions. Experimental data are presented for states in {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu from a variety of reactions. Energy levels, moments-of-inertia, aligned angular momentum, Routhians, gamma-ray intensities, and cross-sections are presented for most cases. Additional spectroscopic information (magnetic moments, M{sub 1}/E{sub 2} mixing ratios, and g-factors) is presented for {sup 233}U. One- and two-neutron transfer reaction mechanisms and the possibility of band crossings (backbending) are discussed. A discussion of odd-A band fitting and Cranking calculations is presented to aid in the interpretation of rotational energy levels and alignment. In addition, several theoretical calculations of rotational populations for inelastic excitation and neutron transfer are compared to the data. Intratheory comparisons between the Sudden Approximation, Semi-Classical, and Alder-Winther-DeBoer methods are made. In connection with the theory development, the possible signature for the nuclear SQUID effect is discussed. 98 refs., 61 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Simulation studies of FRC with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-11-01

    The HYM code has been modified to include the effects of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive. Initial 3D two-fluid and hybrid simulations have been performed for even-parity RMF and different plasma parameters. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside the separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous studies [R. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2804 (2001)]. Effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement have been studied using 3D test particle simulations. Simulations of stationary RMFs show that for relatively large ion Larmor radius (S^*<20), there is very little difference between even- and odd-parity RMFs in terms of the ion losses. The rate of particle losses is larger in larger FRCs, and increases with the RMF amplitude. In contrast, high-frequency RMF can reduce ion losses provided φrmfφci, and the RMF is of even-parity. The improved particle confinement is related to ponderomotive forces due to the rapidly oscillating, inhomogeneous electromagnetic field. It is also found that high-frequency, odd-parity RMFs force particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends.

  14. Studies of superconducting materials with muon spin rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Michael R.; Stronach, Carey E.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Yu, X. H.; Uemura, Y. J.; Sternlieb, B. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Oostens, J.; Lankford, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    The muon spin rotation/relaxation technique was found to be an exceptionally effective means of measuring the magnetic properties of superconductors, including the new high temperature superconductor materials, at the microscopic level. The technique directly measures the magnetic penetration depth (type II superconductors (SC's)) and detects the presence of magnetic ordering (antiferromagnetism or spin-glass ordering were observed in some high temperature superconductor (HTSC's) and in many closely related compounds). Extensive studies of HTSC materials were conducted by the Virginia State University - College of William and Mary - Columbia University collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory and TRIUMF (Vancouver). A survey of LaSrCuO and YBaCaCuO systems shows an essentially linear relationship between the transition temperature T(sub c) and the relaxation rate. This appears to be a manifestation of the proportionality between T(sub c) and the Fermi energy, which suggests a high energy scale for the SC coupling, and which is not consistent with the weak coupling of phonon-mediated SC. Studies of LaCuO and YBaCuO parent compounds show clear evidence of antiferromagnetism. YBa2Cu(3-x)CO(x)O7 shows the simultaneous presence of spin-glass magnetic ordering and superconductivity. Three-dimensional SC, (Ba, K) BiO3, unlike the layered CuO-based compounds, shows no suggestion of magnetic ordering. Experimental techniques and theoretical implications are discussed.

  15. A study of rotational velocity distribution of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Emilio, M.

    2014-10-01

    Classical Be stars are rapid rotators of spectral type late O to early A and luminosity class V-III, which exhibit Balmer emission lines and often a near infrared excess originating in an equatorially concentrated circumstellar envelope, both produced by sporadic mass ejection episodes. The causes of the abnormal mass loss (the so-called Be phenomenon) are as yet unknown. In spite of their high vsin i, rapid rotation alone cannot explain the ejection episodes as most Be stars do not rotate at their critical rotation rates. In this work we present the distribution of vsin i of 261 Be's stars from BeSS (Be Star Spectra) database. We used two techniques, the Fourier method and the FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) method. For the analysis we made use of three absorption lines of Helium (4026r A, 4388 Å and 4471 Å). Stars with projected rotational velocities up to 300 km s^{-1} agree with the ones already published in the literature. 84 of our stars do not have the values of rotational velocity published. The majority of our sample are B1/B2 spectral type, whose have the greatest velocities.

  16. Comparative study on the song behavior and song control nuclei in male and female Mongolian larks (Melanocorypha mongolica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebo; Zeng, Shaoju; Zhang, Xinwen; Zuo, Mingxue

    2011-09-12

    Songbirds can produce a remarkable diversity of songs, which is well-characterized learned behavior that reflects the basic processes of language learning in humans. As song control nuclei governing song behavior has been identified, bird song provides an excellent model to address the relationship between brain areas and their controlling behavior. The Mongolian lark (Melanocorypha mongolica), a species of the Alaudidae family, is well known for its elaborate singing and ability to learn new songs, even in adulthood. Here, we studied the singing behavior and underlying neural structures of the Mongolian lark in both sexes. We found that the sizes of song bouts and song phrases (song repertoires) in male Mongolian larks are extremely large, and that each song repertoire or phrase has a complex structure, comprising several different syllables that seldom appear in other types of song bouts. In accordance with these complex songs, Mongolian lark song control nuclei are well developed and can be easily detected by Nissl staining. In contrast to male Mongolian larks, females were not observed to sing. However, they possess significant song control nuclei with abundant neural connectivity within them despite their small sizes compared with males. These data provide new evidence that help further clarify the mechanisms by which songbirds sing. Our results also have implications for the evolution of complex birdsongs and song control nuclei in oscine birds.

  17. Comparative study on the song behavior and song control nuclei in male and female Mongolian larks (Melanocorypha mongolica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebo; Zeng, Shaoju; Zhang, Xinwen; Zuo, Mingxue

    2011-09-12

    Songbirds can produce a remarkable diversity of songs, which is well-characterized learned behavior that reflects the basic processes of language learning in humans. As song control nuclei governing song behavior has been identified, bird song provides an excellent model to address the relationship between brain areas and their controlling behavior. The Mongolian lark (Melanocorypha mongolica), a species of the Alaudidae family, is well known for its elaborate singing and ability to learn new songs, even in adulthood. Here, we studied the singing behavior and underlying neural structures of the Mongolian lark in both sexes. We found that the sizes of song bouts and song phrases (song repertoires) in male Mongolian larks are extremely large, and that each song repertoire or phrase has a complex structure, comprising several different syllables that seldom appear in other types of song bouts. In accordance with these complex songs, Mongolian lark song control nuclei are well developed and can be easily detected by Nissl staining. In contrast to male Mongolian larks, females were not observed to sing. However, they possess significant song control nuclei with abundant neural connectivity within them despite their small sizes compared with males. These data provide new evidence that help further clarify the mechanisms by which songbirds sing. Our results also have implications for the evolution of complex birdsongs and song control nuclei in oscine birds. PMID:21440576

  18. Nuclear transplant studies on the reduction in numbers of presumptive germ nuclei in exconjugants of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Mikami, K

    1982-08-01

    Nuclear differentiation in exconjugants of Paramecium caudatum is closely associated with a brief localization of the postzygotic nuclei near the opposite ends of the cell, with the germinal nucleus (micronucleus) in the anterior region and the somatic nuclei (macronuclei) in the posterior region. The posterior nuclei cannot regenerate to produce micronuclei when all four anterior nuclei are removed. There is no difference among the anterior four presumptive micronuclei, because, when any three of them were removed, the remaining nucleus was able to divide at each postconjugational fission and to persist as a micronucleus during the vegetative phase. This conclusion agrees with the results of transplanting a presumptive micronucleus into a vegetative cell. Cells during the vegetative phase, however, normally have only one micronucleus. Micronuclear number must be reduced to arrive at the uni-micronucleate condition after the stage of macro- and micronuclear differentiation. Elimination of supernumerary presumptive micronuclei, which had been indicated by morphological observations, was confirmed by the results of nuclear transplantation studies. PMID:7166576

  19. Neuronal Populations in the Basolateral Nuclei of the Amygdala Are Differentially Increased in Humans Compared With Apes: A Stereological Study

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Nicole; Stefanacci, Lisa; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Annese, Jacopo; Allman, John M.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Hof, Patrick R.; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    In human and nonhuman primates, the amygdala is known to play critical roles in emotional and social behavior. Anatomically, individual amygdaloid nuclei are connected with many neural systems that are either differentially expanded or conserved over the course of primate evolution. To address amygdala evolution in humans and our closest living relatives, the apes, we used design-based stereological methods to obtain neuron counts for the amygdala and each of four major amygdaloid nuclei (the lateral, basal, accessory basal, and central nuclei) in humans, all great ape species, lesser apes, and one monkey species. Our goal was to determine whether there were significant differences in the number or percent of neurons distributed to individual nuclei among species. Additionally, regression analyses were performed on independent contrast data to determine whether any individual species deviated from allometric trends. There were two major findings. In humans, the lateral nucleus contained the highest number of neurons in the amygdala, whereas in apes the basal nucleus contained the highest number of neurons. Additionally, the human lateral nucleus contained 59% more neurons than predicted by allometric regressions on nonhuman primate data. Based on the largest sample ever analyzed in a comparative study of the hominoid amygdala, our findings suggest that an emphasis on the lateral nucleus is the main characteristic of amygdala specialization over the course of human evolution. PMID:22473387

  20. Beta-decay studies of nuclei far from stability near N=28

    SciTech Connect

    Sorlin, O.; Anne, R.; Axelsson, L.; Bazin, D.; Boehmer, W.; Borrel, V.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Jading, Y.; Keller, H.; Kratz, K.; Lewitowicz, M.; Lukyanov, S.M.; Mehren, T.; Mueller, A.C.; Penionzhkevich, Y.E.; Pfeiffer, B.; Pougheon, F.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Salamatin, V.S.; Schoedder, S.; Woehr, A.

    1995-02-05

    Beta-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron-emission probabilities of the very neutron-rich nuclei {sup 43}P, {sup 42,44,45}S and {sup 44-46}Cl, {sup 47}Ar have been recently measured. These isotopes, which lie at or close to the N=28 magic shell were produced at GANIL in interactions of a 60 MeV/u {sup 48}Ca beam with a {sup 64}Ni target, and were separated by the doubly achromatic spectrometer LISE3. Their decay was studied by a {beta} or {beta}-n time correlation measurement. The results are compared to recent model predictions and indicate a rapid weakening of the N=28 shell below {sup 48}{sub 20}Ca{sub 28}. The nuclear structure effects reflected in the decay properties of the exotic S and Cl isotopes may be the clue for the astrophysical understanding of the unusual {sup 48}Ca/{sup 46}Ca abundance ratio measured in the solar system, or observed in EK-inclusions of the Allende meteorite. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Estimated desert-dust ice nuclei profiles from polarization lidar: methodology and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R. E.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-03-01

    A lidar method is presented that permits the estimation of height profiles of ice nuclei concentrations (INC) in desert dust layers. The polarization lidar technique is applied to separate dust and non-dust backscatter and extinction coefficients. The desert dust extinction coefficients σd are then converted to aerosol particle number concentrations APC280 which consider particles with radius > 280 nm only. By using profiles of APC280 and ambient temperature T along the laser beam, the profile of INC can be estimated within a factor of 3 by means of APC-T-INC parameterizations from the literature. The observed close relationship between σd at 500 nm and APC280 is of key importance for a successful INC retrieval. We studied this link by means of AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sun/sky photometer observations at Morocco, Cabo Verde, Barbados, and Cyprus during desert dust outbreaks. The new INC retrieval method is applied to lidar observations of dust layers with the spaceborne lidar CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) during two overpasses over the EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) lidar site of the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), Limassol (34.7° N, 33° E), Cyprus. The good agreement between the CALIOP and CUT lidar retrievals of σd, APC280, and INC profiles corroborates the potential of CALIOP to provide 3-D global desert dust APC280 and INC data sets.

  2. Search for and discovery of chiral symmetry in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    Studies devoted to the discovery and investigation of chiral-symmetry breaking in nuclei are briefly reviewed. Unlike the case of molecules and the macrocosm, where chirality manifests itself in the spatial structure of objects, chirality in nuclei is connected with different relative orientation of valence-quasiparticle spins and the angular momentum of collective rotation of the triaxial core. Decisive arguments in favor of the existence of this effect are based on measurements of lifetimes of high-spin nuclear levels in the picosecond range by Doppler methods of {gamma} spectroscopy.

  3. Trapezius muscle transfer for external shoulder rotation: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Sakane, Daniel Takashi; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the viability of transferring the lower and transverse trapezius to the greater tuberosity using three different techniques. METHODS: Twelve shoulders from six cadavers were used. The primary outcome was to assess the suture viability of the trapezius muscle transfer to the greater tuberosity in the insertion topography of the infraspinatus, with the arm adducted during internal rotation (hand on the abdomen) and maximum scapular retraction. Three transfers were applied to each shoulder: the lower and transverse trapezius distal insertion (Group 1); lower trapezius alone (Group 2); and lower trapezius insertion and origin (Group 3). Accessory nerve integrity was assessed before and after transfers. RESULTS: Sutures were viable in 42% (5/12) and 58% (7/12) on Groups 1 and 3, respectively, with no statistically significant difference (Fisher's test, p=0.558); Group 3 exhibited frequent neurologic injury (11/12). Group 2 was the least successful; the tendon did not reach the greater tuberosity, and no sutures were viable. CONCLUSION: Groups 1 and 3 exhibited the best nongrafting suture viability to the greater tuberosity; however, Group 3 was associated to frequent spinal accessory nerve injury. Level of Evidence IV, Anatomical Study PMID:25538475

  4. Shell-model study for neutron-rich sd-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Kazunari; Sun Yang; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Munetake

    2011-01-15

    The microscopic structure of neutron-rich sd-shell nuclei is investigated by using the spherical-shell model in the sd-pf valence space with the extended pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole forces accompanied by the monopole interaction (EPQQM). The calculation reproduces systematically the known energy levels for even-even and odd-mass nuclei including the recent data for {sup 43}S, {sup 46}S, and {sup 47}Ar. In particular, the erosion of the N=28 shell closure in {sup 42}Si can be explained. Our EPQQM results are compared with other shell-model calculations with the SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions.

  5. Cosmogenic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisbeck, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclei, nuclides formed by nuclear interactions of galactic and solar cosmic rays with extraterrestrial or terrestrial matter are discussed. Long lived radioactive cosmogenic isotopes are focused upon. Their uses in dating, as tracers of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter, and in obtaining information on the variation of primary cosmic ray flux in the past are discussed.

  6. STUDIES ON NUCLEI USING CORRELATED CYTOCHEMICAL, LIGHT, AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPE TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Montrose J.

    1956-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure for correlating electron microscope and light microscope cytochemical studies using immediately adjacent serial thin and thick sections has been described and discussed. This technique, combined with the Feulgen reaction for DNA, has been of particular value in framing and answering both general and specific questions about the nucleus. The results may be summarized as follows:— Apparent nuclear homogeneity in the electron microscope is not due to loss of DNA as evidenced by positive Feulgen reactions in such nuclei. Arrangement of Feulgen-positive material in chromosomes, heterochromatin, perinuclear and perinucleolar chromatin, etc., is similar to that customarily observed in the light microscope but this is not necessarily reflected in a cursory survey of the electron image. Careful comparison of light and electron images shows that fine differences in structure are associated with chromatin localization. Primary spermatocyte prophase chromosomes of crayfish have been positively identified by their Feulgen-positive nature. Core-like axial structures in such chromosomes have been observed (9) and are described further. A remarkable feature of spermiogenesis in the crayfish is an elaboration of the nuclear envelope of the spermatid accompanying the formation of what becomes a mass of convoluted membranes in the sperm. In the spermatid, perinuclear chromatin follows outpocketings of the nuclear envelope into the cytoplasm. In the early sperm, on the other hand, although the nuclear envelope is continuous with the system of convoluted membranes, the chromatin is distinct from it and is retained in the nucleus proper by some mechanism independent of the nuclear envelope. None of the above observations was apparent from the electron microscope images alone; they were possible only by virtue of the correlated cytochemical and electron microscope study of adjacent sections. The successful use of other cytochemical tests, such as the PAS

  7. Nanosecond Time-Resolution Study of Gold Nanorod Rotation at the Liquid-Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Bhanu; Chen, Fang; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Ning; Ligler, Frances S; Wang, Gufeng

    2016-07-18

    Early studies showed that the adsorption of nanorods may start from a special "anchored" state, in which the nanorods lose translational motion but retain rotational freedom. Insight into how the anchored nanorods rotate should provide additional dimensions for understanding particle-surface interactions. Based on conventional time-resolution studies, gold nanorods are thought to continuously rotate following initial interactions with negatively charged glass surfaces. However, this nanosecond time-resolution study reveals that the apparent continuous rotation actually consists of numerous fast, intermittent rotations or transitions between a small number of weakly immobilized states, with the particle resting in the immobilized states most of the time. The actual rotation from one immobilized state to the other happens on a 1 ms timescale, that is, approximately 50 times slower than in the bulk solution.

  8. Damping in Yb nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Lee, I.Y.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Clark, R.M.; Diamond, R.M.; Gorgen, A.

    2002-07-01

    In a mixture of three Yb nuclei, we find the rotational damping widths vary from 180 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 290 keV at 1.5 MeV, and the average compound damping widths (or spreading widths) vary from 40 keV at 1.1 MeV {gamma}-ray energy to 60 keV at 1.3 MeV. The simulations also suggest extensive motional narrowing.

  9. Airborne cloud condensation nuclei measurements during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa-Awuku, Akua; Moore, Richard H.; Nenes, Athanasios; Bahreini, Roya; Holloway, John S.; Brock, Charles A.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Decarlo, Peter F.; Hecobian, Arsineh; Weber, Rodney J.; Stickel, Robert; Tanner, Dave J.; Huey, Lewis G.

    2011-06-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were conducted aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D platform during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS/GoMACCS). The measurements were conducted in regions influenced by industrial and urban sources. Observations show significant local variability of CCN activity (CCN/CN from 0.1 to 0.5 at s = 0.43%), while variability is less significant across regional scales (˜100 km × 100 km; CCN/CN is ˜0.1 at s = 0.43%). CCN activity can increase with increasing plume age and oxygenated organic fraction. CCN measurements are compared to predictions for a number of mixing state and composition assumptions. Mixing state assumptions that assumed internally mixed aerosol predict CCN concentrations well. Assuming organics are as hygroscopic as ammonium sulfate consistently overpredicted CCN concentrations. On average, the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) fraction is 60 ± 14% of the organic aerosol. We show that CCN closure can be significantly improved by incorporating knowledge of the WSOC fraction with a prescribed organic hygroscopicity parameter (κ = 0.16 or effective κ ˜ 0.3). This implies that the hygroscopicity of organic mass is primarily a function of the WSOC fraction. The overall aerosol hygroscopicity parameter varies between 0.08 and 0.88. Furthermore, droplet activation kinetics are variable and 60% of particles are smaller than the size characteristic of rapid droplet growth.

  10. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  11. Double-resonance studies of rotational autoionization of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, M. A.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Dehmer, J. L.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1989-01-01

    The rotational autoionization of np Rydberg states of H2 near the first ionization threshold is investigated experimentally by means of two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and photoelectron spectroscopy using the apparatus described by O'Halloran et al. (1988). The results are presented in extensive tables, graphs, and sample REMPI spectra and characterized in detail. It is found that the Rydberg-series members have large v-dependent half-widths, consistent with the predictions of quantum-defect theory, and that ionization involving the change of two quanta of rotational energy is significantly faster than that involving four quanta.

  12. Study of galactic rotation curves in wormhole spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Sen, Banashree; Chakraborty, Koushik; Shit, G. C.

    2016-03-01

    The spacetime of the galactic halo region is described by a wormhole like line element. We assume violation of Null Energy Condition (NEC) in the galactic halo. The Einstein Field equations are solved for two different conditions of pressure and density to obtain physical parameters like tangential velocity of test particles and parameters related to the wormhole geometry. The theoretical rotation curve of the test particles is plotted and compared the same with an observed rotation curve. We obtain a satisfactory fit between the observed curve and the curve obtained from the present theory for the radial distances in the range 9 Kpc to 100 Kpc.

  13. Spectroscopic study of the extremely fast rotating star 44 Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, L.; Vennes, S.; Kawka, A.; Kubat, J.; Nemeth, P.; Borisov, G.; KRaus, M.

    Stars with extremely fast rotation represent interesting challenge to modern understanding of the stellar evolution. The reasons why such a spin-up process should occur during the evolution to otherwise normal star are still not well understood. Already in the beginning of the XX century Otto Struve proposed that fast rotation of the group of stars spectroscopically classified as Be could be the main reason for the formation of observed disks of circumstellar material around them. This circumstellar material is responsible for the emission lines observed in the spectrum of Be-stars as well as for the whole complex of spectral and photometrical patterns called in general Be-phenomenon.

  14. KEWPIE2: A cascade code for the study of dynamical decay of excited nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Hongliang; Marchix, Anthony; Abe, Yasuhisa; Boilley, David

    2016-03-01

    KEWPIE-a cascade code devoted to investigating the dynamical decay of excited nuclei, specially designed for treating very low probability events related to the synthesis of super-heavy nuclei formed in fusion-evaporation reactions-has been improved and rewritten in C++ programming language to become KEWPIE2. The current version of the code comprises various nuclear models concerning the light-particle emission, fission process and statistical properties of excited nuclei. General features of the code, such as the numerical scheme and the main physical ingredients, are described in detail. Some typical calculations having been performed in the present paper clearly show that theoretical predictions are generally in accordance with experimental data. Furthermore, since the values of some input parameters cannot be determined neither theoretically nor experimentally, a sensibility analysis is presented. To this end, we systematically investigate the effects of using different parameter values and reaction models on the final results. As expected, in the case of heavy nuclei, the fission process has the most crucial role to play in theoretical predictions. This work would be essential for numerical modeling of fusion-evaporation reactions.

  15. Relativistic mean-field study on proton skins and proton halos in exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhongzhou; Mittig, W.; Sarazin, F.

    1999-06-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of proton-rich nuclei in the framework of the relativistic mean-field model. Calculations show that the experimental proton halo in the nuclei 26,27,28P can be reproduced by the model. The proton halos can appear in proton-rich nuclei because the total nuclear potential is attractive up to the radial distance r ≈ 5.5 fm. But the size of proton halos is finite due to the limitation of the Coulomb potential barrier. The mean-square radius of a halo proton is not very sensitive to the separation energy of the last proton in some very proton-rich nuclei due to the effect of the Coulomb barrier. This behavior is different from the case of a neutron halo where the mean-square radius of a halo neutron is inversely proportional to the separation energy of the last halo neutron. We have also analysed the differences of the relativistic mean-field potentials of 25Al and 26P and found that the isovector potential from the p meson has an important effect on the differences.

  16. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using the CPT mass spectrometer at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Bertone, P. F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, J. E.; Deibel, C. M.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Savard, G.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Sun, T.; Van Schelt, J.

    2011-09-01

    The nucleosynthetic path of the astrophysical r-process and the resulting elemental abundances depend on neutron-separation energies which can be determined from the masses of the nuclei along the r-process reaction path. Due to the current lack of experimental data, mass models are often used. The mass values provided by the mass models are often too imprecise or disagree with each other. Therefore, direct high-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei are necessary to provide input parameters to the calculations and help refine the mass models. The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility of Argonne National Laboratory will provide experiments with beams of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line to extend measurements of the neutron-rich nuclei into the mostly unexplored region along the r-process path. This will allow precise mass measurements (~ 10 keV/c2) of more than a hundred very neutron-rich isotopes that have not previously been measured.

  17. A statistical study of magnetopause structures: Tangential versus rotational discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y.-C.; Hau, L.-N.

    2012-08-01

    A statistical study of the structure of Earth's magnetopause is carried out by analyzing two-year AMPTE/IRM plasma and magnetic field data. The analyses are based on the minimum variance analysis (MVA), the deHoffmann-Teller (HT) frame analysis and the Walén relation. A total of 328 magnetopause crossings are identified and error estimates associated with MVA and HT frame analyses are performed for each case. In 142 out of 328 events both MVA and HT frame analyses yield high quality results which are classified as either tangential-discontinuity (TD) or rotational-discontinuity (RD) structures based only on the Walén relation: Events withSWA ≤ 0.4 (SWA ≥ 0.5) are classified as TD (RD), and rest (with 0.4 < SWA < 0.5) is classified as "uncertain," where SWA refers to the Walén slope. With this criterion, 84% of 142 events are TDs, 12% are RDs, and 4% are uncertain events. There are a large portion of TD events which exhibit a finite normal magnetic field component Bnbut have insignificant flow as compared to the Alfvén velocity in the HT frame. Two-dimensional Grad-Shafranov reconstruction of forty selected TD and RD events show that single or multiple X-line accompanied with magnetic islands are common feature of magnetopause current. A survey plot of the HT velocity associated with TD structures projected onto the magnetopause shows that the flow is diverted at the subsolar point and accelerated toward the dawn and dusk flanks.

  18. Off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice NMR relaxation studies of phosphorus metabolite rotational diffusion in bovine lens homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, G.H.; Schleich, T.; Morgan, C.F. ); Farnsworth, P.N. )

    1990-08-21

    The rotational diffusion behavior of phosphorus metabolites present in calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates was investigated by the NMR technique of {sup 31}P off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation as a means of assessing the occurrence and extent of phosphorus metabolite-lens protein interactions. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of calf lens homogenates were obtained at 10 and 18{degree}C at 7.05 T. Effective rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub 0,eff}) for the major phosphorus metabolites present in cortical and nuclear bovine calf lens homogenates were derived from nonlinear least-squares analysis of R vs {omega}{sub e} data with the assumption of isotropic reorientational motion. Intramolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P, {sup 31}P-{sup 31}P), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and solvent (water) translational intermolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P) relaxation contributions were assumed in the analyses. A fast-exchange model between free and bound forms, was employed in the analysis of the metabolite R vs {omega}{sub e} curves to yield the fraction of free (unbound) metabolite ({Theta}{sub free}). The results of this study establish the occurrence of significant temperature-dependent (above and below the cold cataract phase transition temperature) binding of ATP (cortex) and PME (nucleus) and p{sub i} (nucleus) in calf lens.

  19. Study of Nuclei far From Stability by Using the CHIMERA 4{pi} Detector and Radioactive Beams at LNS

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Auditore, L.; Loria, D.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Geraci, E.

    2009-08-26

    At LNS are available radioactive beams at tandem and intermediate energies provided respectively by the EXCYT and by the fragmentation FRIBS facilities. Using these beams, and the 4{pi} detector CHIMERA, we want to study excitation and decay of resonances in light exotic nuclei populated with pick-up stripping and other reaction mechanisms. Some preliminary results obtained with stable and unstable beams are reported.

  20. Theoretical study of the similarity between nuclei with four valence nucleons in A = 208, 132 and 68 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Benmicia, N.; Benrachi, F.

    2012-06-27

    One of the most interesting topics in nuclear structure is the study of nuclei near the limits of particle stability. Much attention is currently being focused on nuclei with few valence nucleons around Z= 28, 50 and 82, in particular the 68Ni, 132Sn and 208Pb neighbors. We are interested of the even-even isobars 72Ni, 72Ge and 72Zn in 68Ni region, 136Sn, 136Xe and 136Te in 132Sn region, 212Pb, 212Rn and 212Po in 208Pb region. The calculation of energies spectra using the effective interactions JUN45M, CW{Delta}5082 and KHP shows a good agreement with the available experimental data for the energie levels and their sequences. We have extended the existed similarity between lead and tin regions to the Nickel region.

  1. Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky vs the spherical shell model: A comparative study of pf-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Juodagalvis, Andrius; Ragnarsson, Ingemar; Angstromberg, Sven

    2006-04-15

    A comparative study is performed of a deformed mean field theory, represented by the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) model and the spherical shell model. Energy spectra, occupation numbers, B(E2) values, and spectroscopic quadrupole moments in the light pf-shell nuclei are calculated in the two models and compared. The result is also compared to available experimental data which are generally well described by the shell model. Although the Nilsson-Strutinsky calculation does not include pairing, both the subshell occupation numbers and quadrupole properties are found to be rather similar in the two models. It is also shown that 'unpaired' shell model calculations produce energies similar to those from the CNS. The role of the pairing energy in the description of backbending and signature splitting in odd-mass nuclei is also discussed.

  2. Systematic study of α decay half-lives for even-even nuclei within a two-potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Ping; Li, Xiao-Hua

    2016-03-01

    α decay is a common and important process of natural radioactivity of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The α decay half-lives for even-even nuclei from Z =62 to Z =118 are systematically studied based on the two-potential approach with a quasistationary state approximation. As for the nuclear potential, the isospin effect is considered, which slightly improves the results by 6.8%. To reduce the deviations between experimental half-lives and calculated results due to the nuclear shell structure, the analytic expression of hindrance factors is employed. Our results can reproduce the experimental half-lives as good as using the density-dependent cluster model and the generalized liquid drop model.

  3. Path integral studies of the rotations of methane and its heavier isotopomers in 4He nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Markovskiy, N D; Mak, C H

    2009-08-13

    Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to study the rotations of a methane molecule and its heavier isotopomers inside a small cluster of 4He atoms at 0.3 K in order to determine how the renormalization in the methane's rotational constant is related to the quantum statistics and superfluidity of the helium shell. By changing the mass of the hydrogens and systematically varying the moment of inertia of the methane, we were able to study the effects of its rotations on the quantum statistics of the helium atoms and their countereffects on the methane's effective rotational constant. The renormalized rotational constant depends strongly on the intrinsic moment of inertia of the methane. A heavy probe favors strong templating of the helium density as well as a large renormalization in the probe's rotational constant, but a light probe shows almost no effect on the shell density or the effective rotational constant. These results suggest that in order to fully understand the superfluidity of the helium shell, the probe must be treated as an integral part of the system. We rationalize the findings in terms of a rotational smearing effect and suggest that there is no clearly quantifiable relationship between the superfluid fraction of the shell and the renormalized rotational constant of the probe for cases where the probe molecule is either light or has weak anisotropic interactions with the helium atoms. PMID:19618956

  4. Effect of Subject Rotation on Assessment of Esthetic Dental Ratios: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Prabhat Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to find out the change in esthetic ratios during rotation of patient's head using a simulation. Materials and Methods. A plaster study model was photographed placing its midline along the long axis of the camera. Then a series of photographs were taken by rotating the model each degree till 10° on both right and left sides. These photographs were digitally measured and the ratio of the maxillary anterior teeth at zero-degree rotation was compared with that at various degrees of rotation. Results. As the model was rotated to the right side till 10°, the ratio of the right lateral to central incisor gradually decreased while the ratio of the left lateral to central incisor gradually increased. However, the ratio of the canine to lateral incisor on both sides gradually increased. Similar results were obtained when the model was rotated to the left side. The ratio of the lateral to central incisor deviated from the acceptable range (±10%) when there was rotation of more than 7°, whereas the ratio of the canine to lateral incisor was within the acceptable range till 10° rotation on either side. Conclusions. Rotation of the model by more than 7° leads to a substantial change in the esthetic ratio. PMID:27092181

  5. Low-lying dipole excitations in vibrational nuclei: The Cd isotopic chain studied in photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohstall, C.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Linnemann, A.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2005-09-01

    High-resolution nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) were performed on 110,111,112,114,116Cd at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Dynamitron accelerator in Stuttgart to study the low-lying dipole strength distributions in these vibrational nuclei. Numerous excited states, most of them previously unknown, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, decay branchings, and transition probabilities. For states in the even-even isotopes 110,112,114,116Cd, parities could be assigned from linear polarization measurements. Together with our previous results for 108,112,113,114Cd from NRF studies without polarization measurements, systematics was established for the dipole strength distributions of the stable nuclei within the Cd isotopic chain. The results are discussed with respect to the systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations and mixed-symmetry states in even-even nuclei near the Z=50 shell closure and the fragmentation of these excitation modes in the odd-mass Cd isotopes.

  6. Electric dipole response of nuclei studied by proton inelastic scattering: neutron thickness, symmetry energy, and pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; RCNP E282/E316/E326/E350/E376/E377 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. JSPS No. 25105509.

  7. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  8. Study of near-stability nuclei populated as fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Nelson, Ronald O; Devlin, Matthew; Cizewski, Jolie A; Krucken, Reiner; Clark, R M; Fallon, Paul; Lee, I Yang; Macchiavelli, Agusto O; Becker, John A; Younes, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Examples are presented to illustrate the power of prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from compound nuclei with A {approx} 200 formed in fusion-evaporation reactions in experiments using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Complementary methods, such as Coulomb excitation and deep-inelastic processes, are also discussed. In other cases (n, xn{gamma}) reactions on stable isotopes have been used to establish neutron excitation functions for {gamma}-rays using a pulsed 'white'-neutron source, coupled to a high-energy-resolution germanium-detector array. The excitation functions can unambiguously assign {gamma}-rays to a specific reaction product. Results from all these methods bridge the gaps in the systematics of high-spin states between the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei. Results near shell closures should motivate new shell model calculations.

  9. Study of N = Z nuclei in variation-after-projection framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    War, Tariq Ahmad; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2004-10-01

    Variation-after-projection (VAP) calculations in conjunction with the Hartree- Bogoliubov (HB) ansatz have been carried out for A = 68-88, N = Z nuclei. In this framework, the yrast spectra with J^{π} ≤slant 10^{ + } , B( E2) transition probabilities and deformation parameter (β2) have been obtained. A pairing interaction for like particles as well as protons and neutrons has been included in the model for a two-body interaction.

  10. Numerical study of rotating interstellar clouds: equilibrium and collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    Equilibrium and collapse of rotating, axisymmetric, idealized interstellar gas clouds is calculated with a 2D hydrodynamics code. The hydrodynamics features an improved angular momentum advection algorithm. Angular momentum is advected consistently with mass by deriving angular momentum fluxes from mass fluxes and the local distribution of specific angular momentum. Local conservation is checked by a graph of mass versus specific angular momentum for the cloud as a whole.

  11. Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Cumulus Humilis — selected Case Study During the CHAPS Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Lee, Y.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Laskin, A.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, E.

    2010-03-15

    The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) provided a unique opportunity to study aerosol and cloud processing. Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and impact scavenging. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used as one of the main platforms in CHAPS. Flight tracks were designed and implemented to characterize freshly emitted aerosols at cloud top and cloud base as well as within the cloud, i.e., cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus), in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. Measurements of interstitial aerosols and residuals of activated condensation cloud nuclei were conducted simultaneously. The interstitial aerosols were measured downstream of an isokinetic inlet, and the activated particles downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of non-activated interstitial particles outside of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured, as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point. We will report on the CCN properties in cumulus humilis. Several approaches will be taken. The first is single-particle analysis of particles collected by the Time-Resolved Aerosol Sampler (TRAC) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Specifically, we examine differences between activated and interstitial ones, such as differences in chemical composition and morphology. The second analysis will link in situ measurements by AMS and PTRMS with the observations by TRAC. For

  12. New prospects in synthesis and study of neutron rich heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, W.

    2011-10-01

    The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are rather close to the beta stability line while the unexplored area of heavy neutron rich nuclides (also those located along the neutron closed shell N = 126 to the right hand side of the stability line) is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z > 100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The "north-east" area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of new nuclei. Multi-nucleon transfer processes in near barrier collisions of heavy ions seem to be the only reaction mechanism allowing us to produce and explore neutron rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy island of stability. Neutron capture process can be also considered as an alternative method for the production of long-lived neutron rich superheavy nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by nuclear reactors and nuclear explosions in laboratory frame and by supernova explosions in nature.

  13. Effects of ventricular insertion sites on rotational motion of left ventricular segments studied by cardiac MR

    PubMed Central

    Robson, M D; Rider, O J; Pegg, T J; Dasanu, C A; Jung, B A; Clarke, K; Holloway, C J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Obtaining new details for rotational motion of left ventricular (LV) segments using velocity encoding cardiac MR and correlating the regional motion patterns to LV insertion sites. Methods: Cardiac MR examinations were performed on 14 healthy volunteers aged between 19 and 26 years. Peak rotational velocities and circumferential velocity curves were obtained for 16 ventricular segments. Results: Reduced peak clockwise velocities of anteroseptal segments (i.e. Segments 2 and 8) and peak counterclockwise velocities of inferoseptal segments (i.e. Segments 3 and 9) were the most prominent findings. The observations can be attributed to the LV insertion sites into the right ventricle, limiting the clockwise rotation of anteroseptal LV segments and the counterclockwise rotation of inferoseptal segments as viewed from the apex. Relatively lower clockwise velocities of Segment 5 and counterclockwise velocities of Segment 6 were also noted, suggesting a cardiac fixation point between these two segments, which is in close proximity to the lateral LV wall. Conclusion: Apart from showing different rotational patterns of LV base, mid ventricle and apex, the study showed significant differences in the rotational velocities of individual LV segments. Correlating regional wall motion with known orientation of myocardial aggregates has also provided new insights into the mechanisms of LV rotational motions during a cardiac cycle. Advances in knowledge: LV insertion into the right ventricle limits the clockwise rotation of anteroseptal LV segments and the counterclockwise rotation of inferoseptal segments adjacent to the ventricular insertion sites. The pattern should be differentiated from wall motion abnormalities in cardiac pathology. PMID:24133098

  14. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  15. Studies of ice nuclei at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike

    2013-04-01

    Ice containing clouds permanently cover 40% of the earth's surface. Ice formation processes have a large impact on the formation of precipitation, cloud radiative properties, cloud electrification and hence influence both, weather and climate. Our understanding of the physical and chemical processes underlying ice formation is limited. However what we know is that the two main pathways of atmospheric ice formation are homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. The latter involves aerosol particles that act as ice nuclei inducing cloud droplet freezing at temperatures significantly above the homogeneous freezing threshold temperature. Particles acting as IN are e.g. dust particles, but also biological particles like bacteria, pollen and fungal spores. Different heterogeneous freezing mechanisms do exit, with their relative importance for atmospheric clouds still being debated. However, there are strong indications that immersion freezing is the most important mechanism when considering mixed phase clouds. What we are still lacking is a) the fundamental process understanding on how aerosol particles induce ice nucleation and b) means to quantify ice nucleation in atmospheric models. Concerning a) there most likely is not only one answer, considering the variety of IN found in the atmosphere. With respect to b) different approaches based on either the stochastic or singular hypotheses have been suggested. However it is still being debated which would be a suitable way to parameterize laboratory data for use in atmospheric modeling. In this presentation, both topics will be addressed. Using the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) (Hartmann et al., 2011), we examined different types of dust particles with and without coating, and biological particles such as bacteria and pollen, with respect to their immersion freezing behaviour. We will summarize our findings concerning the properties controlling the ice nucleation behaviour of these particles and

  16. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  17. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event: A Parametric Study

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 – 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index (MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested. Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): (1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remnant cavitation nuclei; (2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; (3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  18. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as hock-wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 to 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index(MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested.Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): 1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remanent cavitation nuclei; 2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; and 3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high-magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  19. Response of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  20. Study of nuclei far from stability with AYE-Ball array

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.

    1996-11-01

    The coupling of a Compton-suppressed Ge (CsGe) detector array to a recoil mass separator (RMS) has seen limited use in the past due to the low efficiency for measuring recoil-{gamma} ray coincidences (< 0.1%). With the building of new generation recoil separators and gamma-ray arrays, a substantial increase in detection efficiency has been achieved. This allows for the opportunity to measure excited states in nuclei with cross-sections approaching 100 nb. In this paper, results from the coupling of a modest array of CsGe detectors (AYE-Ball) with a recoil separator (FMA) will be presented.

  1. Properties of Hot Nuclei at Extreme Angular Momenta Studied by the GDR

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Adam; Kmiecik, Maria; Schunck, Nicolas; Styczen, Jan

    2005-11-21

    Hot nuclei, from both heavy and light mass regions, were investigated at extreme angular momenta by means of the gamma decay of Giant Dipole Resonance. It was found that the 216Rn nucleus possesses an almost spherical equilibrium shape up to the fission limit, while 46Ti undergoes a Jacobi shape transition. Preferential feeding of the highly deformed band in 42Ca by the low energy GDR component in 46Ti is found. The experimental results are interpreted within the newest liquid drop model LSD.

  2. Passive Rotation Range of Motion and Shoulder Subluxation: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William; Kozey, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports of range of motion (ROM) findings exist related to shoulder instability. Knowledge of range of motion findings among individuals with shoulder subluxation may aid in diagnosis and facilitate appropriate management. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare passive rotation ROM and determine if a symptom-provoking activity alters ROM between patients with shoulder subluxations and healthy controls. Methods Seventeen symptomatic patients with shoulder subluxations and 14 healthy controls between the ages of 18 and 35 years were recruited. Lateral and medial rotation ROM measures were taken using a universal goniometer. Symptoms were assessed using a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Each group performed a symptom-provoking activity, and VAS and ROM measures were repeated. Results A two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measures on pre/post activity demonstrated lower medial rotation measures for the instability group, but no differences for lateral rotation or total range (p < 0.05). A “warm-up” effect was noted, with greater ROM found in each group post activity, with a greater increase noted among controls. Analysis of the ratio of lateral rotation to medial rotation ROM found a significantly greater ratio in the instability group. VAS pain scores were greater in the instability group. Conclusion Shoulder subluxation is not necessarily associated with increased rotation ROM, therefore total ROM findings should not be used to screen for instability. Imbalances in rotation ROM may be associated with symptomatic shoulder instability and may have implications for treatment. PMID:21509102

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: The halo structure of neutron-drip line nuclei: (neutron) cluster-core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Raj K.; Balasubramaniam, M.; Puri, Rajeev K.; Scheid, Werner

    2000-02-01

    Nuclei at the neutron-drip line are studied. In particular, we analyse the binding energies with the effects of Coulomb repulsion, nuclear attraction due to proximity and rotational energy due to angular momentum. This includes the study of the `neutron-halo structure' of some 18 light neutron-rich nuclei. In terms of the neutron-cluster + core picture, the halo structures of these nuclei are identified which agree with the hypothesis of one/two neutron separation energies and are supported by available experimental information. All the studied nuclei possess 1n- or 2n-halo structure. It is further shown that these nuclei prefer stable cores with not only the neutron number N = 2Z but also with 2Z +/-2.

  4. Structure of A Equals 76 Nuclei and Fast-Timing Studies of the Rare-Earth Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Nathan Michael

    produce useful results. Such cases include estimation of total -gamma-decay widths of neutron resonances and -gamma-ray spectra following nuclear reactions. Of particular interest in modern research are so-called pygmy resonances which may be due, for example, to a neutron skin resonance or other exotic modes of excitation. Another topic of continued interest is that of double-beta decay and in particular the search for neutrinoless double-beta (0vbeta) decay. Conclusive observation of 0 vbeta decay would show that the neutrino is its own anti-particle, and evaluation of the neutrino mass could be performed if the matrix element of the decay were known. Constraining parameters of theoretical models using experimental data is of the utmost importance to these calculations. In this dissertation, the structure of A = 76 nuclei near stability, candidates for involvement in the hypothetical 0vbeta decay of 76Ge, is explored though seven experiments performed at the Darmstadt High-Intensity Photon Source, the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source, and at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory. Of particular concern is the analysis and interpretation of nuclear resonance fluorescence data on 76Se, 76Ge, and nuclei in general. Details and results of experiments performed using fast-timing electronics to study structure of low-lying states of 174W and 176Hf at WNSL are additionally presented as an appendix.

  5. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  6. Shape changes and isospin purity in highly excited light mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kicinska-Habior, M. |; Snover, K.A.; Behr, J.A.; Gossett, C.A.; Gundlach, J.H.; Drebi, Z.M.; Kaplan, M.S.; Wells, D.P.

    1993-11-01

    The statistical decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance built on a highly excited states of light-mass nuclei was studied in inclusive experiments. Results of the search for a shape change of hot, fast-rotating {sup 45}Sc and the test of the isospin purity at high excitation in {sup 28}Si and {sup 26}Al are reported.

  7. Long-term study of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Steiner, G.; Reischl, G.; Hitzenberger, R.

    2011-10-01

    During a total of 11 months, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at super-saturation S 0.5%) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations were measured in the urban background aerosol of Vienna, Austria. For several months, number size distributions between 13.22 nm and 929 nm were also measured with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS). Activation ratios (i.e. CCN/CN ratios) were calculated and apparent activation diameters obtained by integrating the SMPS size distributions. Variations in all CCN parameters (concentration, activation ratio, apparent activation diameter) are quite large on timescales of days to weeks. Passages of fronts influenced CCN parameters. Concentrations decreased with the passage of a front. No significant differences were found for fronts from different sectors (for Vienna mainly north to west and south to east). CCN concentrations at 0.5% S ranged from 160 cm-3 to 3600 cm-3 with a campaign average of 820 cm-3. Activation ratios were quite low (0.02-0.47, average: 0.13) and comparable to activation ratios found in other polluted regions (e.g. Cubison et al., 2008). Apparent activation diameters were found to be much larger (campaign average: 169 nm, range: (69-370) nm) than activation diameters for single-salt particles (around 50 nm depending on the salt). Contrary to CN concentrations, which are influenced by source patterns, CCN concentrations did not exhibit distinct diurnal patterns. Activation ratios showed diurnal variations counter-current to the variations of CN concentrations.

  8. Interaction of Fast Nucleons with Actinide Nuclei Studied with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yu.; Pshenichnov, I.; Mishustin, I.; Greiner, W.

    2014-04-01

    We model interactions of protons and neutrons with energies from 1 to 1000 MeV with 241Am and 243Am nuclei. The calculations are performed with the Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems (MCADS) which we developed based on the GEANT4 toolkit of version 9.4. This toolkit is widely used to simulate the propagation of particles in various materials which contain nuclei up to uranium. After several extensions we apply this toolkit also to proton- and neutron-induced reactions on Am. The fission and radiative neutron capture cross sections, neutron multiplicities and distributions of fission fragments were calculated for 241Am and 243Am and compared with experimental data. As demonstrated, the fission of americium by energetic protons with energies above 20 MeV can be well described by the Intra-Nuclear Cascade Liège (INCL) model combined with the fission-evaporation model ABLA. The calculated average numbers of fission neutrons and mass distributions of fission products agree well with the corresponding data. However, the proton-induced fission below 20 MeV is described less accurately. This is attributed to the limitations of the Intra-Nuclear Cascade model at low projectile energies.

  9. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafinelli, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.

    2016-02-01

    The variability of the X-Ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis [1], who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that the spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X- Ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter β, defined by Trevese and Vagnetti [2] as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarithmic flux variation. We find that the spectral variability of quasars has a softer when brighter behaviour, similarly to local AGNs.

  10. Similarities between explicit and implicit motor imagery in mental rotation of hands: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Bethel A; Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2014-12-01

    Chronometric and imaging studies have shown that motor imagery is used implicitly during mental rotation tasks in which subjects for example judge the laterality of human hand pictures at various orientations. Since explicit motor imagery is known to activate the sensorimotor areas of the cortex, mental rotation is expected to do similar if it involves a form of motor imagery. So far, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography have been used to study mental rotation and less attention has been paid to electroencephalogram (EEG) which offers a high time-frequency resolution. The time-frequency analysis is an established method for studying explicit motor imagery. Although hand mental rotation is claimed to involve motor imagery, the time-frequency characteristics of mental rotation have never been compared with those of explicit motor imagery. In this study, time-frequency responses of EEG recorded during explicit motor imagery and during a mental rotation task, inducing implicit motor imagery, were compared. Fifteen right-handed healthy volunteers performed motor imagery of hands in one condition and hand laterality judgement tasks in another while EEG of the whole head was recorded. The hand laterality judgement was the mental rotation task used to induce implicit motor imagery. The time-frequency analysis and sLORETA localisation of the EEG showed that the activities in the sensorimotor areas had similar spatial and time-frequency characteristics in explicit motor imagery and implicit motor imagery conditions. Furthermore this sensorimotor activity was different for the left and for the right hand in both explicit and implicit motor imagery. This result supports that motor imagery is used during mental rotation and that it can be detected and studied with EEG technology. This result should encourage the use of mental rotation of body parts in rehabilitation programmes in a similar manner as motor imagery.

  11. A Parametric Study of Erupting Flux Rope Rotation: Modeling the 'Cartwheel CME' on 9 April 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of erupting filaments in the solar corona is addressed through a parametric simulation study of unstable, rotating flux ropes in bipolar force-free initial equilibrium. The Lorentz force due to the external shear-field component and the relaxation of tension in the twisted field are the major contributors to the rotation in this model, while reconnection with the ambient field is of minor importance, due to the field's simple structure. In the low-beta corona, the rotation is not guided by the changing orientation of the vertical field component's polarity inversion line with height. The model yields strong initial rotations which saturate in the corona and differ qualitatively from the profile of rotation vs. height obtained in a recent simulation of an eruption without preexisting flux rope. Both major mechanisms writhe the flux rope axis, converting part of the initial twist helicity, and produce rotation profiles which, to a large part, are very similar within a range of shear-twist combinations. A difference lies in the tendency of twist-driven rotation to saturate at lower heights than shear-driven rotation. For parameters characteristic of the source regions of erupting filaments and coronal mass ejections, the shear field is found to be the dominant origin of rotations in the corona and to be required if the rotation reaches angles of order 90 degrees and higher; it dominates even if the twist exceeds the threshold of the helical kink instability. The contributions by shear and twist to the total rotation can be disentangled in the analysis of observations if the rotation and rise profiles are simultaneously compared with model calculations. The resulting twist estimate allows one to judge whether the helical kink instability occurred. This is demonstrated for the erupting prominence in the "Cartwheel CME" on 9 April 2008, which has shown a rotation of approximately 115 deg. up to a height of 1.5 Solar R above the photosphere. Out of a range of

  12. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  13. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  14. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in 254No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  15. Nuclear rotation in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic nuclei often exhibit collective rotational-like behavior in highly excited states, well above the particle emission threshold. What determines the existence of collective motion in the continuum region is not fully understood. Purpose: In this work, by studying the collective rotation of the positive-parity deformed configurations of the one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, we assess different mechanisms that stabilize collective behavior beyond the limits of particle stability. Method: To solve a particle-plus-core problem, we employ a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism and the Berggren single-particle ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We study the valence-neutron density in the intrinsic rotor frame to assess the validity of the adiabatic approach as the excitation energy increases. Results: We demonstrate that collective rotation of the ground band of 11Be is stabilized by (i) the fact that the ℓ =0 one-neutron decay channel is closed, and (ii) the angular momentum alignment, which increases the parentage of high-ℓ components at high spins; both effects act in concert to decrease decay widths of ground-state band members. This is not the case for higher-lying states of 11Be, where the ℓ =0 neutron-decay channel is open and often dominates. Conclusion: We demonstrate that long-lived collective states can exist at high excitation energy in weakly bound neutron drip-line nuclei such as 11Be.

  16. Study of Variations in Solar Differential Rotation Based on Compact Magnetic Features and Hydrogen Hα Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japaridze, D. R.; Chargeishvili, B. B.

    2016-09-01

    Data on compact magnetic features and hydrogen Hα filaments during solar activity cycles 20 and 21 are used to study variations in the solar differential rotation. The difference in the differential rotation rates of the compact magnetic features and hydrogen Hα filaments is greatest between the 20-30° and 30-40° latitude zones in both solar hemispheres. The rotation rates of the compact magnetic featuresat all latitudes are higher than those of the hydrogen Hα filaments and the difference between them increases with latitude.

  17. Semi-analytical study of the rotational motion stability of artificial satellites using quaternions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso dos Santos, Josué; Zanardi, Maria Cecília; Matos, Nicholas

    2013-10-01

    This study at aims performing the stability analysis of the rotational motion to artificial satellites using quaternions to describe the satellite attitude (orientation on the space). In the system of rotational motion equations, which is composed by four kinematic equations of the quaternions and by the three Euler equations in terms of the rotational spin components. The influence of the gravity gradient and the direct solar radiation pressure torques have been considered. Equilibrium points were obtained through numerical simulations using the softwares Matlab and Octave, which are then analyzed by the Routh-Hurwitz Stability Criterion.

  18. Uterine leiomyomas with bizarre nuclei: a clinicopathologic study of 59 cases.

    PubMed

    Croce, Sabrina; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther

    2014-10-01

    Leiomyoma with bizarre nuclei (LM-BN) is an uncommon tumor with histologic features (mononucleated or multinucleated bizarre cells that may have a diffuse distribution, prominent nucleoli, and karyorrhectic nuclei that may mimic atypical mitoses) that often causes confusion with leiomyosarcoma. Fifty-nine LM-BNs were collected from our consultation files over the years 2000 to 2011. Features recorded included patient age, therapy, tumor size, border, gross appearance, density and distribution of BN, mitotic count, karyorrhectic nuclei, prominent nucleoli, cells with conspicuous dense eosinophilic cytoplasm (rhabdoid-like), vascular changes and type of vasculature, and presence of necrosis and its nature. Follow-up information was obtained for all patients. Patients ranged in age from 25 to 75 (average 45) years (11 patients between 25 and 35 y, 20 between 36 and 45 y, 22 between 46 and 55 y, and 6 between 56 and 75 y). Forty-two underwent hysterectomy and 17 myomectomy. For 51 tumors gross findings were known. Forty (78%) had a solid white and whorled cut surface and 11 (22%) a yellow appearance. Five (10%) neoplasms showed prominent cystic degeneration, and hemorrhage and/or necrosis was seen in 9 (18%). Forty-five LM-BNs had a pushing margin with the surrounding myometrium, whereas 1 showed irregular borders. Margins could not be ascertained in the slides available in 13 cases. Twenty-eight (48%), 19 (32%), and 12 (20%) LM-BN showed low, intermediate, and high BN density. Eighteen (30%) tumors showed diffuse, 26 (44%) showed multifocal, and 15 (26%) had focal BN distribution. Mitotic counts ranged from 0 to 7/10 high-power fields (HPF) (average 1 to 2/10 HPF). Thirty-seven (63%) had <2/10 HPF, 19 (32%) had 2 to 5 mitoses/10 HPF, and in 3 tumors (5%) mitotic counts were 6, 7, and 7/10 HPF (2 with focal and 1 with diffuse BN). All but 4 LM-BNs showed karyorrhectic nuclei, striking in 12 neoplasms, mimicking atypical mitoses. Nineteen (32%) LMs had prominent

  19. New method to study the photon strength function using the beta-decay of unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddick, Sean

    2015-10-01

    The photon strength function is a fundamental property of the atomic nucleus that can be linked with many different areas of nuclear science. In particular, a knowledge of the photon strength function can be applied in statistical-model reaction calculations to constrain neutron capture rates useful for nuclear astrophysics and other applications. A new method has been developed which takes advantage of beta-decay to populate high-energy states in a daughter nucleus. This preparation is combined with a total absorption spectrometer to record the subsequent gamma-ray cascade and the overall technique is the so-called beta-Oslo method. The technique is applicable to very low production rates (~1 pps) and, thus, can be used to look at trends across a wide range of neutron and proton numbers. A description of the technique, and preliminary results on neutron-rich nuclei near Z = 28 and N = 40 will be presented.

  20. Distribution of primary afferent fibres in the cochlear nuclei. A silver and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) study.

    PubMed Central

    Merchan, M A; Collia, F P; Merchan, J A; Saldana, E

    1985-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase, when injected intracochlearly, is transported transganglionically to the brain stem cochlear nuclei, thus providing an excellent method for tracing the central projection of the spiral ganglion neurons. Silver impregnation using the Cajal-de Castro method, which stains axons even when inside the bone, was used as a reference technique. The combination of both procedures led to the following conclusions. Primary cochlear afferents are found only in the ventral zone of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. In this area they cover the deep and fusiform cell layers. The molecular layer shows no HRP label. The higher concentration of primary cochlear afferents in the ventral cochlear nucleus appears in its central zone; wide areas in this nucleus are not labelled at all. A thin bundle of primary cochlear afferents runs parallel to, and beneath, the granular region. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:4077711

  1. Comparative studies for different proximity potentials applied to large cluster radioactivity of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. L.; Yao, Y. J.; Guo, M. F.; Pan, M.; Zhang, G. X.; Liu, X. X.

    2016-07-01

    Half-lives of large cluster radioactivity of even-even nuclei calculated by using fourteen proximity potentials are compared to experimental data. The results show that the results of BASS77 and Denisov potentials are most agreeable with the experimental data. Christensen and Winther 1976 potential gives the smallest half-lives. In comparison with the distributions of different proximity potentials and the distributions of total potentials when the values of total potentials are more than the released energy Qc, it is found that at the small distances the large differences of proximity potentials do not affect the calculation results. The different distributions of total potentials affect the penetration probability of large cluster radioactivity, and then affect the half-life of large cluster radioactivity.

  2. Long-term study of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna.

    PubMed

    Burkart, J; Steiner, G; Reischl, G; Hitzenberger, R

    2011-10-01

    During a total of 11 months, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at super-saturation S 0.5%) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations were measured in the urban background aerosol of Vienna, Austria. For several months, number size distributions between 13.22 nm and 929 nm were also measured with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS). Activation ratios (i.e. CCN/CN ratios) were calculated and apparent activation diameters obtained by integrating the SMPS size distributions. Variations in all CCN parameters (concentration, activation ratio, apparent activation diameter) are quite large on timescales of days to weeks. Passages of fronts influenced CCN parameters. Concentrations decreased with the passage of a front. No significant differences were found for fronts from different sectors (for Vienna mainly north to west and south to east). CCN concentrations at 0.5% S ranged from 160 cm(-3) to 3600 cm(-3) with a campaign average of 820 cm(-3). Activation ratios were quite low (0.02-0.47, average: 0.13) and comparable to activation ratios found in other polluted regions (e.g. Cubison et al., 2008). Apparent activation diameters were found to be much larger (campaign average: 169 nm, range: (69-370) nm) than activation diameters for single-salt particles (around 50 nm depending on the salt). Contrary to CN concentrations, which are influenced by source patterns, CCN concentrations did not exhibit distinct diurnal patterns. Activation ratios showed diurnal variations counter-current to the variations of CN concentrations.

  3. Study of 11Li and 10,11Be nuclei through elastic scattering and breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Spasova, K.

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid model of the microscopic optical potential (OP) is applied to calculate the 11Li+p, 10,11Be+p, and 10,11Be+12C elastic scattering cross sections at energies E < 100 MeV/nucleon. The OP's contain the folding-model real part (ReOP) with the direct and exchange terms included, while its imaginary part (ImOP) is derived within the high-energy approximation (HEA) theory. For the 11Li+p elastic scattering, the microscopic large-scale shell model (LSSM) density of 11Li is used, while the density distributions of 10,11Be nuclei obtained within the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) model and the generator coordinate method (GCM) are utilized to calculate the microscopic OPs and cross sections of elastic scattering of these nuclei on protons and 12C. The depths of the real and imaginary parts of OP are fitted to the elastic scattering data, being simultaneously adjusted to reproduce the true energy dependence of the corresponding volume integrals. Also, the cluster models, in which 11Li consists of 2n-halo and the 9Li core having its own LSSM form of density and 11Be consists of a n-halo and the 10Be core, are adopted. Within the latter, we give predictions for the longitudinal momentum distributions of 9Li fragments produced in the breakup of 11Li at 62 MeV/nucleon on a proton target. It is shown that our results for the diffraction and stripping reaction cross sections in 11Be scattering on 9Be, 93Nb, 181Ta, and 238U targets at 63 MeV/nucleon are in a good agreement with the available experimental data.

  4. Sex chromosome loss and aging: In situ hybridization studies on human interphase nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenbach, M.; Koschorz, B.; Bernthaler, U.

    1995-11-01

    A total of 1,000 lymphocyte interphase nuclei per proband from 90 females and 138 males age 1 wk to 93 years were analyzed by in situ hybridization for loss of the X and Y chromosomes, respectively. Both sex chromosomes showed an age-dependent loss. In males, Y hypoploidy was very low up to age 15 years (0.05%) but continuously increased to a frequency of 1.34% in men age 76-80 years. In females, the baseline level for X chromosome loss is much higher than that seen for the Y chromosome in males. Even prepubertal females show a rate of X chromosome loss on the order of 1.5%-2.5%, rising to {approximately}4.5%-5% in women older than 75 years. Dividing the female probands into three biological age groups on the basis of sex hormone function (<13 years, 13-51 years, and >51 years), a significant correlation of X chromosome loss versus age could clearly be demonstrated in women beyond age 51 years. Females age 51-91 years showed monosomy X at a rate from 3.2% to 5.1%. In contrast to sex chromosomal loss, the frequency of autosomal monosomies does not change during the course of aging: chromosome 1 and chromosome 17 monosomic cells were found with a constant incidence of 1.2% and 1%, respectively. These data also indicate that autosome loss in interphase nuclei is not a function of chromosome size. 34 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Excitatory and inhibitory innervation of the mouse orofacial motor nuclei: A stereological study.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Oñate-Ponce, Alejandro; Fernández-Collemann, Sara; Henny, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Neurons in the trigeminal (Mo5), facial (Mo7), ambiguus (Amb), and hypoglossal (Mo12) motor nuclei innervate jaw, facial, pharynx/larynx/esophagus, and tongue muscles, respectively. They are essential for movements subserving feeding, exploration of the environment, and social communication. These neurons are largely controlled by sensory afferents and premotor neurons of the reticular formation, where central pattern generator circuits controlling orofacial movements are located. To provide a description of the orofacial nuclei of the adult mouse and to ascertain the influence of excitatory and inhibitory afferents upon them, we used stereology to estimate the number of motoneurons as well as of varicosities immunopositive for glutamate (VGluT1+, VGluT2+) and GABA/glycine (known as VIAAT+ or VGAT+) vesicular transporters in the Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12. Mo5, Mo7, Amb, and Mo12 contain ∼1,000, ∼3,000, ∼600, and ∼1,700 cells, respectively. VGluT1+, VGluT2+, and VIAAT+ varicosities respectively represent: 28%, 41%, and 31% in Mo5; 2%, 49%, and 49% in Mo7; 12%, 42%, and 46% in Amb; and 4%, 54%, and 42% in Mo12. The Mo5 jaw-closing subdivision shows the highest VGluT1+ innervation. Noticeably, the VGluT2+ and VIAAT+ varicosity density in Mo7 is 5-fold higher than in Mo5 and 10-fold higher than in Amb and Mo12. The high density of terminals in Mo7 likely reflects the convergence and integration of numerous inputs to motoneurons subserving the wide range of complex behaviors to which this nucleus contributes. Also, somatic versus neuropil location of varicosities suggests that most of these afferents are integrated in the dendritic trees of Mo7 neurons.

  6. A detailed study of nucleon structure function in nuclei in the valence quark region

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, N.

    1994-04-01

    The so called {open_quotes}EMC effect{close_quotes} discovered during the 1980`s, has caused a big controversy in the community of nuclear and high energy physicists; during the last ten years, five experiments have been performed in different laboratories and several hundreds of papers about the possible interpretation of the modification of the nucleon structure function inside nuclei have been published. However, from the experimental point of view, the main goal of four experiments (EMC, BCDMS, NMC, FNAL) has been to emphasize the region of low x{sub b}, where shadowing effects appear. In the region of valence quarks and nuclear effects (x{sub b} > 0.1 - 0.2) the most reliable data presently available are from the SLAC E139 experiment performed in 1983 with only 80 hours of beam time. New precise data in the valence quark region are necessary to measure separate structure functions F{sub 2}(x{sub b}, Q{sup 2}) and R{sup lt}(x{sub b},Q{sup 2}) = {sigma}{sub l}/{sigma}{sub t}, and to investigate the real A-dependence of the ratio between bound and free-nucleon structure functions which is not completely defined by the SLAC data. Moreover, from the nuclear physics point of view, a measurement on some unexplored nuclei, like {sup 3}He and {sup 48}Ca, would be of great interest. The intermediate scaling region (0.1 < x{sub b} < 0.7) would be accessible at CEBAF if the machine energy will reach 6-8 GeV, as suggested by all the tests performed on the RF cavities. This physics program has been already presented in two letter of intents.

  7. Coulomb Excitation and One-Neutron Transfer Studies of Stable and Radioactive Nuclei at HRIBF-ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M

    2015-01-01

    Several stable and radioactive nuclei ranging from $A=58$ to 208 were recently studied in inverse kinematics by Coulomb excitation and heavy-ion induced one-neutron transfer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These studies used a CsI-HPGe detector array to detect scattered charged particles and emitted $\\gamma$ rays from the in-beam reactions. A Bragg-curve detector was used to measure the energy loss of the various beams through the targets and to measure the radioactive beam compositions. Stable nickel, strontium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, tellurium, and lead isotopes and neutron-rich radioactive tin and tellurium isotopes were among the nuclei recently studied. Coulomb excitation was used to measure the electromagnetic moments of the first excited states and heavy-ion induced one-neutron transfer was used to measure the absolute cross sections and lifetimes of the excited single-particle states. A sample of these results are presented here with an emphasis on the tin isotopes. In particular, a survey of the Bragg-curve measurements, Doppler corrections, and inconclusive $i_{13/2}$ candidate in $^{133}$\\textrm{Sn} are presented.

  8. Van der waals interactions and decrease of the rotational barrier of methyl-sized rotators: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Jerome

    2006-08-30

    Rotational barriers of methyl-sized molecular rotators are investigated theoretically using ab initio and empirical force field calculations in molecular models simulating various environmental conditions experienced by the molecular rotors. Calculations on neopentane surrounded by methyl groups suggest that the neopentane's methyl rotational potential energy barrier can be reduced by up to an order of magnitude by locating satellite functional groups around the rotator at a geometry that destabilizes the staggered conformation of the rotator through van der Waals repulsive interactions and reduces the staggered/eclipsed relative energy difference. Molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics calculations indicate that this barrier-reducing geometry can also be found in molecular rotators surface mounted on graphite surfaces or carbon nanotube models. In these models, molecular dynamics simulations show that the rotation of methyl-sized functional groups can be catalyzed by van der Waals interactions, thus making very rigid rotators become thermally activated at room temperature. These results are discussed in the context of design of nanostructures and use of methyl groups as markers for microenvironmental conditions.

  9. Thermocapillary bubble flow and coalescence in a rotating cylinder: A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, A.; Al-mazidi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The process of thermocapillary bubbles rising in a rotating 3D cylinder in zero gravity was analysed and presented numerically with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by means of the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Calculations were carried out to investigate in detail the effect of the rotational speed of the hosted liquid on the trajectory of both single and group bubbles driven by the Marangoni force in zero-gravity conditions. For rotational speeds from 0.25 to 2 rad/s, bubble displacement with angular motion was found to be directed between the hotter surface and the rotational axis. This is contrary to the conventional bubble flow from areas of high pressure to low pressure, radial direction, or from cold to hot regions, axial direction. The results demonstrate that for the ratio of rotational speeds to the thermocapillary bubble velocity larger than unity, the surface tension gradient is the dominant force and the bubble motion towards the hotter. On the other hand, for ratio less than 1, the bubble motion is dominated and is significantly affected by centrifugal force. As rotation speed increases, the amount of deflection increases and the Marangoni effect vanishes. The current study is novel in the sense that single- and multi-bubble motion incorporating thermocapillary forces in a rotating liquid in a zero-gravity environment has never been numerically investigated.

  10. Shoulder rotators electro-mechanical properties change with intensive volleyball practice: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cornu, C; Nordez, A; Bideau, B

    2009-12-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the incidence of high-level volleyball practice on muscle strength production and muscle activation during internal and external shoulder rotations. Seven professional and seven French amateur league volleyball players performed maximal isometric at three forearm angles, concentric and eccentric isokinetic internal and external shoulder rotations. The torque production and muscle activation levels of PECTORALIS MAJOR and INFRASPINATUS were determined. Few significant differences were found for muscle activation and co-activation between amateur and professional volleyball players during both internal and external rotations. No significant difference in torque production was observed for shoulder internal rotation between professional and amateur volleyball players. Torque production was significantly higher during shoulder external rotation for amateur (46.58+/-2.62 N . m) compared to professional (35.35+/-1.17 N . m) volleyball players relative to isometric contractions, but it was not different during isokinetic efforts. The torque ratios for external/internal rotations were always significantly lower for professional (0.42+/-0.03 pooling isometric and concentric conditions) compared to amateur volleyball players (0.56+/-0.03 pooling isometric and concentric conditions). Those results emphasize that a high level of volleyball practice induces a strong external rotators deficit compared to sports such as swimming, baseball or tennis.

  11. Loss of glenohumeral internal rotation in little league pitchers: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasuo; Nobuhara, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) is a significant shoulder problem for throwing athletes. GIRD, however, has not been reported in little league pitchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate GIRD in little leaguers. The range of motion of both shoulders was measured in 25 male little league pitchers. All pitchers underwent motion analyses of their pitching to evaluate shoulder kinematics. GIRD was found in 10 of the 25 pitchers. External rotation in the dominant arm in the GIRD group was not significantly different compared to the contralateral or dominant arm in the non-GIRD group. This biomechanical study showed that the GIRD group had increased external rotation while throwing compared to the non-GIRD group. These findings indicate that GIRD can occur prior to development of the increased external rotation in the dominant arm seen in adult throwers.

  12. Study of cluster structures in 10Be and 16C neutron-rich nuclei via break-up reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    Projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH2) target are used in order to study the spectroscopy of 10Be and 16C nuclei. For the present experiment we used 10Be and 16C beams delivered by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS, and the CHIMERA 4π multi-detector. 10Be and 16C structures are studied via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments. The 4He+6He break-up channel allowed us to study the spectroscopy of 10Be; in particular we find evidence of a new state in 10Be at 13.5 MeV excitation energy. The 16C nucleus is studied via 6He-10Be correlation; we find the fingerprint of a possible state at about 20.6 MeV

  13. Rotation Frequencies of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; James, David J.; Coley, Daniel; Connour, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half the 131 objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015).A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004).Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  14. Brownian motion studies of viscoelastic colloidal gels by rotational single particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mengning; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-05-01

    Colloidal gels have unique properties due to a complex microstructure which forms into an extended network. Although the bulk properties of colloidal gels have been studied, there has been difficulty correlating those properties with individual colloidal dynamics on the microscale due to the very high viscosity and elasticity of the material. We utilize rotational X-ray tracking (RXT) to investigate the rotational motion of component crystalline colloidal particles in a colloidal gel of alumina and decanoic acid. Our investigation has determined that the high elasticity of the bulk is echoed by a high elasticity experienced by individual colloidal particles themselves but also finds an unexpected high degree of rotational diffusion, indicating a large degree of freedom in the rotational motion of individual colloids even within a tightly bound system.

  15. Studies of the composition of solar particles and of energetic oxygen and sulfur nuclei trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray System (CRS) experiment on board each of the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft consists of four Low Energy Telescopes (LETs), two High Energy Telescopes (HETs), the Electron Telescope (TET), and associated electronics. With these instruments it is possible to measure the energy spectrum of electrons over the 3-110MeV energy range and the energy spectra and nuclear charge of atomic nuclei from hydrogen through zinc over the 3-500 MeV/nuc energy range. The exclusive use of solid-state detectors in the CRS telescopes achieves the objectives of reliability over a long mission life, high resolution determinations of energy and charge, and high-count-rate capability during large solar flares and passage through the magnetospheres of the outer planets. Summarized here are some of the many accomplishments that have resulted from the CRS measurements during the period covered by this report, May 15, 1981 to May 15, 1984, including studies of the energetic oxygen and sulfur nuclei trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere.

  16. Rotational viscosity of fluids composed of linear molecules: An equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. J. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Todd, B. D.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the rotational viscosity for a chlorine fluid and for a fluid composed of small linear molecules by using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The rotational viscosity is calculated over a large range of state points. It is found that the rotational viscosity is almost independent of temperature in the range studied here but exhibits a power-law dependency on density. The rotational viscosity also shows a power-law relationship with the molecular length, and the ratio between the shear and rotational viscosities approaches 0.5 for the longest molecule studied here. By changing the number of atoms or united atomic units per molecule and by keeping the molecule length fixed, we show that fluids composed of molecules which have a rodlike shape have a lower rotational viscosity. We argue that this phenomenon is due to the reduction in intermolecular connectivity, which leads to larger fluctuations around the values possessed by the fluid on average. The conclusions here can be extended to fluids composed of uniaxial molecules of arbitrary length.

  17. Spectral characterization and differential rotation study of active CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, E.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The CoRoT space telescope observed nearly 160 000 light curves. Among the most outstanding is that of the young, active planet host star CoRoT-2A. In addition to deep planetary transits, the light curve of CoRoT-2A shows strong rotational variability and a superimposed beating pattern. To study the stars that produce such an intriguing pattern of photometric variability, we identified a sample of eight stars with rotation periods between 0.8 and 11 days and photometric variability amplitudes of up to 7.5%, showing a similar CoRoT light curve. We also obtained high-resolution follow-up spectroscopy with TNG/SARG and carried out a spectral analysis with SME and MOOG. We find that the color dependence of the light curves is consistent with rotational modulation due to starspots and that latitudinal differential rotation provides a viable explanation for the light curves, although starspot evolution is also expected to play an important role. Our MOOG and SME spectral analyses provide consistent results, showing that the targets are dwarf stars with spectral types between F and mid-K. Detectable Li i absorption in four of the targets confirms a low age of 100-400 Myr also deduced from gyrochronology. Our study indicates that the photometric beating phenomenon is likely attributable to differential rotation in fast-rotating stars with outer convection zones.

  18. The study of exotic N approx equal 82 nuclei using the Daresbury recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, J.H.; Chishti, A.A.; Gelletly, W.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Varley, B.J.; Blomqvist, J.; Daly, P.J.; Piiparinen, M.; Woods, P.J.; Manchester Univ. . Schuster Lab.; Manne Siegbahn Inst.; Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN . Dept. of Chemistry; Jyvaeskylae Univ. . Dept. of Physics; Edinburgh Univ. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    Experiments using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator have identified microsecond isomers in the exotic N {equals} 82, 83 nuclei {sup 153}Yb, {sup 153}Lu, {sup 154}Hf, and have established their decay schemes. The results for {sup 153}Lu and {sup 154}Hf, together with those for lighter N {equals} 82 isotones, provide an outstanding illustration of the dependence of E2 transition rates between J{sup n} states on the subshell occupation, and demonstrate that half-filling of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} subshell in the N {equals} 82 series occurs just below Z {equals} 71 {sup 153}Lu. The result of the isomer in the even-odd N {equals} 83 nucleus {sup 153}Yb shows that the isomerism is due to a low-energy E2 transition rather than an E3 transition as in lighter N {equals} 83 even-odd isotones, which is another consequence of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} subshell being about half-filled. Furthermore, the long-lived isomer observed in the odd-odd N {equals} 83 nucleus {sup 154}Lu also reflects that the {pi}h{sub 11/2} subshell is close to being half-filled. 23 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Study of torus structure of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, T.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the nature of the torus structure of eight low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; NGC 1566, NGC 2655, NGC 3718, NGC 3998, NGC 4138, NGC 4941, NGC 5273 and NGC 5643) based on the broad band X-ray spectra (0.5-200 keV) obtained with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. Their X-ray luminosities are smaller than 1e 42 erg/s, while the Eddington ratios span a range from 1e-4 to 1e-2. No significant iron- Kalpha line is detected in the spectra of two LLAGNs with the lowest Eddington ratios (<3e-4) in our sample (NGC 3718 and NGC 3998), suggesting that their tori are little developed. The others show the iron-Kalpha equivalent widths larger than 100 eV. For these six LLAGNs, we utilize the Monte-Carlo based simulation code by Ikeda 09 to constrain the torus parameters by assuming a nearly spherical geometry. The torus solid- angles in three sources (NGC 2655, NGC 4138, and NGC 4941) are constrained to be Omega/2pi > 0.34, and the rest are found to have torus column-densities of logNrmH > 22.7. These results suggest that there are two types of LLAGNs, (1) those where the torus is very small and little mass accretion takes place, and (2) those where the torus is moderately developed and a sufficient amount of gas is supplied to the black hole.

  20. Tectonic rotations within the Rio Grande rift - Evidence from paleomagnetic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. L.; Golombek, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic studies on Miocene Pliocene volcanic rocks from the Espanola basin of the Rio Grande rift, New Mexico, reveal directions discordant form the expected mean direction for North America. The Paliza Canyon Formation, Tschicoma Formation, and Lobato Basalt, all sampled in the Jemez Mountains west of the Pajarito fault zone, have mean declinations east of the expected mean. The Cerros del Rio volcanics, lying east of the Pajarito fault zone, have a westerly declination. Combined with published data on the Santa Fe Group sediments east of the fault zone, and the Valles Rhyolite, west of the fault zone, distinct rotations of the two areas are evident. The western block has rotated clockwise 12 deg, while the eastern block shows 16 deg of conter-clockwise motion. Differential rotations of 25-30 deg are calculated between the two blocks; 4 deg/m.y. is the minimum differential rotation for the past 5 m.y. Geologic explanations for these rotations include the opening of the Rio Grande rift in response to clockwise rotation of the Colorado Plateau and significant left slip along the Rio Grande rift.

  1. An overview of the research program at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS) to study light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammad

    2010-02-01

    A program is underway at the HIGS facility to study the response of nucleons and light nuclei, namely the deuteron and 3He, to gamma rays having energies between photodisintegration threshold and 100 MeV. Major components of this program are: 1) the spin response of polarized deuterium and polarized 3He to circularly polarized gamma rays to study the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule; 2) Compton scattering from protons and deuterons to extract the static electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleons; 3) A first measurement of the proton spin-polarizabilities; and 4) measurement of total and differential cross sections of the deuteron and 3He at energies relevant to Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). An overview of these programs and initial results will be presented. )

  2. Evolution of pre-collective nuclei: Structural signatures near the drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that the phenomenology of single-magic and near-magic nuclei has universal characteristics analogous to those of collective nuclei and that, moreover, this phenomenology attaches smoothly to that describing collective nuclei. This has led to a number of new signatures of structure as well as to a new, tripartite, classification of nuclear structure that embraces the gamut of structures from magic, through pre-collective, to fully collective and rotational nuclei. Aside from the natural appeal of simple global correlations of collective observables, these results have particular significance for soon-to-be accessible exotic nuclei near the drip lines since they rely on only the simplest-to-obtain data, in particular, the energies of just the first two excited states, E(4{sub 1}{sup +}) and E(2{sub 1}{sup +}), of even-even nuclei, and the B(E2:2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +}) value. Indeed, without the need for more extensive level schemes, these basic data alone can reveal information about the goodness of seniority, about the validity of pair-addition mode relationships of adjacent even-even nuclei, about underlying shell structure (validity of magic numbers) and even about the shell model potential itself (e.g., the strengths of the l{center_dot} and l{sup 2} terms).

  3. Study of Swift/Bat Selected Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard

    2016-11-01

    We systematically analyze the broadband (0.5–200 keV) X-ray spectra of hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected local low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. The sample consists of 10 LLAGNs detected with Swift/BAT with intrinsic 14–195 keV luminosities smaller than 1042 erg s‑1 available in the Suzaku archive, covering a wide range of the Eddington ratio from 10‑5 to 10‑2. The overall spectra can be reproduced with an absorbed cut-off power law, often accompanied by reflection components from distant cold matter, and/or optically thin thermal emission from the host galaxy. In all of the objects, relativistic reflection components from the innermost disk are not required. Eight objects show a significant narrow iron-Kα emission line. Comparing their observed equivalent widths with the predictions from the Monte-Carlo-based torus model by Ikeda et al. (2009), we constrain the column density in the equatorial plane to be {log} {N}{{H}}{{eq}}\\gt 22.7, or the torus half-opening angle θ oa < 70°. We infer that the Eddington ratio (λ Edd) is a key parameter that determines the torus structure of LLAGNs: the torus becomes large at λ Edd ≳ 2 × 10‑4, whereas at lower accretion rates it is little developed. The luminosity correlation between the hard X-ray and mid-infrared (MIR) bands of the LLAGNs follows the same correlation as for more luminous AGNs. This implies that mechanisms other than AGN-heated dust are responsible for the MIR emission in low Eddington ratio LLAGNs.

  4. Experimental study of the quasifission, fusion-fission, and de-excitation of Cf compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuyagbaatar, J.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Evers, M.; Luong, D. H.; du Rietz, R.; Wakhle, A.; Williams, E.; Yakushev, A.

    2015-05-01

    Background: The fusion-evaporation reaction at energies around the Coulomb barrier is presently the only way to produce the heaviest elements. However, formation of evaporation residues is strongly hindered due to the competing fusion-fission and quasifission processes. Presently, a full understanding of these processes and their relationships has not been reached. Purpose: This work aims to use new fission measurements and existing evaporation residue and fission excitation function data for reactions forming Cf isotopes to investigate the dependence of the quasifission probability and characteristics on the identities of the two colliding nuclei in heavy element formation reactions. Method: Using the Australian National University's 14UD electrostatic accelerator and CUBE detector array, fission fragments from the 12C +235U , 34S +208Pb , 36S +206Pb , 36S +208Pb , and 44Ca +198Pt reactions were measured. Mass and angle distributions of fission fragments were extracted and compared to investigate the presence and characteristics of quasifission. Results: Mass-angle-correlated fission fragments were observed for the 44Ca +198Pt reaction; no correlation was observed in the other reactions measured. Flat-topped fission-fragment mass distributions were observed for 12C +235U at compound-nucleus excitation energies from 28 to 52 MeV. Less pronounced flat-topped distributions were observed, with very similar shapes, for all three sulfur-induced reactions at excitation energies lower than 45 MeV. Conclusions: A high probability of long-time-scale quasifission seems necessary to explain both the fission and evaporation residue data for the 34S +208Pb and 36S +206Pb reactions. Flat-topped mass distributions observed for 12C - and 34 ,36S -induced reactions are suggested to originate both from late-chance fusion-fission at low excitation energies and the persistence of shell effects at the higher energies associated with quasifission.

  5. An Efficient Method for Studying the Stability and Dynamics of the Rotational Motions of Celestial Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. I.; Maciejewski, A. J.

    2003-08-01

    We use the alternative MEGNO (Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits) technique developed by Cincotta and Simo to study the stability of orbital-rotational motions for plane oscillations and three-dimensional rotations. We present a detailed numerical-analytical study of a rigid body in the case where the proper rotation of the body is synchronized with its orbital motion as 3: 2 (Mercurian-type synchronism). For plane rotations, the loss of stability of the periodic solution that corresponds to a 3: 2 resonance is shown to be soft, which should be taken into account to estimate the upper limit for the ellipticity of Mercury. In studying stable and chaotic translational-rotational motions, we point out that the MEGNO criterion can be effectively used. This criterion gives a clear picture of the resonant structures and allows the calculations to be conveniently presented in the form of the corresponding MEGNO stability maps for multidimensional systems. We developed an appropriate software package.

  6. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen rotational, vibrational and translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen hollow cathode glow discharges (HCGD) have been extensively used for study of fundamental discharge processes as well as for wide variety of applications. For instance, recently, this type of discharge was utilized for producing hydrogen by reforming natural gas (da Silva et al. 2006). The translational or gas kinetic temperature in gas discharges is a parameter of utmost importance in the field of plasma chemistry while vibrationally excited neutral hydrogen molecules play significant role in the chemistry of weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. This is why the modeling of cold, reactive hydrogen plasma includes rotational and vibrational energy of the hydrogen molecule. This is the reason why we study HC discharge parameters like rotational, translational and vibrational temperature. Several diagnostic techniques are developed to determine gas kinetic temperature T_g like coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Here we selected OES. This diagnostic technique provides information about atom, molecule and ion density in excited and ground state, as well as rotational, vibrational, and gas temperature including the excitation temperature of certain group of excited levels. The technique is applied for measurements of the rotational T_rot, vibrational T_vib and determines translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen. The rotational temperature of excited electron energy levels is determined from the Boltzmann plot of intensities of rotational moleculelar hydrogen lines belonging to Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. Following procedure described elsewhere (Astashkevich et al. 2006) the temperature of ground state rovibronic levels is evaluated. The constrains of rotational temperature are discussed in detail. The vibrational temperature is also determined, but from the relative intensities of the H_2 Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. The dependence of these

  7. Impact of Resident Rotations on Critically Ill Patient Outcomes: Results of a French Multicenter Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guidet, Bertrand; Aegerter, Philippe; Mentec, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of resident rotation on patient outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU) has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to address this question using a large ICU database. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the French CUB-REA database. French residents rotate every six months. Two periods were compared: the first (POST) and fifth (PRE) months of the rotation. The primary endpoint was ICU mortality. The secondary endpoints were the length of ICU stay (LOS), the number of organ supports, and the duration of mechanical ventilation (DMV). The impact of resident rotation was explored using multivariate regression, classification tree and random forest models. Results 262,772 patients were included between 1996 and 2010 in the database. The patient characteristics were similar between the PRE (n = 44,431) and POST (n = 49,979) periods. Multivariate analysis did not reveal any impact of resident rotation on ICU mortality (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.94; 1.07, p = 0.91). Based on the classification trees, the SAPS II and the number of organ failures were the strongest predictors of ICU mortality. In the less severe patients (SAPS II<24), the POST period was associated with increased mortality (OR = 1.65, 95%CI = 1.17–2.33, p = 0.004). After adjustment, no significant association was observed between the rotation period and the LOS, the number of organ supports, or the DMV. Conclusion Resident rotation exerts no impact on overall ICU mortality at French teaching hospitals but might affect the prognosis of less severe ICU patients. Surveillance should be reinforced when treating those patients. PMID:27627449

  8. Grammar improvement following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic and the pedunculopontine nuclei in advanced Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Sergio; Moschella, Vincenzo; Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Galati, Salvatore; Costa, Alberto; Mazzone, Paolo; Stanzione, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    Combined deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic (STN) and pedunculopontine (PPN) nuclei has been recently proposed as surgical treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. STN stimulation alone has been shown to provide selective improvement of the grammatical aspect of language. We studied five advanced Parkinson's disease patients who underwent combined deep brain stimulation (STN + PPN). Overall cognitive profile did not change. On the contrary, an interesting trend towards reduction of ungrammatical errors (particularly substitution of free and inflectional morphemes) was found when stimulating the STN, and also the PPN, when the STN was switched off. These findings replicate previous observations on the STN, and provide the rationale for further investigation of the role of the PPN in processing linguistic grammar.

  9. Yields of positron and positron emitting nuclei for proton and carbon ion radiation therapy: a simulation study with GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy; Chen, Yong; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo application is developed to investigate the yields of positron-emitting nuclei (PEN) used for proton and carbon ion range verification techniques using the GEANT4 Toolkit. A base physics list was constructed and used to simulate incident proton and carbon ions onto a PMMA or water phantom using pencil like beams. In each simulation the total yields of PEN are counted and both the PEN and their associated positron depth-distributions were recorded and compared to the incident radiation's Bragg Peak. Alterations to the physics lists are then performed to investigate the PEN yields dependence on the choice of physics list. In our study, we conclude that the yields of PEN can be estimated using the physics list presented here for range verification of incident proton and carbon ions.

  10. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    DOE PAGES

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using themore » EDF modelling.« less

  11. Numerical study of the Kerr solution in rotating coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, S.; Izquierdo, G.; Klein, C.

    2016-06-01

    The Kerr solution in coordinates corotating with the horizon is studied as a testbed for a spacetime with a helical Killing vector in the Ernst picture. The solution is numerically constructed by solving the Ernst equation with a spectral method and a Newton iteration. We discuss convergence of the iteration for several initial iterates and different values of the Kerr parameters.

  12. Rotational Mobility in a Crystal Studied by Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionisio, Madalena S. C.; Diogo, Herminio P.; Farinha, J. P. S.; Ramos, Joaquim J. Moura

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate physical chemistry courses that uses the experimental technique of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to study molecular mobility in a crystal is proposed. An experiment provides an excellent opportunity for dealing with a wide diversity of important basic concepts in physical chemistry.

  13. An experimental study of counter-rotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Roelofs, G. R.; Smith, B. F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observational studies (Franx and Illingworth 1987; Jedrzejewski and Schechter 1988; Bender 1988; Illingworth and Franx 1989) have shown that some elliptical galaxies have a small region near the center that rotates in the opposite direction from the outer parts of the galaxy. Often the rotation in the central part is much faster than that in the outer part. A few other galaxies show a small region near the center that rotates in the same direction as the rest of the galaxy, but much faster. Either way, the part near the center that shows a strange pattern of rotation (the 'core') has been interpreted as a distinct dynamical subsystem. Very briefly, the observational data seem to be that anomalies show up in rotation curves near the centers of some elliptical galaxies and that galaxies with these strange rotational properties do not show a photometric signature: there are no noticeable bumps in the brightness profile and no unusual shapes of isophotal contours that would suggest an excess of matter concentrated near the center. No strong color variations have been reported. The puzzle is to learn what we can about elliptical galaxies in general, and about galaxies with strange central regions in particular, from these observational facts. The authors' approach is experimental. They make a guess about the form of the dynamically distinct subsystem, and then build a galaxy model to test experimental consequences such as the amount of matter required to produce observable effects and the length of time over which these effects would remain observable. They sidestep questions about how the galaxy might have gotten to be that way in the first place. That gives them more freedom to explore a variety of suggestions about what kind of dynamical system might give rise to the observed rotational patterns.

  14. An Event-Related Potentials Study of Mental Rotation in Identifying Chemical Structural Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how mental rotation strategies affect the identification of chemical structural formulas. This study conducted event-related potentials (ERPs) experiments. In addition to the data collected in the ERPs, a Chemical Structure Conceptual Questionnaire and interviews were also admin-istered for data…

  15. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  16. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  17. Analytical studies of axially symmetric motion of an incompressible viscous fluid between two concentric rotating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The equations of motion for a viscous incompressible fluid in a rotating spherical annulus, subject to case study boundary conditions were developed. The specific boundary conditions studied were: (1) one or both spheres rotates with prescribed constant angular velocities, and (2) one sphere rotates under the action of an applied constant or impulsive torque. The solution of the stream and circumferential functions were obtained in the form of a series in powers of the Reynolds number. The number of independent variables in the perturbation equations were reduced (from three to two) by specifying the meridional dependence with Gegenbauer functions and then employing the concept of orthogonality. The zeroth-order perturbation solution for the resulting partial differential equation subject to nonhomogeneous boundary conditions were obtained by employing the Laplace Transform in conjunction with Cauchy's Residual Theorem. The higher-order perturbation solutions were obtained by applying the method of Separation of Variables. Results were obtained for a fifth-order solution.

  18. N lone-pair···π interaction: a rotational study of chlorotrifluoroethylene···ammonia.

    PubMed

    Gou, Qian; Spada, Lorenzo; Geboes, Yannick; Herrebout, Wouter A; Melandri, Sonia; Caminati, Walther

    2015-03-28

    The rotational spectra of four isotopologues of the adduct C2F3Cl-NH3 show that NH3 is bound to the partner molecule through a (N)lone-pair···π interaction. Ammonia is located in proximity to the C2 atom (the one linked to two fluorine atoms), with the C2···N distance = 2.987(2) Å. The nuclear hyperfine structure due to the quadrupole coupling effects of (35)Cl/(37)Cl and (14)N nuclei has been fully resolved. The (14)N quadrupole coupling constants allow estimating the effective orientation of NH3 in the complex.

  19. 50 Hz rotating superconducting magnet for screening studies

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.G.; Stoll, R.; Stovold, R.

    1981-09-01

    A superconducting rotor facility has been constructed to study the magnetic shielding of superconducting ac machines. The superconducting dipolar magnet 128 mm diam, 515 mm long, 40 kg weight, is capable of providing a field of 1.5 T at a radius of 100 mm with 525 amp energizing current. Novel features include helical vapor-cooled current leads, antirecirculation baffles in the vapor space, vapor dump valves and liquid nitrogen cooling.

  20. Experimental study on active structural acoustic control of rotating machinery using rotating piezo-based inertial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Alujević, N.; Depraetere, B.; Pinte, G.; Swevers, J.; Sas, P.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, two Piezo-Based Rotating Inertial Actuators (PBRIAs) are considered for the suppression of the structure-borne noise radiated from rotating machinery. As add-on devices, they can be directly mounted on a rotational shaft, in order to intervene as early as possible in the transfer path between disturbance and the noise radiating surfaces. A MIMO (Multi-Input-Multi-Output) form of the FxLMS control algorithm is employed to generate the appropriate actuation signals, relying on a linear interpolation scheme to approximate time varying secondary plants. The proposed active vibration control approach is tested on an experimental test bed comprising a rotating shaft mounted in a frame to which a noise-radiating plate is attached. The disturbance force is introduced by an electro-dynamic shaker. The experimental results show that when the shaft spins below 180 rpm, more than a 7 dB reduction can be achieved in terms of plate vibrations, along with a reduction in the same order of magnitude in terms of noise radiation.

  1. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  2. Towards advanced study of Active Galactic Nuclei with visible light adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, Stephen Mark

    It is thought that the immense energies associated with accretion of matter onto black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) may "feedback," via intense photon flux or outward motion of gas, and affect certain properties of the host galaxy. In particular, AGN feedback may contribute to "quenching," or ceasing, of star formation by the expulsion or heating of cold gas, causing the host galaxy to evolve onto the red sequence (e.g., Di Matteo et al. 2005, Hopkins et al. 2006). I probe for the effects of feedback on the stellar populations of 60 X-ray-selected AGN hosts at a redshift of 1 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) Southern field. Combining high spatial resolution optical imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST ACS), and high spatial resolution near infrared data from Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) and HST Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrograph (NICMOS), I test for the presence of young stars on sub-kiloparsec scales, independent of dust extinction. Testing for correlations between near-ultraviolet/optical ( NUV- R ) colors and gradients and X-ray parameters such as hardness ratio and luminosity reveals new information about the nature of AGN-driven feedback. These AGN hosts display color gradients in rest-frame NUV - R as far inward as ~400 pc, suggesting stellar mixtures with nonuniform age distributions. There is little (< 0.3 mags) difference between the NUV - R gradients of the obscured (hard in X-ray) sources and the unobscured (soft in X-ray) sources, suggesting that the unobscured sources are not increasingly quenched of star formation. I compare the NUV - R colors of spiral galaxies that host AGN to non-active spirals, finding similar color gradients, but redder colors. These observations support the notion that unobscured intermediate-luminosity AGN hosts do not appear to be increasingly quenched of star formation relative to obscured sources

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  4. Selective studies of the excited rotational bands in the superdeformed nucleus {sup 151}Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Conto, A. De; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Robin, J.; Duchene, G.; Curien, D.; Byrski, Th.; Beck, F. A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Joshi, P.; Nourreddine, A.; Piqueras, I.; Vivien, J. P.

    2007-04-15

    The experimental study of the unresolved rotational bands, forming ridge structures in {gamma}-{gamma} spectra, has been performed on the superdeformed nucleus {sup 151}Tb. {gamma} transitions from the reaction {sup 27}Al, at 155 MeV, on {sup 130}Te were measured with EUROBALL IV in high fold coincidence. The analysis of the intensities and count fluctuations of the ridge structures shows the existence of {approx_equal}30 discrete rotational bands of superdeformed nature, half of which is in direct coincidence with the superdeformed yrast band. A comparison with band mixing model predictions and with a previous work on the superdeformed nucleus {sup 143}Eu is presented.

  5. Statistical studies in stellar rotation 2: A method of analyzing rotational coupling in double stars and an introduction to its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacca, P. L.

    1971-01-01

    The correlation between the equatorial velocities of the components of double stars is studied from a statistical standpoint. A theory of rotational correlation is developed and discussed with regard to its applicability to existing observations. The theory is then applied to a sample of visual binaries which are the least studied for rotational coupling. Consideration of eclipsing systems and spectroscopic binaries is limited to show how the degrees of freedom in the spin parallelism problem can be reduced. The analysis lends support to the existence of synchronism in closely spaced binaries.

  6. Interplay between one-particle and collective degrees of freedom in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    Some developments of nuclear-structure physics uniquely related to Copenhagen School are sketched based on theoretical considerations versus experimental findings and one-particle versus collective aspects. Based on my personal overview I pick up the following topics; (1) Study of vibration in terms of particle-vibration coupling; (2) one-particle motion in deformed and rotating potentials, and yrast spectroscopy in high-spin physics; (3) triaxial shape in nuclei: wobbling motion and chiral bands; (4) nuclear structure of drip line nuclei: in particular, shell-structure (or magic numbers) change and spherical or deformed halo phenomena; (5) shell structure in oblate deformation.

  7. Studying Rotation/torsion Coupling in H5^+ Using Diffusion Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlett, Melanie L.; Lin, Zhou; McCoy, Anne B.

    2015-06-01

    H5+ is a highly fluxional intermediate found in interstellar clouds. The rotational/torsional couplings in this molecule are of great interest due to the unusually large coupling between these modes. However, theoretical studies of highly fluxional molecules like H5+ are challenging due to the lack of a good zero-order model. In order to better understand the rotation/vibration interaction, a method has been developed to model the rotational/torsional motions. This method is based upon diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). In this approach, the vibrational contribution to the wavefunction is modeled using standard DMC approaches, while the rotational/torsional contribution is treated as a set of coefficients that are assigned to the various rotational/torsional state vectors. The potential portion of the Hamiltonian is expressed as a low-order expansion in terms of the torsion angle between the two outer H2 units. The expansion coefficients are evaluated at each time step for each walker and depend on the 3N-7 other internal coordinates. The transition frequencies obtained from this method for J ≤ 1 agree well with results obtained using other methods such as fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo. This new method is advantageous over the fixed-node approach because it allows for multiple state calculations at once which saves on computation time. Sarka, J.; Fábri, C.; Szidarovszky, T.; Császár, A.G.; Lin Z.; McCoy, A.B., "Modeling Rotations, Vibrations, and Rovibrational Couplings in Astructural Molecules - A Case Study Based on the H5+ Molecular Ion.", accepted by Mol. Phys.

  8. Unveiling epimerization effects: a rotational study of α-D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2015-06-25

    By studying its C4 epimer α-D-galactose, the effects of epimerization on the conformational behaviour of α-D-glucose have been unveiled. Using laser ablation of crystalline samples, four conformers of α-D-galactopyranose have been observed, for the first time, in a supersonic expansion by analyzing the Fourier transform rotational spectrum.

  9. Low gravity experiment for studying a rotating fluid having a free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderer, O. C.

    1983-01-01

    Electrical, mechanical, and operational aspects of a test cell assembly for studying rotating fluids with a free surface are described. Results of a stress analysis prepared to document the structural adequacy for safe use on the KC-135 aircraft are presented along with results of a single load proof test of the most critical load case. Engineering drawings are included.

  10. Laboratory and field studies in rotational spectroscopy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Rotational spectroscopy of atmospheric molecules has long been a hallmark of laboratory and field studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. in addition to maintenance of the millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalog, the laboratory has actively purued the challenging laboratory tasks of quantitative linewidth measurements and transient species identification.

  11. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  12. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  13. A STUDY OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION ON II PEGASI VIA PHOTOMETRIC STARSPOT IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Harmon, Robert O.; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Henry, Gregory W.

    2011-04-15

    We present the results of a study of differential rotation on the K2 IV primary of the RS CVn binary II Pegasi (HD 224085) performed by inverting light curves to produce images of the dark starspots on its surface. The data were obtained in the standard Johnson B and V filter passbands via the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m Automated Photometric Telescope from JD 2447115.8086-2455222.6238 (1987 November 16-2010 January 26). The observations were subdivided into 79 data sets consisting of pairs of B and V light curves, which were then inverted using a constrained nonlinear inversion algorithm that makes no a priori assumptions regarding the number of spots or their shapes. The resulting surface images were then assigned to 24 groups corresponding to time intervals over which we could observe the evolution of a given group of spots (except for three groups consisting of single data sets). Of these 24 groups, six showed convincing evidence of differential rotation over time intervals of several months. For the others, the spot configuration was such that differential rotation was neither exhibited nor contraindicated. The differential rotation we infer is in the same sense as that on the Sun: lower latitudes have shorter rotation periods. From plots of the range in longitude spanned by the spotted regions versus time, we obtain estimates of the differential rotation coefficient k defined as in earlier work by Henry et al. and show that our results for its value are consistent with the value obtained therein.

  14. Hyperfine Structure in Rotational Spectra of Deuterated Molecules: the Hds and ND_3 Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The determination of hyperfine parameters (quadrupole-coupling, spin-spin coupling, and spin-rotation constants) is one of the aims of high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. These parameters are relevant not only from a spectroscopic point of view, but also from a physical and/or chemical viewpoint, as they might provide detailed information on the chemical bond, structure, etc. In addition, the hyperfine structure of rotational spectra is so characteristic that its analysis may help in assigning the spectra of unknown species. In astronomical observations, hyperfine structures of rotational spectra would allow us to gain information on column densities and kinematics, and the omission of taking them into account can lead to a misinterpretation of the line width of the molecular emission lines. Nevertheless, the experimental determination of hyperfine constants can be a challenge not only for actual problems in resolving hyperfine structures themselves, but also due to the lack of reliable estimates or the complexity of the hyperfine structure itself. It is thus important to be able to rely on good predictions for such parameters, which can nowadays be provided by quantum-chemical calculations. In fact, the fruitful interplay of experiment and theory will be demonstrated by means of two study cases: the hypefine structure of the rotational spectra of HDS and ND_3. From an experimental point of view, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed to improve the resolving power in themillimeter- and submillimeterwave frequency range by at least one order of magnitude, thus making it possible to perform sub-Doppler measurements as well as to resolve narrow hyperfine structures. Concerning theory, it will be demonstrated that high-level calculations can provide quantitative estimates for hyperfine parameters (quadrupole coupling constants, spin-rotation tensors, spin-spin couplings, etc.) and shown how theoretical predictions are often essential for a detailed analysis of

  15. Studies of yrast and continuum states in A=140-160 nuclei. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Purdue Univ. , 1/1/80-12/31/80

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of nuclei in the A approx. 150 region was investigated by in-beam ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion beams, mostly from the Argonne Tandem-Linac. Results for the nuclei /sup 148/Dy, /sup 149/Dy, /sup 153/Dy, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 150/Ho are summarized. The feeding of yrast states in these nuclei and the link between the highest known yrast states and the continuum region were also studied. 6 figures.

  16. Numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer from a rotating cylinder inside a trapezoidal enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed; Khan, Arham Amin; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    This article reports a numerical investigation of mixed convection heat transfer phenomena around an active rotating heated cylinder placed inside a trapezoidal enclosure. The cavity is configured such that top and bottom walls remain thermally insulated while the remaining two sidewalls experience a constant cold temperature. The heated cylinder is located at the centre of the trapezoidal enclosure and undergoes counter clockwise rotation. The numerical solution of various governing equations (i.e. continuity, momentum and energy equations) for the present problem is obtained by using Galerkin finite element method. The present study focused on the influence of the variation of inertia effect of the rotating cylinder as manifested by the parameter, Reynolds number (Re) for various Grashof number (Gr) ranging from 103 to 105 while keeping the Richardson number constant as 1, which essentially represents the case of pure mixed convection. An envision of flow field and thermal field has been made by studying the streamlines, isotherms respectively while for the study of heat transfer characteristics, local and average Nusselt number over the heated cylinder has been considered. The result indicates that both the side wall inclination angle as well as the inertia effect of the rotating cylinder has greater impact on heat transfer characteristics compared to the case of motionless heated cylinder placed in a square cavity.

  17. GDR in Hot Nuclei: New Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, F.; Kmiecik, M.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Mason, P.; Moroni, A.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Styczen, J.; Brekiesz, M.; Meczynski, W.; Zieblinski, M.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Mastinu, P. F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.

    2005-04-01

    The measured properties of the Giant Dipole Resonance in hot rotating nuclei are successfully described with the model of thermal fluctuations, even though there are still some open problems especially at very low (T < 1.2MeV), very high (T >2.5MeV) temperatures and missing data in some mass regions. Recent experimental works have addressed more specific problems regarding the nuclear shape and its behaviour in very particular and delimited phase space regions. In this paper will be discussed new exclusive measurements of the GDR γ decay in heavy 216Rn nuclei (where the shape of nuclei surviving fission have been probed) and some preliminary data on the 132Ce nuclei at very high excitation energy.

  18. Rotation lightcurves of small jovian Trojan asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Sieben, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We present new lightcurve information for 19 Trojans ≲ 30 km in diameter, more than doubling the number of objects in this size range for which some rotation information is known. The minimum densities for objects with complete lightcurves are estimated and are found to be comparable to those measured for cometary nuclei. A significant fraction (∼40%) of this observed small Trojan population rotates slowly (P > 24 h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner, B.D., Stephens, R.D. [2011]. Minor Planet Bull. 38, 110-111). The excess of slow rotators may be due to the YORP effect. Results of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test suggest that the distribution of Trojan rotation rates is dissimilar to those of Main Belt Asteroids of the same size. Concerted observations of a large number of Trojans could establish the spin barrier (Warner, B.D., Harris, A.W., Pravec, P. [2009]. Icarus 202, 134-146), making it possible to estimate densities for objects near the critical period.

  19. Studies of light exotic nuclei in the vicinity of neutron and proton drip lines at FLNR JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Krupko, S. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Fomichev, A. S.; Chudoba, V.

    2016-04-01

    Defining the limits of the existence of the nuclear structure is one of fundamental problems of natural science, requiring the advancement of studies towards the sites of maximum neutron- and proton-excess nuclei, to the borders of nuclear stability, and further, to the regions of nuclear instability. In such regions, nuclear systems exist only as resonant states in continuous spectra with characteristic 'nuclear' lifetimes. This work is done most effectively with experimental setups providing radioactive ion beams (RIBs). This review discusses the approaches in this field of research developed during the last 20 years at the ACCULINNA fragment separator in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The methodology developed is based on the comprehensive study of correlations among the reaction fragments emitted in the decays of nuclear-unstable systems which are populated in direct reactions induced by RIBs with intermediate (20 – 60 MeV per nucleon) energies. This allows us to acquire detailed knowledge about exotic nuclear systems close to and beyond nuclear drip lines. We discuss exotic forms of nuclear dynamics appearing in the vicinity of nuclear drip lines and relevant results of their theoretical analysis. Also discussed are existing facilities and prospective projects aimed at nuclear structure studies with RIBs at JINR.

  20. Studies of light exotic nuclei in the vicinity of neutron and proton drip lines at FLNR JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Krupko, S. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Fomichev, A. S.; Chudoba, V.

    2016-04-01

    Defining the limits of the existence of the nuclear structure is one of fundamental problems of natural science, requiring the advancement of studies towards the sites of maximum neutron- and proton-excess nuclei, to the borders of nuclear stability, and further, to the regions of nuclear instability. In such regions, nuclear systems exist only as resonant states in continuous spectra with characteristic 'nuclear' lifetimes. This work is done most effectively with experimental setups providing radioactive ion beams (RIBs). This review discusses the approaches in this field of research developed during the last 20 years at the ACCULINNA fragment separator in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The methodology developed is based on the comprehensive study of correlations among the reaction fragments emitted in the decays of nuclear-unstable systems which are populated in direct reactions induced by RIBs with intermediate (20 - 60 MeV per nucleon) energies. This allows us to acquire detailed knowledge about exotic nuclear systems close to and beyond nuclear drip lines. We discuss exotic forms of nuclear dynamics appearing in the vicinity of nuclear drip lines and relevant results of their theoretical analysis. Also discussed are existing facilities and prospective projects aimed at nuclear structure studies with RIBs at JINR.

  1. Rotational dynamics of confined C60 from near-infrared Raman studies under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, D.; Yu, S.; Wang, P.; Wang, T.; Yao, M.; Li, Q.; Zou, B.; Cui, T.; Zou, G.; Wagberg, T.; Sundqvist, B.; Mao, H.-K.

    2009-12-29

    Peapods present a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained crystal structures, whose dynamical properties are very important. We have recently studied the rotational dynamics of C60 molecules confined inside single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by analyzing the intermediate frequency mode lattice vibrations using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The rotation of C60 was tuned to a known state by applying high pressure, at which condition C60 first forms dimers at low pressure and then forms a single-chain, nonrotating, polymer structure at high pressure. In the latter state the molecules form chains with a 2-fold symmetry. We propose that the C60 molecules in SWNT exhibit an unusual type of ratcheted rotation due to the interaction between C60 and SWNT in the “hexagon orientation,” and the characteristic vibrations of ratcheted rotation becomes more obvious with decreasing temperature.

  2. Numerical study on three-dimensional flow field of continuously rotating detonation in a toroidal chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Dong; Fan, Bao-Chun; Gui, Ming-Yue; Pan, Zhen-Hua; Dong, Gang

    2012-02-01

    Gaseous detonation propagating in a toroidal chamber was numerically studied for hydrogen/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The numerical method used is based on the three-dimensional Euler equations with detailed finiterate chemistry. The results show that the calculated streak picture is in qualitative agreement with the picture recorded by a high speed streak camera from published literature. The three-dimensional flow field induced by a continuously rotating detonation was visualized and distinctive features of the rotating detonations were clearly depicted. Owing to the unconfined character of detonation wavelet, a deficit of detonation parameters was observed. Due to the effects of wall geometries, the strength of the outside detonation front is stronger than that of the inside portion. The detonation thus propagates with a constant circular velocity. Numerical simulation also shows three-dimensional rotating detonation structures, which display specific feature of the detonationshock combined wave. Discrete burning gas pockets are formed due to instability of the discontinuity. It is believed that the present study could give an insight into the interesting properties of the continuously rotating detonation, and is thus beneficial to the design of continuous detonation propulsion systems.

  3. Electroproduction of Strange Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Hungerford

    2002-06-01

    The advent of high-energy, CW-beams of electrons now allows electro-production and precision studies of nuclei containing hyperons. Previously, the injection of strangeness into a nucleus was accomplished using secondary beams of mesons, where beam quality and target thickness limited the missing mass resolution. We review here the theoretical description of the (e, e'K+) reaction mechanism, and discuss the first experiment demonstrating that this reaction can be used to precisely study the spectra of light hypernuclei. Future experiments based on similar techniques, are expected to attain even better resolutions and rates.

  4. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00311 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges. The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  5. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 EL-1994-00206 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  6. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00391 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appearsDE:to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at leastDE:one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The

  7. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 EL-1994-00385 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays lower and left flanges and at the right end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  8. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 EL-1994-00387 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays upper and right flanges and at the left end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar with a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  9. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00184 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE

  10. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 EL-1994-00205 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain that provides outlines of the experiment tray clamp blocks that are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  11. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00089 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and

  12. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00088 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The tray flanges also appear to be discolored but with a lighter stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF

  13. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00019 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from

  14. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00272 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF and the silvered TEFLON® thermal cover removed. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. A copper coated pressure sensitive tape was used to provide an electrical ground strap between the thermal cover and the LDEF structure. All experiment hardware appears to be in prelaunch condition and securely in place. The three cylindrical pressure vessels containing the experiment detectors are shown mounted in the experiment tray with the frame for mounting the

  15. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 EL-1994-00171 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment was removed from the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and intact. The circular damaged locations that appeared to to be impact points in the flight photograph are not as apparent in the reflections and is less taut cover. The wrinkled spots on the thermal cover are areas

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00162 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiter's payload bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque with numerous black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. Many of the craters appear to have

  17. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 EL-1994-00122 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) at KSC during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiters cargo bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque (glossy white) with many black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. An impact

  18. The Role of Anterior Nuclei of the Thalamus: A Subcortical Gate in Memory Processing: An Intracerebral Recording Study

    PubMed Central

    Štillová, Klára; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Chrastina, Jan; Halámek, Josef; Bočková, Martina; Goldemundová, Sabina; Říha, Ivo; Rektor, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the involvement of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus (ANT) as compared to the involvement of the hippocampus in the processes of encoding and recognition during visual and verbal memory tasks. Methods We studied intracerebral recordings in patients with pharmacoresistent epilepsy who underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ANT with depth electrodes implanted bilaterally in the ANT and compared the results with epilepsy surgery candidates with depth electrodes implanted bilaterally in the hippocampus. We recorded the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by the visual and verbal memory encoding and recognition tasks. Results P300-like potentials were recorded in the hippocampus by visual and verbal memory encoding and recognition tasks and in the ANT by the visual encoding and visual and verbal recognition tasks. No significant ERPs were recorded during the verbal encoding task in the ANT. In the visual and verbal recognition tasks, the P300-like potentials in the ANT preceded the P300-like potentials in the hippocampus. Conclusions The ANT is a structure in the memory pathway that processes memory information before the hippocampus. We suggest that the ANT has a specific role in memory processes, especially memory recognition, and that memory disturbance should be considered in patients with ANT-DBS and in patients with ANT lesions. ANT is well positioned to serve as a subcortical gate for memory processing in cortical structures. PMID:26529407

  19. Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids: An Excess of Slow Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support a common origin for, and possible hereditary link between, cometary nuclei and jovian Trojan asteroids. Due to their distance and low albedos, few comet-sized Trojans have been studied. We discuss the rotation properties of Jovian Trojan asteroids less than 30 km in diameter. Approximately half of the objects discussed here were studied using densely sampled lightcurves (French et al. 2015a, b); Stephens et al. 2015), and the other half were sparse lightcurves obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Waszcazk et al. 2015). A significant fraction (~40%) of the objects in the ground-based sample rotate slowly (P > 24h), with measured periods as long as 375 h (Warner and Stephens 2011). The PTF data show a similar excess of slow rotators. Only 5 objects in the combined data set have rotation periods of less than six hours. Three of these fast rotators were contained in the data set of French et al. these three had a geometric mean rotation period of 5.29 hours. A prolate spheroid held together by gravity rotating with this period would have a critical density of 0.43 gm/cm3, a density similar to that of comets (Lamy et al. 2004). Harris et al. (2012) and Warner et al. (2011) have explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the results from wide-field surveys. We will examine Trojan rotation statistics with and without the results from the PTF.

  20. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-A rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei 155Gd and 159Tb to study the fragmentation of the M1 scissors mode in odd deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-γ spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei 161,163Dy and 157Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 (155Gd) and 90 transitions (157Gd) in the energy range 2-4 MeV. The nucleus 159Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2-3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now.

  1. Non-motoneurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei projecting to the cerebellar flocculus in the cat. A fluorescent double-labelling and WGA-HRP study.

    PubMed

    Røste, G K

    1989-01-01

    The cerebellar projection from the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei was studied in the cat by means of retrograde axonal transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent tracers. The feline facial nucleus was cytoarchitectonically subdivided into ventromedial, ventrolateral, lateral, dorsal, intermediate and medial divisions (see Papez 1927), and the motor trigeminal nucleus into medial, ventral, intermediate, lateral and dorsal divisions. The neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei were classified as small (ovoid to round cells with a maximum diameter of the cell body of about 20 microns) or large (polygonal to round cells with maximum diameter of about 40 microns). After floccular injections of the wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase complex, retrogradely labelled cells were found throughout the facial nucleus, but especially in its medial and dorsal divisions. In the motor trigeminal nucleus, labelled neurons were found only in the ventral, intermediate and lateral divisions. Cases with tracer deposition (implants or injections) in other parts of the cerebellar cortex or nuclei were all negative. All facial and motor trigeminal neurons labelled after floccular injections were smaller than the neurons labelled after injections in the facial mimic and masticatory muscles, and only single-labelled neurons were found following floccular injections of Fluoro-Gold and muscular injections of rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate in the same animals. These observations strongly suggest that the neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei which project to flocculus are of the non-motoneuron type. PMID:2470610

  2. Butorphanol suppression of histamine itch is mediated by nucleus accumbens and septal nuclei: a pharmacological fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Kraft, Robert A; Coghill, Robert C; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2015-02-01

    Opioid receptors in the central nervous system are important modulators of itch transmission. In this study, we examined the effect of mixed-action opioid butorphanol on histamine itch, cowhage itch, and heat pain in healthy volunteers. Using functional MRI, we investigated significant changes in cerebral perfusion to identify the critical brain centers mediating the antipruritic effect of butorphanol. Butorphanol suppressed the itch induced experimentally with histamine, reduced the intensity of cowhage itch by approximately 35%, and did not affect heat pain sensitivity. In comparison with the placebo, butorphanol produced a bilateral deactivation of claustrum, insula, and putamen, areas activated during itch processing. Analysis of cerebral perfusion patterns of brain processing of itch versus itch inhibition under the effect of the drug revealed that the reduction in cowhage itch by butorphanol was correlated with changes in cerebral perfusion in the midbrain, thalamus, S1, insula, and cerebellum. The suppression of histamine itch by butorphanol was paralleled by the activation of nucleus accumbens and septal nuclei, structures expressing high levels of kappa opioid receptors. In conclusion, important relays of the mesolimbic circuit were involved in the inhibition of itch by butorphanol and could represent potential targets for the development of antipruritic therapy. PMID:25211175

  3. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in {sup 32}S + {sup 118,124}Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 208}Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe Collisions at E{sub lab}/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray {mu}{sup {minus}} with a Muon Telescope.

  4. Mini-review: synaptic integration in the cerebellar nuclei--perspectives from dynamic clamp and computer simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    The cerebellar nuclei (CN) process inhibition from Purkinje cells (PC) and excitation from mossy and climbing fiber collaterals. CN neurons in slices show intrinsic pacemaking activity, which is easily modulated by synaptic inputs. Our work using dynamic clamping and computer modeling shows that synchronicity between PC inputs is an important factor in determining spike rate and spike timing of CN neurons and that brief pauses in PC inputs provide a potent stimulus to trigger CN spikes. Excitatory input can equally control spike rate, but, due to a large slow, NMDA component also amplifies responses to inhibitory inputs. Intrinsic properties of CN neurons are well suited to provide prolonged responses to strong input transients and could be involved in motor pattern generation. One such specific mechanism is given by fast and slow rebound bursting. Nevertheless, we are just beginning to unravel synaptic integration in the CN, and the outcome of the work to date is best characterized by the generation of new specific questions that lend themselves to a combined experimental and computer modeling approach in future studies.

  5. Experimental Studies of Quark-Gluon Structure of Nucleons and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Gary

    2004-12-17

    The NMSU group has a lengthy history in the study of the nucleon structure and in particular its spin structure in terms of its fundamental constituents. This line of research is continuing in our current involvement in experiments at Brookhaven National Lab and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus with local convective forcing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolan, Hélène; Su, Sylvie; Wright, Susie; Young, Roland M. B.; Read, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus convectively forced by local thermal forcing via a heated annular ring at the bottom near the external wall and a cooled circular disk near the centre at the top surface of the annulus. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus analogue of the atmosphere circulation, where thermal forcing was previously applied uniformly on the sidewalls. Two vertically and horizontally displaced heat sources/sinks are arranged so that, in the absence of background rotation, statically unstable Rayleigh-Bénard convection would be induced above the source and beneath the sink, thereby relaxing strong constraints placed on background temperature gradients in previous experimental configurations to better mimic in fine local vigorous convection events in tropics and polar regions whilst also facilitating baroclinic motion in midlatitude regions in the Earth's atmosphere. By using the Met Office/ Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory (MORALS) code, we have investigated a series of equilibrated, 2D axisymmetric flows for a large range of dimensionless parameters and characterized them in terms of velocity and temperature fields. Several distinct and different flow regimes were identified, depending upon the rotation rate and strength of differential heating. These regimes will be presented with reference to variations of horizontal Ekman layer thickness versus the thermal boundary layer thickness and corresponding scalings for various quantities such as the azimuthal velocity or the heat transport. Experimental investigation of the same setup is carried out with a 1m diameter cylindrical container on a rotating platform: local heating is produced with an electrically heated annular ring at the bottom of the tank and cooling is imposed through a circular disk near the centre of the tank at the upper surface, cooled with circulating water. Different unstable circulation regimes

  7. Design of experimental studies of human performance under influences of simulated artificial gravity. [effects of rotation on psychomotor tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, W. M.; Hausch, H. G.; Maraman, G. V.; Green, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A ground based research program is now being undertaken to provide data concerning the effects of a rotating environment on man's ability to adequately perform gross and fine psychomotor tasks. Emphasis is being placed on establishing the levels of artificial gravity and rates and radii of rotation required in future space systems for preservation of crew performance and comfort. An experimental study utilizing a rotational facility to investigate crew mobility, cargo transfer and handling, and fine motor coordination at radii up to 24 meters and at rotational rates up to 5 rpm is reported.

  8. Vestibular convergence patterns in vestibular nuclei neurons of alert primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory signal convergence is a fundamental and important aspect of brain function. Such convergence may often involve complex multidimensional interactions as those proposed for the processing of otolith and semicircular canal (SCC) information for the detection of translational head movements and the effective discrimination from physically congruent gravity signals. In the present study, we have examined the responses of primate rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) neurons that do not exhibit any eye movement-related activity using 0.5-Hz translational and three-dimensional (3D) rotational motion. Three distinct neural populations were identified. Approximately one-fourth of the cells exclusively encoded rotational movements (canal-only neurons) and were unresponsive to translation. The canal-only central neurons encoded head rotation in SCC coordinates, exhibited little orthogonal canal convergence, and were characterized with significantly higher sensitivities to rotation as compared to primary SCC afferents. Another fourth of the neurons modulated their firing rates during translation (otolith-only cells). During rotations, these neurons only responded when the axis of rotation was earth-horizontal and the head was changing orientation relative to gravity. The remaining one-half of VN neurons were sensitive to both rotations and translations (otolith + canal neurons). Unlike primary otolith afferents, however, central neurons often exhibited significant spatiotemporal (noncosine) tuning properties and a wide variety of response dynamics to translation. To characterize the pattern of SCC inputs to otolith + canal neurons, their rotational maximum sensitivity vectors were computed using exclusively responses during earth-vertical axis rotations (EVA). Maximum sensitivity vectors were distributed throughout the 3D space, suggesting strong convergence from multiple SCCs. These neurons were also tested with earth-horizontal axis rotations (EHA), which would activate

  9. Study on ( n,t) Reactions of Zr, Nb and Ta Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2012-04-01

    The world faces serious energy shortages in the near future. To meet the world energy demand, the nuclear fusion with safety, environmentally acceptability and economic is the best suited. Fusion is attractive as an energy source because of the virtually inexhaustible supply of fuel, the promise of minimal adverse environmental impact, and its inherent safety. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Furthermore, there are not radioactive nuclear waste problems in the fusion reactors. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Because, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. And also, the success of fusion power system is dependent on performance of the first wall, blanket or divertor systems. So, the performance of structural materials for fusion power systems, understanding nuclear properties systematic and working out of ( n,t) reaction cross sections are very important. Zirconium (Zr), Niobium (Nb) and Tantal (Ta) containing alloys are important structural materials for fusion reactors, accelerator-driven systems, and many other fields. In this study, ( n,t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 88,90,92,94,96Zr, 93,94,95Nb and 179,181Ta have been investigated. The calculated results are discussed andcompared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  10. Rotational Quenching Study in Isovalent H+ + CO and H+ + CS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Cooling and trapping of polar molecules has attracted attention at cold and ultracold temperatures. Extended study of molecular inelastic collision processes of polar interstellar species with proton finds an important astrophysical application to model interstellar medium. Present study includes computation of rate coefficient for molecular rotational quenching process in proton collision with isovalent CO and CS molecules using quantum dynamical close-coupling calculations. Full dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces have been computed for the ground state for both the systems using internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and basis sets. Quantum scattering calculations for rotational quenching of isovalent species are studied in the rigid-rotor approximation with CX (X=O, S) bond length fixed at an experimental equilibrium value of 2.138 and 2.900 a.u., respectively. Asymptotic potentials are computed using the dipole and quadrupole moments, and the dipole polarizability components. The resulting long-range potentials with the short-range ab initio interaction potentials have been fitted to study the anisotropy of the rigid-rotor surface using the multipolar expansion coefficients. Rotational quenching cross-section and corresponding rates from j=4 level of CX to lower j' levels have been obtained and found to obey Wigner's threshold law at ultra cold temperatures.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of the rotating detonation engine in hydrogen-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindracki, J.; Kobiera, A.; Wolański, P.; Gut, Z.; Folusiak, M.; Swiderski, K.

    2011-10-01

    Experimental and numerical study of rotating detonation is presented. The experimental study is focused on the evaluation of the geometry of the detonation chamber and the conditions at which the rotating detonation can propagate in cylindrical channels. Lean hydrogen-air mixtures were tested in the experiments. The pressure measured at different locations was used to check the detonative nature of combustion. Also, the relationship between detonation velocity and operation conditions is analyzed in the paper. The experimental study is accompanied with numerical analysis. The paper briefly presents the results of two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation of detonative combustion. The detonating mixture is created by mixting hydrogen with air. The air is injected axially to the chamber and hydrogen is injected through the inner wall of the chamber in radial direction. Application of proper injection conditions (pressure and nozzle area) allows establishing a stable rotating detonation like in the experiments. The detonation can be sustained for some range of conditions which are studied herein. The analysis of mean parameters of the process is provided as well. The numerical simulation results agree well with the experiments.

  12. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application.

  13. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application. PMID:20545180

  14. An experimental study on the effects of relative rotation direction on the wake interferences among tandem wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Hu, Hui

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of relative rotation direction on the wake interferences among two tandemwind turbines models. While the oncoming flow conditions were kept in constant during the experiments, turbine power outputs, wind loads acting on the turbines, and wake characteristics behind the turbines were compared quantitatively with turbine models in either co-rotating or counter-rotating configuration. The measurement results reveal that the turbines in counter-rotating would harvest more wind energy from the same oncoming wind, compared with the co-rotating case. While the recovery of the streamwise velocity deficits in the wake flows was found to be almost identical with the turbines operated in either co-rotating or counter-rotating, the significant azimuthal velocity generated in the wake flow behind the upstream turbine is believed to be the reason why the counter-rotating turbines would have a better power production performance. Since the azimuthal flow velocity in the wake flow was found to decrease monotonically with the increasing downstream distance, the benefits of the counter-rotating configuration were found to decrease gradually as the spacing between the tandem turbines increases. While the counter-rotating downstream turbine was found to produce up to 20% more power compared with that of co-rotating configuration with the turbine spacing being about 0.7 D, the advantage was found to become almost negligible when the turbine spacing becomes greater than 6.5 D. It suggests that the counter-rotating configuration design would be more beneficial to turbines in onshore wind farms due to the smaller turbine spacing (i.e., ˜3 rotor diameters for onshore wind farms vs. ˜7 rotor diameters for offshore wind farms in the prevailing wind direction), especially for those turbines sited over complex terrains with the turbine spacing only about 1-2 rotor diameters.

  15. Measurements @ Sub-Mm Spectroscopy Laboratory of Bologna: Rotational Spectroscopy Applied to Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The physico-chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere has been one of the main subjects of studies over last years. In particular, the composition of the atmosphere is indeed very important to understand chemical processes linked to depletion of stratospheric ozone and greenhouse effect. The vertical concentration profiles of atmospheric gases can be provided by remote sensing measurements, but they require the accurate knowledge of the parameters involved: line positions, transition intensities, pressure-broadened half-widths, pressure-induced frequency shifts and their temperature dependence. In particular, the collisional broadening parameters have a crucial influence on the accuracy of spectra calculations and on reduction of remote sensing data. Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, by applying the source frequency modulation technique it has been found that rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having an high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations. A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the work carried out at the Laboratory of Millimeter/submillimeter-wave Spectroscopy of Bologna in the field of atmospheric studies.

  16. Effect of through-plane motion on left ventricular rotation: a study using slice-following harmonic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Brotman, David; Zhang, Ziheng; Sampath, Smita

    2013-05-01

    Noninvasive quantification of regional left ventricular rotation may improve understanding of cardiac function. Current methods used to quantify rotation typically acquire data on a set of prescribed short-axis slices, neglecting effects due to through-plane myocardial motion. We combine principles of slice-following tagged imaging with harmonic phase analysis methods to account for through-plane motion in regional rotation measurements. We compare rotation and torsion measurements obtained using our method to those obtained from imaging datasets acquired without slice-following. Our results in normal volunteers demonstrate differences in the general trends of average and regional rotation-time plots in midbasal slices and the rotation versus circumferential strain loops. We observe substantial errors in measured peak average rotation of the order of 58% for basal slices (due to change in the pattern of the curve), -6.6% for midventricular slices, and -8.5% for apical slices; and an average error in base-to-apex torsion of 19% when through-plane motion is not considered. This study concludes that due to an inherent base-to-apex gradient in rotation that exists in the left ventricular, accounting for through-plane motion is critical to the accuracy of left ventricular rotation quantification.

  17. On the Poincaré instability of a rotating liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, F. A.; Pomorski, K.

    2013-05-01

    The stability of a rotating nuclear liquid drop against pear-like deformations is studied within the optimal shape theory of Strutinsky et al (1963 Nucl. Phys. 46 639). It is found that such a break-up of reflection symmetric shapes appears in light nuclei at high angular momenta when non-axial degrees of freedom are taken into account.

  18. Preoperative assessment of femoral rotation and its relationship with coronal alignment: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Catherine J; Gallie, Price; Whitehouse, Sarah L

    2016-12-01

    This MRI study explores the individual variation of the rotational axes of the distal femur, and investigate the relationship of this variation with overall coronal alignment in the osteoarthritic knee,The mean surgical epicondylar axis (SEA) was 1.7°, anatomical epicondylar axis (AEA) 5.6° and AP trochlea axis (APA) 94.3° external rotation, compared to the posterior condylar line. Investigating this relationship between different coronal alignment groups, there were statistically significant differences between excessive varus and excessive valgus knees for SEA (0.9:3.0 p < 0.001) and AEA (4.7:7.0 p < 0.001). There was no statistical difference for APA (93.9:95.3 p = 0.238). PMID:27408506

  19. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Dracoulis, G D; Walker, P M; Kondev, F G

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with [Formula: see text]. The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances. PMID:27243336

  20. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Walker, P. M.; Kondev, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with A≳ 150 . The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances.

  1. A microwave study of hydrogen-transfer-triggered methyl-group rotation in 5-methyltropolone.

    PubMed

    Ilyushin, Vadim V; Cloessner, Emily A; Chou, Yung-Ching; Picraux, Laura B; Hougen, Jon T; Lavrich, Richard

    2010-11-14

    We present here the first experimental and theoretical study of the microwave spectrum of 5-methyltropolone, which can be visualized as a seven-membered "aromatic" carbon ring with a five-membered hydrogen-bonded cyclic structure at the top and a methyl group at the bottom. The molecule is known from earlier studies in the literature to exhibit two large-amplitude motions, an intramolecular hydrogen transfer and a methyl torsion. The former motion is particularly interesting because transfer of the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl to the carbonyl group induces a tautomerization in the molecule, which then triggers a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group. Measurements were carried out by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 8-24 GHz frequency range. Theoretical analysis was carried out using a tunneling-rotational Hamiltonian based on a G(12)(m) extended-group-theory formalism. Our global fit of 1015 transitions to 20 molecular parameters gave a root-mean-square deviation of 1.5 kHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J=0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure hydrogen-transfer motion is calculated to be 1310 MHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J=0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure methyl top internal-rotation motion is calculated to be 885 MHz. We have also carried out ab initio calculations, which support the structural parameters determined from our spectroscopic analysis and give estimates of the barriers to the two large-amplitude motions.

  2. In situ synchrotron study of electromigration induced grain rotations in Sn solder joints.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao; Zhu, Wenxin; Li, Yao; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here we report an in situ study of the early stage of microstructure evolution induced by electromigration in a Pb-free β-Sn based solder joint by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction. With this technique, crystal orientation evolution is monitored at intragranular levels with high spatial and angular resolution. During the entire experiment, no crystal growth is detected, and rigid grain rotation is observed only in the two grains within the current crowding region, where high density and divergence of electric current occur. Theoretical calculation indicates that the trend of electrical resistance drop still holds under the present conditions in the grain with high electrical resistivity, while the other grain with low resistivity reorients to align its a-axis more parallel with the ones of its neighboring grains. A detailed study of dislocation densities and subgrain boundaries suggests that grain rotation in β-Sn, unlike grain rotation in high melting temperature metals which undergo displacive deformation, is accomplished via diffusional process mainly, due to the high homologous temperature. PMID:27086863

  3. In situ synchrotron study of electromigration induced grain rotations in Sn solder joints

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Hao; Zhu, Wenxin; Li, Yao; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-04-18

    In this paper we report an in situ study of the early stage of microstructure evolution induced by electromigration in a Pb-free β-Sn based solder joint by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction. With this technique, crystal orientation evolution is monitored at intragranular levels with high spatial and angular resolution. During the entire experiment, no crystal growth is detected, and rigid grain rotation is observed only in the two grains within the current crowding region, where high density and divergence of electric current occur. Theoretical calculation indicates that the trend of electrical resistance drop still holds under the present conditions in themore » grain with high electrical resistivity, while the other grain with low resistivity reorients to align its a-axis more parallel with the ones of its neighboring grains. A detailed study of dislocation densities and subgrain boundaries suggests that grain rotation in β-Sn, unlike grain rotation in high melting temperature metals which undergo displacive deformation, is accomplished via diffusional process mainly, due to the high homologous temperature.« less

  4. In situ synchrotron study of electromigration induced grain rotations in Sn solder joints

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hao; Zhu, Wenxin; Li, Yao; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here we report an in situ study of the early stage of microstructure evolution induced by electromigration in a Pb-free β-Sn based solder joint by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction. With this technique, crystal orientation evolution is monitored at intragranular levels with high spatial and angular resolution. During the entire experiment, no crystal growth is detected, and rigid grain rotation is observed only in the two grains within the current crowding region, where high density and divergence of electric current occur. Theoretical calculation indicates that the trend of electrical resistance drop still holds under the present conditions in the grain with high electrical resistivity, while the other grain with low resistivity reorients to align its a-axis more parallel with the ones of its neighboring grains. A detailed study of dislocation densities and subgrain boundaries suggests that grain rotation in β-Sn, unlike grain rotation in high melting temperature metals which undergo displacive deformation, is accomplished via diffusional process mainly, due to the high homologous temperature. PMID:27086863

  5. In situ synchrotron study of electromigration induced grain rotations in Sn solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Zhu, Wenxin; Li, Yao; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Here we report an in situ study of the early stage of microstructure evolution induced by electromigration in a Pb-free β-Sn based solder joint by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction. With this technique, crystal orientation evolution is monitored at intragranular levels with high spatial and angular resolution. During the entire experiment, no crystal growth is detected, and rigid grain rotation is observed only in the two grains within the current crowding region, where high density and divergence of electric current occur. Theoretical calculation indicates that the trend of electrical resistance drop still holds under the present conditions in the grain with high electrical resistivity, while the other grain with low resistivity reorients to align its a-axis more parallel with the ones of its neighboring grains. A detailed study of dislocation densities and subgrain boundaries suggests that grain rotation in β-Sn, unlike grain rotation in high melting temperature metals which undergo displacive deformation, is accomplished via diffusional process mainly, due to the high homologous temperature.

  6. Signature effects in some [ital N]=90 odd-[ital Z] rare-earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.K.; Praharaj, C.R.; Khadkikar, S.B. Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 )

    1993-05-01

    Using axially symmetric deformed configuration mixing and angular momentum projection techniques, we have studied the signature effects in the [pi][ital h][sub 11/2] bands of [sup 147]La, [sup 149]Pr, and [sup 151]Pm nuclei. Effects of rotation alignment on the signature splitting in energy and signature inversion in the [ital B]([ital E]2,[ital I][r arrow][ital I][minus]1) values are discussed. We find that transition from a strongly rotation-aligned limit to a weakly rotation-aligned (or more regular rotational behavior) regime or vice versa leads to signature inversion of the [ital B]([ital E]2) values.

  7. Feasibility of Using PZT Actuators to Study the Dynamic Behavior of a Rotating Disk due to Rotor-Stator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Valentin, David; Seidel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, PZT actuators are used to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk structure due to rotor-stator interaction excitation. The disk is studied with two different surrounding fluids—air and water. The study has been performed analytically and validated experimentally. For the theoretical analysis, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the rotating disk in air and water are obtained with the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory coupled with the interaction with the surrounding fluid. A model for the Rotor Stator Interaction that occurs in many rotating disk-like parts of turbomachinery such as compressors, hydraulic runners or alternators is presented. The dynamic behavior of the rotating disk due to this excitation is deduced. For the experimental analysis a test rig has been developed. It consists of a stainless steel disk (r = 198 mm and h = 8 mm) connected to a variable speed motor. Excitation and response are measured from the rotating system. For the rotating excitation four piezoelectric patches have been used. Calibrating the piezoelectric patches in amplitude and phase, different rotating excitation patterns are applied on the rotating disk in air and in water. Results show the feasibility of using PZT to control the response of the disk due to a rotor-stator interaction. PMID:25004151

  8. Geometrical symmetries of nuclear systems: {{ D }}_{3h} and {{ T }}_{d} symmetries in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof

    2016-07-01

    The role of discrete (or point-group) symmetries in α-cluster nuclei is discussed in the framework of the algebraic cluster model which describes the relative motion of the α-particles. Particular attention is paid to the discrete symmetry of the geometric arrangement of the α-particles, and the consequences for the structure of the corresponding rotational bands. The method is applied to study cluster states in the nuclei 12C and 16O. The observed level sequences can be understood in a simple way as a consequence of the underlying discrete symmetry that characterizes the geometrical configuration of the α-particles, i.e. an equilateral triangle with {{ D }}3h symmetry for 12C, and a tetrahedron with {{ T }}d symmetry for 16O. The structure of rotational bands provides a fingerprint of the underlying geometrical configuration of α-particles.

  9. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00299 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are faint but visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  10. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00188 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The white paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is

  11. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 EL-1994-00212 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  12. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00207 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear to be discolored by a light brown stain. An outline of experiment tray clamp block locations is clearly visible on the experiment trays upper flange and to a lesser extent on its lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to

  13. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00038 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange and on the tray clamp blocks at each end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be discolored by the stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical

  14. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00087 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the upper flange appears to be stained less. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  15. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00134 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The paint dot , originally white, on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appears to be coated but with a much lighter stain. The paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  16. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00062 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dot on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange appears to be in prelaunch condition but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the lower flange appears to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  17. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00010 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays left flange and on the clamp blocks located at the upper and lower ends of the experiment trays right flange appear to be in near prelaunch condition. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover

  18. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00312 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The outline of the experiment tray clamp blocks is clearly visible on the upper tray flange and to a lesser extent on the lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The prelaunch photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the experiment tray on the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  19. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  20. Sensitivity Studies of Dust Ice Nuclei Effect on Cirrus Clouds with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Shi, Xiangjun; Zhang, Kai; Jensen, Eric; Gettelman, A.; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios; Lawson, Paul

    2012-12-19

    In this study the effect of dust aerosol on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds through heterogeneous ice nucleation is investigated in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) with two ice nucleation parameterizations. Both parameterizations consider homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and the competition between the two mechanisms in cirrus clouds, but differ significantly in the number concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) from dust. Heterogeneous nucleation on dust aerosol reduces the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation and thus the ice crystal number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) cirrus clouds compared to simulations with pure homogeneous nucleation. Global and annual mean shortwave and longwave cloud forcing are reduced by up to 2.0 ± 0.1 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty) and 2.4 ± 0.1 W m-2, respectively due to the presence of dust IN, with the net cloud forcing change of -0.40 ± 0.20 W m-2. Comparison of model simulations with in situ aircraft data obtained in NH mid-latitudes suggests that homogeneous ice nucleation may play an important role in the ice nucleation at these regions with temperatures of 205–230 K. However, simulations overestimate observed ice crystal number concentrations in the tropical tropopause regions with temperatures of 190–205 K, and overestimate the frequency of occurrence of high ice crystal number concentration (> 200 L-1) and underestimate the frequency of low ice crystal number concentration (< 30 L-1) at NH mid-latitudes. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the number concentrations and properties of heterogeneous IN (including dust aerosol) in the upper troposphere from the global perspective.

  1. Sensitivity Studies of Dust Ice Nuclei Effect on Cirrus Clouds with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Jensen, Eric J.; Gettelman, Andrew; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios; Lawson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this study the effect of dust aerosol on upper tropospheric cirrus clouds through heterogeneous ice nucleation is investigated in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) with two ice nucleation parameterizations. Both parameterizations consider homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and the competition between the two mechanisms in cirrus clouds, but differ significantly in the number concentration of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) from dust. Heterogeneous nucleation on dust aerosol reduces the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation and thus the ice crystal number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) cirrus clouds compared to simulations with pure homogeneous nucleation. Global and annual mean shortwave and longwave cloud forcing are reduced by up to 2.0+/-0.1Wm (sup-2) (1 uncertainty) and 2.4+/-0.1Wm (sup-2), respectively due to the presence of dust IN, with the net cloud forcing change of -0.40+/-0.20W m(sup-2). Comparison of model simulations with in situ aircraft data obtained in NH mid-latitudes suggests that homogeneous ice nucleation may play an important role in the ice nucleation at these regions with temperatures of 205-230 K. However, simulations overestimate observed ice crystal number concentrations in the tropical tropopause regions with temperatures of 190- 205 K, and overestimate the frequency of occurrence of high ice crystal number concentration (greater than 200 L(sup-1) and underestimate the frequency of low ice crystal number concentration (less than 30 L(sup-1) at NH mid-latitudes. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the number concentrations and properties of heterogeneous IN (including dust aerosol) in the upper troposphere from the global perspective.

  2. Ab initio and relativistic DFT study of spin–rotation and NMR shielding constants in XF{sub 6} molecules, X = S, Se, Te, Mo, and W

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Kenneth; Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał

    2014-05-21

    We present an analysis of the spin–rotation and absolute shielding constants of XF{sub 6} molecules (X = S, Se, Te, Mo, W) based on ab initio coupled cluster and four-component relativistic density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that the relativistic contributions to the spin–rotation and shielding constants are large both for the heavy elements as well as for the fluorine nuclei. In most cases, incorporating the computed relativistic corrections significantly improves the agreement between our results and the well-established experimental values for the isotropic spin–rotation constants and their anisotropic components. This suggests that also for the other molecules, for which accurate and reliable experimental data are not available, reliable values of spin–rotation and absolute shielding constants were determined combining ab initio and relativistic DFT calculations. For the heavy nuclei, the breakdown of the relationship between the spin–rotation constant and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constant, due to relativistic effects, causes a significant error in the total absolute shielding constants.

  3. A Hamiltonian for the electron-vibrational-rotational problem in the theory of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of the use of the generalized (natural) coordinates for the description of electrons and nuclei and the representation of a molecule as a stable geometrical figure, where the electrons and nuclei interact by Coulomb's law, while nuclei with nuclei interact elastically, a Hamiltonian describing simultaneously the electron and vibrational states and the rotations of a molecule as a whole is proposed.

  4. Validity Study of Vertebral Rotation Measurement Using 3-D Ultrasound in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Meng; Lou, Edmond H M; Chu, Winnie C W; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Cheng, Jack C Y; Wong, Man-Sang

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the validity of 3-D ultrasound measurements on the vertebral rotation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) under clinical settings. Thirty curves (mean Cobb angle: 21.7° ± 15.9°) from 16 patients with AIS were recruited. 3-D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at the supine position. Each of the two raters measured the apical vertebral rotation using the center of laminae (COL) method in the 3-D ultrasound images and the Aaro-Dahlborn method in the magnetic resonance images. The intra- and inter-reliability of the COL method was demonstrated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) (both [2, K] >0.9, p < 0.05). The COL method showed no significant difference (p < 0.05) compared with the Aaro-Dahlborn method. Furthermore, the agreement between these two methods was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman method, and high correlation was found (r > 0.9, p < 0.05). These results validated the proposed 3-D ultrasound method in the measurements of vertebral rotation in the patients with AIS. PMID:27083978

  5. RADIOGRAPHIC STUDY ON THE ACROMION INDEX AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Menegassi Martel, Éder; Debom, Leandro Gervazoni; Andrade, Manoel Loyola; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the lateral projection of the acromion and rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in the Brazilian population. Methods: The lateral projection of the acromion was measured using anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulders, carried out with the glenoid cavity in absolute profile and the humeral head in the neutral position or with internal rotation. The acromion index (AI) was defined as the ratio between the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the acromion and the distance from the plane of the glenoid cavity to the lateral edge of the humeral head. This index was measured in 83 patients (mean age of 54 years) with RCTs and compared with a group of 28 individuals (mean age of 48 years) without RCTs. The presence or absence of RCTs was determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The mean AI was 0.7194 for the patients with RCTs and 0.6677 for the individuals without RCTs, in the Brazilian population. This difference was statistically significant, with P < 0.001. Conclusion: A relationship can be established between AI and rotator cuff tears in the Brazilian population. PMID:27022534

  6. Rotating Night Shifts and Risk of Skin Cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Pedram; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2011-01-01

    Night shift work is associated with increased risk of several cancers, but the risk of skin cancer among night shift workers is unknown. We documented 10 799 incident skin cancers in 68 336 women in the Nurses’ Health Study from June 1988 to June 2006 and examined the relationship between rotating night shifts and skin cancer. We used Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for confounding variables (phenotypic and established risk factors of skin cancer), and performed stratified analysis to explore the modifying effect of hair color. Working 10 years or more on rotating night shifts was associated with a 14% decreased risk of skin cancer compared with never working night shifts (age-standardized incidence rate: 976 per 100 000 person-years (PY) vs 1070 per 100 000 PY, respectively; adjusted hazard ratios = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.81 to 0.92, Ptrend < .001). This association was strongest for cutaneous melanoma; working 10 years or more of rotating night shifts was associated with 44% decreased risk of melanoma, after adjustment for melanoma risk factors (age-standardized incidence rate: 20 per 100 000 PY vs 35 per 100 000 PY, respectively; adjusted hazard ratios = 0.56, 95% confidence interval = 0.36 to 0.87, Ptrend = .005). Hair color, a surrogate for an individual’s susceptibility to skin cancer, was a statistically significant effect modifier for the observed associations; darker-haired women had the lowest risk (Pinteraction = .02). PMID:21335547

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering study of methyl groups rotation in some methylxanthines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, M.; Pawlukojc, A.; Wischnewski, A.; Wuttke, J.

    2007-12-01

    The three isomeric dimethylxanthines and trimethylxanthine are studied by neutron spectroscopy up to energy transfers of 100meV at energy resolutions ranging from 0.7μeV to some meV. The loss of elastic intensity with increasing temperature can be modeled by quasielastic methyl rotation. The number of inequivalent methyl groups is in agreement with those of the room temperature crystal structures. Activation energies are obtained. In the case of theophylline, a doublet tunneling band is observed at 15.1 and 17.5μeV. In theobromine, a single tunneling band at 0.3μeV is found. Orientational disorder in caffeine leads to a 2.7μeV broad distribution of tunneling bands around the elastic line. At the same time, broad low energy phonon spectra characterize an orientational glassy state with weak methyl rotational potentials. Librational energies of the dimethylxanthines are clearly seen in the phonon densities of states. Rotational potentials can be derived which explain consistently all observables. While their symmetry in general is threefold, theophylline shows a close to sixfold potential reflecting a mirror symmetry.

  8. Microwave Study of a Hydrogen-Transfer Methyl-Group Internal Rotation in 5-METHYLTROPOLONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Vadim V.; Cloessner, Emily A.; Chou, Yung-Ching; Picraux, Laura B.; Hougen, Jon T.; Lavrich, Richard

    2010-06-01

    We present here the first experimental and theoretical study of the microwave spectrum of 5-methyltropolone, which can be visualized as a 7-membered "aromatic" carbon ring with a five-membered hydrogen-bonded cyclic structure at the top and a methyl group at the bottom. The molecule exhibits two large-amplitude motions, an intramolecular hydrogen transfer and a methyl torsion. The former motion is particularly interesting because transfer of the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl to the carbonyl group induces a tautomerization in the molecule, which then triggers a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group. Measurements were carried out by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 8 to 24 GHz frequency range. Theoretical analysis was carried out using a tunneling-rotational Hamiltonian based on a G12^m extended-group-theory formalism. Our global fit of 1015 transitions to 20 molecular parameters gave a root-mean-square deviation of 1.5 kHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure hydrogen transfer motion is calculated to be 1310 MHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure methyl-top internal rotation motion is calculated to be 885 MHz. Some theoretical difficulties in interpreting the low-order tunneling parameters in this and the related molecule 2-methylmalonaldehyde will be discussed.

  9. Study of turbulence and interacting inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Michael; Harlander, Uwe; Triana, Santiago Andrés

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell (spherical Couette flow) experiment with a radius ratio of η =1 /3 . Inertial modes are Coriolis-restored linear wave modes which often arise in rapidly rotating fluids. Recent experimental work has shown that inertial modes exist in a spherical Couette flow for Ωi<Ωo , where Ωi and Ωo are the inner and outer sphere rotation rate. A finite number of particular inertial modes has previously been found. By scanning the Rossby number from -2.5

  10. Proton Donor/acceptor Propensities of Ammonia: Rotational Studies of its Molecular Complexes with Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Barbara M.; Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Favero, Laura B.; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2009-06-01

    We studied the rotational spectra of the adducts of ammonia with several organic molecules, namely tert-butanol, glycidol, ethyl alcohol, anisol and 1,4-difluorobenzene. The adducts with glycidol and ethanol have been observed for both conformers of the substrate molecule. Based on the rotational and ^{14}N quadrupole coupling constants of the various complexes, we found a considerably different behaviour of ammonia, with respect to water, in its proton donor/acceptor double role. In the interaction with the three alcohol molecules, NH_{3} acts as a proton acceptor and the OH groups as a proton donor. However, in the case of glycidol-NH_{3}, a secundary N-H\\cdotsO interaction occurrs between ammonia and the ether oxygen. This interaction generates a sizable V_{3} barrier to the internal rotation of the NH_{3} moiety, while NH_{3} undergoes a free rotation in tert-butanol-NH_{3} and in ethanol-NH_{3}. As to the anisole-NH_{3} and 1,4-difluorobenzene-NH_{3} complexes, the NH_{3} group explicits its double proton donor/acceptor role, although through two weak (C_{Me}-H\\cdotsN and N-H\\cdotsπ) H-bonds. There is, however, an important difference between the two complexes, because in the first one NH_{3} lies out of the aromatic plane, while in the second one it is in the plane of the aromatic ring. B. M. Giuliano, M. C. Castrovilli, A. Maris, S. Melandri, W. Caminati and E. A. Cohen, Chem.Phys.Lett., 2008, 463, 330 B. M. Giuliano, S. Melandri, A. Maris, L. B. Favero and W. Caminati, Angew.Chem.Int.Ed., 2009, 48, 1102

  11. Rotationally resolved state-to-state photoelectron study of niobium carbide radical

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Zhihong; Huang, Huang; Zhang, Zheng; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2014-07-14

    By employing the two-color visible (VIS)-ultraviolet (UV) laser photoexcitation scheme and the pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) detection, we have obtained rovibronically selected and resolved photoelectron spectra for niobium carbide cation (NbC{sup +}). The fully rotationally resolved state-to-state VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra thus obtained allow the unambiguous assignments of rotational photoionization transitions, indicating that the electronic configuration and term symmetry of NbC{sup +}(X{sup ~}) ground state are …10σ{sup 2} 5π{sup 4} 11σ{sup 2} (X{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}). Furthermore, the rotational analysis of these spectra yields the ionization energy of NbC [IE(NbC)] to be 56 369.2 ± 0.8 cm{sup −1} (6.9889 ± 0.0001 eV) and the rotation constant B{sub 0}{sup +} = 0.5681 ± 0.0007 cm{sup −1}. The latter value allows the determination of the bond distance r{sub 0}{sup +} = 1.671 ± 0.001 Å for NbC{sup +}(X{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}). Based on conservation of energy, the IE(NbC) determined in the present study along with the known IE(Nb) gives the difference of 0 K bond dissociation energies (D{sub 0}’s) for NbC{sup +} and NbC, D{sub 0}(NbC{sup +}) − D{sub 0}(NbC) = −1855.4 ± 0.9 cm{sup −1} (−0.2300 ± 0.0001 eV). The energetic values and the B{sub 0}{sup +} constant determined in this work are valuable for benchmarking state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations of 4d transition metal-containing molecules.

  12. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  13. Study of Even-Even/Odd-Even/Odd-Odd Nuclei in Zn-Ga-Ge Region in the Proton-Neutron IBM/IBFM/IBFFM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, N.; Brant, S.; Zuffi, L.

    2009-08-26

    We study the even-even, odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the region including Zn-Ga-Ge in the proton-neutron IBM and the models derived from it: IBM2, IBFM2, IBFFM2. We describe {sup 67}Ga, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 68}Ga by coupling odd particles to a boson core {sup 66}Zn. We also calculate the beta{sup +}-decay rates among {sup 68}Ge, {sup 68}Ga and {sup 68}Zn.

  14. Detectability of neural tracts and nuclei in the brainstem utilizing 3DAC-PROPELLER.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Taro; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Matsuzawa, Hitoshi; Terumitsu, Makoto; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2014-01-01

    Despite clinical importance of identifying exact anatomical location of neural tracts and nuclei in the brainstem, no neuroimaging studies have validated the detectability of these structures. The aim of this study was to assess the detectability of the structures using three-dimensional anisotropy contrast-periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (3DAC-PROPELLER) imaging. Forty healthy volunteers (21 males, 19 females; 19-53 years, average 23.4 years) participated in this study. 3DAC-PROPELLER axial images were obtained with a 3T-MR system at four levels of the brainstem: the lower midbrain, upper and lower pons, and medulla oblongata. Three experts independently judged whether five tracts (corticospinal tract, medial lemniscus, medial longitudinal fasciculus, central tegmental and spinothalamic tracts) and 10 nuclei (oculomotor and trochlear nuclei, spinal trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibular, hypoglossal, prepositus, and solitary nuclei, locus ceruleus, superior and inferior olives) on each side could be identified. In total, 240 assessments were made. The five tracts and eight nuclei were identified in all the corresponding assessments, whereas the locus ceruleus and superior olive could not be identified in 3 (1.3%) and 16 (6.7%) assessments, respectively. 3DAC-PROPELLER seems extremely valuable imaging method for mapping out surgical strategies for brainstem lesions.

  15. Solid-liquid surface tensions of critical nuclei and nucleation barriers from a phase-field-crystal study of a model binary alloy using finite system sizes.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal; Kundin, Julia; Emmerich, Heike; Oettel, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Phase-field-crystal (PFC) modeling has emerged as a computationally efficient tool to address crystal growth phenomena on atomistic length and diffusive time scales. We use a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal model for a binary system based on Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007)] to study critical nuclei and their liquid-solid phase boundaries, in particular the nucleus size dependence of the liquid-solid interface tension as well as of the nucleation barrier. Critical nuclei are stabilized in finite systems of various sizes, however, the extracted interface tension as function of the nucleus radius r is independent of system size. We suggest a phenomenological expression to describe the dependence of the extracted interface tension on the nucleus radius r for the liquid-solid system. Moreover, the numerical PFC results show that this dependency can not be fully described by the nonclassical Tolman formula. PMID:25215738

  16. Solid-liquid surface tensions of critical nuclei and nucleation barriers from a phase-field-crystal study of a model binary alloy using finite system sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal; Kundin, Julia; Emmerich, Heike; Oettel, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Phase-field-crystal (PFC) modeling has emerged as a computationally efficient tool to address crystal growth phenomena on atomistic length and diffusive time scales. We use a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal model for a binary system based on Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study critical nuclei and their liquid-solid phase boundaries, in particular the nucleus size dependence of the liquid-solid interface tension as well as of the nucleation barrier. Critical nuclei are stabilized in finite systems of various sizes, however, the extracted interface tension as function of the nucleus radius r is independent of system size. We suggest a phenomenological expression to describe the dependence of the extracted interface tension on the nucleus radius r for the liquid-solid system. Moreover, the numerical PFC results show that this dependency can not be fully described by the nonclassical Tolman formula.

  17. How to Study Placebo Responses in Motion Sickness with a Rotation Chair Paradigm in Healthy Participants

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Katja; Horing, Björn; Muth, Eric R.; Enck, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Placebo responses occur in every medical intervention when patients or participants expect to receive an effective treatment to relieve symptoms. However, underlying mechanisms of placebo responses are not fully understood. It has repeatedly been shown that placebo responses are associated with changes in neural activity but for many conditions it is unclear whether they also affect the target organ, such as the stomach in motion sickness. Therefore, we present a methodology for the multivariate assessment of placebo responses by subjective, behavioral and objective measures in motion sickness with a rotation chair paradigm. The physiological correlate of motion sickness is a shift in gastric myoelectrical activity towards tachygastria that can be recorded with electrogastrography. The presented study applied the so-called balanced placebo design (BPD) to investigate the effects of ginger compared to placebo and the effects of expectations by verbal information. However, the study revealed no significant main or interactional effects of ginger (as a drug) or information on outcome measures but showed interactions when sex of participants and experimenters are taken into considerations. We discuss limitations of the presented study and report modifications that were used in subsequent studies demonstrating placebo responses when rotation speed was lowered. In general, future placebo studies have to identify the appropriate target organ for the studied placebo responses and to apply the specific methods to assess the physiological correlates. PMID:25549015

  18. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Cherepanov, E. A.

    Methods of production of light exotic nuclei and study of their ptoperties -- Superheavy elements. Syhnthesis and properties -- Nuclear fission -- Nuclear reactions -- rare processes, decay and nuclear structure -- Experimental set-ups and future projects -- Radioactive beams. Production and research programmes -- Public relations.

  19. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  20. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  2. Radiation induced rotation of interplanetary dust particles - A feasibility study for a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, K. F.; Misconi, N. Y.; Paddack, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    Irregular interplanetary dust particles may acquire a considerable spin rate due to two non-statistical dynamical mechanisms induced by solar radiation. These arise from variations in surface albedo discussed by Radzievskii (1954) and from irregularities in surface geometry discussed by Paddack (1969). An experiment is reported which will lead to an evaluation in space of the effectiveness of these two spin mechanisms. The technique of optical levitation in an argon laser beam provides a stable trap for particles 10-60 microns in diameter. The objective is to design an optical trap for dielectric particles in vacuum to study these rotation mechanisms in the gravity-free environment of a Spacelab experiment.

  3. Electronic structure with vibration-rotation study of the NaYb molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Samir N.; Korek, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    The potential energy curves have been investigated for the 15 lowest doublet and quartet electronic states in the 2s+1Λ± representation of the molecule NaYb via CASSCF/MRCI (single and double excitations with Davidson correction) calculations. The spectroscopic constants (Te, De, ωe, Be, re, …) have been calculated in addition to the permanent dipole moments μ. By using the canonical functions approach, the eigenvalues Ev, the rotational constants Bv, the centrifugal distortion constant Dv, and the abscissas of the turning points rmin and rmax have been calculated for different electronic states. Fourteen molecular states have been studied theoretically for the first time.

  4. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  5. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-08-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  6. The variability in the external rotation axis of the distal femur: an MRI-based anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carl; Nawaz, Zuhair; Hassan, Abdel; White, Simon; Khaleel, Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Commonly used total knee arthroplasty (TKA) systems utilising measured resection techniques default to 5°-7° valgus for the distal cut relative to the anatomical axis and 3° external rotation of the femoral component relative to posterior condylar axis (PCA). Rotational errors of the femoral component are associated with pain, patella maltracking and a poorer outcome. We analysed MRI scans from patients undergoing TKA using patient-specific instrumentation to assess coronal and rotational alignment from landmarks identified on the scans. One hundred and eight scans in 59 males and 49 females were studied with age range 35-93 years (mean 67.9 years). We found 91 % of patients had a femoral valgus angle between 5° and 7° (mean angles 5.9°), while only 24 % had an external rotation angle between 2.5° and 3.5° relative to PCA. There was no statistical significance in rotation between males and females although outliers tended to be female. Mean Whiteside's angle was 92.9° (87.8-98). This study highlights the variations in external rotation between patients undergoing TKA using the PCA as a reference for rotation. This may be a contributing factor in implant malalignment and patient dissatisfaction.

  7. Rotating and semi-stationary multi-beamline architecture study for cardiac CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Fitzgerald, Paul; Gao, Hewei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decade, there has been abundant research on future cardiac CT architectures and corresponding reconstruction algorithms. Multiple cardiac CT concepts have been published, including third-generation single-source CT with wide-cone coverage, dual-source CT, and electron-beam CT, etc. In this paper, we apply a Radon space analysis method to two multi-beamline architectures: triple-source CT and semi-stationary ring-source CT. In our studies, we have considered more than thirty cardiac CT architectures and triple-source CT was identified as a promising solution, offering approximately a three-fold advantage in temporal resolution, which can significantly reduce motion artifacts due to the moving heart and lungs. In this work, we describe a triple-source CT architecture with all three beamlines (i.e. source-detector pairs) limited to the cardiac field of view in order to eliminate the radiation dose outside the cardiac region. We also demonstrate the capability of performing full field of view imaging when desired, by shifting the detectors. Ring-source dual-rotating-detector CT is another architecture of interest, which offers the opportunity to provide high temporal resolution using a full-ring stationary source. With this semi-stationary architecture, we found that the azimuthal blur effect can be greater than in a fully-rotating CT system. We therefore propose novel scanning modes to reduce the azimuthal blur in ring-source rotating detector CT. Radon space analysis method proves to be a useful method in CT system architecture study.

  8. Numerical Parameter Study of the Rotational Influence on the 'Metal Rain Scenario'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, A.; Hansen, U.

    2012-12-01

    Today it is widely accepted that the Earth experienced a period of extended mantle melting 4.5 billion years ago. The most likely explanation is the 'Giant Impact hypothesis'. A consequence of such a giant impact is the formation of a magma ocean covering the whole Earth with a depth of about 1000km. In this magma ocean the first steps of core formation can take place. Iron entrapped in the mantle will separate from the silicate magma and form small metal droplets that fall, due to their higher densities, to the bottom of the magma ocean like metal rain drops. This is the so called 'Metal Rain Scenario'. The behavior of the falling metal droplets is strongly dependent on the influence of the surrounding magma. Due to its low viscosity, this magma ocean was not only strongly convecting but also experienced the influence of strong rotation. The resulting fluid flows will have altered the settling of the iron particles and can prevent them from falling straight to the bottom of the magma ocean. Because the exact parameters of the magma ocean are unknown and all assumptions lead to parameters that are far beyond anything that is computational and experimentally feasible today, it is important to develop general principles for the behavior of the iron droplets. Previous studies show that especially at the equatorial region of the Earth the droplets can show different settling dynamics depending on the rotation rate of the system. At low rotation rates the droplets will fall with nearly Stokes' velocity through the magma and form a pond at the bottom. With increasing rotation rate the droplets at the equator can stay suspended, and other phenomena, like temperature layering, can occur in this scenarios. If the iron droplets stay suspended in a magma ocean over a longer time period, perhaps even during the freezing process this will have strong consequences for the later differentiation processes in the Earth's mantle. But it is not quite clear in which parameter ranges

  9. Vortex dynamics studies in supersonic flow: Merging of co-rotating streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, L.; Vergine, F.; Crisanti, M.

    2014-04-01

    For air-breathing propulsion systems intended for flight at very high Mach numbers, combustion is carried out at supersonic velocities and the process is mixing limited. Substantial increase in mixing rates can be obtained by fuel injection strategies centered on generating selected modes of supersonic, streamwise vortex interactions. Despite the recognized importance, and potential of the role of streamwise vortices for supersonic mixing enhancement, only few fundamental studies on their dynamics and interactions have been conducted, leaving the field largely unexplored. A reduced order model that allows the dynamics of complex, interacting, supersonic vortical structures to be investigated, is presented in this work. The prediction of the evolution of mutually interacting streamwise vortices represents an enabling element for the initiation of an effective, systematic experimental study of selected cases of interest, and is an important step toward the design of new fuel injection strategies for supersonic combustors. The case presented in this work is centered on a merging process of co-rotating vortices, and the subsequent evolution of a system composed of two counter-rotating vortex pairs. This interaction was studied, initially, with the proposed model, and was chosen for the peculiarity of the resulting morphology of the vorticity field. These results were used to design an experimental investigation with the intent to target the same specific complex flow physics. The experiment revealed the same peculiar features encountered in the simulation.

  10. Comparison of rotational imaging optical coherence tomography and selective plane illumination microscopy for embryonic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Ran, Shihao; Le, Henry H.; Singh, Manmohan; Larina, Irina V.; Mayerich, David; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The mouse is a common model for studying developmental diseases. Different optical techniques have been developed to investigate mouse embryos, but each has its own set of limitations and restrictions. In this study, we imaged the same E9.5 mouse embryo with rotational imaging Optical Coherence Tomography (RI-OCT) and Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM), and compared the two techniques. Results demonstrate that both methods can provide images with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. The RI-OCT technique was developed to increase imaging depth of OCT by performing traditional OCT imaging at multiple sides and co-registering the images. In SPIM, optical sectioning is achieved by illuminating the sample with a sheet of light. In this study, the images acquired from both techniques are compared with each other to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each technique for embryonic imaging. Since 3D stacks can be obtained by SPIM from different angles by rotating the sample, it might be possible to build a hybrid setup of two imaging modalities to combine the advantages of each technique.

  11. The Csbnd O rotation in the gaseous glycine. An energy decomposition analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xin; Chen, ZuoChang; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The physical origins of the Csbnd O rotations in glycine are explored theoretically. By the localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (LMO-EDA) method, the rotation barriers are decomposed into the electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, correlation and geometrical relaxation terms. In general, the Csbnd O rotations are controlled by Pauli repulsion and polarization interactions. However, if the rotated conformer has obvious inter-group interaction between COOH and NH2, the physical origin of the Csbnd O rotation is changed, which is governed by polarization and correlation interactions.

  12. Study of the Rotational Spectrum of the Ne-N2O van der Waals Dimer with a Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ngarĩ; Jäger

    1998-12-01

    Rotational spectra of six isotopomers of the van der Waals dimer Ne-N2O, namely 20Ne-14N14NO, 22Ne-14N14NO, 20Ne-14N15NO, 22Ne-14N15NO, 20Ne-15N14NO, and 22Ne-15N14NO, were measured in the frequency range between 5 and 18 GHz using a pulsed beam cavity Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The spectra are those of prolate asymmetric rotors and are in accord with a T-shaped structure of the complex. Both a- and b-type transitions were measured. Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine patterns of the rotational transitions due to the 14N nuclei were observed and analyzed. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined, as well as the quadrupole coupling constants chiaa and chibb, for both terminal and central 14N nuclei. The distance from the center of mass of the N2O subunit to the Ne atom and the angle between this distance and the N2O axis were derived from the rotational constants. The structural parameters indicate that the Ne atom is on average closer to the O atom than to the terminal N atom. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  14. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Rotational spectroscopic and ab initio studies of the Xe-H2O van der Waals dimer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2006-06-22

    An ab initio potential energy surface of the Xe-H(2)O van der Waals dimer was constructed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and pertubatively included triple excitations. For the Xe atom, the small-core pseudopotential and augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ-PP) basis set was used. Dunning's augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta (aug-cc-pVTZ) basis set was chosen for O and H atoms. Midbond functions were used to supplement the atom-centered basis sets. Rotational spectra of the Xe-H(2)O van der Waals dimer were recorded with a pulsed-nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions within two internal rotor states, namely, the 0(00) and 1(01) states, were measured and assigned. Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structures due to the (131)Xe (I = (3)/(2)), D (I = 1) and (17)O (I = (5)/(2)) nuclei were also observed and analyzed. Information about the molecular structure and the H(2)O angular motions was extracted from the spectroscopic results with the assistance of the ab initio potential.

  16. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J

    2014-08-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 1.30 ± 0.02 µm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 0.91 ± 0.01 µm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating.

  17. Earth's rotation and a feasibility study of a possible mexican participation with a VLBI station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo Morales, Julio Cesar; Kokina, Tatiana; Mendoza Araiza, Daniel

    This work begins by presenting a historical introduction on how the change in the Earth's rotation axis was first detected, and on related aspects of the discovery of precession and nutation phenomena. Newton's explanation of precession, the dynamical theory of nutation by Délambert as well as an acount of the first observatories dedicated to these studies are also discussed. In 1899 the International Latitude Service "ILS" was established, defining their main objectives, and started to determine the mean pole (1900 - 1905). In 1961 ILS was substituted by the International Polar Motion Service "IPMS". This service used laser telemetry to the Earth's artificial satelites "SAT", as well as to the Moon. Also in that period, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) aproved the MERIT international program, dedicated to monitor the Earth rotation intercomparing techniques of observation and analysis. It was in this program that "very long base interferometry" VLBI was used for the fist time, obtaining very good results. In 1987 the IAU started the International Earth Rotation Service "IERS" suported by its two networks ICRF and ITRF. The VLBI is said to be a powerful tool that could be used to solve global problems which have an impact in the countries' economies. In México we lack a rigid link in the geodesic network, which is linked to the global positional system NAVSTAR (GPS), as well as to the international system of coordinates (ITRF), and on the other hand there is a very high sysmic activity. We conclude by arguing that México ought to participate in IERS, as it has both scientists and infraestructure, such as the GMT, Sierra la Negra, Puebla, México. To achieve this a companion radiotelescope is needed. For this purpose, 5 telescopes are discussed, showing estimates for simultaneous reception as well as for the precission of the position of these radiotelescopes.

  18. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 1.30 ± 0.02 μm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 0.91 ± 0.01 μm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating. PMID:25055842

  19. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J

    2014-08-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 1.30 ± 0.02 µm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 0.91 ± 0.01 µm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating. PMID:25055842

  20. Rotating night shifts and risk of skin cancer in the nurses' health study.

    PubMed

    Schernhammer, Eva S; Razavi, Pedram; Li, Tricia Y; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali

    2011-04-01

    Night shift work is associated with increased risk of several cancers, but the risk of skin cancer among night shift workers is unknown. We documented 10,799 incident skin cancers in 68,336 women in the Nurses' Health Study from June 1988 to June 2006 and examined the relationship between rotating night shifts and skin cancer. We used Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for confounding variables (phenotypic and established risk factors of skin cancer), and performed stratified analysis to explore the modifying effect of hair color. Working 10 years or more on rotating night shifts was associated with a 14% decreased risk of skin cancer compared with never working night shifts (age-standardized incidence rate: 976 per 100,000 person-years (PY) vs 1070 per 100,000 PY, respectively; adjusted hazard ratios = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.81 to 0.92, P(trend) < .001). This association was strongest for cutaneous melanoma; working 10 years or more of rotating night shifts was associated with 44% decreased risk of melanoma, after adjustment for melanoma risk factors (age-standardized incidence rate: 20 per 100,000 PY vs 35 per 100,000 PY, respectively; adjusted hazard ratios = 0.56, 95% confidence interval = 0.36 to 0.87, P(trend) = .005). Hair color, a surrogate for an individual's susceptibility to skin cancer, was a statistically significant effect modifier for the observed associations; darker-haired women had the lowest risk (P(interaction) = .02).

  1. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  2. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  3. Effect of Rotation Crops on Heterodera glycines Population Density in a Greenhouse Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Warnke, S.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Wyse, D.L.; Johnson, G.A.; Porter, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Crop rotation is a common means of reducing pathogen populations in soil. Several rotation crops have been shown to reduce soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) populations, but a comprehensive study of the optimal crops is needed. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effect of growth and decomposition of 46 crops on population density of H. glycines. Crops were sown in soil infested with H. glycines. Plants were maintained until 75 days after planting, when the soil was mixed, a sample of the soil removed to determine egg density, and shoots and roots chopped and mixed into the soil. After 56 days, soil samples were again taken for egg counts, and a susceptible soybean (‘Sturdy’) was planted in the soil as a bioassay to determine egg viability. Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), forage pea (Pisum sativum), lab-lab bean (Lablab purpureus), Illinois bundleflower (Desman-thus illinoensis), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) generally resulted in smaller egg population density in soil or number of cysts formed on soybean in the bioassay than the fallow control. Sunn hemp most consistently showed the lowest numbers of eggs and cysts. As a group, legumes resulted in lower egg population densities than monocots, Brassica species, and other dicots. PMID:19259545

  4. Concentration Dependent Specific Rotations of Chiral Surfactants: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Covington, Cody L; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2016-07-21

    Recent experimental studies have shown unexpected chiroptical response from some chiral surfactant molecules, where the specific rotations changed significantly as a function of concentration. To establish a theoretical understanding of this experimentally observed phenomena, a novel methodology for studying chiral surfactants via combined molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations is presented. MD simulations on the +10 000 atom surfactant systems have been performed using MD and QM/molecular mechanics (MM) approaches. QM calculations performed on MD snapshots coupled with extensive analysis on lauryl ester of phenylalanine (LEP) surfactant system indicate that the experimentally observed variation of specific rotation with concentration may be due to the conformational differences of the surfactant monomers in the aggregates. Though traditional MM simulations did not show significant differences in the conformer populations, QM/MM simulations using the forces derived from the PM6 method did predict conformational differences between aggregated and nonaggregated LEP molecules, which is consistent with experimental data. Additionally the electrostatic environment of charged surfactants may also be important, since dramatic changes in the Boltzmann populations of surfactant monomers can be noted in the presence of an electric field generated by the chiral ionic aggregates. PMID:27355395

  5. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  6. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  7. Study of nonneutral plasma storage in a magnetic trap with a rotating electric field at the lepta facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rudakov, A. Yu.; Yakovenko, S. L.

    2013-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of plasma storage in a Penning-Malmberg trap at the LEPTA facility are presented. The number of stored particles is found to increase substantially when using the so-called “rotating wall” method, in which a transverse rotating electric field generated by a cylindrical segmented electrode cut into four pairs is applied to the plasma storage region. The conditions of transverse compression of the plasma bunch under the action of the rotating field and buffer gas are studied. The optimal storage parameters are determined for these experimental conditions. Mechanisms of the action of the rotating field and buffer gas on the process of plasma storage are discussed.

  8. Spectroscopy of the lightest nuclei in the Lanthanide region

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C. M.; Fantuzi, M.

    2007-11-30

    The lightest nuclei in the A = 130 mass region reachable with stable beams were investigated by using the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 92}Mo fusion-evaporation reaction and the powerful detection system consisting of GASP+ISIS+n-ring at Legnaro (Italy). The level scheme of {sup 122}La was established for the first time. The observed rotational bands are compared with the bands observed in the heavier Lanthanum nuclei and possible configuration assignments are discussed.

  9. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  10. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-12-01

    We calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd-even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  11. Nuclear physics aspects involved in studies of low-Q parity-violating electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T. W.; Moreno, O.

    2013-11-07

    The parity-violating asymmetry in polarized electron scattering from nuclei can be used to extract information on nuclear and nucleon structure, as well as to determine the values of Standard Model electroweak couplings. To achieve the latter, high precision is needed both in the measured asymmetry and in the underlying nuclear structure theory. For the former a few tenths of a percent may be attainable; for the latter the present discussions have the dual goal of ascertaining both the sizes of various nuclear structure related effects and of providing estimates of their uncertainties.

  12. Element-specific soft x-ray magneto-optic rotation studies of magnetic films and multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1996-05-01

    Tunable multilayer linear polarizers extend magneto-optic rotation techniques that directly sense polarization changes into the 50--1,000 eV range. The resonant response at atomic core levels yields element-specific magnetic signals that can be much larger than the analogous signal in the visible. A tunable multilayer polarimeter is described, and examples of its use in early Kerr rotation hysteresis studies of Fe films and Fe/Cr multilayers are given.

  13. A study of the dynamics of rotating space stations with elastically connected counterweight and attached flexible appendages. Volume 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, F.; Markowitz, J.; Goldenberg, S.; Zetkov, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    The formulation of a mathematical model for predicting the dynamic behavior of rotating flexible space station configurations was conducted. The overall objectives of the study were: (1) to develop the theoretical techniques for determining the behavior of a realistically modeled rotating space station, (2) to provide a versatile computer program for the numerical analysis, and (3) to present practical concepts for experimental verification of the analytical results. The mathematical model and its associated computer program are described.

  14. Prospects for further studies of effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the polarized-neutron-induced ternary fission of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. A. Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Goennenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.

    2008-07-15

    Prospects for further studies of TRI and ROT effects of T-odd asymmetry in the emission of light particles in the ternary and binary fission of heavy nuclei that is induced by slow polarized neutrons are considered with a view to studying the mechanism for the formation of these effects and using them to get new information about fission dynamics. It is planned to investigate the dependence of the corresponding T-odd-asymmetry coefficients on the main characteristics of the fission reaction.

  15. Low-energy structure studies of odd-odd deformed nuclei and the coriolis and residual interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    The nuclear level structure of /sup 176/Lu, /sup 170/Tm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 160/Tb have been studied by means of the /sup 177/Hf(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 176/Lu, /sup 171/Yb(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 170/Tm, /sup 167/Er(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 166/Ho, and /sup 161/Dy(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 160/Tb reactions and with the use of previously published (d,p) spectroscopy and gamma transitions from the (n,..gamma..) reactions. The (t,..cap alpha..) reactions have been performed and analyzed with 17 MeV tritons and the Los Alamos Q3D spectrometer. Eighty-one new rotational states in excited proton configurations or vibrational excited states are proposed. An independent parameterization of the Coriolis interaction is presented, which leads to satisfactory results in reproducing experimental single-particle transfer reaction cross-sections by theoretical calculations. The anomalous population of the excited neutron configurations (404 reduces to -624 up arrow) in /sup 176/Lu and (411 reduces to +- 512 up arrow) in /sup 170/Tm, and the anomalously low (t,..cap alpha..) cross-sections of the (411 up arrow +- 633 up arrow) configuration in /sup 166/Ho are observed. Qualitative explanation of the anomalies is presented in terms of the mixing of states which satisfy the requirement delta/sub I'/,/sub I/delta/sub K'/,/sub K/. Off-diagonal H/sub INT/ matrix elements are calculated, which show that the residual interaction cannot be used to account for the magnitude of the cross-sections observed.

  16. Chirality recognition in the glycidol···propylene oxide complex: a rotational spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Javix; Sunahori, Fumie X; Borho, Nicole; Xu, Yunjie

    2011-04-11

    Chirality recognition in the hydrogen-bonded glycidol···propylene oxide complex has been studied by using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. An extensive conformational search has been performed for this binary adduct at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory and a total of 28 homo- and heterochiral conformers were identified. The eight binary conformers, built of the two dominant glycidol monomeric conformers, g-G+ and g+G-, were predicted to be the most stable ones. Jet-cooled rotational spectra of six out of the eight conformers were observed and unambiguously assigned for the first time. The experimental stability ordering has been obtained and compared with the ab initio predictions. The relative stability of the two dominant glycidol monomeric conformers is reversed in some cases when binding to propylene oxide. The contributions of monomeric energy, deformation energy, and binary intermolecular interaction energy to the relative stability of the binary conformers are discussed.

  17. Rotational Synchronization May Enhance Habitability for Circumbinary Planets: Kepler Binary Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Clark, Joni M.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.

    2013-09-01

    We report a mechanism capable of reducing (or increasing) stellar activity in binary stars, thereby potentially enhancing (or destroying) circumbinary habitability. In single stars, stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres causes mass-loss, which is especially detrimental for late-type stars, because habitable zones are very close and activity is long lasting. In binaries, tidal rotational breaking reduces magnetic activity, thus reducing harmful levels of X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and stellar mass-loss that are able to erode planetary atmospheres. We study this mechanism for all confirmed circumbinary (p-type) planets. We find that main sequence twins provide minimal flux variation and in some cases improved environments if the stars rotationally synchronize within the first Gyr. Solar-like twins, like Kepler 34 and Kepler 35, provide low habitable zone XUV fluxes and stellar wind pressures. These wide, moist, habitable zones may potentially support multiple habitable planets. Solar-type stars with lower mass companions, like Kepler 47, allow for protected planets over a wide range of secondary masses and binary periods. Kepler 38 and related binaries are marginal cases. Kepler 64 and analogs have dramatically reduced stellar aggression due to synchronization of the primary, but are limited by the short lifetime. Kepler 16 appears to be inhospitable to planets due to extreme XUV flux. These results have important implications for estimates of the number of stellar systems containing habitable planets in the Galaxy and allow for the selection of binaries suitable for follow-up searches for habitable planets.

  18. ROTATIONAL SYNCHRONIZATION MAY ENHANCE HABITABILITY FOR CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: KEPLER BINARY CASE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Paul A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo A.; Clark, Joni M.

    2013-09-10

    We report a mechanism capable of reducing (or increasing) stellar activity in binary stars, thereby potentially enhancing (or destroying) circumbinary habitability. In single stars, stellar aggression toward planetary atmospheres causes mass-loss, which is especially detrimental for late-type stars, because habitable zones are very close and activity is long lasting. In binaries, tidal rotational breaking reduces magnetic activity, thus reducing harmful levels of X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and stellar mass-loss that are able to erode planetary atmospheres. We study this mechanism for all confirmed circumbinary (p-type) planets. We find that main sequence twins provide minimal flux variation and in some cases improved environments if the stars rotationally synchronize within the first Gyr. Solar-like twins, like Kepler 34 and Kepler 35, provide low habitable zone XUV fluxes and stellar wind pressures. These wide, moist, habitable zones may potentially support multiple habitable planets. Solar-type stars with lower mass companions, like Kepler 47, allow for protected planets over a wide range of secondary masses and binary periods. Kepler 38 and related binaries are marginal cases. Kepler 64 and analogs have dramatically reduced stellar aggression due to synchronization of the primary, but are limited by the short lifetime. Kepler 16 appears to be inhospitable to planets due to extreme XUV flux. These results have important implications for estimates of the number of stellar systems containing habitable planets in the Galaxy and allow for the selection of binaries suitable for follow-up searches for habitable planets.

  19. Study of Forming Limit for Rotational Incremental Sheet Forming of Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jingee; Kim, Jeounghan; Park, Nhokwang; Kim, Youngsuk

    2010-01-01

    As a lightweight material, magnesium is being increasingly used for automotive parts. However, due to a hexagonal-closed-packed (hcp) crystal structure, in which only the basal plane can move, magnesium alloy sheets exhibit a low ductility and formability at room temperature. Press forming of magnesium alloy sheets is conventionally performed at elevated temperatures of 200 °C to 250 °C and thus is known as energy consumed forming. Therefore, in view of an energy saving forming technology, we study magnesium alloy sheet forming by a rotational incremental sheet forming (RISF) at room temperature, where the rotational tool generates local heat of specimen enough to accelerate plastic deformation. The flow curves of the magnesium alloy sheet are obtained and calculated at elevated temperatures, while the yield loci of the magnesium alloy sheet are measured at room temperature. Using RISF, a square cup of 80-mm width, 80-mm length, and 25-mm height is then formed from a magnesium alloy sheet at room temperature. In addition, the strain distribution is obtained and compared with the forming limit curve (FLC) by considering the effect of the tool radius and is found to effectively predict the forming limit of a magnesium alloy sheet in RISF.

  20. Studies on orientation and rotation parameters of 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Ji, Jianghui; Hu, Shoucun

    The ginger-shaped near-Earth asteroid 4179 Toutatis is close to a 4:1 orbital resonance with the Earth and has made close Earth flybys approximately every four years in the recent 20 years. China’s lunar probe Chang’e-2 achieved a successful flyby the Toutatis on 13th Dec 2012 during its most recent flyby of Earth. During the mission, a series of image with high resolution has been obtained. Combined with the radar model of Toutatis, these figures show the attitude of the asteroid from the camera’s point of view and the orientation of it is then deduced based on the attitude of the camera and the relative position between 4179 Toutatis and Chang'e-2 in our works. According to the previous ground-based observations and works on the rotation parameters of Toutatis, this paper studies the rotating rate of the asteroid in accordance with the imaging result of Toutatis by Chang’e-2 and puts forward a correction to the spin rate parameters.

  1. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 1; An Analytical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system s center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied. The geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a 2-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The overall response of the system was required in order to design the experimental system for operation beyond the first critical. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk s geometry and center of mass were rather small. The difference between the maximum centrifugal radial displacements between the undamaged and damaged disks at 8000 RPM was 0.00014 in. for a 0.963 in. notch length. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  2. Theoretical study on the translation and rotation of an elliptic camphor particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Keita; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2014-04-01

    The spontaneous motion of an elliptic camphor particle floating on water is studied theoretically and experimentally. Considering a mathematical model for the motion of an elliptic camphor particle in a two-dimensional space, we first investigate the asymptotic solutions with numerical computation. We then introduce a small parameter ε into the definition of the particle shape, which represents an elliptic deformation from a circular shape and, by means of perturbation theory, we analytically calculate the travelling solution to within O(ε). The results show that short-axis-directed travelling solutions primarily bifurcate from stationary solutions and that long-axis-directed ones are secondary which means that elliptic camphor particles are easier to move in the short-axis direction. Furthermore, we show that rotating solutions bifurcate from stationary solutions and that the bifurcation point changes with O(ε2), which suggests that elliptic camphor disks easily exhibit translational motion, rather than rotational, within the small deformation. Finally, our theoretical suggestions are confirmed by an experiment.

  3. A Numerical Study of Taylor-Couette Problem for a Rarefied Gas: Effect of Rotation of the Outer Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Aoki, Kazuo

    2005-05-01

    The Taylor-Couette problem for a rarefied gas is studied numerically by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The gas is supposed to be contained in an annular domain, bounded by two coaxial rotating cylinders and top and bottom (specularly reflecting) boundaries, and the flow is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric. Special attention is focused on the effect of rotation of the outer cylinder on the type of the induced Taylor-vortex flow. It is shown that different types of flow can coexist stably in a wide range of speeds of rotation of the inner and outer cylinders unless the outer cylinder is rotating fast in the opposite direction to the inner.

  4. Computed Tomography Analysis of Postsurgery Femoral Component Rotation Based on a Force Sensing Device Method versus Hypothetical Rotational Alignment Based on Anatomical Landmark Methods: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Stefan W; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Leffers, Kevin J; Johnson, Clint W; Dettmer, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of the femoral component is an important aspect of knee arthroplasty, due to its effects on postsurgery knee kinematics and associated functional outcomes. It is still debated which method for establishing rotational alignment is preferable in orthopedic surgery. We compared force sensing based femoral component rotation with traditional anatomic landmark methods to investigate which method is more accurate in terms of alignment to the true transepicondylar axis. Thirty-one patients underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with femoral rotation established via a force sensor. During surgery, three alternative hypothetical femoral rotational alignments were assessed, based on transepicondylar axis, anterior-posterior axis, or the utilization of a posterior condyles referencing jig. Postoperative computed tomography scans were obtained to investigate rotation characteristics. Significant differences in rotation characteristics were found between rotation according to DKB and other methods (P < 0.05). Soft tissue balancing resulted in smaller deviation from anatomical epicondylar axis than any other method. 77% of operated knees were within a range of ±3° of rotation. Only between 48% and 52% of knees would have been rotated appropriately using the other methods. The current results indicate that force sensors may be valuable for establishing correct femoral rotation. PMID:26881086

  5. Numerical study of rotating detonation engine with an array of injection holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S.; Han, X.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to adopt the method of injection via an array of holes in three-dimensional numerical simulations of a rotating detonation engine (RDE). The calculation is based on the Euler equations coupled with a one-step Arrhenius chemistry model. A pre-mixed stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture is used. The present study uses a more practical fuel injection method in RDE simulations, injection via an array of holes, which is different from the previous conventional simulations where a relatively simple full injection method is usually adopted. The computational results capture some important experimental observations and a transient period after initiation. These phenomena are usually absent in conventional RDE simulations due to the use of an idealistic injection approximation. The results are compared with those obtained from other numerical studies and experiments with RDEs.

  6. Dynamic NMR studies of restricted arene rotation in the chromiu tricarbonyl thiophene and selenophene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanger, M.J.

    1994-05-27

    This thesis contains the results of organometallic studies of thiophene and selenophene coordination in transition metal complexes. Chromium tricarbonyl complexes of thiophene, selenophene, and their alkyl-substituted derivatives were prepared and variable-temperature {sup 13}C NMR spectra of these complexes were recorded in dimethyl ether. Bandshape analyses of these spectra yielded activation parameters for restricted rotation of the thiophene and selenophene ligands in these complexes. Extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations (EHMO) of the free thiophene and selenophene ligands and selected chromium tricarbonyl thiophene complexes were performed to better explain the activation barriers of these complexes. The structure of Cr(CO){sub 3}({eta}{sup 5}-2,5-dimethylthiophene) was established by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study.

  7. Exotic Light Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerny, Joseph; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    1978-01-01

    Among the light elements, nuclei with unequal numbers of protons and neutrons are highly unstable. Some survive just long enough to be detected and exhibit unusual regimes of radioactive decay. ( Autor/MA)

  8. KINEMATIC SYNERGIES DURING SACCADES INVOLVING WHOLE-BODY ROTATION: A STUDY BASED ON THE UNCONTROLLED MANIFOLD HYPOTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Adriana M.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Robert, Thomas; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to study the coordination of body segments and eye movements in standing persons during the task of shifting the gaze to a target positioned behind the body. The task was performed at a comfortable speed and fast. Multi-segment and head-eye synergies were quantified as co-varied changes in elemental variables (body segment rotations and eye rotation) that stabilized (reduced the across trials variability) of head rotation in space and gaze trajectory. Head position in space was stabilized by co-varied rotations of body segments prior to the action, during its later stages, and after its completion. The synergy index showed a drop that started prior to the action initiation (anticipatory synergy adjustment) and continued during the phase of quick head rotation. Gaze direction was stabilized only at the movement completion and immediately after the saccade at movement initiation under the “fast” instruction. The study documents for the first time anticipatory synergy adjustments during whole-body actions. It shows multi-joint synergies stabilizing head trajectory in space. In contrast, there was no synergy between head and eye rotations during saccades that would achieve a relatively invariant gaze trajectory. PMID:20346529

  9. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  10. Comparative Study of Job Burnout Among Critical Care Nurses With Fixed and Rotating Shift Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Shamali, Mahdi; Shahriari, Mohsen; Babaii, Atye; Abbasinia, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses, as health care providers, are insurmountably obliged to the practice of shift work. Literature has reported shift working as one of the inducing factors of burnout. Despite numerous studies in this area, there are inconsistencies on the relationship between shift working and burnout among nurses, especially in those who work in critical care settings. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the occupational burnout in critical care nurses with and without fixed shift schedules. Patients and Methods: In this comparative study, 130 nurses with rotating shift schedule and 130 nurses with fixed shift schedule from six university hospitals were selected using stratified random sampling. Maslach burnout inventory was used for data collection. Independent samples t-test, chi-square and one-way ANOVA tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Most of the participants were females (62.7%), aged between 22 - 29 years (38.5%), married (59.2%), and had a bachelor degree (86.9%). The mean score of emotional exhaustion was significantly higher in nurses with fixed shift schedules (P < 0.001). However, no significant difference was found between the mean scores of the two groups in the personal accomplishment and depersonalization subscales (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant difference was found in burnout mean scores between nurses with fixed morning and fixed night shifts (P > 0.05). The means of the emotional exhaustion subscale were significantly different in nurses with different characteristics (P < 0.05) except the gender and working unit. Conclusions: As a result of this study, it was found that critical care nurses with fixed shift schedules display more burnout in emotional exhaustion dimension, compared to those working with rotating shift schedules. PMID:26576442

  11. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, G.; Typel, S.

    2005-10-14

    We discuss recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei. We propose to study Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential as a homework problem. We study the transition from stripping to bound and unbound states and point out in this context that the Trojan-Horse method is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  12. Mass model for unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1994-02-01

    We present some essential features of a macroscopic-microscopic nuclear-structure model, with special emphasis on the results of a recent global calculation of nuclear masses. We discuss what should be some minimal requirements of a nuclear mass model and study how the macroscopic-microscopic method and other nuclear mass models fulfil such basic requirements. We study in particular the reliability of nuclear mass models in regions of nuclei that were not considered in the determination of the model parameters.

  13. A clinical study of the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liangjia; Liu, Xiaomin; Liu, Changlu; Liu, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The reasons for femorotibial rotational malalignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were analyzed to provide evidence for clinical knee joint surgery and to reduce complications. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety knees of 60 patients were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). For one group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was determined by the transepicondylar axis and TKA was performed. For the other group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was conducted through 3° external rotation of the posterior femoral condyles. Knee joint specimens were operated with TKA and various biomechanical indices were measured. [Results] The femoral epicondylar axis was a constant, reliable reference for femoral component rotational alignment. When the femoral component was rotated by 0° versus the epicondylar axis, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint was optimal. When the femoral component was arranged in parallel with Whiteside’s line, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint varied largely. The patellofemoral contact areas of the two groups were similar. [Conclusion] Axial rotational alignment of the femoral component influenced the contact pressure of patellofemoral joints in TKA more significantly than external rotation of the femoral condyles. It is more reliable to use the femoral epicondylar axis as the reference for the rotational alignment of the femoral component. PMID:26311929

  14. Coupling of the rotational and translational degrees of freedom in molecular DIET: A classical trajectory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselbrink, Eckart

    1990-07-01

    Classical trajectories have been calculated to address recent observations in laser-induced desorption of molecules: in particular that the mean translational energy increases with rotational energy of the desorbed molecule. A model is discussed which explains rotational excitation on the basis of an anisotropic repulsive interaction in the excited state. The observed correlation is a consequence of the lifetime spread in the excited state resulting in the fact that for those molecules quenched later more potential energy is transferred into translational and rotational energy. Calculated rotational state and velocity distributions are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental findings.

  15. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  16. Experimental study of the boiling mechanism of a liquid film flowing on the surface of a rotating disc

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokotsa, D.; Yanniotis, S.

    2010-11-15

    The boiling mechanism of a liquid film formed on the surface of a smooth horizontal rotating disc was studied using de-ionised water at 2 l/min flow rate, boiling under vacuum at 40 C and 5-10 C wall superheat. Visualization experiments were carried out and video films were taken for rotational speeds from 0 to 1000 rpm. It was observed that nucleate flow boiling prevails in the case of 0 rpm (stationary disc). Nucleate boiling was also observed at 100 and 200 rpm with the number of bubbles and the diameter of the bubbles decreasing as the rotational speed was increasing. At 600 and 1000 rpm rotational speeds, vapor bubbles were not observed. The results of visual observation were in agreement with bubble growth analysis which showed that at heat flux values of 40 kW/m{sup 2}, conditions for bubble growth are favorable at low rotational speeds (<200 rpm) but are unfavorable at high rotational speeds (1000 rpm). (author)

  17. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  18. Galaxy luminosity function and Tully-Fisher relation: reconciled through rotation-curve studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Salucci, Paolo; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2014-03-10

    The relation between galaxy luminosity L and halo virial velocity v {sub vir} required to fit the galaxy luminosity function differs from the observed Tully-Fisher relation between L and disk speed v {sub rot}. Because of this, the problem of reproducing the galaxy luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation simultaneously has plagued semianalytic models since their inception. Here we study the relation between v {sub rot} and v {sub vir} by fitting observational average rotation curves of disk galaxies binned in luminosity. We show that the v {sub rot}-v {sub vir} relation that we obtain in this way can fully account for this seeming inconsistency. Therefore, the reconciliation of the luminosity function with the Tully-Fisher relation rests on the complex dependence of v {sub rot} on v {sub vir}, which arises because the ratio of stellar mass to dark matter mass is a strong function of halo mass.

  19. Enhanced brain connectivity in math-gifted adolescents: An fMRI study using mental rotation.

    PubMed

    Prescott, James; Gavrilescu, Maria; Cunnington, Ross; O'Boyle, Michael W; Egan, Gary F

    2010-12-01

    Mathematical giftedness is a form of intelligence related to enhanced mathematical reasoning that can be tested using a variety of numerical and spatial tasks. A number of neurobiological mechanisms related to exceptional mathematical reasoning ability have been postulated, including enhanced brain connectivity. We aimed to further investigate this possibility by comparing a group of mathematically gifted adolescents with an average math ability control group performing mental rotation of complex three-dimensional block figures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected and differences in intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivity between the groups were assessed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The math-gifted showed heightened intrahemispheric frontoparietal connectivity, as well as enhanced interhemispheric frontal connectivity between the dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortex. These enhanced connectivity patterns are consistent with previous studies linking increased activation of the frontal and parietal regions with high fluid intelligence, and may be a unique neural characteristic of the mathematically gifted brain.

  20. Coexistence of Order and Chaos at Critical Points of First-Order Quantum Phase Transitions in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, M.; Leviatan, A.

    2013-03-01

    We study the interplay between ordered and chaotic dynamics at the critical point of a generic first-order quantum phase transition in the interacting boson model of nuclei. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a distinct behaviour of the coexisting phases. While the dynamics in the deformed phase is robustly regular, the spherical phase shows strongly chaotic behavior in the same energy intervals. The effect of collective rotations on the dynamics is investigated.

  1. Variations of characteristic time scales in rotating stratified turbulence using a large parametric numerical study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, D; Marino, R; Herbert, C; Pouquet, A

    2016-01-01

    We study rotating stratified turbulence (RST) making use of numerical data stemming from a large parametric study varying the Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, Re, Fr and Ro in a broad range of values. The computations are performed using periodic boundary conditions on grids of 1024(3) points, with no modeling of the small scales, no forcing and with large-scale random initial conditions for the velocity field only, and there are altogether 65 runs analyzed in this paper. The buoyancy Reynolds number defined as R(B) = ReFr2 varies from negligible values to ≈ 10(5), approaching atmospheric or oceanic regimes. This preliminary analysis deals with the variation of characteristic time scales of RST with dimensionless parameters, focusing on the role played by the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes, as a key ingredient for modeling the dynamics of such flows. We find that neither rotation nor the ratio of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency to the inertial frequency seem to play a major role in the absence of forcing in the global dynamics of the small-scale kinetic and potential modes. Specifically, in these computations, mostly in regimes of wave turbulence, characteristic times based on the ratio of energy to dissipation of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, T(V) and T(P), vary substantially with parameters. Their ratio γ=T(V)/T(P) follows roughly a bell-shaped curve in terms of Richardson number Ri. It reaches a plateau - on which time scales become comparable, γ≈0.6 - when the turbulence has significantly strengthened, leading to numerous destabilization events together with a tendency towards an isotropization of the flow.

  2. Variations of characteristic time scales in rotating stratified turbulence using a large parametric numerical study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, D; Marino, R; Herbert, C; Pouquet, A

    2016-01-01

    We study rotating stratified turbulence (RST) making use of numerical data stemming from a large parametric study varying the Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, Re, Fr and Ro in a broad range of values. The computations are performed using periodic boundary conditions on grids of 1024(3) points, with no modeling of the small scales, no forcing and with large-scale random initial conditions for the velocity field only, and there are altogether 65 runs analyzed in this paper. The buoyancy Reynolds number defined as R(B) = ReFr2 varies from negligible values to ≈ 10(5), approaching atmospheric or oceanic regimes. This preliminary analysis deals with the variation of characteristic time scales of RST with dimensionless parameters, focusing on the role played by the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes, as a key ingredient for modeling the dynamics of such flows. We find that neither rotation nor the ratio of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency to the inertial frequency seem to play a major role in the absence of forcing in the global dynamics of the small-scale kinetic and potential modes. Specifically, in these computations, mostly in regimes of wave turbulence, characteristic times based on the ratio of energy to dissipation of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, T(V) and T(P), vary substantially with parameters. Their ratio γ=T(V)/T(P) follows roughly a bell-shaped curve in terms of Richardson number Ri. It reaches a plateau - on which time scales become comparable, γ≈0.6 - when the turbulence has significantly strengthened, leading to numerous destabilization events together with a tendency towards an isotropization of the flow. PMID:26830757

  3. Distribution of primary cochlear afferents in the bulbar nuclei of the rat: a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) study in parasagittal sections.

    PubMed Central

    Merchan, M A; Collia, F P; Merchan, J A; Ludeña, M D

    1986-01-01

    HRP was injected into the cochleae of 25 young albino rats in order to trace the primary afferents to the bulbar cochlear nuclei. Besides the classic V-shaped pattern and unconnected with it, HRP labelling revealed two plexuses stemming directly from the axons of the cochlear root. The plexuses cover the posterior area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (posterior plexus) and the anterolaterodorsal area of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (anterior plexus). The fibres giving rise to these two plexuses were previously grouped in two bundles which have been called the posterior and anterior bundles, respectively. The origin of the anterior bundle is typically seen with the fibres stemming out at right angles; the origin and course of the posterior bundle, which characteristically cross over, is also a typical feature. Images Fig. 1 Figs. 2-3 (cont.) Figs. 2-3 Fig. 4 PMID:3319993

  4. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    1999-10-29

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities.

  5. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  6. Reliability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Rotator Cuff: The ROW Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Collins, Jamie; Newman, Joel S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Losina, Elena; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physiatrists encounter patients with rotator cuff disorders and imaging is frequently an important component of their diagnostic assessment. However, there is paucity of literature on reliability of MRI assessment between shoulder specialists and musculoskeletal radiologists. Objective We assessed inter- and intra-rater reliability of MRI characteristics of the rotator cuff. Design Cross-sectional secondary analyses in a prospective cohort study Setting Academic tertiary care centers Patients Subjects with shoulder pain recruited from orthopedic and physiatry clinics Methods Two shoulder fellowship trained physicians (a physiatrist and a shoulder surgeon) jointly performed a blinded composite MRI review by consensus on 31 subjects with shoulder pain. Subsequently, MRI was reviewed by one fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Main Outcome Measures We calculated Cohen’s kappa coefficients and percent agreement among the two reviews (composite review of two shoulder specialists versus that of the musculoskeletal radiologist). Intra-rater reliability was assessed among the shoulder specialists by performing a repeat blinded composite MRI review. In addition to this repeat composite review, only one of the physiatry shoulder specialists performed an additional review. Results Inter-rater reliability (shoulder specialists versus musculoskeletal radiologist) was substantial for the presence or absence of tear (kappa=0.90; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), tear-thickness (kappa=0.84;95% CI=0.70, 0.99), longitudinal size of tear (kappa=0.75;95% CI=0.44, 1.00), fatty infiltration (kappa=0.62; 95% CI=0.45, 0.79), and muscle atrophy (kappa=0.68; 95% CI=0.50, 0.86). There was only fair inter-rater reliability of transverse size of tear (kappa=0.20; 95% CI=0.00, 0.51). The kappa for intra-rater reliability was high for tear thickness (0.88; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), longitudinal tear size (0.61; 95% CI=0.22, 0.99), fatty infiltration (0.89; 95% CI=0.80, 0.98), and muscle

  7. Cenozoic crustal rotations in the Mojave Desert from paleomagnetic studies around Barstow, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Michael J.; Brown, Laurie L.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1993-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from the Mojave Desert around Barstow, California, suggest 55 to 75 deg of clockwise rotation of this area in earliest Miocene time, followed by 23 deg of counterclockwise rotation in the Early Miocene, and no rotation after 18 Ma. Earliest Miocene clockwise rotation of the Barstow area is suggested by data from nine sites in the Oligocene-Miocene Lane Mountain Quartz Latite and Jackhammer Formation and may be related to oroclinal bending of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. Data from 13 sites in the Early Miocene Pickhandle Formation indicate counterclockwise rotation, which coincides with Early Miocene E-NE - W-SW extension and detachment faulting in the Mojave Desert. These results suggest that Miocene extension in the Mojave Desert is related to similarly oriented extension in the Colorado River extensional corridor. Early Miocene to Pliocene rocks of the Andesite and Dacite of the Calico Mountains, Barstow Formation, Andesite of Murphy's Well, and Black Mountain Basalt show no evidence for significant rotation of the Barstow area after 18 Ma. Most other paleomagnetic data from elsewhere in the Mojave are consistent with a lack of significant post-18 Ma rotations, suggesting that post-10 Ma right-lateral faulting there has produced relatively little crustal rotation.

  8. Study of physiological and behavioral response to transitions between rotating and nonrotating environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Future manned space missions may require transition between artificial gravity and weightlessness environments. The frequency and rate of such transition will influence the psychophysiological responses of man. Abrupt transfers are examined between such rotating and nonrotating environments to determine the physiological and behavioral responses of man. Five subjects were tested using rates of rotation up to 5 rpm.

  9. Cenozoic crustal rotations in the Mojave Desert from paleomagnetic studies around Barstow, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Michael J.; Brown, Laurie L.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1993-06-01

    Paleomagnetic data from the Mojave Desert around Barstow, California, suggest 55 to 75 deg of clockwise rotation of this area in earliest Miocene time, followed by 23 deg of counterclockwise rotation in the Early Miocene, and no rotation after 18 Ma. Earliest Miocene clockwise rotation of the Barstow area is suggested by data from nine sites in the Oligocene-Miocene Lane Mountain Quartz Latite and Jackhammer Formation and may be related to oroclinal bending of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. Data from 13 sites in the Early Miocene Pickhandle Formation indicate counterclockwise rotation, which coincides with Early Miocene E-NE - W-SW extension and detachment faulting in the Mojave Desert. These results suggest that Miocene extension in the Mojave Desert is related to similarly oriented extension in the Colorado River extensional corridor. Early Miocene to Pliocene rocks of the Andesite and Dacite of the Calico Mountains, Barstow Formation, Andesite of Murphy's Well, and Black Mountain Basalt show no evidence for significant rotation of the Barstow area after 18 Ma. Most other paleomagnetic data from elsewhere in the Mojave are consistent with a lack of significant post-18 Ma rotations, suggesting that post-10 Ma right-lateral faulting there has produced relatively little crustal rotation.

  10. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  11. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  12. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  13. Methodology for increased precision in saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance studies of rotational dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Thomas, D D

    1986-01-01

    Microsecond rotational motions of nitroxide spin labels are measured primarily with saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR). In the present study we have used model system experiments to quantitatively evaluate different ST-EPR spectral parameters, both in-phase and out-of-phase, with an emphasis on techniques for suppressing the interference from weakly immobilized probes. Analyses of both systematic and random errors show that maximum sensitivity to small changes in correlation time and minimum ambiguity of interpretation are best achieved by combining measurements of both spectral line-shape, i.e., the ratio of line-heights, and spectral intensity, i.e., the absolute amplitude of either a position within a spectrum or a spectral integral. Errors in the measurement of correlation times for the two types of parameters tend to be complementary. Integrated intensity parameters are particularly useful in measuring microsecond probe motions in the presence of weakly immobilized components. We confirm that integrated intensity parameters are sometimes effective in rejecting signals from weakly immobilized probes, but the effectiveness of this rejection is more limited than previously supposed and depends on the type of parameter being measured. We describe procedures for evaluating and minimizing errors due to weakly immobilized probes, emphasizing the advantages of a new kind of intensity parameter obtained from integrated in-phase spectra. We provide detailed descriptions of experimental procedures, along with calibration plots of the most useful spectral parameters vs. rotational correlation time, which should make it possible for workers in other laboratories, using different instruments and sample geometries, to reproduce spectra quantitatively and to make accurate correlation time measurements. PMID:3013330

  14. Experimental study of rotating Hagen-Poiseuille flow discharging into a 1:8 sudden expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda-Barea, A.; Martínez-Arias, B.; Parras, L.; Burgos, M. A.; del Pino, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present experimental evidence for the five different states that result from rotating Hagen-Poiseuille flow when it discharges into a 1:8 sudden expansion, namely: stable, convectively unstable, unstable shear layer, stable and unstable vortex breakdowns. Sanmiguel-Rojas et al. ["Three-dimensional structure of confined swirling jets at moderately large Reynolds numbers," Phys. Fluids 20, 044104 (2008)] numerically predicted four of these five states and mapped the transition from one state to another. Our main objective is to study the onset of instabilities and vortex breakdown in these states experimentally. For this purpose, we visualize the flow at the inlet of the expansion for several values of moderately large Reynolds numbers, Re, and of swirl parameters, S. We analyze the inner region of the state that corresponds to the unstable shear layer in the sudden expansion and find two different states that share the same character, although they have different non-dimensional frequencies. The first relates to an oscillating structure near the axis, which arises at a small value of the swirl parameter, as well as to a generation of vortices that move downstream. The second shows, for greater values of the swirl parameter, vortices interacting with the boundary layer located on the wall of the static container that is perpendicular to the flow direction. In addition, we find a transition from stable to unstable vortex breakdown when perturbations become absolutely unstable inside the rotating pipe flow. Therefore, the most remarkable experimental finding is a new state, namely, unstable or transient vortex breakdown that takes place for the same pair of values (Rea, Sa) at which the onset of the absolute instability curve appears and intersects the region of stable vortex breakdown.

  15. Excited states of deformable odd {sup 157,159}Tb nuclei: Nonconservation of the angular momentum of external nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Sharipov, Sh.; Ermamatov, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    The previously developed rotationally single-particle and vibrational model of the triaxial deformable odd nuclei is extended to the case where the total angular momentum of an external nucleon is not conserved. The calculated ratios of the excitation energies of the {sup 157,159}Tb nuclei are compared with the existing experimental data. The ratios of E2-transition probabilities and those of quadrupole moments of the above nuclei are calculated using parameters determined from the spectra of these nuclei.

  16. Does the posterolateral bundle influence rotational movement more than the anteromedial bundle in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Komzák, M; Hart, R; Okál, F; Safi, A

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains controversial. Some studies report that the AM bundle stabilises the knee joint in anteroposterior (AP) translation and rotational movement (both internal and external) to the same extent as the PL bundle. Others conclude that the PL bundle is more important than the AM in controlling rotational movement. The objective of this randomised cohort study involving 60 patients (39 men and 21 women) with a mean age of 32.9 years (18 to 53) was to evaluate the function of the AM and the PL bundles of the ACL in both AP and rotational movements of the knee joint after single-bundle and double-bundle ACL reconstruction using a computer navigation system. In the double-bundle group the patients were also randomised to have the AM or the PL bundle tensioned first, with knee laxity measured after each stage of reconstruction. All patients had isolated complete ACL tears, and the presence of a meniscal injury was the only supplementary pathology permitted for inclusion in the trial. The KT-1000 arthrometer was used to apply a constant load to evaluate the AP translation and the rolimeter was used to apply a constant rotational force. For the single-bundle group deviation was measured before and after ACL reconstruction. In the double-bundle group deviation was measured for the ACL-deficient, AM- or PL-reconstructed first conditions and for the total reconstruction. We found that the AM bundle in the double-bundle group controlled rotation as much as the single-bundle technique, and to a greater extent than the PL bundle in the double-bundle technique. The double-bundle technique increases AP translation and rotational stability in internal rotation more than the single-bundle technique.

  17. Design of in situ sample rotation mechanism for angle-dependent study of cantilever-detected high-frequency ESR.

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, E; Hirano, S; Ohta, H

    2013-02-01

    Cantilever detected electron spin resonance (ESR) technique is combined with a precise rotation stage for angle-dependent ESR study of a tiny single crystalline sample on the order of 1 μg. Generally speaking, sample rotation in transmission-type ESR measurement is quite difficult. However, high angle resolution Δθ(min)∼0.2° and compact design of our stage allow in situ sample rotation in strong magnetic fields at low temperatures. As a result, a systematic study of ESR spectra for different field orientations can be easily obtained without sample extraction from a cryostat. As an example, angle-dependent ESR study of Co Tutton salt in the millimeter wave region is demonstrated at liquid helium temperature.

  18. Nuclear Rotations and the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-10-27

    We deal here with the application of the Nuclear Born Oppenheimer (NBO) method to the description of nuclear rotations. As an edifying illustration, we apply the NBO formalism to study the rotational motion of nuclei which are axially-symmetric and even, but whose shells are not closed. We focus, in particular, on the derivation of expressions for the rotational energy and for the moment of inertia. Additionally, we examine the connection between the NBO method and the self-consistent cranking (SCC) model. Finally, we compare the moment of inertia generated by the NBO method with the Thouless-Valantin formula and hence establish a connection between the NBO method and the large body of experimental data.

  19. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  20. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  1. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2010-09-15

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration, and rotational frequency dependencies of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analyzed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean-field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid-body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have the moments of inertia which are close to rigid-body value. The structure of the currents in rotating frame, their microscopic origin, and the relations to the moments of inertia have been systematically analyzed. The phenomenon of signature separation in odd-odd nuclei, induced by time-odd mean fields, has been analyzed in detail.

  2. Physical processing of cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1989-01-01

    Cometary nuclei were formed far from the Sun in the colder regions of the solar nebula, and have been stored in distant orbits in the Oort cloud over most of the history of the solar system. It had been thought that this benign environment would preserve comets in close to their original pristine state. However, recent studies have identified a number of physical processes that have likely acted to modify cometary nuclei in a variety of significant ways. It is important to consider all of these possible processes, both in deciding on a site on the nucleus for collection of cometary samples, and in interpreting the results of analyses of returned cometary samples. Although it can no longer be said that comets are pristine samples of original solar nebula material, they are still the best obtainable samples of that unique period in the formation of the planetary system.

  3. Impact of patient rotational errors on target and critical structure dose in IMRT: A 3D simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Xing, A.; Vial, P.; Scotti, A.; Stirton, R.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-06-01

    The impact of 3D rotational errors in patient positioning on dose delivered target volumes and critical structures in IMRT was studied. Patient rotational errors ranging from -30 to +30 was introduced to IMRT treatment plans of pelvis, head and neck and brain treatment sites and the impact of rotational error on DVH metrics was assessed. The magnitude of impact of rotational error on the error in dose delivered to the target volume and critical structures depends on the location of the structures from plan isocentre. In studied plans, a maximum percentage difference of up to -9.8(1s=13.4) % in D95 to PTV was observed for head and neck treatments. Similarly, in Brain treatments a maximum difference of up to 24.0(1s=33.0) % in maximum dose of Optic chiasm was observed. The results suggest that failure to correct patient's rotational error results in under-dosage to target volumes and over-dosage to the critical structures in some specific treatment scenarios.

  4. Neotectonic rotations in the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin (Western Carpathians): An integrated palaeomagnetic and fractured clasts study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarski, Antek K.; Márton, Emő; Świerczewska, Anna; Fheed, Adam; Zasadni, Jurek; Kukulak, Józek

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this contribution are: (1) to promote the application of fractured clasts analysis in conglomerates for regional stress reconstructions and (2) to advance reconstruction of the Western Carpathians structural development. Our results show that the Neogene fill of the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin underwent CCW rotation of about 30°. We infer that the rotation terminated after 8 Ma and was related to shift along NW-SE to NNW-SSE trending faults at the NE termination of the sinistral Mur-Žilina Fault Zone. Our results show that, fractured clasts analysis can be good tool for regional tectonic reconstructions. The tool is especially useful when other tectonic tools are scarce or absent. Results of our palaeomagnetic study and fractured clasts analysis verify and supplement each others. In the studied case, palaeomagnetic results allow to distinguish between regional stress field rotation and rotation of the Orava-Nowy Targ Basin Neogene fill, whereas, results of fractured clast analysis help to constrain the age of rotation.

  5. Age-related intra-axonal accumulation of neurofilaments in the dorsal column nuclei of the cat brainstem: a light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1998-06-29

    In the present study, we examined the age-related intra-axonal accumulation of neurofilaments in the dorsal column nuclei of the cat by using immunohistochemical techniques combined with light and electron microscopy. Light microscopic analysis revealed oval or circular immunostained structures in the dorsal column nuclei of old cats. These immunostained structures were not observed in the material obtained from adult controls. Under the electron microscope, it was discovered that the immunostained structures were greatly enlarged axons with disrupted myelin sheaths. These enlarged axons contained massive accumulations of neurofilaments, some mitochondria, vacuoles and dense granules. The abnormalities of the myelin sheaths included the breaking of myelin at several locations, a splitting and ballooning in the myelin lamellae of the sheath and a distended periaxonal space between the axon and myelin sheaths. These ultrastructural changes resembled the degenerative alterations that have been observed in the axons of human and animals suffering from a number of pathological conditions, including giant axonal neuropathy and toxic neuropathy. Therefore, severely altered axons with intra-axonal accumulation of neurofilaments appear to reflect chronic degenerative changes that are a component of the aging process. PMID:9666164

  6. The study of rotation curve with MOND for ESO138-G014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, N.; Salucci, P.; Abidin, Z. Z.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is devoted to solve the galactic rotation problem based on Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). It addresses a new fundamental constant a0, called the acceleration constant, at which acceleration scale of Newton's second law fails to hold. It is an indication of a breakdown of classical Newtonian dynamics. In this respect, we choose the HI observations of a late type galaxy, ESO138-G014, to test the rotation curve within the MOND framework which leads to "MOND RC". We ask whether ESO138-G014 is compatible with MOND or dark matter is still favorable for the galactic rotation problem.

  7. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  8. GDR as a Probe of the Collective Motion in Nuclei at High Spins, Temperatures or Isospins

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Adam

    2008-11-11

    The gamma-decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), the high-frequency collective vibration of protons against neutrons, has been proven to be a basic probe for the shapes of hot nuclei, especially to study the effective shape evolution caused by the collective rotation of a nucleus. In this context an interesting question arises: what is the nuclear shape at extreme values of spin or temperatures, close to the limit impose by another collective motion--fission, and how evolves the giant dipole collective vibrations as a function of isospin. Short overview of the results from the experiments aimed to answer these questions are presented and possible perspectives of these type of studies for exotic nuclei to be obtained with the novel gamma-calorimeter PARIS and soon available intense radioactive beams are discussed.

  9. Simulation studies on the effect of absorbers on dose distribution in rotational radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T; Bliznakova, K; Malatara, G; Kardamakis, D; Kolitsi, Z; Pallikarakis, N

    2009-12-01

    The effect of cylindrical protector dimensions, material and distance from the source on the dose distribution in rotational radiotherapy was studied to assess the potential protection possibilities of small-sized radiosensitive structures, such as spinal cord. The dose distributions were evaluated in terms of dose at the protected region and surface dose, ratio of the dose at the protected region to the maximum dose, and dose gradient. High-density materials, such as lead, tungsten, gold and cerrobend, along with new polymer-metal composite ones were used in simulation studies, performed by an in-house developed Monte Carlo Radiotherapy Simulator. To ensure correct modeling of the composite materials, simulated attenuation data were verified against experimentally measured data. The dependence of the dose at the protected region from the protector diameter and the field size was established. Protectors of higher density and larger diameter provide not only lower dose at the protected region, but also steeper dose gradient and lower ratio of the dose at the protected region to the treatment dose. For the protection of small structures, high-density protectors placed further from the source allow thicker protectors to be used. The surface dose increases insignificantly for the studied protector-surface distances. The results have shown that shielding properties of composite materials are close to those of lead. PMID:19186088

  10. Three-dimensional segmentation of nuclei and mitotic chromosomes for the study of cell divisions in live Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Chinta, Rambabu; Wasser, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila embryogenesis is an established model to investigate mechanisms and genes related to cell divisions in an intact multicellular organism. Progression through the cell cycle phases can be monitored in vivo using fluorescently labeled fusion proteins and time-lapse microscopy. To measure cellular properties in microscopic images, accurate and fast image segmentation methods are a critical prerequisite. To quantify static and dynamic features of interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method based on multiple level sets. We tested our method on 3D time-series images of live embryos expressing histone-2Av-green fluorescence protein. Our method is robust to low signal-to-noise ratios inherent to high-speed imaging, fluorescent signals in the cytoplasm, and dynamic changes of shape and texture. Comparisons with manual ground-truth segmentations showed that our method achieves more than 90% accuracy on the object as well as voxel levels and performs consistently throughout all cell cycle phases and developmental stages from syncytial blastoderm to postblastoderm mitotic domains.

  11. Study of the {sup 18}Ne and {sup 11}Li Nuclei in a Three-body Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Jensen, A. S.

    2010-04-26

    We investigate the structure of the nuclei {sup 18}Ne and {sup 11}Li within a three-body model using Faddeev equations with the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The {sup 18}Ne system is described as an inert {sup 16}O core and two protons. Besides reproducing the experimentally known bound states, two tentative states with J{sup p}i = 3{sup +} and 1{sup -} are predicted close to the two-proton separation threshold. We also find several low-lying resonances based on a 3{sup -} excited state of the core. The {sup 11}Li nucleus is treated using a {sup 9}Li+n+n model. In this case, the lack of information of the {sup 9}Li+n spectrum only allows us to obtain the ground state with enough accuracy. The calculated three-body wavefunction has been used to develop a simplified two-body model of the {sup 11}Li nucleus (dineutron model). This model is found to reproduce very well the recent data for the electric transition probability, B(E1).

  12. Co-localisation studies of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors reveal different types of speckles in plant cell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Barta, Andrea

    2008-10-15

    SR proteins are multidomain splicing factors which are important for spliceosome assembly and for regulation of alternative splicing. In mammalian nuclei these proteins localise to speckles from where they are recruited to transcription sites. By using fluorescent protein fusion technology and different experimental approaches it has been shown that Arabidopsis SR proteins, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic staining, localise into an irregular nucleoplasmic network resembling speckles in mammalian cells. As Arabidopsis SR proteins fall into seven conserved sub-families we investigated co-localisation of members of the different sub-families in transiently transformed tobacco protoplast. Here we demonstrate the new finding that members of different SR protein sub-families localise into distinct populations of nuclear speckles with no, partial or complete co-localisation. This is particularly interesting as we also show that these proteins do interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in pull-down and in co-immunopreciptiation assays. Our data raise the interesting possibility that SR proteins are partitioned into distinct populations of nuclear speckles to allow a more specific recruitment to the transcription/pre-mRNA processing sites of particular genes depending on cell type and developmental stage.

  13. JET intrinsic rotation studies in plasmas with a high normalized beta and varying toroidal field ripple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, M. F. F.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giroud, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Kirov, K.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ongena, J.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Rimini, F.; Tala, T.; de Vries, P.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the origin of rotation in ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas is important for predictions for burning plasmas sustained by alpha particles, being characterized by a large population of fast ions and no external momentum input. The angular velocity of the plasma column has been measured in JET H-mode plasmas with pure ICRF heating both for the standard low toroidal magnetic ripple configuration, of about ˜0.08% and, for increased ripple values up to 1.5% (Nave et al 2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 105005). These new JET rotation data were compared with the multi-machine scaling of Rice et al (2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1618) for the Alfvén-Mach number and with the scaling for the velocity change from L-mode into H-mode. The JET data do not fit well any of these scalings that were derived for plasmas that are co-rotating with respect to the plasma current. With the standard low ripple configuration, JET plasmas with large ICRF heating power and normalized beta, βN ≈ 1.3, have a very small co-current rotation, with Alfvén-Mach numbers significantly below those given by the rotation scaling of Rice et al (2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1618). In some cases the plasmas are actually counter-rotating. No significant difference between the H-mode and L-mode rotation is observed. Typically the H-mode velocities near the edge are lower than those in L-modes. With ripple values larger than the standard JET value, between 1% and 1.5%, H-mode plasmas were obtained where both the edge and the core counter-rotated.

  14. Finite Element Study on Continuous Rotating versus Reciprocating Nickel-Titanium Instruments.

    PubMed

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I; Yousief, Salah A; Kataia, Engy M; El-Wahab, Tarek M Abd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, GTX and ProTaper as continuous rotating endodontic files were numerically compared with WaveOne reciprocating file using finite element analysis, aiming at having a low cost, accurate/trustworthy comparison as well as finding out the effect of instrument design and manufacturing material on its lifespan. Two 3D finite element models were especially prepared for this comparison. Commercial engineering CAD/CAM package was used to model full detailed flute geometries of the instruments. Multi-linear materials were defined in analysis by using real strain-stress data of NiTi and M-Wire. Non-linear static analysis was performed to simulate the instrument inside root canal at a 45° angle in the apical portion and subjected to 0.3 N.cm torsion. The three simulations in this study showed that M-Wire is slightly more resistant to failure than conventional NiTi. On the other hand, both materials are fairly similar in case of severe locking conditions. For the same instrument geometry, M-Wire instruments may have longer lifespan than the conventional NiTi ones. In case of severe locking conditions both materials will fail similarly. Larger cross sectional area (function of instrument taper) resisted better to failure than the smaller ones, while the cross sectional shape and its cutting angles could affect instrument cutting efficiency. PMID:27652707

  15. Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Case Studies Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Sobey, C.; Eftekhari, T.; Jensen, E. A.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an update on the progress made using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) next-generation radio telescope for space-weather related activities - namely observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and the first tests of observing heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). The former has been used for half a century for heliospheric science and much progress has been made in recent years for using IPS in space weather science and forecasting. The latter, typically an astrophysical technique that uses pulsars and extragalactic radio sources to study the Galactic magnetic field, is now being investigated for heliospheric studies. The determination of heliospheric FR, combined with observations of IPS, can provide essential information on the Sun's extended magnetic-field structure out into the inner heliosphere, especially when also combined with other forms of remote-sensing/heliospheric imaging data, and in-situ measurements. Here, we will present recent observations of IPS using LOFAR, including preliminary highlights from the first LOFAR joint IPS and heliospheric FR science campaign and investigate pathways for determining Bzfrom, and an overview of the potential of, such observations. LOFAR is an interferometric phased-array radio telescope that can be used to observe between 10 MHz (depending on ionospheric conditions) and 240 MHz, and consists of many relatively-low-cost antennas. These antennas are organised into 'stations' located in an area of ~100km diameter in the Netherlands, with additional international stations spread across central and western Europe with several more in the planning stages.

  16. Simulation Studies of Field-Reversed Configurations with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    Results of 3D kinetic simulations of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Self-consistent hybrid simulations have been performed using the HYM code for even- and odd-parity RMF and different FRC parameters and RMF frequencies. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous two-fluid studies. Generation of axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field during the RMF current drive has been observed. Numerical study of the effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement shows that the rate of particle losses increases for RMF frequency close to the ion cyclotron frequency. It is also shown that high-frequency even-parity RMF reduces ion losses when it is fully penetrated. It is also found that fully-penetrated, odd-parity RMF forces particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends. The observed changes in particle confinement are related to ponderomotive forces. Partially penetrated RMF results in mostly radial ponderomotive forces which improve particle confinement in both cases.

  17. Scattering by rotationally symmetric anisotropic spheres: potential formulation and parametric studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Li, Le-Wei; Yeo, Tat-Soon; Zouhdi, Saïd

    2007-02-01

    Vector potential formulation and parametric studies of electromagnetic scattering problems of a sphere characterized by the rotationally symmetric anisotropy are studied. Both epsilon and mu tensors are considered herein, and four elementary parameters are utilized to specify the material properties in the structure. The field representations can be obtained in terms of two potentials, and both TE (TM) modes (with respect to r) inside (outside) the sphere can be derived and expressed in terms of a series of fractional-order (in a real or complex number) Ricatti-Bessel functions. The effects due to either electric anisotropy ratio (Ae=epsilont/epsilonr) or magnetic anisotropy ratio (Am=mut/mur) on the radar cross section (RCS) are considered, and the hybrid effects due to both Ae and Am are also examined extensively. It is found that the material anisotropy affects significantly the scattering behaviors of three-dimensional dielectric objects. For absorbing spheres, however, the Ae or Am no longer plays a significant role as in lossless dielectric spheres and the anisotropic dependence of RCS values is found to be predictable. The hybrid effects of Ae and Am are considered for absorbing spheres as well, but it is found that the RCS can be greatly reduced by controlling the material parameters. Details of the theoretical treatment and numerical results are presented.

  18. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial flagellar rotation and the flagellar number regulation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Many motile bacteria have the motility organ, the flagellum. It rotates by the rotary motor driven by the ion-motive force and is embedded in the cell surface at the base of each flagellar filament. Many researchers have been studying its rotary mechanism for years, but most of the energy conversion processes have been remained in mystery. We focused on the flagellar stator, which works at the core process of energy conversion, and found that the periplasmic region of the stator changes its conformation to be activated only when the stator units are incorporated into the motor and anchored at the cell wall. Meanwhile, the physiologically important supramolecular complex is localized in the cell at the right place and the right time with a proper amount. How the cell achieves such a proper localization is the fundamental question for life science, and we undertake this problem by analyzing the mechanism for biogenesis of a single polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus. Here I describe the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum is generated at the specific place with a proper number, and also how the flagellar stator is incorporated into the motor to complete the functional motor assembly, based on our studies. PMID:27581279

  19. Finite Element Study on Continuous Rotating versus Reciprocating Nickel-Titanium Instruments.

    PubMed

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I; Yousief, Salah A; Kataia, Engy M; El-Wahab, Tarek M Abd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, GTX and ProTaper as continuous rotating endodontic files were numerically compared with WaveOne reciprocating file using finite element analysis, aiming at having a low cost, accurate/trustworthy comparison as well as finding out the effect of instrument design and manufacturing material on its lifespan. Two 3D finite element models were especially prepared for this comparison. Commercial engineering CAD/CAM package was used to model full detailed flute geometries of the instruments. Multi-linear materials were defined in analysis by using real strain-stress data of NiTi and M-Wire. Non-linear static analysis was performed to simulate the instrument inside root canal at a 45° angle in the apical portion and subjected to 0.3 N.cm torsion. The three simulations in this study showed that M-Wire is slightly more resistant to failure than conventional NiTi. On the other hand, both materials are fairly similar in case of severe locking conditions. For the same instrument geometry, M-Wire instruments may have longer lifespan than the conventional NiTi ones. In case of severe locking conditions both materials will fail similarly. Larger cross sectional area (function of instrument taper) resisted better to failure than the smaller ones, while the cross sectional shape and its cutting angles could affect instrument cutting efficiency.

  20. Interactions between protein coated particles and polymer surfaces studied with the rotating particles probe.

    PubMed

    Kemper, M; Spridon, D; van IJzendoorn, L J; Prins, M W J

    2012-05-29

    Nonspecific interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces have to be minimized in order to control the performance of biosensors based on immunoassays with particle labels. In this paper we investigate these nonspecific interactions by analyzing the response of protein coated magnetic particles to a rotating magnetic field while the particles are in nanometer vicinity to a polymer surface. We use the fraction of nonrotating (bound) particles as a probe for the interaction between the particles and the surface. As a model system, we study the interaction of myoglobin coated particles with oxidized polystyrene surfaces. We measure the interaction as a function of the ionic strength of the solution, varying the oxidation time of the polystyrene and the pH of the solution. To describe the data we propose a model in which particles bind to the polymer by crossing an energy barrier. The height of this barrier depends on the ionic strength of the solution and two interaction parameters. The fraction of nonrotating particles as a function of ionic strength shows a characteristic shape that can be explained with a normal distribution of energy barrier heights. This method to determine interaction parameters paves the way for further studies to quantify the roles of protein coated particles and polymers in their mutual nonspecific interactions in different matrixes.