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Sample records for rotating wave approximation

  1. Coherent population transfer beyond rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Kwon, Duck-Hee; Han, Jaemin; Park, Hyunmin; Kim, Sunkook

    2002-05-01

    The mechanism of coherent population transfer in a three-level system of lamda type interacting with strong and ultra-short laser pulses is investigated beyond the rotating wave approximation (RWA). The characteristics of population transfer arising from the consideration without RWA are numerically shown and interpreted in the point of view of dressed states both for the typical Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage(STIRAP) and for Optimal Detuning Method(ODM) which uses large wavelength-detuned lasers without time delay.

  2. Quantum optimal control within the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, Maximilian; Müller, Matthias M.; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2015-09-01

    We study the interplay between rotating-wave approximation and optimal control. In particular, we show that for a wide class of optimal control problems one can choose the control field such that the Hamiltonian becomes time independent under the rotating-wave approximation. Thus, we show how to recast the functional minimization defined by the optimal control problem into a simpler multivariable function minimization. We provide the analytic solution to the state-to-state transfer of the paradigmatic two-level system and to the more general star configuration of an N -level system. We demonstrate numerically the usefulness of this approach in the more general class of connected acyclic N -level systems with random spectra. Finally, we use it to design a protocol to entangle Rydberg via constant laser pulse atoms in an experimentally relevant range of parameters.

  3. Quantum speed limits in open systems: Non-Markovian dynamics without rotating-wave approximation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Liu, Jing; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    We derive an easily computable quantum speed limit (QSL) time bound for open systems whose initial states can be chosen as either pure or mixed states. Moreover, this QSL time is applicable to either Markovian or non-Markovian dynamics. By using of a hierarchy equation method, we numerically study the QSL time bound in a qubit system interacting with a single broadened cavity mode without rotating-wave, Born and Markovian approximation. By comparing with rotating-wave approximation (RWA) results, we show that the counter-rotating terms are helpful to increase evolution speed. The problem of non-Markovianity is also considered. We find that for non-RWA cases, increasing system-bath coupling can not always enhance the non-Markovianity, which is qualitatively different from the results with RWA. When considering the relation between QSL and non-Markovianity, we find that for small broadening widths of the cavity mode, non-Markovianity can increase the evolution speed in either RWA or non-RWA cases, while, for larger broadening widths, it is not true for non-RWA cases. PMID:25676589

  4. Cavity losses for the dissipative Jaynes Cummings Hamiltonian beyond rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, M.; Militello, B.; Messina, A.; Maniscalco, S.; Piilo, J.; Suominen, K.-A.

    2007-11-01

    A microscopic derivation of the master equation for the Jaynes-Cummings model with cavity losses is given, taking into account the terms in the dissipator which vary with frequencies of the order of the vacuum Rabi frequency. Our approach allows us to single out physical contexts wherein the usual phenomenological dissipator turns out to be fully justified and constitutes an extension of our previous analysis (Scala et al 2007 Phys. Rev. A 75 013811), where a microscopic derivation was given in the framework of the rotating wave approximation.

  5. Damping of a harmonic oscillator in a squeezed vacuum without rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S. S.; Joshi, A.; Frege, O. M.; Emam, W.

    2007-09-01

    A single harmonic oscillator interacting with a broadband squeezed reservoir is analyzed within the framework of master equation without invoking the rotating-wave approximation. The dynamical evolution and photon statistics of the system are investigated by studying mean photon number and second order intensity-intensity correlation function, respectively, under resonance condition which show transient oscillations at twice the harmonic oscillator frequency. The transient fluorescent spectrum reveals asymmetric features. Inclusion of vacuum and field-dependent frequency shifts affects the thermal equilibrium value of the average photon number of the harmonic oscillator.

  6. Phase-conjugated mirror-induced oscillations outside the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S. S.; Frege, O.

    2002-06-01

    Dynamical behaviour of a single harmonic oscillator (HO) and of a single and two cooperative atoms in front of a phase-conjugated mirror is investigated without using the rotating-wave approximation. The mean photon number of the HO shows transient oscillation of frequency (2ω0) and O(γ/ω0), the ratio of the free-space decay rate to the oscillation frequency, and the fluorescent spectrum becomes asymmetric due to additional resonant and non-resonant dispersive terms. In the single-two-level-atom case, the mean atomic inversion and the fluorescent intensity show steady oscillation O(γ0/ω0), the ratio of the A-coefficient to the atomic transition frequency. The amplitude of this steady oscillation at frequency (2ω0) is larger in the case of two cooperative atoms.

  7. Absence of vacuum induced Berry phases without the rotating wave approximation in cavity QED.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jonas

    2012-01-20

    We revisit earlier studies on Berry phases suggested to appear in certain cavity QED settings. It has been especially argued that a nontrivial geometric phase is achievable even in the situation of no cavity photons. We, however, show that such results hinge on imposing the rotating wave approximation (RWA), while without the RWA no Berry phases occur in these schemes. A geometrical interpretation of our results is obtained by introducing semiclassical energy surfaces which in a simple way brings out the phase-space dynamics. With the RWA, a conical intersection between the surfaces emerges and encircling it gives rise to the Berry phase. Without the RWA, the conical intersection is absent and therefore the Berry phase vanishes. It is believed that this is a first example showing how the application of the RWA in the Jaynes-Cummings model may lead to false conclusions, regardless of the mutual strengths between the system parameters.

  8. Measurement-Induced State Transitions in a Superconducting Qubit: Beyond the Rotating Wave Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sank, Daniel; Chen, Zijun; Khezri, Mostafa; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; White, T.; Wenner, J.; Korotkov, Alexander N.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-11-01

    Many superconducting qubit systems use the dispersive interaction between the qubit and a coupled harmonic resonator to perform quantum state measurement. Previous works have found that such measurements can induce state transitions in the qubit if the number of photons in the resonator is too high. We investigate these transitions and find that they can push the qubit out of the two-level subspace, and that they show resonant behavior as a function of photon number. We develop a theory for these observations based on level crossings within the Jaynes-Cummings ladder, with transitions mediated by terms in the Hamiltonian that are typically ignored by the rotating wave approximation. We find that the most important of these terms comes from an unexpected broken symmetry in the qubit potential. We confirm the theory by measuring the photon occupation of the resonator when transitions occur while varying the detuning between the qubit and resonator.

  9. Optomechanical dual-beam backaction-evading measurement beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malz, Daniel; Nunnenkamp, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    We present the exact analytical solution of the explicitly time-periodic quantum Langevin equation describing the dual-beam backaction-evading measurement of a single mechanical oscillator quadrature due to V. B. Braginsky, Y. I. Vorontsov, and K. S. Thorne [Science 209, 547 (1980), 10.1126/science.209.4456.547] beyond the commonly used rotating-wave approximation. We show that counterrotating terms lead to extra sidebands in the optical and mechanical spectra and to a modification of the main peak. Physically, the backaction of the measurement is due to periodic coupling of the mechanical resonator to a light-field quadrature that only contains cavity-filtered shot noise. Since this fact is independent of other degrees of freedom the resonator might be coupled to, our solution can be generalized, including to dissipatively or parametrically squeezed oscillators, as well as recent two-mode backaction-evading measurements.

  10. Breaking the rotating wave approximation for a strongly driven dressed single-electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laucht, Arne; Simmons, Stephanie; Kalra, Rachpon; Tosi, Guilherme; Dehollain, Juan P.; Muhonen, Juha T.; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a strongly driven microwave-dressed donor-bound electron spin qubit in silicon. A resonant oscillating magnetic field B1 is used to dress the electron spin and create a new quantum system with a level splitting proportional to B1. The dressed two-level system can then be driven by modulating the detuning Δ ν between the microwave source frequency νMW and the electron spin transition frequency νe at the frequency of the level splitting. The resulting dressed qubit Rabi frequency ΩR ρ is defined by the modulation amplitude, which can be made comparable to the level splitting using frequency modulation on the microwave source. This allows us to investigate the regime where the rotating wave approximation breaks down without requiring microwave power levels that would be incompatible with a cryogenic environment. We observe clear deviations from normal Rabi oscillations and can numerically simulate the time evolution of the states in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Interaction of a two-level atom with single-mode optical field beyond the rotating wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    One of the simplest models involving the atom-field interaction is the coupling of a single two-level atom with single-mode optical field. Under the rotating wave approximation, this problem is reduced to a form that can be solved exactly. But the approximation is only valid when the two levels are resonant or nearly resonant with the applied electromagnetic radiation. Here we present an analytical solution without the rotating wave approximation and applicable to general atom-field interaction far away from the resonance. We find that there exists remarkable influence of the initial phase of optical field on the Rabi oscillations and Rabi splitting, and this issue cannot be explored in the context of the rotating wave approximation. Due to the retention of the counter-rotating terms, higher-order harmonic appears during the Rabi splitting. The analytical solution suggests a way to regulate and control the quantum dynamics of a two-level atom and allows for exploring more essential features of the atom-field interaction.

  12. Non-Markovian dynamics for an open two-level system without rotating wave approximation: indivisibility versus backflow of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, H. S.; Tang, N.; Zheng, Y. P.; Xu, T. T.

    2012-10-01

    By use of the recently presented two measures, the indivisibility and the backflow of information, we study the non-Markovianity of the dynamics for a two-level system interacting with a zero-temperature structured environment without using rotating wave approximation (RWA). In the limit of weak coupling between the system and its reservoir, and by expanding the time-convolutionless (TCL) generator to the forth order with respect to the coupling strength, the time-local non-Markovian master equation for the reduced state of the system is derived. Under the secular approximation, the exact analytic solution is obtained and the sufficient and necessary conditions for the indivisibility and the backflow of information for the system dynamics are presented. In the more general case, we investigate numerically the properties of the two measures for the case of Lorentzian reservoir. Our results show the importance of the counter-rotating terms to the short-time-scale non-Markovian behavior of the system dynamics, further expose the relation between the two measures and their rationality as non-Markovian measures. Finally, the complete positivity of the dynamics of the considered system is discussed.

  13. Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation to the isotropic and anisotropic Rabi model in the ultrastrong-coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu

    2016-12-01

    Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation (GSRWA) is proposed by employing both the displacement and the squeezing transformations. A solvable Hamiltonian is reformulated in the same form as the ordinary RWA ones. For a qubit coupled to oscillators experiment, a well-defined Schrödinger-cat-like entangled state is given by the displaced-squeezed oscillator state instead of the original displaced state. For the isotropic Rabi case, the mean photon number and the ground-state energy are expressed analytically with additional squeezing terms, exhibiting a substantial improvement of the GSRWA. And the ground-state energy in the anisotropic Rabi model confirms the effectiveness of the GSRWA. Due to the squeezing effect, the GSRWA improves the previous methods only with the displacement transformation in a wide range of coupling strengths even for large atom frequency.

  14. Analytical approximations for spiral waves

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob Engel, Harald

    2013-12-15

    We propose a non-perturbative attempt to solve the kinematic equations for spiral waves in excitable media. From the eikonal equation for the wave front we derive an implicit analytical relation between rotation frequency Ω and core radius R{sub 0}. For free, rigidly rotating spiral waves our analytical prediction is in good agreement with numerical solutions of the linear eikonal equation not only for very large but also for intermediate and small values of the core radius. An equivalent Ω(R{sub +}) dependence improves the result by Keener and Tyson for spiral waves pinned to a circular defect of radius R{sub +} with Neumann boundaries at the periphery. Simultaneously, analytical approximations for the shape of free and pinned spirals are given. We discuss the reasons why the ansatz fails to correctly describe the dependence of the rotation frequency on the excitability of the medium.

  15. Analytical approximations for spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Löber, Jakob; Engel, Harald

    2013-12-01

    We propose a non-perturbative attempt to solve the kinematic equations for spiral waves in excitable media. From the eikonal equation for the wave front we derive an implicit analytical relation between rotation frequency Ω and core radius R(0). For free, rigidly rotating spiral waves our analytical prediction is in good agreement with numerical solutions of the linear eikonal equation not only for very large but also for intermediate and small values of the core radius. An equivalent Ω(R(+)) dependence improves the result by Keener and Tyson for spiral waves pinned to a circular defect of radius R(+) with Neumann boundaries at the periphery. Simultaneously, analytical approximations for the shape of free and pinned spirals are given. We discuss the reasons why the ansatz fails to correctly describe the dependence of the rotation frequency on the excitability of the medium.

  16. Quantum phase fluctuations of coherent and thermal light coupled to a non-degenerate parametric oscillator beyond rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohosin; Mandal, Swapan; Wahiddin, Mohamed Ridza

    2017-09-01

    The essence of the rotating wave approximation (RWA) is to eliminate the non-conserving energy terms from the interaction Hamiltonian. The cost of using RWA is heavy if the frequency of the input radiation field is low (e.g. below optical region). The well known Bloch-Siegert effect is the out come of the inclusion of the terms which are normally neglected under RWA. We investigate the fluctuations of the quantum phase of the coherent light and the thermal light coupled to a nondegenerate parametric oscillator (NDPO). The Hamiltonian and hence the equations of motion involving the signal and idler modes are framed by using the strong (classical) pump condition. These differential equations are nonlinear in nature and are found coupled to each other. Without using the RWA, we obtain the analytical solutions for the signal and idler fields. These solutions are obtained up to the second orders in dimensionless coupling constants. The analytical expressions for the quantum phase fluctuation parameters due to Carruther's and Nieto are obtained in terms of the coupling constants and the initial photon numbers of the input radiation field. Moreover, we keep ourselves confined to the Pegg-Barnett formalism for measured phase operators. With and without using the RWA, we compare the quantum phase fluctuations for coherent and thermal light coupled to the NDPO. In spite of the significant departures (quantitative), the qualitative features of the phase fluctuation parameters for the input thermal light are identical for NDPO with and without RWA. On the other hand, we report some interesting results of input coherent light coupled to the NDPO which are substantially different from their RWA counterpart. In spite of the various quantum optical phenomena in a NDPO, we claim that it is the first effort where the complete analytical approach towards the solutions and hence the quantum phase fluctuations of input radiation fields coupled to it are obtained beyond rotating wave

  17. Controlling subluminal to superluminal behavior of group velocity in an f-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate beyond the rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenasfard, Z.; Naderi, M. H.; Soltanolkotabi, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate tunable control of the group velocity of a weak probe field propagating through an f-deformed Bose-Einstein condensate of Λ-type three-level atoms beyond the rotating wave approximation. For this purpose, we use an f-deformed generalization of an effective two-level quantum model of the three-level Λ-configuration without the rotating wave approximation in which the Gardiner's phonon operators for Bose-Einstein condensate are deformed by an operator-valued function, f(nˆ), of the particle-number operator nˆ. We consider the collisions between the atoms as a special kind of f-deformation where the collision rate κ is regarded as the deformation parameter. We demonstrate the enhanced effect of subluminal and superluminal propagation based on electromagnetically induced transparency and electromagnetically induced absorption, respectively. In particular, we find that (i) the absorptive and dispersive properties of the deformed condensate can be controlled effectively in the absence of the rotating wave approximation by changing the deformation parameter κ, the total number of atoms N^ and the counter-rotating terms parameter λ, (ii) by increasing the values of λ, κ and η = 1/ N, the group velocity of the probe pulse changes, from subluminal to superluminal and (iii) beyond the rotating wave approximation, the subluminal and superluminal behaviors of the probe field are enhanced.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of a two-level system of a single spin driven beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Rama Koteswara; Suter, Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Quantum systems driven by strong oscillating fields are the source of many interesting physical phenomena. In this work, we experimentally study the dynamics of a two-level system of a single spin driven in the strong-driving regime where the rotating-wave approximation is not valid. This two-level system is a subsystem of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond coupled to a first-shell 13C nuclear spin at a level anticrossing point. This near degeneracy occurs in the ms=±1 manifold of the electron spin when the energy level splitting between the ms=-1 and +1 states due to the static magnetic field is ≈127 MHz and thus equal to the splitting due to the 13C hyperfine interaction. The transition frequency of this electron spin two-level system in a static magnetic field of 28.9 G is 1.7 MHz and it can be driven only by the component of the radio-frequency (RF) field along the NV symmetry axis. Electron spin Rabi frequencies in this system can reach tens of MHz even for moderate RF powers. The simple sinusoidal Rabi oscillations that occur when the amplitude of the driving field is small compared to the transition frequency evolve into complex patterns when the driving field amplitude is comparable to or greater than the energy level splitting. We observe that the system oscillates faster than the amplitude of the driving field and the response of the system shows multiple frequencies.

  19. (p,q) deformations and (p,q)-vector coherent states of the Jaynes-Cummings model in the rotating wave approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Geloun, Joseph; Govaerts, Jan; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2007-03-15

    Classes of (p,q) deformations of the Jaynes-Cummings model in the rotating wave approximation are considered. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian is performed exactly, leading to useful spectral decompositions of a series of relevant operators. The latter include ladder operators acting between adjacent energy eigenstates within two separate infinite discrete towers, except for a singleton state. These ladder operators allow for the construction of (p,q)-deformed vector coherent states. Using (p,q) arithmetics, explicit and exact solutions to the associated moment problem are displayed, providing new classes of coherent states for such models. Finally, in the limit of decoupled spin sectors, our analysis translates into (p,q) deformations of the supersymmetric harmonic oscillator, such that the two supersymmetric sectors get intertwined through the action of the ladder operators as well as in the associated coherent states.

  20. Interaction of a Λ-type three-level atom with a single-mode field without rotating wave approximation: perturbation theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegarzadeh, M.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this article, by using the perturbation theory, we analytically solve the eigenvalue problem for the Hamiltonian describing the interaction of a Λ-type three-level atom with a single-mode radiation field without the rotating wave approximation (RWA). For this purpose, the atom-field interaction Hamiltonian, which contains the counter-rotating terms (CRTs), is transformed to an analytically solvable Hamiltonian by applying three successive unitary transformations. According to our calculations, the contribution of CRTs within the transformed Hamiltonian is in fact replaced by transforming the ‘constant detuning’ with the ‘intensity-dependent detuning’ in the first order, and the ‘constant atom-field coupling’ with the intensity-dependent coupling in the second order of the perturbation parameters. Then, by solving the eigenvalue problem for the transformed Hamiltonian, the eigenvector of the considered atom-field Hamiltonian is obtained analytically. Finally, after achieving the state vector of the atom-field system at an arbitrary time, a few nonclassical properties of the system state are investigated numerically. Meanwhile, we compare our results with the presence of RWA, from which the role of CRTs will be established.

  1. Evolution of a hybrid micro-macro entangled state of the qubit-oscillator system via the generalized rotating wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, R.; Yogesh, V.

    2016-04-01

    We study the evolution of the hybrid entangled states in a bipartite (ultra) strongly coupled qubit-oscillator system. Using the generalized rotating wave approximation the reduced density matrices of the qubit and the oscillator are obtained. The reduced density matrix of the oscillator yields the phase space quasi probability distributions such as the diagonal P-representation, the Wigner W-distribution and the Husimi Q-function. In the strong coupling regime the Q-function evolves to uniformly separated macroscopically distinct Gaussian peaks representing ‘kitten’ states at certain specified times that depend on multiple time scales present in the interacting system. The ultrastrong coupling strength of the interaction triggers appearance of a large number of modes that quickly develop a randomization of their phase relationships. A stochastic averaging of the dynamical quantities sets in, and leads to the decoherence of the system. The delocalization in the phase space of the oscillator is studied by using the Wehrl entropy. The negativity of the W-distribution reflects the departure of the oscillator from the classical states, and allows us to study the underlying differences between various information-theoretic measures such as the Wehrl entropy and the Wigner entropy. Other features of nonclassicality such as the existence of the squeezed states and appearance of negative values of the Mandel parameter are realized during the course of evolution of the bipartite system. In the parametric regime studied here these properties do not survive in the time-averaged limit.

  2. Finite-time Landau-Zener processes and counterdiabatic driving in open systems: Beyond Born, Markov, and rotating-wave approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; Zhou, Longwen; Xiao, Gaoyang; Poletti, Dario; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Landau-Zener processes modeled by a two-level quantum system, with its finite bias energy varied in time and in the presence of a single broadened cavity mode at zero temperature. By applying the hierarchy equation method to the Landau-Zener problem, we computationally study the survival fidelity of adiabatic states without Born, Markov, rotating-wave, or other perturbative approximations. With this treatment it also becomes possible to investigate cases with very strong system-bath coupling. Different from a previous study of infinite-time Landau-Zener processes, the fidelity of the time-evolving state as compared with instantaneous adiabatic states shows nonmonotonic dependence on the system-bath coupling and on the sweep rate of the bias. We then consider the effect of applying a counterdiabatic driving field, which is found to be useful in improving the fidelity only for sufficiently short Landau-Zener processes. Numerically exact results show that different counterdiabatic driving fields can have very different robustness against environment effects. Lastly, using a case study, we discuss the possibility of introducing a dynamical decoupling field in order to eliminate the decoherence effect of the environment and, at the same time, to retain the positive role of a counterdiabatic field. Our work indicates that finite-time Landau-Zener processes with counterdiabatic driving offer a fruitful testbed to understand controlled adiabatic processes in open systems.

  3. Plane-Wave and Vector-Rotation Approximation Technique for Reducing Computational Complexity to Simulate MIMO Propagation Channel Using Ray-Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Wataru; Kita, Naoki; Sugiyama, Takatoshi; Nojima, Toshio

    This paper proposes new techniques to simulate a MIMO propagation channel using the ray-tracing method for the purpose of decreasing the computational complexity. These techniques simulate a MIMO propagation channel by substituting the propagation path between a particular combination of transmitter and receiver antennas for all combinations of transmitter and receiver antennas. The estimation accuracy calculated using the proposed techniques is evaluated based on comparison to the results calculated using imaging algorithms. The results show that the proposed techniques simulate a MIMO propagation channel with low computational complexity, and a high level of estimation accuracy is achieved using the proposed Vector-Rotation Approximation technique compared to that for the imaging algorithm.

  4. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  5. Planetary waves in rotating ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khantadze, A. G.; Jandieri, V. G.; Jandieri, G. V.

    2008-06-15

    The problem of propagation of ultralong planetary waves in the Earth's upper atmosphere is considered. A new exact solution to the MHD equations for the ionosphere is obtained in spherical coordinates with allowance for the geomagnetic field and Earth's rotation. A general dispersion relation is derived for planetary waves in the ionospheric E and F regions, and the characteristic features of their propagation in a weakly ionized ionospheric plasma are discussed.

  6. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  7. Regularity of rotational travelling water waves.

    PubMed

    Escher, Joachim

    2012-04-13

    Several recent results on the regularity of streamlines beneath a rotational travelling wave, along with the wave profile itself, will be discussed. The survey includes the classical water wave problem in both finite and infinite depth, capillary waves and solitary waves as well. A common assumption in all models to be discussed is the absence of stagnation points.

  8. Period spacing of gravity modes strongly affected by rotation. Going beyond the traditional approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, V.; Mathis, S.; Lignières, F.; Ballot, J.; Culpin, P.-M.

    2017-02-01

    Context. As of today, asteroseismology mainly allows us to probe the internal rotation of stars when modes are only weakly affected by rotation using perturbative methods. Such methods cannot be applied to rapidly rotating stars, which exhibit complex oscillation spectra. In this context, the so-called traditional approximation, which neglects the terms associated with the latitudinal component of the rotation vector, describes modes that are strongly affected by rotation. This approximation is sometimes used for interpreting asteroseismic data, however, its domain of validity is not established yet. Aims: We aim at deriving analytical prescriptions for period spacings of low-frequency gravity modes strongly affected by rotation through the full Coriolis acceleration (i.e. without neglecting any component of the rotation vector), which can be used to probe stellar internal structure and rotation. Methods: We approximated the asymptotic theory of gravito-inertial waves in uniformly rotating stars using ray theory described in a previous paper in the low-frequency regime, where waves are trapped near the equatorial plane. We put the equations of ray dynamics into a separable form and used the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) quantisation method to compute modes frequencies from rays. Results: Two spectral patterns that depend on stratification and rotation are predicted within this new approximation: one for axisymmetric modes and one for non-axisymmetric modes. Conclusions: The detection of the predicted patterns in observed oscillation spectra would give constraints on internal rotation and chemical stratification of rapidly rotating stars exhibiting gravity modes, such as γ Doradus, SPB, or Be stars. The obtained results have a mathematical form that is similar to that of the traditional approximation, but the new approximation takes the full Coriolis, which allows for propagation near the centre, and centrifugal accelerations into account.

  9. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  10. Bifurcations of rotating waves in rotating spherical shell convection.

    PubMed

    Feudel, F; Tuckerman, L S; Gellert, M; Seehafer, N

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics and bifurcations of convective waves in rotating and buoyancy-driven spherical Rayleigh-Bénard convection are investigated numerically. The solution branches that arise as rotating waves (RWs) are traced by means of path-following methods, by varying the Rayleigh number as a control parameter for different rotation rates. The dependence of the azimuthal drift frequency of the RWs on the Ekman and Rayleigh numbers is determined and discussed. The influence of the rotation rate on the generation and stability of secondary branches is demonstrated. Multistability is typical in the parameter range considered.

  11. Theory of inertial waves in rotating fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelash, Andrey; L'vov, Victor; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    The inertial waves emerge in the geophysical and astrophysical flows as a result of Earth rotation [1]. The linear theory of inertial waves is known well [2] while the influence of nonlinear effects of wave interactions are subject of many recent theoretical and experimental studies. The three-wave interactions which are allowed by inertial waves dispersion law (frequency is proportional to cosine of the angle between wave direction and axes of rotation) play an exceptional role. The recent studies on similar type of waves - internal waves, have demonstrated the possibility of formation of natural wave attractors in the ocean (see [3] and references herein). This wave focusing leads to the emergence of strong three-wave interactions and subsequent flows mixing. We believe that similar phenomena can take place for inertial waves in rotating flows. In this work we present theoretical study of three-wave and four-wave interactions for inertial waves. As the main theoretical tool we suggest the complete Hamiltonian formalism for inertial waves in rotating incompressible fluids [4]. We study three-wave decay instability and then present statistical description of inertial waves in the frame of Hamiltonian formalism. We obtain kinetic equation, anisotropic wave turbulence spectra and study the problem of parametric wave turbulence. These spectra were previously found in [5] by helicity decomposition method. Taking this into account we discuss the advantages of suggested Hamiltonian formalism and its future applications. Andrey Gelash thanks support of the RFBR (Grant No.16-31-60086 mol_a_dk) and Dr. E. Ermanyuk, Dr. I. Sibgatullin for the fruitful discussions. [1] Le Gal, P. Waves and instabilities in rotating and stratified flows, Fluid Dynamics in Physics, Engineering and Environmental Applications. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 25-40, 2013. [2] Greenspan, H. P. The theory of rotating fluids. CUP Archive, 1968. [3] Brouzet, C., Sibgatullin, I. N., Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E

  12. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  13. Generalized stationary phase approximations for mountain waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, H.; Broutman, D.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2016-04-01

    Large altitude asymptotic approximations are derived for vertical displacements due to mountain waves generated by hydrostatic wind flow over arbitrary topography. This leads to new asymptotic analytic expressions for wave-induced vertical displacement for mountains with an elliptical Gaussian shape and with the major axis oriented at any angle relative to the background wind. The motivation is to understand local maxima in vertical displacement amplitude at a given height for elliptical mountains aligned at oblique angles to the wind direction, as identified in Eckermann et al. ["Effects of horizontal geometrical spreading on the parameterization of orographic gravity-wave drag. Part 1: Numerical transform solutions," J. Atmos. Sci. 72, 2330-2347 (2015)]. The standard stationary phase method reproduces one type of local amplitude maximum that migrates downwind with increasing altitude. Another type of local amplitude maximum stays close to the vertical axis over the center of the mountain, and a new generalized stationary phase method is developed to describe this other type of local amplitude maximum and the horizontal variation of wave-induced vertical displacement near the vertical axis of the mountain in the large altitude limit. The new generalized stationary phase method describes the asymptotic behavior of integrals where the asymptotic parameter is raised to two different powers (1/2 and 1) rather than just one power as in the standard stationary phase method. The vertical displacement formulas are initially derived assuming a uniform background wind but are extended to accommodate both vertical shear with a fixed wind direction and vertical variations in the buoyancy frequency.

  14. Advances in wave turbulence: rapidly rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon, C.; Rubinstein, R.; Godeferd, F. S.

    2004-07-01

    At asymptotically high rotation rates, rotating turbulence can be described as a field of interacting dispersive waves by the general theory of weak wave turbulence. However, rotating turbulence has some complicating features, including the anisotropy of the wave dispersion relation and the vanishing of the wave frequency on a non-vanishing set of 'slow' modes. These features prevent straightforward application of existing theories and lead to some interesting properties, including the transfer of energy towards the slow modes. This transfer competes with, and might even replace, the transfer to small scales envisioned in standard turbulence theories. In this paper, anisotropic spectra for rotating turbulence are proposed based on weak turbulence theory; some evidence for their existence is given based on numerical calculations of the wave turbulence equations. Previous arguments based on the properties of resonant wave interactions suggest that the slow modes decouple from the others. Here, an extended wave turbulence theory with non-resonant interactions is proposed in which all modes are coupled; these interactions are possible only because of the anisotropy of the dispersion relation. Finally, the vanishing of the wave frequency on the slow modes implies that these modes cannot be described by weak turbulence theory. A more comprehensive approach to rotating turbulence is proposed to overcome this limitation.

  15. Gravitational wave background from rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2012-11-01

    produce a stronger emission of gravitational radiation. Considering the most optimistic (in terms of the detection of gravitational waves) of these models, an upper limit for the background produced by magnetars is obtained; it could be detected by ET, but not by BBO or DECIGO. Simple approximate formulas to characterize both the total and the unresolvable backgrounds are given for the ensemble of rotating neutron stars, and, for completion, also for the ensemble of binary star systems.

  16. Tkachenko waves in rotating superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Andereck, C.D.; Chalupa, J.; Glaberson, W.I.

    1980-01-07

    The resonant response of a stack of disks driven into torsional oscillation within a container of rotating superfluid helium has been observed. It is shown that the oscillation modes excited are related to Tkachenko waves, that is, vortex displacement waves in the vortex array propagating in a direction transverse to the vortex lines. In particular, the resonances occur at peaks in the vortex wave density of states.

  17. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  18. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in E×B rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  19. Exact Steady Azimuthal Edge Waves in Rotating Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2017-09-01

    The full problem of water waves travelling along a constant sloping beach with the shoreline parallel to the Equator, written in a moving frame with the origin at a point on the rotating Earth is introduced. An exact steady solution of this problem moving only in the azimuthal direction, with no variations in this direction, is obtained. The solution is discussed in turn in spherical coordinates, in cylindrical coordinates and in the tangent-plan approximations.

  20. Exact Steady Azimuthal Edge Waves in Rotating Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2016-09-01

    The full problem of water waves travelling along a constant sloping beach with the shoreline parallel to the Equator, written in a moving frame with the origin at a point on the rotating Earth is introduced. An exact steady solution of this problem moving only in the azimuthal direction, with no variations in this direction, is obtained. The solution is discussed in turn in spherical coordinates, in cylindrical coordinates and in the tangent-plan approximations.

  1. Surface acoustic wave micromotor with arbitrary axis rotational capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjeung, Ricky T.; Hughes, Mark S.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2011-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuated rotary motor is reported here, consisting of a millimeter-sized spherical metal rotor placed on the surface of a lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric substrate upon which the SAW is made to propagate. At the design frequency of 3.2 MHz and with a fixed preload of 41.1 μN, the maximum rotational speed and torque achieved were approximately 1900 rpm and 5.37 μN-mm, respectively, producing a maximum output power of 1.19 μW. The surface vibrations were visualized using laser Doppler vibrometry and indicate that the rotational motion arises due to retrograde elliptical motions of the piezoelectric surface elements. Rotation about orthogonal axes in the plane of the substrate has been obtained by using orthogonally placed interdigital electrodes on the substrate to generate SAW impinging on the rotor, offering a means to generate rotation about an arbitrary axis in the plane of the substrate.

  2. Spectral Modulation by Rotational Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baertschy, Mark; Hartinger, Klaus

    2005-05-01

    Periodic rephasing of molecular rotational wave packets can create rapid fluctuations in the optical properties of a molecular gas which can be used to manipulate the temporal phase and spectral content of ultrashort light pulses. We have demonstrated spectral control of a time-delayed ultrafast probe pulse propagating through the rotational wave packet prepared by a pump laser pulse. The spectrum of the probe pulse can be either broadened or compressed, depending on the relative sign of the temporal phase modulation and the initial chirp of the probe pulse. Adjustment of the spectral phase at the output of the interaction region allows controlled temporal pulse streching^1 and compression^2. The degree to which the spectrum of an ultrafast pulse can be modified depends on the strength and shape of the rotational wavepacket. We are studying the optimization of the rotational wave packet excitation with complex, shaped pump laser pulses for the purpose of optimizing probe pulse spectra modulation. ^1 Klaus Hartinger and Randy A. Bartels, Opt. Lett., submitted (2005). ^2 R.A. Bartels, T.C. Weinacht, N. Wagner, M. Baertschy, Chris H. Greene, M.M. Murnane, and H.C. Kapteyn , Phys. Rev. Lett., 88, 013903 (2002). This work was supported by the NSF.

  3. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  4. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  5. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-06

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  6. Rotating waves within a hollow vortex core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Siddiqui, Kamran; Vatistas, Georgios H.

    2011-03-01

    The rotating waves within a hollow vortex core (polygonal patterns) are generated under shallow water conditions inside a cylindrical tank by a revolving disk at its bottom. We previously reported some basic features of these polygonal patterns during transition and at the equilibrium states. The present paper includes a more comprehensive investigation into the transition process of these polygonal patterns and expands the recent partial results that have been previously reported. We show that the parent wave (or the N- gon pattern) to disk frequencies ratio is around one-third (1/3) regardless of the flow conditions . A detailed insight into the transition process from the parent wave N- gon to daughter wave ( N + 1)- gon is provided, which consists of two regimes, quasi-periodic and synchronized. Based on these observations, we explained the shrinking of the disk speed subintervals over which the N- gon patterns occur, when N increases.

  7. A consistent collinear triad approximation for operational wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, J. E.; Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Holthuijsen, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    In shallow water, the spectral evolution associated with energy transfers due to three-wave (or triad) interactions is important for the prediction of nearshore wave propagation and wave-driven dynamics. The numerical evaluation of these nonlinear interactions involves the evaluation of a weighted convolution integral in both frequency and directional space for each frequency-direction component in the wave field. For reasons of efficiency, operational wave models often rely on a so-called collinear approximation that assumes that energy is only exchanged between wave components travelling in the same direction (collinear propagation) to eliminate the directional convolution. In this work, we show that the collinear approximation as presently implemented in operational models is inconsistent. This causes energy transfers to become unbounded in the limit of unidirectional waves (narrow aperture), and results in the underestimation of energy transfers in short-crested wave conditions. We propose a modification to the collinear approximation to remove this inconsistency and to make it physically more realistic. Through comparison with laboratory observations and results from Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed modified collinear model is consistent, remains bounded, smoothly converges to the unidirectional limit, and is numerically more robust. Our results show that the modifications proposed here result in a consistent collinear approximation, which remains bounded and can provide an efficient approximation to model nonlinear triad effects in operational wave models.

  8. Micropolar modelling of rotational waves in seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Rafael; Kamm, Jochen; Reiß, Anne-Sophie

    2017-08-01

    In this contribution we study elastic wave propagation via the introduction of the micropolar theory. As a generalization of a classical linear elastic medium, a micropolar medium allows each particle to have intrinsic rotational degrees of freedom (spin). We perform numerical experiments using the Pseudospectral method. We find analytical harmonic micropolar solutions for different problem configurations, which result in waveform differences between the classical linear elastic and micropolar media. In contrast to linear elastic media, wave propagation in micropolar media is dispersive. We study how the spin waveform depends on the micropolar elastic parameters and frequency content of the simulation. The micropolar effect on numerical seismograms has a direct implication on the phase, amplitude and arrival time. For frequencies lower than the cut-off frequency, the spin waveform has the same amplitude as the macrorotation field. For frequencies higher than the cut-off frequency, the amplitude of the spin waveform decreases with increasing frequency, so that then it is no longer comparable to the amplitude of macroscopic rotations. When both frequencies are equal there is no wave propagation. This work attempts to clarify the theory of micropolar media for its applications in seismology. We argue that micropolar theory should be further investigated for its potential uses in seismology to, for example, describe energy dissipation, seismograms recorded with rotational seismometers and rupture processes.

  9. Two Timescale Approximation Applied to Gravitational Waves from Eccentric EMRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna; Hinderer, Tanja; Pound, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational-wave driven inspirals of compact objects into massive black holes (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals - EMRIs) form an interesting, long-lived signal for future space-based gravitational wave detectors. Accurate signal predictions will be necessary to take full advantage of matched filtering techniques, motivating the development of a calculational technique for deriving the gravitational wave signal to good approximation throughout the inspiral. We report on recent work on developing the two-timescale technique with the goal of predicting waveforms from eccentric equatorial systems to subleading (post-adiabatic) order in the phase, building on recent work by Pound in the scalar case. The computation requires us to understand the dissipative component of the second-order self force. It also demands careful consideration of how the two timescale (near-zone) approximation should match with the post-Minkowski approximation of the gravitational waves at great distances.

  10. Approximate formulas for rotational effects in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falamarz-Sheikhabadi, Mohammad Reza; Ghafory-Ashtiany, Mohsen

    2012-10-01

    The paper addresses the issue of researching into the engineering characteristics of rotational strong ground motion components and rotational effects in structural response. In this regard, at first, the acceleration response spectra of rotational components are estimated in terms of translational ones. Next, new methods in order to consider the effects of rotational components in seismic design codes are presented by determining the effective structural parameters in the rotational loading of structures due only to the earthquake rotational components. Numerical results show that according to the frequency content of rotational components, the contribution of the rocking components to the seismic excitation of short period structures can never be ignored. During strong earthquakes, these rotational motions may lead to the unexpected overturning or local structural damages for the low-rise multi-story buildings located on soft soil. The arrangement of lateral-load resisting system in the plan, period, and aspect ratio of the system can severely change the seismic loading of wide symmetric buildings under the earthquake torsional component.

  11. Wave Modes Trapped in Rotating Nonlinear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongyao; Pang, Wei; Malomed, Boris A.

    We study modes trapped in a rotating ring with the local strength of the nonlinearity modulated as \\cos (2θ ) , where θ is the azimuthal angle. This modulation pattern may be of three different types: self-focusing (SF), self-defocusing (SDF), and alternating SF-SDF. The model, based on the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with periodic boundary conditions, applies to the light propagation in a twisted pipe waveguide, and to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) loaded into a toroidal trap, under the action of the rotating nonlinear pseudopotential induced by means of the Feshbach resonance in an inhomogeneous external field. This is the difference from the recently considered similar setting with the rotating linear potential. In the SF, SDF, and alternating regimes, four, three, and five different types of stable trapped modes are identified, respectively: even, odd, second-harmonic (2H), symmetry-breaking, and 2H-breaking ones. The shapes and stability of these modes, together with transitions between them, are investigated in the first rotational Brillouin zone. Ground-state modes are identified in each regime. Boundaries between symmetric and asymmetric modes are also found in an analytical form, by means of a two-mode approximation.

  12. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  13. Dislocation kinetics and the acoustic-wave approximation for liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    A dislocation-dependent model for liquids describes the lattice deformation and the fluidity deformation as additive deformations. The lattice deformation represents distortions of an atom's potential energy structure and is a recoverable deformation response. The fluidity deformation represents discontinuous repositioning of atoms by dislocation kinetics in the lattice structure and is a nonrecoverable deformation response. From this model, one concludes that in liquids the acoustic-wave approximation is a description of a recoverable oscillation deformation that has dissipation because of dislocation kinetics. Other more-complex waves may exist, but such waves would rapidly disappear because of the small thermodynamic potential for dislocation kinetics in liquids.

  14. Nuclear Rotations and the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-10-27

    We deal here with the application of the Nuclear Born Oppenheimer (NBO) method to the description of nuclear rotations. As an edifying illustration, we apply the NBO formalism to study the rotational motion of nuclei which are axially-symmetric and even, but whose shells are not closed. We focus, in particular, on the derivation of expressions for the rotational energy and for the moment of inertia. Additionally, we examine the connection between the NBO method and the self-consistent cranking (SCC) model. Finally, we compare the moment of inertia generated by the NBO method with the Thouless-Valantin formula and hence establish a connection between the NBO method and the large body of experimental data.

  15. Generation of whistler waves by a rotating magnetic field source

    SciTech Connect

    Karavaev, A. V.; Gumerov, N. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, Xi; Sharma, A. S.; Gekelman, W.; Gigliotti, A.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2010-01-15

    The paper discusses the generation of polarized whistler waves radiated from a rotating magnetic field source created via a novel phased orthogonal two loop antenna. The results of linear three-dimensional electron magnetohydrodynamics simulations along with experiments on the generation whistler waves by the rotating magnetic field source performed in the large plasma device are presented. Comparison of the experimental results with the simulations and linear wave properties shows good agreement. The whistler wave dispersion relation with nonzero transverse wave number and the wave structure generated by the rotating magnetic field source are also discussed. The phase velocity of the whistler waves was found to be in good agreement with the theoretical dispersion relation. The exponential decay rate of the whistler wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field is determined by Coulomb collisions. In collisionless case the rotating magnetic field source was found to be a very efficient radiation source for transferring energy along the ambient magnetic field lines.

  16. Submillimeter-Wave Rotational Spectra of DNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, T.

    2011-06-01

    Spectroscopic investigations of DNC have been less extensive than those for HNC. See Brünken et al. and Bechtel et al. for relevant references. In the present investigation, rotational transitions of DNC have been observed in the submillimeter-wave region in an extended negative glow discharge in a gas mixture of CD_4 and N_2. The dissociative recombination reaction of DCND^+ with electrons is thought to be a dominant channel to produce DNC in highly excited vibrational states; the rotational lines in levels up to (008) are observed. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants are determined for these states along with those for the (100) state. The measurement accuracy is high enough to determine some higher order vibration-rotation interaction constants. The least-squares fits were straightforward except for (004), (006), and (008), where very small but significant perturbations were found. A striking isotope effect was observed on the vibrational temperature in this investigation. The vibrational temperature for the ν_3 mode for DNC is as high as 4000 K and the rotational transitions are observable in states up to (008), while the corresponding temperature is about 1500 K for HNC. The vibrational temperature for the ν_1 mode is about 1000 K for DNC and about 1300 K for HNC. The bending vibrational mode is not excited, and the vibrational temperature for the ν_2 mode is only about 400 K. The origin of this conspicuous excitation of the ν_3 mode of DNC is not obvious. However, it should be closely related to mechanism of the dissociation of HCNH and DCND. Apparently the difference in the masses of the departing H/D is a factor causing this difference, but the vibrational temperature for ν_3 of DCN is not particularly high, about 1000 K. When the D atom departs from the D-C side, apparently the C-N vibration is highly excited. On the other hand, when the D-N bond is broken, not much excitation of the C-N vibration occurs. S. Brünken, H. S. P. M

  17. Atmospheric planetary waves induced by solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that there are variations in the atmospheric processes with a period close to that of the rotation of the Sun (27 days). The variations are discovered in tropospheric processes, rainfalls, geopotential and in stratosphere. The main theoretical problem is the identification of the physical process by which these heterogeneous solar and meteorological phenomena are connected. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the periodic heating of the ozone layer by the short wave radiation would be the reason of excitation the 27-day oscillations. It was also assumed that excitement takes place in condition of resonance with an excited mode corresponding to the conditions present in the stratospheric circulations. The possibility is discussed of the resonant excitation and presentation is made of the data analysis results which support this idea.

  18. Spin waves on chains of YIG particles: dispersion relations, Faraday rotation, and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Nicholas A.; Stroud, David

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the dispersion relations for spin waves on a periodic chain of spherical or cylindrical Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) particles. We use the quasistatic approximation, appropriate when kd ≪ 1, where k is the wave number and d the interparticle spacing. In this regime, because of the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between the localized magnetic excitations on neighboring particles, dispersive spin waves can propagate along the chain. The waves are analogous to plasmonic waves generated by electric dipole-dipole interactions between plasmons on neighboring metallic particles. The spin waves can be longitudinal (L), transverse (T), or elliptically polarized. We find that a linearly polarized spin wave undergoes a Faraday rotation as it propagates along the chain. The amount of Faraday rotation can be tuned by varying the off-diagonal component of the permeability tensor. We also discuss the possibility of wireless power transmission along the chain using these coupled spin waves.

  19. Higher order parabolic approximations of the reduced wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions of order k to the nth are developed for the reduced wave equation. Here k is a dimensionless wave number and n is the arbitrary order of the approximation. These approximations are an extension of geometric acoustics theory, and provide corrections to that theory in the form of multiplicative functions which satisfy parabolic partial differential equations. These corrections account for the diffraction effects caused by variation of the field normal to the ray path and the interaction of these transverse variations with the variation of the field along the ray. The theory is applied to the example of radiation from a piston, and it is demonstrated that the higher order approximations are more accurate for decreasing values of k.

  20. An approximate global solution of Einstein's equations for a differentially rotating compact body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, A.; Ruiz, E.

    2017-10-01

    We obtain an approximate global stationary and axisymmetric solution of Einstein's equations which can be thought of as a simple star model: a self-gravitating perfect fluid ball with a differential rotation motion pattern. Using the post-Minkowskian formalism (weak-field approximation) and considering rotation as a perturbation (slow-rotation approximation), we find approximate interior and exterior (asymptotically flat) solutions to this problem in harmonic coordinates. Interior and exterior solutions are matched, in the sense described by Lichnerowicz, on the surface of zero pressure, to obtain a global solution. The resulting metric depends on four arbitrary constants: mass density; rotational velocity at r=0; a parameter that accounts for the change in rotational velocity through the star; and the star radius in the non-rotation limit. The mass, angular momentum, quadrupole moment and other constants of the exterior metric are determined in terms of these four parameters.

  1. Properties of rotational bands at the spin limit in A {approximately} 50, A {approximately} 65 and A {approximately} 110 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, V.P.; Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    There is now widespread evidence for the smooth termination of rotational bands in A {approx_equal} 110 nuclei at spins of 40-to-50{Dirac_h}s. The characteristics of these bands are compared to those of bands recently observed to high spin in {sup 64}Zn and {sup 48}Cr, studied with the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer coupled to the Chalk River miniball charged-particle-detector array.

  2. Anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation modeling using parabolic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. I.; Siegmann, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.; Jacyna, G. M.

    1990-12-01

    A new method for the investigation of anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere is developed using parabolic approximations. Model equations for the electric field components are formulated which include the effects of both the inhomogeneous atmosphere and the static magnetic field of the earth. Application of parabolic-type approximations produces different systems of coupled parabolic equations. Each is valid for different relative magnitudes of components of the electric field. All admissible cases are then synthesized into one system which can be numerically examined, yielding solutions without a priori knowledge of electric field ratios. A specific example is presented and examined to understand static magnetic field effects on electromagnetic wave propagation. The influences of the earth's magnetic field are discussed and displayed in terms of electric components and the Poynting vector. Results demonstrate that the geomagnetic field can significantly influence HF atmospheric propagation.

  3. Investigation on the propagation process of rotating detonation wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Ma, Hu; Xu, Can; Zhou, Changsheng; Liu, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Effects of mass flow rate and equivalence ratio on the wave speed performance and instantaneous pressure characteristics of rotating detonation wave are investigated using hydrogen and air mixtures. The interaction between air and fuel manifolds and combustion chamber is also identified. The results show that the rotating detonation waves are able to adapt themselves to the changes of equivalence ratio during the run, the rotating detonation waves decayed gradually and then quenched after the shutdown of reactants supply. The wave speed performance is closely related to the mass flow rate and the pressure ratio of the fuel to air manifolds at different equivalence ratios. The blockage ratio of the air manifold increases with the increasing of the wave speed due to high-pressure detonation products, while increasing of the equivalence ratios will reduce the blockage ratio of the hydrogen manifold. Higher equivalence ratio can enhance the stabilization of the rotating detonation wave and lower equivalence ratio will lead to the large fluctuations of the lap time and instantaneous pressure magnitude. The overpressure of rotating detonation wave is determined by the combination of mass flow rate and equivalence ratio, which increases with the increasing of mass flow rate in the equivalence ratio ranges that the rotating detonation wave propagates stably. The secondary spike in the instantaneous pressure and ionization signals indicates that a shocked mixing zone exists near the fuel injection holes and the reflection of shock in the mixing zone induces the reaction.

  4. Dynamical cluster approximation plus semiclassical approximation study for a Mott insulator and d-wave pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, SungKun; Lee, Hunpyo

    2017-06-01

    Via a dynamical cluster approximation with N c = 4 in combination with a semiclassical approximation (DCA+SCA), we study the doped two-dimensional Hubbard model. We obtain a plaquette antiferromagnetic (AF) Mott insulator, a plaquette AF ordered metal, a pseudogap (or d-wave superconductor) and a paramagnetic metal by tuning the doping concentration. These features are similar to the behaviors observed in copper-oxide superconductors and are in qualitative agreement with the results calculated by the cluster dynamical mean field theory with the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CDMFT+CTQMC) approach. The results of our DCA+SCA differ from those of the CDMFT+CTQMC approach in that the d-wave superconducting order parameters are shown even in the high doped region, unlike the results of the CDMFT+CTQMC approach. We think that the strong plaquette AF orderings in the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) with N c = 4 suppress superconducting states with increasing doping up to strongly doped region, because frozen dynamical fluctuations in a semiclassical approximation (SCA) approach are unable to destroy those orderings. Our calculation with short-range spatial fluctuations is initial research, because the SCA can manage long-range spatial fluctuations in feasible computational times beyond the CDMFT+CTQMC tool. We believe that our future DCA+SCA calculations should supply information on the fully momentum-resolved physical properties, which could be compared with the results measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments.

  5. Frozen Gaussian approximation for 3-D seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in 3-D earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a 3-D seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3-D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model, respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3-D crust-over-mantle model.

  6. Frozen Gaussian approximation for three-dimensional seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in three-dimensional earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a three-dimensional (3D) seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3D crust-over-mantle model.

  7. Non-Hermitian wave packet approximation of Bloch optical equations

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Eric; Sukharev, Maxim

    2013-01-14

    We introduce a non-Hermitian approximation of Bloch optical equations. This approximation provides a complete description of the excitation, relaxation, and decoherence dynamics of ensembles of coupled quantum systems in weak laser fields, taking into account collective effects and dephasing. In the proposed method, one propagates the wave function of the system instead of a complete density matrix. Relaxation and dephasing are taken into account via automatically adjusted time-dependent gain and decay rates. As an application, we compute the numerical wave packet solution of a time-dependent non-Hermitian Schroedinger equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a quantum nano-structure, and compare the calculated transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra with those obtained from the numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. It is shown that the proposed wave packet scheme is significantly faster than the propagation of the full density matrix while maintaining small error. We provide the key ingredients for easy-to-use implementation of the proposed scheme and identify the limits and error scaling of this approximation.

  8. Single-photon scattering with counter rotating wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi-Kai; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Z. H.; Zhou, D. L.

    2017-07-01

    Recent experiments have pushed the studies on atom-photon interactions to the ultrastrong regime, which motivates the exploration of physics beyond the rotation wave approximation. Here we study the single-photon scattering on a system composed of a coupling cavity array with a two-level atom in the center cavity, which, by varying two outside coupling parameters, corresponds to a model from a supercavity (SC) QED to a waveguide QED with counter rotating wave (CRW) interaction. By applying a time-independent scattering theory based on the bound states in the scattering region, we find that the CRW interaction obviously changes the transmission valley even in the weak atom-cavity coupling regime; in particular, the CRW interaction leads to an inelastic scattering process and a Fano-type resonance, which is directly observed in the crossover from the SC-QED case to the waveguide QED case. Predictably, our findings provide the potential of manipulating the CRW effects in realistic systems and pave the way for the numerical study of very general QED systems.

  9. Phase shift approximation for the post-critical seismic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhongjie; Xu, Tao; Bai, Zhiming; Harris, Jerry M.

    2012-10-01

    Post-critical seismic waves are widely used in crustal exploration of the seismic velocity structure, and are gaining interest in the oil/gas seismic community to image the deeper structure beneath the high velocity basalt layer. They are featured with their phase shifts and strength changes, which should be taken into account in seismic data processing, such as velocity analysis and true amplitude migration, etc. In order to simplify the exact but complicated formula of reflection and transmission coefficients, numerous approximate expressions for reflection and transmission coefficients for pre-critical incidence are obtained. In the post-critical case, there is Downton's approximation with acceptable accuracy approximation when the velocity changes smoothly. However if the velocity model changes rapidly, the error will be relatively very large, limiting the use of the approach. In order to improve the post-critical approximation, we utilize Taylor expansion of ray parameters with angle increment (compared to critical angle) in wide-angle seismic reflection and transmission coefficients. The explicit expressions for amplitude and phase shift (time shift) for the post-critical incident angle are obtained. Our results confirm that the wide-angle seismic reflection/transmission phase shifts are strongly frequency dependent; phase shifts of low frequency wide-angle seismic waves are more predominant and their correction should be considered in seismic processing and imaging. Numerical examples demonstrate that (1) the accuracies of these approximations are high compared to the classic Aki's formula and Downton's approximation, and (2) the wide-angle effect can be effectively reduced with phase-shift correction by utilizing our time-shift approximation to the seismic traveltimes.

  10. Dissipative effects on nonlinear waves in rotating fluids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.; Randall, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Modifications to the existing inviscid theory of long-wave propagation in rotating fluids are studied. A modification to the Korteweg-deVries equation is found to describe weak dissipation in long waves in a swirling fluid. General features of solutions are discussed, and a solution for the damping of solitary waves is presented.

  11. Helicity-rotation-gravity coupling for gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jairzinho; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2006-04-15

    The consequences of spin-rotation-gravity coupling are worked out for linear gravitational waves. The coupling of helicity of the wave with the rotation of a gravitational-wave antenna is investigated and the resulting modifications in the Doppler effect and aberration are pointed out for incident high-frequency gravitational radiation. Extending these results to the case of a gravitomagnetic field via the gravitational Larmor theorem, the rotation of linear polarization of gravitational radiation propagating in the field of a rotating mass is studied. It is shown that in this case the linear polarization state rotates by twice the Skrotskii angle as a consequence of the spin-2 character of linear gravitational waves.

  12. Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    It is known that commercially-available terahertz (THz) emitters usually generate linearly polarized waves only along certain directions, but in practice, a polarization rotator that is capable of rotating the polarization of THz waves to any direction is particularly desirable and it will have various important applications. In this work, we demonstrate a freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband THz waves using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized THz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. The device performance has been experimentally demonstrated by both THz transmission spectra and direct imaging. The polarization rotation originates from multi wave interference in the three-layer grating structure based on the scattering-matrix analysis. We can expect that this active broadband polarization rotator has wide applications in analytical chemistry, biology, communication technology, imaging, etc.. Reference: R. H. Fan, Y. Zhou, X. P. Ren, R. W. Peng, S. C. Jiang, D. H. Xu, X. Xiong, X. R. Huang, and Mu Wang, Advanced Materials 27,1201(2015). Freely-tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

  13. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  14. Curvilinear parabolic approximation for surface wave transformation with wave-current interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Fengyan . E-mail: fyshi@coastal.udel.edu; Kirby, James T.

    2005-04-10

    The direct coordinate transformation method, which only transforms independent variables and retains Cartesian dependent variables, may not be an appropriate method for the purpose of simplifying the curvilinear parabolic approximation of the vector form of the wave-current equation given by Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. In this paper, the covariant-contravariant tensor method is used for the curvilinear parabolic approximation. We use the covariant components of the wave number vector and contravariant components of the current velocity vector so that the derivation of the curvilinear equation closely follows the higher-order approximation in rectangular Cartesian coordinates in Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. The resulting curvilinear equation can be easily implemented using the existing model structure and numerical schemes adopted in the Cartesian parabolic wave model [J.T. Kirby, R.A. Dalrymple, F. Shi, Combined Refraction/Diffraction Model REF/DIF 1, Version 2.6. Documentation and User's Manual, Research Report, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, 2004]. Several examples of wave simulations in curvilinear coordinate systems, including a case with wave-current interaction, are shown with comparisons to theoretical solutions or measurement data.

  15. Curvilinear parabolic approximation for surface wave transformation with wave current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2005-04-01

    The direct coordinate transformation method, which only transforms independent variables and retains Cartesian dependent variables, may not be an appropriate method for the purpose of simplifying the curvilinear parabolic approximation of the vector form of the wave-current equation given by Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. In this paper, the covariant-contravariant tensor method is used for the curvilinear parabolic approximation. We use the covariant components of the wave number vector and contravariant components of the current velocity vector so that the derivation of the curvilinear equation closely follows the higher-order approximation in rectangular Cartesian coordinates in Kirby [Higher-order approximations in the parabolic equation method for water waves, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 933-952]. The resulting curvilinear equation can be easily implemented using the existing model structure and numerical schemes adopted in the Cartesian parabolic wave model [J.T. Kirby, R.A. Dalrymple, F. Shi, Combined Refraction/Diffraction Model REF/DIF 1, Version 2.6. Documentation and User's Manual, Research Report, Center for Applied Coastal Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, 2004]. Several examples of wave simulations in curvilinear coordinate systems, including a case with wave-current interaction, are shown with comparisons to theoretical solutions or measurement data.

  16. Circularly polarized few-cycle optical rogue waves: Rotating reduced Maxwell-Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K.; He, Jingsong; Cheng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The rotating reduced Maxwell-Bloch (RMB) equations, which describe the propagation of few-cycle optical pulses in a transparent media with two isotropic polarized electronic field components, are derived from a system of complete Maxwell-Bloch equations without using the slowly varying envelope approximations. Two hierarchies of the obtained rational solutions, including rogue waves, which are also called few-cycle optical rogue waves, of the rotating RMB equations are constructed explicitly through degenerate Darboux transformation. In addition to the above, the dynamical evolution of the first-, second-, and third-order few-cycle optical rogue waves are constructed with different patterns. For an electric field E in the three lower-order rogue waves, we find that rogue waves correspond to localized large amplitude oscillations of the polarized electric fields. Further a complementary relationship of two electric field components of rogue waves is discussed in terms of analytical formulas as well as numerical figures.

  17. Distorted Wave Born Approximation for scattering from rough magnetic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Richard; Sinha, Sunil; Freeland, John W.; Nelson, Christie S.

    2000-03-01

    Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering has been used to elicit the magnetic properties of surfaces and multilayer interfaces. Recently, it was found that the magnetic roughness of a single Co layer was larger than its chemical roughness.^1,2 Calculations using first-order perturbation theory and the vector wave equation (the Born Approximation) found that, in the absence of any correlation between the magnetic and structural roughness, there is no contribution to the difference in the diffuse magnetic scattering from x-rays circularly polarized in opposite senses relative to the direction of magnetization.^3 The diffuse magnetic resonant x-ray scattering from Fe/Gd multilayers has been measured;^4 fits to the data (using the Born Approximation) result in longer correlation lengths for charge-magnetic roughness than for charge roughness. We go beyond the current model to the Distorted Wave Born Approximation and simulate the diffuse magnetic scattering from various experimental systems studied to date. ^1 J.F. MacKay, C. Teichert, D.E. Savage, M.G. Lagally, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3925 (1996). ^2 J.W. Freeland, K. Bussmann, Y.U. Idzerda, C.-C. Kao Phys. Rev. B 60, R9923 (1999). ^3 R.M. Osgood III, S.K. Sinha, J.W. Freeland, S.D. Bader, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 4619 (1998). ^4 C.S. Nelson et al. Phys. Rev. B 60, 12234 (1999).

  18. Rossby wave extra invariant in the Galerkin approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2017-08-01

    The non-linear system of Rossby waves or plasma drift waves is known to have a unique adiabatic-like extra invariant in addition to the energy and enstrophy. This invariant is physically significant because its presence implies the generation of zonal flow. The latter is known to slow down the anomalous transport of temperature and particles in nuclear fusion with magnetic confinement. However, the derivation of the extra invariant - unlike the energy and enstrophy - is based on the continuum of resonances, while in numerical simulations there are only finite number of resonances. We show that precisely the same invariant takes place in the Galerkin approximations (even of low order, with a few ODEs). To show this we make variation of boundary conditions, when the solution is periodic in different directions. We also simplify the derivation of the extra conservation.

  19. Approximations in seismic interferometry and their effects on surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.; Trampert, J.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate common approximations and assumptions in seismic interferometry. The interferometric equation, valid for the full elastic wavefield, gives the Green's function between two arbitrary points by cross-correlating signals recorded at each point. The relation is exact, even for complicated lossless media, provided the signals are generated on a closed surface surrounding the two points and are from both unidirectional point-forces and deformation-rate-tensor sources. A necessary approximation to the exact interferometric equation is the use of signals from point-force sources only. Even in simple layered media, the Green's function retrieval can then be imperfect, especially for waves other than fundamental mode surface waves. We show that this is due to cross terms between different modes that occur even if a full source boundary is present. When sources are located at the free surface only, a realistic scenario for ambient noise, the cross terms can overwhelm the higher mode surface waves. Sources then need to be very far away, or organized in a band rather than a surrounding surface to overcome this cross-term problem. If sources are correlated, convergence of higher modes is very hard to achieve. In our examples of simultaneously acting sources, the phase of the higher modes only converges correctly towards the true solution if sources are acting in the stationary phase regions. This offers an explanation for some recent body wave observations, where only interstation paths in-line with the prevailing source direction were considered. The phase error resulting from incomplete distributions around the stationary phase region generally leads to an error smaller than 1 per cent for realistic applications.

  20. An approximate solution for the free vibrations of rotating uniform cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate solutions are obtained for the uncoupled frequencies and modes of rotating uniform cantilever beams. The frequency approximations for flab bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion are simple expressions having errors of less than a few percent over the entire frequency range. These expressions provide a simple way of determining the relations between mass and stiffness parameters and the resultant frequencies and mode shapes of rotating uniform beams.

  1. Generation of limited-diffraction wave by approximating theoretical X-wave with simple driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaqin; Ding, MingYue; Hua, Shaoyan; Ming, Yuchi

    2012-03-01

    X-wave is a particular case of limited diffracting waves which has great potential applications in the enlargement of the field depth in acoustic imaging systems. In practice, the generation of real time X-wave ultrasonic fields is a complex technology which involves precise and specific voltage for the excitations for each distinct array element. In order to simplify the X-wave generating process, L. Castellanos proposed an approach to approximate the X-wave excitations with rectangular pulses. The results suggested the possibility of achieving limited-diffraction waves with relatively simple driving waveforms, which could be implemented with a moderate cost in analogical electronics. In this work, we attempt to improve L. Castellanos's method by calculating the approximation driving pulse not only from rectangular but also triangular driving pulse. The differences between theoretical X-wave signals and driving pulses, related to their excitation effects, are minimized by L2 curve criterion. The driving pulses with the minimal optimization result we chosen. A tradeoff is obtained between the cost of implementation of classical 0-order X-wave and the precision of approximation with the simple pulsed electrical driving. The good agreement of the driving pulse and the result resulting field distributions, with those obtained from the classical X-wave excitations can be justified by the filtering effects induced by the transducer elements in frequency domain. From the simulation results, we can see that the new approach improve the precise of the approximation, the difference between theoretical X-wave and the new approach is lower 10 percent than the difference between theoretical X-wave and rectangular as the driving pulse in simulation.

  2. The Submillimeter-wave Rotational Spectra of Interstellar Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, Eric; DeLucia, Frank C.; Butler, R. A. H.; Winnewisser, M.; Winnewisser, G.; Fuchs, U.; Groner, P.; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss past and recent progress in our long-term laboratory program concerning the submillimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy of known and likely interstellar molecules, especially those associated with regions of high-mass star formation. Our program on the use of spectroscopy to study rotationally inelastic collisions of interstellar interest is also briefly mentioned.

  3. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  4. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Wave Functions for Rotating Molecule: Plot of Spherical Harmonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Teramae, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Umpei

    2013-01-01

    At an early stage of learning quantum chemistry, undergraduate students usually encounter the concepts of the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, and then the particle on a sphere. Rotational levels of a diatomic molecule can be well approximated by the energy levels of the particle on a sphere. Wave functions for the particle in a…

  5. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Wave Functions for Rotating Molecule: Plot of Spherical Harmonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Teramae, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Umpei

    2013-01-01

    At an early stage of learning quantum chemistry, undergraduate students usually encounter the concepts of the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, and then the particle on a sphere. Rotational levels of a diatomic molecule can be well approximated by the energy levels of the particle on a sphere. Wave functions for the particle in a…

  6. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-01

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  7. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, A. J. Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  8. Extreme-ultraviolet observations of global coronal wave rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, G. D. R.; Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2014-11-20

    We present evidence of global coronal wave rotation in EUV data from SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The sense of rotation is found to be consistent with the helicity of the source region (clockwise for positive helicity, anticlockwise for negative helicity), with the source regions hosting sigmoidal structures. We also study two coronal wave events observed by SDO/AIA where no clear rotation (or sigmoid) is observed. The selected events show supporting evidence that they all originate with flux rope eruptions. We make comparisons across this set of observations (both with and without clear sigmoidal structures). On examining the magnetic configuration of the source regions, we find that the nonrotation events possess a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The coronal waves that do show a rotation originate from bipolar source regions.

  9. Restoration of Surface Waves Elevation Using the 5-th Order Stokes Waves Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Vasily; Nudner, Igor; Semenov, Konstantin; Titova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    It is very useful from the engineering point of view to get the way to recalculate the pressure values measured inside the liquid to the elevation of the free surface. Up to now this problem, despite its obvious importance, has not received any satisfactory solution. This is mostly due to the fact that the waves on the surface may have a different nature and complex degree of description. In our study, we examined both theoretically and experimentally the ability to restore the elevation of the free surface, using the data for the pressure within the fluid in the case of nonlinear periodic waves. We have seen how the wave surface elevation restores using the first, third, and fifth approximations for Stokes waves. The algorithm of wave height restoration is presented for each order from the list above. We examined how the measurements errors propagate through our algorithms of wave height restoration with Monte-Carlo techniques. The experiments were fulfilled in the hydro flume having 40 m length, 1.0 m width, and 1.2 m height. The depth of fluid was 0.6 m. The shield-type wavemaker produced the periodic waves having large amplitude. The wave height was varied in the range of 4 to 22 cm. The wave periods were from 1.0 to 2.6 sec. The wave steepness was from 0.006 to 0.064. Depth of the liquid was 66 cm. In the experiments, we have measured the pressure wave at about half the depth (more precisely, at a depth of 26.5 cm) and at the bottom. The free surface elevation was measured directly by wavemeter. The comparison of experimental and numerical data shows clearly that theoretical results describe satisfactory the physics of the problem. The rules for the selection of varying order of approximation depending on the measurement accuracy of the initial parameters are proposed.

  10. Rotating solitary wave at the wall of a cylindrical container.

    PubMed

    Amaouche, Mustapha; Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Vatistas, Georgios H

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of a rotating solitary surface wave that was observed during water drainage from a cylindrical reservoir, when shallow water conditions were reached. It represents an improvement of our previous study, where the radial flow perturbation was neglected. This assumption led to the classical planar Korteweg-de Vries equation for the wall wave profile, which did not account for the rotational character of the base flow. The present formulation is based on a less restricting condition and consequently corrects the last shortcoming. Now the influence of the background flow appears in the wave characteristics. The theory provides a better physical depiction of the unique experiment by predicting fairly well the wave profile at least in the first half of its lifetime and estimating the speed of the observed wave with good accuracy.

  11. Excitation and propagation of nonlinear waves in a rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi

    1993-09-01

    A numerical study of the nonlinear waves excited in an axisymmetric rotating flow through a circular tube is described. The waves are excited by either an undulation of the tube wall or an obstacle on the axis of the tube. The results are compared with the weakly nonlinear theory (forced KdV equation). The computations are done when the upstream swirling velocity is that of Burgers' vortex type. The flow behaves like the solution of the forced KdV equation, and the upstream advancing of the waves appear even when the flow is critical or slightly supercritical to the fastest inertial wave mode.

  12. Millimetre Wave Rotational Spectrum of Glycolic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczolkowski, Lech; Bialkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of glycolic acid, CH2OHCOOH, was studied in the region 115-318 GHz. For the most stable SSC conformer, transitions in all vibrational states up to 400 cm(exp -1) have been measured and their analysis is reported. The data sets for the ground state, v21 = 1, and v21 = 2 have been considerably extended. Immediately higher in vibrational energy are two triads of interacting vibrational states and their rotational transitions have been assigned and successfully fitted with coupled Hamiltonians accounting for Fermi and Coriolis resonances. The derived energy level spacings establish that the vibrational frequency of the v21 mode is close to 100 cm(exp -1). The existence of the less stable AAT conformer in the near 50 C sample used in our experiment was also confirmed and additional transitions have been measured.

  13. Millimetre Wave Rotational Spectrum of Glycolic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczolkowski, Lech; Bialkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of glycolic acid, CH2OHCOOH, was studied in the region 115-318 GHz. For the most stable SSC conformer, transitions in all vibrational states up to 400 cm(exp -1) have been measured and their analysis is reported. The data sets for the ground state, v21 = 1, and v21 = 2 have been considerably extended. Immediately higher in vibrational energy are two triads of interacting vibrational states and their rotational transitions have been assigned and successfully fitted with coupled Hamiltonians accounting for Fermi and Coriolis resonances. The derived energy level spacings establish that the vibrational frequency of the v21 mode is close to 100 cm(exp -1). The existence of the less stable AAT conformer in the near 50 C sample used in our experiment was also confirmed and additional transitions have been measured.

  14. Millimetre wave rotational spectrum of glycolic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Białkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-03-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of glycolic acid, CH2OHCOOH, was studied in the region 115-318 GHz. For the most stable SSC conformer, transitions in all vibrational states up to 400 cm-1 have been measured and their analysis is reported. The data sets for the ground state, v21 = 1 , and v21 = 2 have been considerably extended. Immediately higher in vibrational energy are two triads of interacting vibrational states and their rotational transitions have been assigned and successfully fitted with coupled Hamiltonians accounting for Fermi and Coriolis resonances. The derived energy level spacings establish that the vibrational frequency of the ν21 mode is close to 100 cm-1. The existence of the less stable AAT conformer in the near 50 °C sample used in our experiment was also confirmed and additional transitions have been measured.

  15. APPROXIMATION OF ROTATIONAL STRENGTHS FROM MOLAR ROTATION DATA AND GENERATION OF ROTATORY DISPERSION CURVES FOR D-CAMPHOR-10-SULFONATE

    PubMed Central

    Urry, Dan W.

    1969-01-01

    Starting with the expression for optical rotatory dispersion in the absorption region that was arrived at by Condon, two series were considered for the purpose of achieving the experimentally observed, steeper wavelength dependence in the absorption region while retaining the established 1/λ2 law in regions removed from absorption. The first two terms of one series in which the second term exhibits a 1/λ6 wavelength dependence were found to calculate satisfactorily the optical rotatory dispersion curve of d-camphor-10-sulfonate from 400 mμ to 190 mμ when only three bands were considered. Evaluated at the extrema, the two-term expression can be approximated by a simple equation which allows calculation of the rotational strength of a nonoverlapping band by using only the wavelength and molar rotation of the extrema and the index of refraction of the solution. The rotational strengths calculated from optical rotatory dispersion data in this manner closely agree with those calculated from corresponding circular dichroism data. Thus when position and magnitude of rotatory dispersion extrema alone are reported for carbonyls, it is suggested that such published data may be converted to approximate rotational strengths. PMID:5257123

  16. Airy pattern approximation of a phased microphone array response to a rotating point source.

    PubMed

    Debrouwere, Maarten; Angland, David

    2017-02-01

    Deconvolution of phased microphone array source maps is a commonly applied technique in order to improve the dynamic range and resolution of beamforming. Most deconvolution algorithms require a point spread function (PSF). In this work, it is shown that the conventional definition of the PSF, based on steering vectors, is changed when the source is rotating. The effect of rotation results in an increase in the resolution and aperture of the array. The concept of virtual array positions created by source rotation is used to derive an approximation of the PSF based on an Airy pattern. The Airy pattern approximation is suitable for use in deconvolution of rotating source maps as it is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the conventional PSF definition. The proposed Airy pattern approximation was tested with both CLEAN and DAMAS deconvolution algorithms. On the same hardware, it was significantly faster when compared to the conventional definition. The limitations of the Airy pattern approximation are shown in a synthesized broadband test case with a high dynamic range. However, in most practical beamforming applications, the proposed Airy pattern approximated PSF for deconvolution is a suitable option considering its accuracy and speed.

  17. Can the slow-rotation approximation be used in electromagnetic observations of black holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayzenberg, Dimitry; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    Future electromagnetic observations of black holes (BHs) may allow us to test general relativity (GR) in the strong-field regime. Such tests, however, require knowledge of rotating BH solutions in modified gravity theories, a class of which does not admit the Kerr metric as a solution. Several rotating BH solutions in modified theories have only been found in the slow-rotation approximation (i.e. assuming the spin angular momentum is much smaller than the mass squared). We here investigate whether the systematic error due to the approximate nature of these BH metrics is small enough relative to the observational error to allow their use in electromagnetic observations to constrain deviations from GR. We address this by considering whether electromagnetic observables constructed from a slow-rotation approximation to the Kerr metric can fit observables constructed from the full Kerr metric with systematic errors smaller than current observational errors. We focus on BH shadow and continuum spectrum observations, as these are the least influenced by accretion disk physics, with current observational errors of about 10%. We find that the fractional systematic error introduced by using a second-order, slowly rotating Kerr metric is at most 2% for shadows created by BHs with dimensionless spins χ ≤slant 0.6. We also find that the systematic error introduced by using the slowly rotating Kerr metric as an exact metric when constructing continuum spectrum observables is negligible for BHs with dimensionless spins of χ ≲ 0.9. Our results suggest that the modified gravity solutions found in the slow-rotation approximation may be used to constrain realistic deviations from GR with continuum spectrum and BH shadow observations.

  18. Efficiency of wave-driven rigid body rotation toroidal confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rax, J. M.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-03-01

    The compensation of vertical drifts in toroidal magnetic fields through a wave-driven poloidal rotation is compared with compensation through the wave driven toroidal current generation to support the classical magnetic rotational transform. The advantages and drawbacks associated with the sustainment of a radial electric field are compared with those associated with the sustainment of a poloidal magnetic field both in terms of energy content and power dissipation. The energy content of a radial electric field is found to be smaller than the energy content of a poloidal magnetic field for a similar set of orbits. The wave driven radial electric field generation efficiency is similarly shown, at least in the limit of large aspect ratio, to be larger than the efficiency of wave-driven toroidal current generation.

  19. The effect of lower hybrid waves on JET plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, M. F. F.; Kirov, K.; Bernardo, J.; Brix, M.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hellsten, T.; Jonsson, T.; Mailloux, J.; Ongena, J.; Parra, F.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on observations of rotation in JET plasmas with lower hybrid current drive. Lower hybrid (LH) has a clear impact on rotation. The changes in core rotation can be either in the co- or counter-current directions. Experimental features that could determine the direction of rotation were investigated. Changes from co- to counter-rotation as the q-profile evolves from above unity to below unity suggests that magnetic shear could be important. However, LH can drive either co- or counter-rotation in discharges with similar magnetic shear and at the same plasma current. It is not clear if a slightly lower density is significant. A power scan at fixed density, shows a lower hybrid power threshold around 3 MW. For smaller LH powers, counter rotation increases with power, while for larger powers a trend towards co-rotation is found. The estimated counter-torque from the LH waves, would not explain the observed angular frequencies, neither would it explain the observation of co-rotation.

  20. Inertial wave beams and inertial wave modes in a rotating cylinder with time-modulated rotation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, Ion D.; Ghasemi V., Abouzar; Harlander, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Inertial gravity waves play an crucial role in atmospheres, oceans, and the fluid inside of planets and moons. In the atmosphere, the effect of rotation is neglected for small wavelength and the waves bear the character of internal gravity waves. For long waves, the hydrostatic assumption is made which in turn makes the atmosphere inelastic with respect to inertial motion. In contrast, in the Earth's interior, pure inertial waves are considered as an important fundamental part of the motion. Moreover, as the deep ocean is nearly homogeneous, there the inertial gravity waves bear the character of inertial waves. Excited at the oceans surface mainly due to weather systems the waves can propagate downward and influence the deep oceans motion. In the light of the aforesaid it is important to understand better fundamental inertial wave dynamics. We investigate inertial wave modes by experimental and numerical methods. Inertial modes are excited in a fluid filled rotating annulus by modulating the rotation rate of the outer cylinder and the upper and lower lids. This forcing leads to inertial wave beams emitted from the corner regions of the annulus due to periodic motions in the boundary layers (Klein et al., 2013). When the forcing frequency matches with the eigenfrequency of the rotating annulus the beam pattern amplitude is increasing, the beams broaden and mode structures can be observed (Borcia et al., 2013a). The eigenmodes are compared with analytical solutions of the corresponding inviscid problem (Borcia et al, 2013b). In particular for the pressure field a good agreement can be found. However, shear layers related to the excited wave beams are present for all frequencies. This becomes obvious in particular in the experimental visualizations that are done by using Kalliroscope particles, highlighting relative motion in the fluid. Comparing the eigenfrequencies we find that relative to the analytical frequencies, the experimental and numerical ones show a small

  1. A Generalized Multiple Discrete Interaction Approximation for resonant four-wave interactions in wind wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolman, Hendrik L.

    2013-10-01

    For several decades, the Discrete Interaction Approximation (DIA) for nonlinear resonant four-wave interactions has been the engine of third-generation wind-wave models. The present study presents a Generalized Multiple DIA (GMD) which expands upon the DIA by (i) expanding the definition of the representative quadruplet, (ii) formulating the DIA for arbitrary water depths, (iii) providing complimentary deep and shallow water scaling terms and (iv) allowing for multiple representative quadruplets. The GMD is rigorously derived to be an extension of the DIA, and is backward compatible with it. The free parameters of the GMD are optimized holistically, by optimizing full model behavior in the WAVEWATCH III® wave model as reported in a companion paper. Here, a cascade of GMD configurations with increasing complexity, accuracy and cost is presented. First, the performance of these configurations is discussed using idealized test cases used to optimize the GMD. It is shown that in deep water, GMD configurations can be found which remove most of the errors of the DIA. The GMD is also capable of representing four-wave interactions in extremely shallow water, although some remaining spurious behavior makes applications of this part of the GMD less suitable for operational wave models. Finally, several GMD configurations are applied to an idealized hurricane case, showing that results from idealized test cases indeed are representative for real-world applications, and confirming that such GMD configurations are economically feasible in operational wind wave models. Finally, the DIA results in surprisingly large model errors in hurricane conditions.

  2. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. I - Rotational transitions in the sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The impact parameter method and the sudden approximation are applied to determine the total probability of inelastic rotational transitions arising from a collision of an atom and a homonuclear diatomic molecule at large impact parameters. An analytical approximation to this probability is found for conditions where the electron exchange or overlap forces dominate the scattering. An approximate upper bound to the range of impact parameters for which rotational scattering can be important is determined. In addition, an estimate of the total inelastic cross section is found at conditions for which a statistical model describes the scattering well. The results of this analysis are applied to Ar-O2 collisions and may be readily applied to other combinations of atoms and molecules.

  3. Gravitational wave content and stability of uniformly, rotating, triaxial neutron stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokaros, Antonios; Ruiz, Milton; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Baiotti, Luca; Uryō, Kūji

    2017-06-01

    Targets for ground-based gravitational wave interferometers include continuous, quasiperiodic sources of gravitational radiation, such as isolated, spinning neutron stars. In this work, we perform evolution simulations of uniformly rotating, triaxially deformed stars, the compressible analogs in general relativity of incompressible, Newtonian Jacobi ellipsoids. We investigate their stability and gravitational wave emission. We employ five models, both normal and supramassive, and track their evolution with different grid setups and resolutions, as well as with two different evolution codes. We find that all models are dynamically stable and produce a strain that is approximately one-tenth the average value of a merging binary system. We track their secular evolution and find that all our stars evolve toward axisymmetry, maintaining their uniform rotation, rotational kinetic energy, and angular momentum profiles while losing their triaxiality.

  4. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations.

  5. Comparisons of characteristic timescales and approximate models for Brownian magnetic nanoparticle rotations

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising tools for a host of therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. The dynamics of rotating magnetic nanoparticles in applied magnetic fields depend strongly on the type and strength of the field applied. There are two possible rotation mechanisms and the decision for the dominant mechanism is often made by comparing the equilibrium relaxation times. This is a problem when particles are driven with high-amplitude fields because they are not necessarily at equilibrium at all. Instead, it is more appropriate to consider the “characteristic timescales” that arise in various applied fields. Approximate forms for the characteristic time of Brownian particle rotations do exist and we show agreement between several analytical and phenomenological-fit models to simulated data from a stochastic Langevin equation approach. We also compare several approximate models with solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation to determine their range of validity for general fields and relaxation times. The effective field model is an excellent approximation, while the linear response solution is only useful for very low fields and frequencies for realistic Brownian particle rotations. PMID:26130846

  6. Waves and linear stability of magnetoconvection in a rotating cylindrical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, K.; Takehiro, S.; Shimizu, H.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a rapidly rotating planetary core can cause the magnetic secular variation. To strengthen our understanding of the physical basis, we revisit the linear stability analyses of thermal convection in a quasi-geostrophic rotating cylindrical annulus with an applied toroidal magnetic field, and we extend the investigation of the oscillatory modes to a broader range of the parameters. Particular attention is paid to influence of thermal boundary conditions, either fixed temperature or heat-flux conditions. While the non-dissipative approximation yields a slow wave propagating retrograde, termed as a Magnetic-Coriolis (MC) Rossby wave, dissipative effects produce a variety of waves. When magnetic diffusion is stronger than thermal diffusion, this can cause a very slow wave propagating prograde. Retrograde-traveling slow waves appear when magnetic diffusion is weaker. Emergence of the slow modes allows convection to occur at lower critical Rayleigh numbers than in the nonmagnetic case. When magnetic diffusion is strong, the onset of the convection occurs with the prograde-propagating slow wave, whereas when it is weak, a slow MC-Rossby mode yields the critical convection. Fixed heat-flux boundary conditions have profound effects on the marginal curves, which monotonically increase with the azimuthal wavenumber, and favor larger length scales at the onset of the convection, provided there is sufficient field strength that the Coriolis force is balanced with the Lorentz force. The effect, however, becomes less clear as magnetic diffusion is weakened and various MHD waves emerge.

  7. Linear Vlasov theory in the shearing sheet approximation with application to the magneto-rotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Tobias; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-09-01

    We derive the conductivity tensor for axisymmetric perturbations of a hot, collisionless, and charge-neutral plasma in the shearing sheet approximation. Our results generalize the well-known linear Vlasov theory for uniform plasmas to differentially rotating plasmas and can be used for wide range of kinetic stability calculations. We apply these results to the linear theory of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in collisionless plasmas. We show analytically and numerically how the general kinetic theory results derived here reduce in appropriate limits to previous results in the literature, including the low-frequency guiding center (or 'kinetic MHD') approximation, Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and the gyro-viscous approximation. We revisit the cold plasma model of the MRI and show that, contrary to previous results, an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma is linearly stable to axisymmetric perturbations in the cold plasma approximation. In addition to their application to astrophysical plasmas, our results provide a useful framework for assessing the linear stability of differentially rotating plasmas in laboratory experiments.

  8. Generic gravitational-wave signals from the collapse of rotating stellar cores.

    PubMed

    Dimmelmeier, H; Ott, C D; Janka, H-T; Marek, A; Müller, E

    2007-06-22

    We perform general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse to a protoneutron star, using a microphysical equation of state (EOS) and an approximation of deleptonization. We show that for a wide range of rotation rates and profiles the gravitational-wave (GW) burst signals from the core bounce are generic, known as type I. In our systematic study, using both GR and Newtonian gravity, we identify and quantify the influence of rotation, the EOS, and deleptonization on this result. Such a generic type of signal templates will facilitate a more efficient search in current and future GW detectors of both interferometric and resonant type.

  9. Analysis of unsteady wave processes in a rotating channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Mawid, M.

    1993-01-01

    The impact of passage rotation on the gas dynamic wave processes is analyzed through a numerical simulation of ideal shock-tube flow in a closed rotating-channel. Initial conditions are prescribed by assuming homentropic solid-body rotation. Relevant parameters of the problem such as wheel Mach number, hub-to-tip radius ratio, length-to-tip radius ratio, diaphragm temperature ratio, and diaphragm pressure ratio are varied. The results suggest possible criteria for assessing the consequences of passage rotation on the wave processes, and they may therefore be applicable to pressure-exchange wave rotors. It is shown that for a fixed geometry and initial conditions, the contact interface acquires a distorted three-dimensional time-dependent orientation at non-zero wheel Mach numbers. At a fixed wheel Mach number, the level of distortion depends primarily on the density ratio across the interface as well as the hub-to-tip radius ratio. Rarefaction fronts, shocks, and contact interfaces are observed to propagate faster with increasing wheel Mach number.

  10. Analysis of unsteady wave processes in a rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Mawid, M.

    1993-06-01

    The impact of passage rotation on the gas dynamic wave processes is analyzed through a numerical simulation of ideal shock-tube flow in a closed rotating-channel. Initial conditions are prescribed by assuming homentropic solid-body rotation. Relevant parameters of the problem such as wheel Mach number, hub-to-tip radius ratio, length-to-tip radius ratio, diaphragm temperature ratio, and diaphragm pressure ratio are varied. The results suggest possible criteria for assessing the consequences of passage rotation on the wave processes, and they may therefore be applicable to pressure-exchange wave rotors. It is shown that for a fixed geometry and initial conditions, the contact interface acquires a distorted three-dimensional time-dependent orientation at non-zero wheel Mach numbers. At a fixed wheel Mach number, the level of distortion depends primarily on the density ratio across the interface as well as the hub-to-tip radius ratio. Rarefaction fronts, shocks, and contact interfaces are observed to propagate faster with increasing wheel Mach number.

  11. On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-14

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________

  12. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  13. Comparison of techniques for approximating ocean bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the effects of using different methods for approximating bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model was conducted. Approximation techniques involving quadratic least squares, cubic least squares, and constrained bicubic polynomial interpolation were compared for computed wave patterns and parameters in the region of Saco Bay, Maine. Although substantial local differences can be attributed to use of the different approximation techniques, results indicated that overall computed wave patterns and parameter distributions were quite similar.

  14. Analytical approximation of transit time scattering due to magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Li, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent test particle simulations have shown that energetic electrons traveling through fast magnetosonic (MS) wave packets can experience an effect which is specifically associated with the tight equatorial confinement of these waves, known as transit time scattering. However, such test particle simulations can be computationally cumbersome and offer limited insight into the dominant physical processes controlling the wave-particle interactions, that is, in determining the effects of the various wave parameters and equatorial confinement on the particle scattering. In this paper, we show that such nonresonant effects can be effectively captured with a straightforward analytical treatment that is made possible with a set of reasonable, simplifying assumptions. It is shown that the effect of the wave confinement, which is not captured by the standard quasi-linear theory approach, acts in such a way as to broaden the range of particle energies and pitch angles that can effectively resonate with the wave. The resulting diffusion coefficients can be readily incorporated into global diffusion models in order to test the effects of transit time scattering on the dynamical evolution of radiation belt fluxes.

  15. An Approximate Method for Analysis of Solitary Waves in Nonlinear Elastic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushchitsky, J. J.; Yurchuk, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two types of solitary elastic waves are considered: a longitudinal plane displacement wave (longitudinal displacements along the abscissa axis of a Cartesian coordinate system) and a radial cylindrical displacement wave (displacements in the radial direction of a cylindrical coordinate system). The basic innovation is the use of nonlinear wave equations similar in form to describe these waves and the use of the same approximate method to analyze these equations. The distortion of the wave profile described by Whittaker (plane wave) or Macdonald (cylindrical wave) functions is described theoretically

  16. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  17. Arc-Polarized, Nonlinear Alfven Waves and Rotational Discontinuities: Directions of Propogation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Ho, C. M.; Sakurai, R.; Arballo, J. K.; Riley, P.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Large amplitude, noncompressive Alfven waves and rotational discontinuities are shown to be arc-polarized. The slowly rotating Alfven wave portion plus the fast rotating discontinuity comprise 360(deg) in phase rotation. The magnetic field vector perturbation lies in a plane. There are two (or more) possible interpretations to the observations.

  18. Universality in the collapse of rotating gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Choptuik's discovery of critical phenomena in the collapse of a spherically symmetric massless scalar field has spurred much interest over the years to explore critical collapse in more general settings. By evolving one-parameter families of initial data, it was found that spacetimes near the threshold of collapse or dispersion exhibited type II critical phenomena, with the properties of universality, scaling, and self-similarity. Shortly afterwards, similar results were obtained by Abrahams and Evans (and more recently by Sorkin) for the critical collapse of axisymmetric non-rotating gravitational waves. Despite many investigations into the critical collapse of other spherically symmetric or axisymmetric configurations, there has been relatively little headway on studying the critical collapse of non-axisymmetric configurations, which may carry angular momentum. In this talk, I will report on progress in simulating the critical collapse of non-axisymmetric rotating gravitational waves, which instead exhibit signs of type I critical phenomena, and comment on evidence for universality.

  19. Neural rotational speed control for wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundarain, M.; Alberdi, M.; Garrido, A. J.; Garrido, I.

    2011-02-01

    Among the benefits arising from an increasing use of renewable energy are: enhanced security of energy supply, stimulation of economic growth, job creation and protection of the environment. In this context, this study analyses the performance of an oscillating water column device for wave energy conversion in function of the stalling behaviour in Wells turbines, one of the most widely used turbines in wave energy plants. For this purpose, a model of neural rotational speed control system is presented, simulated and implemented. This scheme is employed to appropriately adapt the speed of the doubly-fed induction generator coupled to the turbine according to the pressure drop entry, so as to avoid the undesired stalling behaviour. It is demonstrated that the proposed neural rotational speed control design adequately matches the desired relationship between the slip of the doubly-fed induction generator and the pressure drop input, improving the power generated by the turbine generator module.

  20. Interaction of solitons with long waves in a rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, L. A.; Stepanyants, Y. A.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a soliton with long background waves is studied within the framework of rotation modified Korteweg-de Vries (rKdV) equation. Using the asymptotic method for solitons propagating in the field of a long background wave we derive a set of ODEs describing soliton amplitude and phase with respect to the background wave. The shape of the background wave may range from a sinusoid to the limiting profile representing a periodic sequence of parabolic arcs. We analyse energy exchange between a soliton and the long wave taking radiation losses into account. It is shown that the losses can be compensated by energy pumping from the long wave and, as the result, a stationary soliton can exist, unlike the case when there is no variable background. A more complex case when a free long wave attenuates due to the energy consumption by a soliton is also considered. Some of the analytical results are compared with the results of direct numerical calculations within the framework of the rKdV equation.

  1. Wave-driven rotation and mass separation in rotating magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterman, Abraham J.

    2012-01-01

    Axisymmetric mirrors are attractive for fusion because of their simplicity, high plasma pressure at a given magnetic pressure, and steady state operation. Their subclass, rotating mirrors, are particularly interesting because they have increased parallel confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and a natural heating mechanism. This thesis finds and explores an unusual effect in supersonically rotating plasmas: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. Extending the alpha channeling concept to rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field is a particularly simple way to achieve the latter effect. In the rotating frame, this perturbation is seen as a wave near the alpha particle cyclotron harmonic, and can break the azimuthal symmetry and magnetic moment conservation without changing the particles total energy. The particle may exit if it reduces its kinetic energy and becomes more trapped if it gains kinetic energy, leading to a steady state current that maintains the field. Simulations of single particles in rotating mirrors show that a stationary wave can extract enough energy from alpha particles for a reactor to be self-sustaining. In the same way, rotation can be produced in non-fusion plasmas. Waves are identified to produce rotation in plasma centrifuges, which separate isotopes based on their mass difference. Finally, a new high throughput mass filter which is well suited to separating nuclear waste is presented. The new filter, the magnetic centrifugal mass filter (MCMF), has well confined output streams and less potential for nuclear proliferation than competing technologies. To assess the usefulness of the

  2. Supernova seismology: gravitational wave signatures of rapidly rotating core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Klion, Hannah; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-06-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce, and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with non-linear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early post-bounce GW signal is produced by the fundamental quadrupolar oscillation mode of the PNS, at a frequency 0.70 ≲ f ≲ 0.80 kHz, whose energy is largely trapped within the PNS and leaks out on a ˜10-ms time-scale. Quasi-radial oscillations are not trapped within the PNS and quickly propagate outwards until they steepen into shocks. Both the PNS structure and Coriolis/centrifugal forces have a strong impact on the GW spectrum, and a detection of the GW signal can therefore be used to constrain progenitor properties.

  3. Infinite order sudden approximation for rotational energy transfer in gaseous mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldflam, R.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer in gaseous mixtures is analyzed within the framework of the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation, and a new derivation of the IOS from the coupled states Lippman-Schwinger equation is presented. This approach shows the relation between the IOS and coupled state T matrices. The general IOS effective cross section can be factored into a finite sum of 'spectroscopic coefficients' and 'dynamical coefficients'. The evaluation of these coefficients is considered. Pressure broadening for the systems HD-He, HCl-He, CO-He, HCl-Ar, and CO2-Ar is calculated, and results based on the IOS approximation are compared with coupled state results. The IOS approximation is found to be very accurate whenever the rotor spacings are small compared to the kinetic energy, provided closed channels do not play too great a role.

  4. Infinite order sudden approximation for rotational energy transfer in gaseous mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldflam, R.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer in gaseous mixtures is analyzed within the framework of the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation, and a new derivation of the IOS from the coupled states Lippman-Schwinger equation is presented. This approach shows the relation between the IOS and coupled state T matrices. The general IOS effective cross section can be factored into a finite sum of 'spectroscopic coefficients' and 'dynamical coefficients'. The evaluation of these coefficients is considered. Pressure broadening for the systems HD-He, HCl-He, CO-He, HCl-Ar, and CO2-Ar is calculated, and results based on the IOS approximation are compared with coupled state results. The IOS approximation is found to be very accurate whenever the rotor spacings are small compared to the kinetic energy, provided closed channels do not play too great a role.

  5. Scattering of wave packets on atoms in the Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovets, D. V.; Kotkin, G. L.; Serbo, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that 200 -300 keV electrons with the unusual spatial profiles can be produced and even focused to a subnanometer scale—namely, electrons carrying nonzero orbital angular momentum and also the so-called Airy beams. Since the wave functions of such electrons do not represent plane waves, the standard Born formula for scattering of them off a potential field is no longer applicable and, hence, needs modification. In the present paper, we address the generic problem of elastic scattering of a wave packet of a fast nonrelativistic particle off a potential field. We obtain simple and convenient formulas for a number of events and an effective cross section in such a scattering, which represent generalization of the Born formula for a case when finite sizes and spatial inhomogeneity of the initial packet should be taken into account. As a benchmark, we consider two simple models corresponding to scattering of a Gaussian wave packet on a Gaussian potential and on a hydrogen atom, and perform a detailed analysis of the effects brought about by the limited sizes of the incident beam and by the finite impact parameter between the potential center and the packet's axis.

  6. Three-dimensional slow Rossby waves in rotating spherical density-stratified convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2017-09-01

    We develop a theory of three-dimensional slow Rossby waves in rotating spherical density stratified convection. The Rossby waves, with frequencies which are much smaller than the rotating frequency, are excited by a nonaxisymmetric instability from the equilibrium based on the developed convection. These waves interact with the inertial waves and the density stratified convection. The density stratification is taken into account using the anelastic approximation for very low-Mach-number flows. We study long-term planetary Rossby waves with periods which are larger than two years. We suggest that these waves are related to the southern oscillation and El Niño. The El Niño is an irregularly periodical variation in winds and sea surface temperatures over the tropical Pacific ocean, while the southern oscillation is an oscillation in surface air pressure between the tropical eastern and the western Pacific ocean. The strength of the southern oscillation is characterized by the southern oscillation index (SOI). The developed theory is applied for the interpretation of the observed periods of the SOI. This study demonstrates a good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the observations.

  7. Relativistic r-Modes in Slowly Rotating Neutron Stars: Numerical Analysis in the Cowling Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shijun; Lee, Umin

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the properties of relativistic r-modes of slowly rotating neutron stars by using a relativistic version of the Cowling approximation. In our formalism, we take into account the influence of the Coriolis-like force on the stellar oscillations but ignore the effects of the centrifugal-like force. For three neutron star models, we calculate the fundamental r-modes with l'=m=2 and 3. We find that the oscillation frequency σ of the fundamental r-mode is given in a good approximation by σ~κ0Ω, where σ is defined in the corotating frame at spatial infinity and Ω is the angular frequency of rotation of the star. The proportional coefficient κ0 is only weakly dependent on Ω, but it strongly depends on the relativistic parameter GM/c2R, where M and R are the mass and the radius of the star. All the fundamental r-modes with l'=m computed in this study are discrete modes with distinct regular eigenfunctions, and they all fall in the continuous part of the frequency spectrum associated with Kojima's equation. These relativistic r-modes are obtained by including the effects of rotation higher than the first order of Ω so that the buoyant force plays a role, the situation of which is quite similar to that for Newtonian r-modes.

  8. A wave model interpretation of the evolution of rotational discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Cargill, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid numerical code is employed to trace the evolution of rotational discontinuities (RDs). An extensive parameter variation is carried out, with particular emphasis on beta, Ti/Te, theta sub B (the angle between the normal and total magnetic field), and the helicity of the RD. The RD structure is shown to have features in common with the evolution of both strongly modulated nonlinear wave packets and linear dispersive wave propagation in oblique magnetic fields. For small theta sub B, the RD disperses linearly, giving fast and Alfven waves upstream and downstream, respectively, and the familiar S-shaped hodograms. At larger theta sub B, nonlinearity becomes important and strong coupling to a compressional (sonic) component can occur in the main current layer. The results are applied to RDs observed in the solar wind and at the magnetopause.

  9. Wave packet dynamics in the optimal superadiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, V.; Goddard, B. D.; Manthe, U.

    2016-06-01

    We explain the concept of superadiabatic representations and show how in the context of electronically non-adiabatic transitions they lead to an explicit formula that can be used to predict transitions at avoided crossings. Based on this formula, we present a simple method for computing wave packet dynamics across avoided crossings. Only knowledge of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces near the avoided crossing is required for the computation. In particular, this means that no diabatization procedure is necessary, the adiabatic electronic energies can be computed on the fly, and they only need to be computed to higher accuracy when an avoided crossing is detected. We test the quality of our method on the paradigmatic example of photo-dissociation of NaI, finding very good agreement with results of exact wave packet calculations.

  10. Engineering entanglement for metrology with rotating matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico-Gutierrez, L. M.; Spiller, T. P.; Dunningham, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    Entangled states of rotating, trapped ultracold bosons form a very promising scenario for quantum metrology. In order to employ such states for metrology, it is vital to understand their detailed form and the enhanced accuracy with which they could measure phase, in this case generated through rotation. In this work, we study the rotation of ultracold bosons in an asymmetric trapping potential beyond the lowest Landau level (LLL) approximation. We demonstrate that while the LLL can identify reasonably the critical frequency for a quantum phase transition and entangled state generation, it is vital to go beyond the LLL to identify the details of the state and quantify the quantum Fisher information (which bounds the accuracy of the phase measurement). We thus identify a new parameter regime for useful entangled state generation, amenable to experimental investigation.

  11. Approximation of the Garrett-Munk internal wave spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Vatchev, Vesselin

    2011-12-01

    The spectral models of Garrett and Munk (1972, 1975) continue to be a useful description of the oceanic energy spectrum. However, there are several ambiguities (many of them are summarized, for example, in Levine, 2002) that make it difficult to use e.g., in a dissipation modeling (e.g., Hibiya et al., 1996, and Winters and D'Asaro, 1997). An approximate spectral formulation is presented in this work by means of the modified Running Median Methods.

  12. Electron Ionization Cross Sections in the Distorted-Wave Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-18

    solution T(rl, r2 ) of the Schr ~ dinger equation is not known. Moreover, it is difficult to satisfy condition (9) for effective charges Z and Z’ as... computing time . It is therefore suitable for a production of large number of data needed in the analysis and interpretation of hot plasmas in laboratory...goal was to develop an approximation based on the quantum-mechanical approach to the collision problem, simple enough so that it would be suitable

  13. Translation of waves along quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-09-15

    In a recent paper, we give a study of the purely rotational motion of general stationary states in the two-dimensional local induction approximation (2D-LIA) governing superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit [B. Svistunov, “Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)]. Such results demonstrated that variety of stationary configurations are possible from vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion in addition to commonly discussed configurations such as helical or planar states. However, the filaments (or, more properly, waves along these filaments) can also exhibit translational motion along the axis of orientation. In contrast to the study on vortex configurations for purely rotational stationary states, the present paper considers non-stationary states which exhibit a combination of rotation and translational motions. These solutions can essentially be described as waves or disturbances which ride along straight vortex filament lines. As expected from our previous work, there are a number of types of structures that can be obtained under the 2D-LIA. We focus on non-stationary states, as stationary states exhibiting translation will essentially take the form of solutions studied in [R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], with the difference being translation along the reference axis, so that qualitative appearance of the solution geometry will be the same (even if there are quantitative differences). We discuss a wide variety of general properties of these non-stationary solutions and derive cases in which they reduce to known stationary states. We obtain various routes to Kelvin waves along vortex filaments and demonstrate that if the phase and amplitude of a disturbance both propagate with the same wave speed, then Kelvin waves will result. We also consider the self

  14. A diffusion approximation for ocean wave scatterings by randomly distributed ice floes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a continuum approach using a diffusion approximation method to solve the scattering of ocean waves by randomly distributed ice floes. In order to model both strong and weak scattering, the proposed method decomposes the wave action density function into two parts: the transmitted part and the scattered part. For a given wave direction, the transmitted part of the wave action density is defined as the part of wave action density in the same direction before the scattering; and the scattered part is a first order Fourier series approximation for the directional spreading caused by scattering. An additional approximation is also adopted for simplification, in which the net directional redistribution of wave action by a single scatterer is assumed to be the reflected wave action of a normally incident wave into a semi-infinite ice cover. Other required input includes the mean shear modulus, diameter and thickness of ice floes, and the ice concentration. The directional spreading of wave energy from the diffusion approximation is found to be in reasonable agreement with the previous solution using the Boltzmann equation. The diffusion model provides an alternative method to implement wave scattering into an operational wave model.

  15. Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastographic Evaluation of the Rotator Cuff Tendon.

    PubMed

    Hou, Stephanie W; Merkle, Alexander N; Babb, James S; McCabe, Robert; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Adler, Ronald S

    2017-01-01

    (1) Assess the association between the B-mode morphologic appearance and elasticity in the rotator cuff tendon using shear wave elastography (SWE). (2) Assess the association between SWE and symptoms. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. A retrospective review identified 21 studies in 19 eligible patients for whom SWE was performed during routine sonographic evaluations for shoulder pain. Evaluations were compared with 55 studies from 16 asymptomatic volunteers and 6 patients with asymptomatic contralateral shoulders. Repeated studies were accounted for by resampling. Proximal and distal tendon morphologic characteristics were graded from 1 to 4 (normal to full-thickness tear), and average shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements were obtained at both locations. In 68 examinations, deltoid muscle SWV measurements were available for post hoc analysis. The morphologic grade and SWV showed weak-to-moderate negative correlations in the proximal (P < .001) and distal (P = .002) rotator cuff tendon. A weakly significant SWV decrease was found in the proximal tendon in symptomatic patients (P = .049); no significant difference was seen in the distal tendon. The deltoid muscle SWV showed weak-to-moderate negative correlations with the morphologic grade in the proximal (P = .004) and distal (P = .007) tendon; the deltoid SWV was also significantly lower in symptomatic shoulders (P = .001). Shear wave elastography shows tendon softening in rotator cuff disease. It captures information not obtained by a morphologic evaluation alone; however, a poor correlation with symptoms suggests that SWE will be less useful in workups for shoulder pain than for preoperative assessments of tendon quality. Deltoid muscle softening seen in morphologically abnormal and symptomatic patients requires further exploration. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Density wave formation in differentially rotating disk galaxies: Hydrodynamic simulation of the linear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu

    2014-07-01

    Most rapidly and differentially rotating disk galaxies, in which the sound speed (thermal velocity dispersion) is smaller than the orbital velocity, display graceful spiral patterns. Yet, over almost 240 yr after their discovery in M51 by Charles Messier, we still do not fully understand how they originate. In this first paper of a series, the dynamical behavior of a rotating galactic disk is examined numerically by a high-order Godunov hydrodynamic code. The code is implemented to simulate a two-dimensional flow driven by an internal Jeans gravitational instability in a nonresonant wave-“fluid” interaction in an infinitesimally thin disk composed of stars or gas clouds. A goal of this work is to explore the local and linear regimes of density wave formation, employed by Lin, Shu, Yuan and many others in connection with the problem of spiral pattern of rotationally supported galaxies, by means of computer-generated models and to compare those numerical results with the generalized fluid-dynamical wave theory. The focus is on a statistical analysis of time-evolution of density wave structures seen in the simulations. The leading role of collective processes in the formation of both the circular and spiral density waves (“heavy sound”) is emphasized. The main new result is that the disk evolution in the initial, quasilinear stage of the instability in our global simulations is fairly well described using the local approximation of the generalized wave theory. Certain applications of the simulation to actual gas-rich spiral galaxies are also explored.

  17. Converter of rotating-transformer signals to code of successive-approximation angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domrachev, V. G.; Podolyan, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    A cyclic converter of signals from a rotating sine-cosine resolver transformer to a binary code of the angle through successive approximation was designed with large to small scale circuit integration. Its two channels yield informative outputs of 12-bit word length. The conversion process is conventional, with mismatch signals being formed in accordance with the algorithms and then reduced to zero digit by digit by the method of successive approximations. Variable input signals are converted into constant ones with the aid of a sampler-storage device. Other converter components are a read-only memory with synchronous pulse energizing and synchronous code recording, a digital to analog converter, four sign-inverting analog switches, a comparator with summation of products at the input and a trigger transmitting the somparator output signal to a successive approximations register, as well as analog switches for channel commutation and function commutation, operational amplifier, and resistor banks. Functions are recorded in the memory without deficiency, owing to addition of a modified memory which records codes with excess.

  18. The Millimeter-Wave Rotational Spectrum of Phenylacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Kra'Snicki, Adam

    2010-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of phenylacetylene, C_6H_5-CequivC-H, has hitherto only been studied in the centimeter-wave region, at room-temperature, and in supersonic expansion. There appears to be continuing astrophysical interest in polar species closely related to benzene and we decided to extend the knowledge of the laboratory spectrum of phenylacetylene up to the submillimeter-wave region. We report extensive measurements of the room-temperature spectrum at frequencies from 90 to 340 GHz. Precise spectroscopic constants are determined for the ground state, and the two lowest excited vibrational states: v24=1 and v36=1. The two excited states belong to the out-of-plane and the in-plane C-CequivC bending modes, and are very strongly coupled by an a-axis Coriolis interaction. It was, nevertheless, possible to successfully fit the measured transitions with a minimal number of interaction constants. The present results from rotational spectroscopy are compared with previous normal mode analyses for phenylacetylene and with additional anharmonic force field calculations carried out in this work. A.P.Cox, I.C.Ewart, W.M.Stigliani, J. Chem. Soc. Farad. Trans II 71, 504-514 (1975). H.Dreizler, H.D.Rudolph, B.Hartke, J. Mol. Struct., 698, 1-24 (2004).

  19. Experiments on conical beam waves in a rotating stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P.; Peacock, T.

    2003-11-01

    Though the theory of linear disturbances in a rotating stratified fluid is well known (Waves in the Ocean, Le Blond and Mysak), direct experimental verification of the cut-off frequencies and inclination angles of these gyroscopic/internal gravity wave conical beams seems not to have been performed. A large cylindrical tank riding on an air-bearing platform is linearly stratified with salt-water using the double-bucket method. Density profiles are measured in situ with a conductivity probe. Visualization of a section of the upward and downward propagating conical beams generated from a sphere vertically oscillating about its central position along the cylinder axis is performed using the ``synthetic schlieren" technique for axisymmetric density fields. Preliminary data for the beam angles θ from horizontal at three nominal Brunt-Väisälä freqencies N = 0.55, 1.05, 1.60 show good quantative agreement with theory at three nominal rotation rates 2 Ω/N = 0, 1/3, 2/3.

  20. Weak impedance difference approximations of thin-bed PP-wave reflection responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Yun; Lu, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Under the assumptions of weak impedance differences and small incident angles, the PP-wave reflections approximation of a single thin bed is studied. Three analytical equations, defined as weak impedance difference approximation, the fourth-order power series approximation and the second-order power series approximation, are given as functions of incident angle, bed thickness, frequency and elastic parameters (density, P-wave and S-wave velocities) differences of the thin bed; in particular, the latter two approximations are expressed in the power series form of the incident angle’s sine value. Two kinds of thin-bed models and a well log are used to test the approximation equations’ precision and acceptability. Numerical simulations show that these three approximations are not suitable in the case of thin-bed models with strong impedance differences. For thin-bed models with unequal-magnitude reflectivity, weak impedance difference approximation has high approximation accuracy (errors <12%) in pre-critical angle, the fourth-order and the second-order power series approximations are acceptable as the maximum incident angles are about 10 degrees less than the critical angles (if available). For thin-bed models with opposite-polarity and equal-magnitude reflectivity, the three approximations are more suitable for a thin bed with polarities (-, +) than with (+, -). The second-order power series approximation has similar approximation accuracy (errors <10%) with the other two approximation equations with small incident angles. PP-wave synthetic seismograms comparisons of exact and approximate reflections in the case of the well log show that the approximation equations are applicable in the actual sand-shale inter-bedding reservoirs.

  1. Equation of state effects on gravitational waves from rotating core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; O'Connor, Evan; Sullivan, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) generated by axisymmetric rotating collapse, bounce, and early postbounce phases of a galactic core-collapse supernova are detectable by current-generation gravitational wave observatories. Since these GWs are emitted from the quadrupole-deformed nuclear-density core, they may encode information on the uncertain nuclear equation of state (EOS). We examine the effects of the nuclear EOS on GWs from rotating core collapse and carry out 1824 axisymmetric general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations that cover a parameter space of 98 different rotation profiles and 18 different EOS. We show that the bounce GW signal is largely independent of the EOS and sensitive primarily to the ratio of rotational to gravitational energy, T /|W | , and at high rotation rates, to the degree of differential rotation. The GW frequency (fpeak˜600 - 1000 Hz ) of postbounce core oscillations shows stronger EOS dependence that can be parametrized by the core's EOS-dependent dynamical frequency √{G ρ¯ c } . We find that the ratio of the peak frequency to the dynamical frequency fpeak/√{G ρc ¯ } follows a universal trend that is obeyed by all EOS and rotation profiles and that indicates that the nature of the core oscillations changes when the rotation rate exceeds the dynamical frequency. We find that differences in the treatments of low-density nonuniform nuclear matter, of the transition from nonuniform to uniform nuclear matter, and in the description of nuclear matter up to around twice saturation density can mildly affect the GW signal. More exotic, higher-density physics is not probed by GWs from rotating core collapse. We furthermore test the sensitivity of the GW signal to variations in the treatment of nuclear electron capture during collapse. We find that approximations and uncertainties in electron capture rates can lead to variations in the GW signal that are of comparable magnitude to those due to different nuclear EOS. This emphasizes the

  2. Lower Hybrid Wave Induced Rotation on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Ron; Podpaly, Yuri; Rice, John; Schmidt, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Injection of RF power in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency has been observed to cause strong counter current rotation in Alcator C-Mod plasmas [1,2]. The spin-up rate is consistent with the rate at which momentum is injected by the LH waves, and also the rate at which fast electron momentum is transferred to the ions. A momentum diffusivity of ˜ 0.1 m^2/s is sufficient to account for the observed steady-state rotation. This value is also comparable with that derived from an analysis of rotation induced by RF mode conversion [3]. Radial force balance requires a radial electric field, suggesting a buildup of negative charge in the plasma core. This may be the result of an inward pinch of the LH produced fast electrons, as would be expected for resonant trapped particles. Analysis of the fast-electron-produced bremsstrahlung during LH power modulation experiments yields an inward pinch velocity of ˜ 1 m/s, consistent with the estimated trapped particle pinch velocity. [4pt] [1] A. Ince-Cushman, et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 035002 (2009)[0pt] [2] J. E. Rice, et. al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 025004 (2009)[0pt] [3] Y. Lin, et.al., this meeting

  3. Millimeter Wave Tunneling-Rotational Spectrum of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140 - 170 GHz and 280 - 360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (v_{t}, v_{b})^{+} and (v_{t}, v_{b})^{-} and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational ^{b}R- and ^{b}Q-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (+) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the v_{b} = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis terms was performed. The spectroscopic constants for the first excited states of the bending and the torsion vibrational modes have been determined for the first time. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  4. The millimeter wave tunneling-rotational spectrum of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesniková, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-07-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140-170 GHz and 280-360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (vt, vb)+ and (vt, vb)- and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational bR- and bQ-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (±) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the vb = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis-like terms was performed. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  5. Exhaust Gas Emissions from a Rotating Detonation-wave Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. Progress towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model including NOx chemistry is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release. Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. NOx Emissions from a Rotating Detonation-wave Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. Progress towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model including NOx chemistry is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. Results to date show that NOx emissions are not a problem for the RDE due to the short residence times and the nature of the flow field. Furthermore, simulations show that the amount of NOx can be further reduced by tailoring the fluid dynamics within the RDE.

  7. Modeling Alfven Waves Generation by a Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A. V.; Gumerov, N.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Gigliotti, A. F.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2009-12-01

    Recent experiments conducted in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) located at UCLA demonstrated efficient excitation of whistler and shear Alfven waves by a Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) source created by a phased orthogonal loop antenna. This paper presents a combination of computational results along with the experiments that emphasize the RMF properties for generation of MHD waves. In order to understand the RMF and magnetized plasma interaction and the resultant radiation patterns in frequency regimes below the ion cyclotron frequency a three-dimensional code was developed. The time-domain code solves the linearized Maxwell equations coupled to the two fluid magnetohydrodynamics description of cold plasma. The antenna excitation is modeled as a set of external currents. A comparison of the simulation results and the experiments shows good agreement between them. The scaling laws of the induced magnetic field as a function of the RMF frequency, the plasma parameters and the spatial decay rate of magnetic field, as well as the use of RMFs as efficient radiation sources of waves in space plasmas are also discussed. This work was sponsored by ONR MURI Grant 5-28828.

  8. Accuracy of the water column approximation in numerically simulating propagation of teleseismic PP waves and Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Yao, Huajian

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solvers of wave equations have been widely used to simulate global seismic waves including PP waves for modelling 410/660 km discontinuity and Rayleigh waves for imaging crustal structure. In order to avoid extra computation cost due to ocean water effects, these numerical solvers usually adopt water column approximation, whose accuracy depends on frequency and needs to be investigated quantitatively. In this paper, we describe a unified representation of accurate and approximate forms of the equivalent water column boundary condition as well as the free boundary condition. Then we derive an analytical form of the PP-wave reflection coefficient with the unified boundary condition, and quantify the effects of water column approximation on amplitude and phase shift of the PP waves. We also study the effects of water column approximation on phase velocity dispersion of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave with a propagation matrix method. We find that with the water column approximation: (1) The error of PP amplitude and phase shift is less than 5 per cent and 9° at periods greater than 25 s for most oceanic regions. But at periods of 15 s or less, PP is inaccurate up to 10 per cent in amplitude and a few seconds in time shift for deep oceans. (2) The error in Rayleigh wave phase velocity is less than 1 per cent at periods greater than 30 s in most oceanic regions, but the error is up to 2 per cent for deep oceans at periods of 20 s or less. This study confirms that the water column approximation is only accurate at long periods and it needs to be improved at shorter periods.

  9. Note: Lossless laser beam combiner employing a high-speed rotating half-wave plate.

    PubMed

    Yatsuka, E; Yamamoto, T; Hatae, T; Torimoto, K; Itami, K

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a laser beam combiner employing a high-speed rotating half-wave plate based on the specific requirements of the Thomson scattering measurement systems in the ITER. The polarization extinction ratio of the output beam may exceed 1000 and was maintained for more than 1 h via feedback control of the half-wave plate rotation speed. The pointing fluctuations introduced by rotating the half-wave plate were in the order of microradians. The high-speed rotating half-wave plate provides a lossless means of combining laser beams together with stable beam pointing.

  10. Note: Lossless laser beam combiner employing a high-speed rotating half-wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuka, E.; Yamamoto, T.; Hatae, T.; Torimoto, K.; Itami, K.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a laser beam combiner employing a high-speed rotating half-wave plate based on the specific requirements of the Thomson scattering measurement systems in the ITER. The polarization extinction ratio of the output beam may exceed 1000 and was maintained for more than 1 h via feedback control of the half-wave plate rotation speed. The pointing fluctuations introduced by rotating the half-wave plate were in the order of microradians. The high-speed rotating half-wave plate provides a lossless means of combining laser beams together with stable beam pointing.

  11. Dynamics of zonal flows: failure of wave-kinetic theory, and new geometrical optics approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.

    2016-12-01

    The self-organisation of turbulence into regular zonal flows can be fruitfully investigated with quasi-linear methods and statistical descriptions. A wave-kinetic equation that assumes asymptotically large-scale zonal flows leads to ultraviolet divergence. From an exact description of quasi-linear dynamics emerges two better geometrical optics approximations. These involve not only the mean flow shear but also the second and third derivative of the mean flow. One approximation takes the form of a new wave-kinetic equation, but is only valid when the zonal flow is quasi-static and wave action is conserved.

  12. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011

  13. Periodic standing-wave approximation: Overview and three-dimensional scalar models

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Zeferino; Beetle, Christopher; Blinov, Alexey; Bromley, Benjamin; Burko, Lior M.; Cranor, Maria; Price, Richard H.; Owen, Robert

    2004-09-15

    The periodic standing-wave method for binary inspiral computes the exact numerical solution for periodic binary motion with standing gravitational waves, and uses it as an approximation to slow binary inspiral with outgoing waves. Important features of this method presented here are: (i) the mathematical nature of the 'mixed' partial differential equations to be solved (ii) the meaning of standing waves in the method (iii) computational difficulties, and (iv) the 'effective linearity' that ultimately justifies the approximation. The method is applied to three-dimensional nonlinear scalar model problems, and the numerical results are used to demonstrate extraction of the outgoing solution from the standing-wave solution, and the role of effective linearity.

  14. ANALYTIC APPROXIMATE SEISMOLOGY OF PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Soler, R.; Arregui, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations show that propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. The technique of MHD seismology uses the wave observations combined with MHD wave theory to indirectly infer physical parameters of the solar atmospheric plasma and magnetic field. Here, we present an analytical seismological inversion scheme for propagating MHD waves. This scheme uses the observational information on wavelengths and damping lengths in a consistent manner, along with observed values of periods or phase velocities, and is based on approximate asymptotic expressions for the theoretical values of wavelengths and damping lengths. The applicability of the inversion scheme is discussed and an example is given.

  15. Synchronization of chaotic modulated travelling waves in coupled rotating annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Read, Peter L.

    2010-05-01

    Synchronization is now well established as a phenomenon where coherent behaviour between two or more otherwise autonomous nonlinear systems subject to some degree of coupling is developed and maintained. Such behaviour has mostly been studied to date, however, in relatively low-dimensional discrete numerical systems or networks, and very simple laboratory experiments. But the possibility of similar kinds of behaviour in continuous or extended spatiotemporal systems has many potential practical implications, especially in geophysics. Recent investigations have found that some atmospheric teleconnections of oscillatory climate phenomena can be better understood and analysed via chaos synchronization theory. The use of well-controlled laboratory analogues may therefore have an important role to play in the study of natural systems that can only be observed and for which controlled and repeatable experiments are impossible. The laboratory experiment that we use in our research is the thermally driven, rotating baroclinic annulus. The combined effect of differential heating in the horizontal direction and uniform background rotation leads to the formation of a zonally-symmetric jet flow around the annulus that may become unstable to travelling baroclinic waves and exhibit a wide range of flow regimes including steady amplitude travelling waves, periodic amplitude modulated waves and a range of more complex spatiotemporal flows, culminating in forms of geostrophic turbulence. Motivated in part by studies of quasi-periodic and chaotic ‘index cycles' in previous laboratory experiments using the baroclinic annulus, we have investigated synchronization effects in a pair of baroclinically unstable flows in both periodic and chaotic regimes, thermally coupled via their (zonally symmetric) boundary conditions. When the coupling strength and the de-tuning were systematically varied, the experiment showed clear signs of phase synchronization. By increasing or decreasing the

  16. A simple approximation for wave refraction - Application to the assessment of the nearshore wave directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, Alejandro; Solari, Sebastián; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel; Losada, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a simple and relatively quick methodology to obtain the nearshore wave angle. The method is especially valuable for curvilinear coasts where Snell's law may provide excessively inaccurate results. We defined a correction factor, K, that depends on the geometry of the coast and on the wave climate. The values of this coefficient were obtained minimizing the differences with a sophisticated numerical model. The limitations and performance of the methodology are further discussed. The procedure was applied to a beach in Southern Spain to analyze the influence of shoreline geometry on nearshore wave directionality. Offshore and nearshore distributions of wave period and directions were analyzed, and the results showed that the geometry of the coast played a crucial role in the directionality of the nearshore waves, which also plays an important role in hydrodynamics. The methodology presented here is able to analyze and quantify the importance of this directionality without a noticeable computational cost, even when a long time series of wave data are considered. Hence, this methodology constitutes a useful and efficient tool for practical applications in Coastal and Ocean Engineering, such as sedimentary, wave energy, and wave climate studies.

  17. Heteroclinic orbits between rotating waves of semilinear parabolic equations on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Bernold; Rocha, Carlos; Wolfrum, Matthias

    We investigate heteroclinic orbits between equilibria and rotating waves for scalar semilinear parabolic reaction-advection-diffusion equations with periodic boundary conditions. Using zero number properties of the solutions and the phase shift equivariance of the equation, we establish a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a heteroclinic connection between any pair of hyperbolic equilibria or rotating waves.

  18. Dust Rotation Effects on DIA Surface Waves in a Semi-bounded Lorentzian Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2008-09-07

    The dispersion relation for a dust ion-acoustic (DIA) surface wave is kinetically derived for the semi-bounded Lorentzian plasma containing elongated and rotating charged dust particles. The DIA surface wave frequency is found to be decreased as the dust rotational frequency increases.

  19. Exploiting the weak temperature gradient approximation for climate theory on slowly rotating, tidally locked planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S. M.; Abbot, D. S.; Pierrehumbert, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tidally locked planets are subject to extreme temperature variations due to the stellar flux directly warming only one side of the planet. This is important because planets in the habitable zone around M dwarf stars are likely to be tidally locked. Such planets are unlikely to be habitable if their antistellar temperatures are low enough that CO2 will condense. This problem has previously been investigated using GCMs, which explicitly solve for atmospheric dynamics. In order to gain a greater understanding of the effect of different mechanisms on the temperature profile, we use a lower-order energy balance model here. We consider tidally locked planets that rotate slowly enough that we can neglect the Coriolis force, which allows us to assume that atmospheric temperature at any given height is independent of horizontal position (weak temperature gradient approximation). This allows us to easily isolate and contrast the effects of different physical mechanisms, such as greenhouse gas level and surface turbulent exchange, on the resulting temperature profile. We find that the effect of turbulent exchange on climate saturates at fairly low values (very smooth planets), whereas CO2 has a consistently strong effect on climate.

  20. AN EFFICIENT APPROXIMATION TO THE LIKELIHOOD FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE STOCHASTIC BACKGROUND DETECTION USING PULSAR TIMING DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Van Haasteren, R.

    2013-05-20

    Direct detection of gravitational waves by pulsar timing arrays will become feasible over the next few years. In the low frequency regime (10{sup -7} Hz-10{sup -9} Hz), we expect that a superposition of gravitational waves from many sources will manifest itself as an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background. Currently, a number of techniques exist to detect such a signal; however, many detection methods are computationally challenging. Here we introduce an approximation to the full likelihood function for a pulsar timing array that results in computational savings proportional to the square of the number of pulsars in the array. Through a series of simulations we show that the approximate likelihood function reproduces results obtained from the full likelihood function. We further show, both analytically and through simulations, that, on average, this approximate likelihood function gives unbiased parameter estimates for astrophysically realistic stochastic background amplitudes.

  1. Modeling shock waves in an ideal gas: combining the Burnett approximation and Holian's conjecture.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Guang; Tang, Xiu-Zhang; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2008-07-01

    We model a shock wave in an ideal gas by combining the Burnett approximation and Holian's conjecture. We use the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the average temperature in the Burnett transport coefficients. The shock wave profiles and shock thickness are compared with other theories. The results are found to agree better with the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) data than the Burnett equations and the modified Navier-Stokes theory.

  2. Approximate dispersion relation for surface waves on current with arbitrary depth dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ådnøy Ellingsen, Simen

    2017-04-01

    We present a new approximate dispersion relation for surface waves propagating at arbitrary direction with a horizontal shear current whose magnitude and direction may vary arbitrarily with depth, and compare it with existing approximations, in particular (the leading order correction of) the widely used approximation by Kirby & Chen [1989]. There is no practical difference in calculational complexity and effort between the new model and that of Kirby & Chen (KC). We derive and analyse for the first time to our knowledge, the specific criteria that must be satisfied to ensure the applicability and accuracy of the KC formula, as well as for our new approximation. The analysis shows how conditions of applicability for the new approximation are less less strict than for the KC approximation, making the new formula more widely applicable. The new approximation is always applicable whenever the KC formula is, in which case the two approximations coincide to leading order in a small parameter. Our analysis moreover explains why the KC approximation works well (apparently serendipitously) even in situations where the assumptions from which it was originally derived are strongly violated. We argue that the new approximation is more widely applicable, and can be employed with greater confidence than the widely used KC approximation due to better robustness: it is accurate in several realistic example flows where the KC model fails, it remains reasonable in particularly difficult cases where the KC model gives nonsensical results, unlike the KC approximation it is exact for flows of linear depth dependence, and it provides the possibility of a higher order approximation which, unlike existing higher-order schemes, may be applied across the wave spectrum rather than restricted to particular asymptotic regimes.

  3. An approximation to the reflection coefficient of plane longitudinal waves based on the diffusive-viscous wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haixia; Gao, Jinghuai; Peng, Jigen

    2017-01-01

    The frequency-dependent seismic anomalies related to hydrocarbon reservoirs have lately attracted wide interest. The diffusive-viscous model was proposed to explain these anomalies. When an incident diffusive-viscous wave strikes a boundary between two different media, it is reflected and transmitted. The equation for the reflection coefficient is quite complex and laborious, so it does not provide an intuitive understanding of how different amplitude relates to the parameters of the media and how variation of a particular parameter affects the reflection coefficient. In this paper, we firstly derive a two-term (intercept-gradient) and three-term (intercept-gradient-curvature) approximation to the reflection coefficient of the plane diffusive-viscous wave without any assumptions. Then, we study the limitations of the obtained approximations by comparing the approximate value of the reflection coefficient with its exact value. Our results show that the two approximations match well with the exact solutions within the incident angle of 35°. Finally, we analyze the effects of diffusive and viscous attenuation parameters, velocity and density in the diffusive-viscous wave equation on the intercept, gradient and curvature terms in the approximations. The results show that the diffusive attenuation parameter has a big impact on them, while the viscous attenuation parameter is insensitive to them; the velocity and density have a significant influence on the normal reflections and they distinctly affect the intercept, gradient and curvature term at lower acoustic impedance.

  4. Influence of electric field on rotating spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agladze, K.I.; De Kepper, P. |

    1992-06-25

    In this paper, the anisotropy of wave propogation in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction leads to a drift of spiral waves depending on the intensity of electric field. The vector parallel to the field points to the positive electrode and the perpendicular vector has a sign dependent on the spiral wave rotation direction. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Projection operators for the Rossby and Poincare waves in a beta-plane approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedkina, Anastasia; Ivan, Karpov; Sergej, Leble

    2013-04-01

    . The idea to use the polarization relations for the classification of waves originated in radio physics in the works of A. A. Novikov. In the theory of the electromagnetic field polarization relations is traditionally included in the analysis of wave phenomena. In the theory of acoustic-gravity waves, projection operators were introduced in a works of S. B. Leble. The object of study is a four-dimentional vector (components of the velocity, pressure and temperature). Based on these assumptions, we can construct the projection operators for superposition state on the linear basis, corresponding to the well-known type of waves. In this paper we consider procedure for construction of a projection operators for planetary Rossby and Poincare waves in the Earth's atmosphere in the approximation of the "beta-plane". In a result of work we constructed projection operators in this approximation for Poincare and Rossby waves. The tests for operators shown, that separation of the contribution of corresponding waves from source of the wave field is possible. Estimation accuracy of the operators and results of applying operators to the data TEC presented.

  6. Calculating Rotating Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Waves to Understand Magnetic Effects on Dynamical Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-09-01

    To understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated, and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, the magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g., dynamical tides. It is found that the magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency, but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman number and the square of the wavenumber. The dissipation at the resonant frequency on small scales is almost equal to the dissipation at the non-resonant frequencies, namely the resonance takes its effect on the dissipation at intermediate length scales. Moreover, the waves with phase propagation that is perpendicular to the magnetic field are much more damped. It is also interesting to find that the frequency-averaged dissipation is constant. This result suggests that in compact objects, magnetic effects on tidal dissipation should be considered.

  7. Approximation of wave action flux velocity in strongly sheared mean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banihashemi, Saeideh; Kirby, James T.; Dong, Zhifei

    2017-08-01

    Spectral wave models based on the wave action equation typically use a theoretical framework based on depth uniform current to account for current effects on waves. In the real world, however, currents often have variations over depth. Several recent studies have made use of a depth-weighted current U˜ due to [Skop, R. A., 1987. Approximate dispersion relation for wave-current interactions. J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Eng. 113, 187-195.] or [Kirby, J. T., Chen, T., 1989. Surface waves on vertically sheared flows: approximate dispersion relations. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1013-1027.] in order to account for the effect of vertical current shear. Use of the depth-weighted velocity, which is a function of wavenumber (or frequency and direction) has been further simplified in recent applications by only utilizing a weighted current based on the spectral peak wavenumber. These applications do not typically take into account the dependence of U˜ on wave number k, as well as erroneously identifying U˜ as the proper choice for current velocity in the wave action equation. Here, we derive a corrected expression for the current component of the group velocity. We demonstrate its consistency using analytic results for a current with constant vorticity, and numerical results for a measured, strongly-sheared current profile obtained in the Columbia River. The effect of choosing a single value for current velocity based on the peak wave frequency is examined, and we suggest an alternate strategy, involving a Taylor series expansion about the peak frequency, which should significantly extend the range of accuracy of current estimates available to the wave model with minimal additional programming and data transfer.

  8. Self-consistent approximation: Development and application to the problem of waves in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatchenko, V. A.; Polukhin, D. S.; Tsikalov, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    A new self-consistent approximation proposed earlier, is compared with various existing approximations, as well as with a numerical simulation of solutions of the wave equation for a medium with one-dimensional inhomogeneities. The Green's function, found using the new approach, is the closest to the result obtained by the numerical simulation. The results of the work show that the new approach has undoubted advantages in the study of stochastic problems in media with longwave inhomogeneities. The new self-consistent approximation in some cases has advantages over a numerical method: a more rapid process of calculation and the possibility of consideration of three-dimensional problems.

  9. Polynomial scaling approximations and dynamic correlation corrections to doubly occupied configuration interaction wave functions.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Mario; Alcoba, Diego R; Poelmans, Ward; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2015-09-14

    A class of polynomial scaling methods that approximate Doubly Occupied Configuration Interaction (DOCI) wave functions and improve the description of dynamic correlation is introduced. The accuracy of the resulting wave functions is analysed by comparing energies and studying the overlap between the newly developed methods and full configuration interaction wave functions, showing that a low energy does not necessarily entail a good approximation of the exact wave function. Due to the dependence of DOCI wave functions on the single-particle basis chosen, several orbital optimisation algorithms are introduced. An energy-based algorithm using the simulated annealing method is used as a benchmark. As a computationally more affordable alternative, a seniority number minimising algorithm is developed and compared to the energy based one revealing that the seniority minimising orbital set performs well. Given a well-chosen orbital basis, it is shown that the newly developed DOCI based wave functions are especially suitable for the computationally efficient description of static correlation and to lesser extent dynamic correlation.

  10. One-way approximation for the simulation of weak shock wave propagation in atmospheric flows.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Rénier, Mathieu; Gaudard, Eric; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2014-05-01

    A numerical scheme is developed to simulate the propagation of weak acoustic shock waves in the atmosphere with no absorption. It generalizes the method previously developed for a heterogeneous medium [Dagrau, Rénier, Marchiano, and Coulouvrat, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 20-32 (2011)] to the case of a moving medium. It is based on an approximate scalar wave equation for potential, rewritten in a moving time frame, and separated into three parts: (i) the linear wave equation in a homogeneous and quiescent medium, (ii) the effects of atmospheric winds and of density and speed of sound heterogeneities, and (iii) nonlinearities. Each effect is then solved separately by an adapted method: angular spectrum for the wave equation, finite differences for the flow and heterogeneity corrections, and analytical method in time domain for nonlinearities. To keep a one-way formulation, only forward propagating waves are kept in the angular spectrum part, while a wide-angle parabolic approximation is performed on the correction terms. The numerical process is validated in the case of guided modal propagation with a shear flow. It is then applied to the case of blast wave propagation within a boundary layer flow over a flat and rigid ground.

  11. Self-consistent internal structure of a rotating gaseous planet and its comparison with an approximation by oblate spheroidal equidensity surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In an important paper, Roberts (1963b) studied the hydrostatic equilibrium of an isolated, self-gravitating, rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body based on a controversial assumption/approximation that all (outer and internal) equidensity surfaces are in the shape of oblate spheroids whose eccentricities are a function of the equatorial radius and whose axes of symmetry are parallel to the rotation axis. We compute the three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, continuous solution for a rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body with Jupiter-like parameters without making any prior assumptions about its outer shape and internal structure. Upon partially relaxing the Roberts' approximation by assuming that only the outer equidensity surface is in the shape of an oblate spheroid, we also compute a finite-element solution with the same parameters without making any prior assumptions about its internal structure. It is found that all equidensity surfaces of the fully self-consistent solution differ only slightly from the oblate spheroidal shape. It is also found that the characteristic difference between the fully self-consistent solution and the outer-spheroidal-shape solution is insignificantly small. Our results suggest that the Roberts' assumption of spheroidal equidensity surfaces represents a reasonably accurate approximation for rotating polytropic gaseous bodies with Jupiter-like parameters. The numerical accuracy of our finite-element solution is checked by an exact analytic solution based on the Green's function using the spheroidal wave function. The three different solutions in non-spherical geometries - the fully self-consistent numerical solution, the numerical solution with the outer spheroidal shape and the exact analytical solution - can also serve as a useful benchmark for other solutions based on different numerical methods.

  12. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  13. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  14. The Detectability of Millimeter-wave Molecular Rotational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, Harvey S.; Pety, Jerome

    2016-06-01

    Elaborating on a formalism that was first expressed some 40 years ago, we consider the brightness of low-lying millimeter-wave rotational lines of strongly polar molecules at the threshold of detectability. We derive a simple expression relating the brightness to the line-of-sight integral of the product of the total gas and molecular number densities and a suitably defined temperature-dependent excitation rate into the upper level of the transition. Detectability of a line is contingent only on the ability of a molecule to channel enough of the ambient thermal energy into the line, and the excitation can be computed in bulk by summing over rates without solving the multi-level rate equations, or computing optical depths and excitation temperatures. Results for {{HCO}}+, HNC, and CS are compared with escape-probability solutions of the rate equations using closed-form expressions for the expected range of validity of our ansatz, with the result that gas number densities as high as {10}4 {{{cm}}}-3 or optical depths as high as 100 can be accommodated in some cases. For densities below a well-defined upper bound, the range of validity of the discussion can be cast as an upper bound on the line brightness which is 0.3 K for the J = 1-0 lines and 0.8-1.7 K for the J = 2-1 lines of these species. The discussion casts new light on the interpretation of line brightnesses under conditions of weak excitation, simplifies derivation of physical parameters, and eliminates the need to construct grids of numerical solutions of the rate equations.

  15. Detecting the Orbital Angular Momentum of Electro-Magnetic Waves Using Virtual Rotational Antenna.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2017-07-04

    Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) is a typical spatial mode of an Electro-Magnetic (EM) wave. Correctly detecting the OAM mode is fundamental and of foremost importance when applying the phenomenon to wireless transmission in free space. It is found that when rotating an OAM wave, a rotational Doppler shift that is proportional to the rotation speed and the OAM mode number can be observed. This property can be used for OAM detection, i.e., different OAM modes are identified by measuring the corresponding rotational Doppler frequency shifts. In previous work, this method was implemented by mechanically rotating the OAM wave, resulting in a small frequency shift. Since the high-speed mechanical rotation is hard to manufacture in a real system, it brings limitations to the bandwidth for each OAM wave. In this paper, we report on an OAM mode detection method based on digitally rotating a virtual antenna. The transmitter and receiver are physically fixed, but the Virtual Rotational Antenna (VRA) is obtained by interpolating the signals received from transverse-mounted receiving antennas. A large rotational Doppler shift occurs as a consequence of using digital processing, resulting in more capability for wideband wireless data transmission with the larger shifted frequency.

  16. Gravity jitter effected slosh waves and the stability of a rotating bubble under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the pressure of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitters excite slosh wave with higher ratio of maximum amplitude to wave length than that of the slosh waves generated by the higher frequency gravity jitters.

  17. Approximate entropy analysis of short-term HFECG based on wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xinbao; Xu, Yinlin; Wang, Jun; Ma, Xiaofei

    2005-02-01

    An improved approximate entropy (ApEn) algorithm based on wave mode is proposed by analyzing and modifying ApEn, so that the irregular analysis can be applied to analyze the short-term series, which contain a great deal of detailed information and fluctuate slowly but in a wide range, such as high-frequency electrocardiogram (HFECG). By analyzing the complexity of HFECG, a conclusion can be drawn that ApEn algorithm based on wave mode can obviously distinguish heart diseases from the healthy group. Therefore, it is of significance for diagnosing myocardial infarction in time.

  18. A WKB approximation of elastic waves travelling on a shell of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsbøl, J. O.; Sorokin, S. V.; Peake, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the elastic waveguide properties of an infinite pipe with circular cross section whose radius varies slowly along its length. The equations governing the elastodynamics of such shells are derived analytically, approximated asymptotically in the limit of slow axial variation, and solved by means of the WKB-method (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin). From the derived solution the dispersion relation, modal coefficients, and wave amplification at each location along the structure are extracted, allowing identification of which types of waves are able to propagate along the structure at a given frequency. A key feature in the formulation of the model and the solution is that the radius and its variation are not specified in advance. Two characteristic examples of shells of revolution are presented to illustrate some general features of the waveguide properties, demonstrating how the evolution of the waves depends on the axial variation of the shell radius. It is explained how local resonances can be excited by the travelling waves and how strong amplifications of displacement can be produced. Specifically, for the axial/breathing wave it is shown that a local resonance is excited at the location where the frequency of the travelling wave and the radius of the shell exactly match the ring-frequency.

  19. Comparison of methods for calculating Franck-Condon factors beyond the harmonic approximation: how important are Duschinsky rotations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Patrick; Rauhut, Guntram

    2015-12-01

    Three different approaches for calculating Franck-Condon factors beyond the harmonic approximation are compared and discussed in detail. Duschinsky effects are accounted for either by a rotation of the initial or final wavefunctions - which are obtained from state-specific configuration-selective vibrational configuration interaction calculations - or by a rotation of the underlying multi-dimensional potential energy surfaces being determined from explicitly correlated coupled-cluster approaches. An analysis of the Duschinsky effects in dependence on the rotational angles and the anisotropy of the wavefunction is provided. Benchmark calculations for the photoelectron spectra of ClO2, HS-2 and ZnOH- are presented. An application of the favoured approach for calculating Franck-Condon factors to the oxidation of Zn(H2O)+ and Zn2(H2O)+ demonstrates its applicability to systems with more than three atoms.

  20. Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Liu and Hong Qin

    2011-11-07

    The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

  1. Equation of State Dependence of Gravitational Waves from Rapidly Rotating Core-Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar

    2016-03-01

    We carry out axisymmetric simulations of rotating core-collapse, exploring over 92 precollapse rotational configurations and 18 different finite-temperature microphysical equations of state (EOS) using the general-relativistic hydrodynamical code CoCoNuT. Our focus is on gravitational wave (GW) emission. We find that the GW wave signature depends systematically on the rotation rate of the inner core at bounce and the compactness of the protoneutron star (PNS), set by the EOS and rotation. The GW signal from core bounce is almost independent of the EOS. However, the frequency of the post-bounce ring down signal from the fundamental quadrupole oscillation mode of the PNS is dependent on both rotation and the EOS, increasing with rotation rate and compactness. We will discuss the origin of the EOS-dependent f-mode frequency variation and its potential observability with Advanced LIGO.

  2. Approximate Green's function representations for the analysis of SAW and leaky wave devices.

    PubMed

    Peach, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    The Green's function or boundary element method (BEM) is the preferred technique for rigorous SAW device analysis. However, because of its computational cost, its principal application is the analysis of mode propagation in periodic structures to determine parameters that can then be used in simplified coupling of modes (COM) or P-matrix models. In this paper, rigorous representations are derived that express the Green's function in terms of a continuous superposition of modes. The derivations include detailed analysis of the Green's function properties as a function of both frequency and wavenumber, and representations are obtained for both the slowness and spatial domains. Approximate forms are then generated by replacing the continuous mode superposition by a discrete one. The Green's function can be approximated to any required degree of accuracy, and the resulting approximations are applicable to any type of wave on any type of substrate. The long-range spatial components in the approximate forms are represented by exponential terms. The separable properties of these terms allow this class of approximation to be applied to general SAW and leaky wave device analysis in such a way that the computational effort increases only linearly with device size.

  3. A high frequency correction to the Kirchhoff approximation, with application to rough surface EM wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    A high frequency correction to the Kirchhoff approximation is developed for application to rough surface scattering. An approximate solution to the magnetic field integral equation for perfect conductivity and plane wave excitation yields a perturbed surface current expressed as a linear function of the second derivatives of surface height. The corrected surface current vector is substituted into the far field Stratton-Chu integral and average backscattered powers for the four polarization combinations are computed on the assumption that the surface is describable as a stationary Gaussian random process. The strength of this scattering solution is that it can account for height curvature correlation without requiring small height and slope.

  4. The breakdown of the anelastic approximation in rotating compressible convection: implications for astrophysical systems.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Michael A; Julien, Keith; Marti, Philippe

    2015-03-08

    The linear theory for rotating compressible convection in a plane layer geometry is presented for the astrophysically relevant case of low Prandtl number gases. When the rotation rate of the system is large, the flow remains geostrophically balanced for all stratification levels investigated and the classical (i.e. incompressible) asymptotic scaling laws for the critical parameters are recovered. For sufficiently small Prandtl numbers, increasing stratification tends to further destabilize the fluid layer, decrease the critical wavenumber and increase the oscillation frequency of the convective instability. In combination, these effects increase the relative magnitude of the time derivative of the density perturbation contained in the conservation of mass equation to non-negligible levels; the resulting convective instabilities occur in the form of compressional quasi-geostrophic oscillations. We find that the anelastic equations, which neglect this term, cannot capture these instabilities and possess spuriously growing eigenmodes in the rapidly rotating, low Prandtl number regime. It is shown that the Mach number for rapidly rotating compressible convection is intrinsically small for all background states, regardless of the departure from adiabaticity.

  5. The breakdown of the anelastic approximation in rotating compressible convection: implications for astrophysical systems

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Michael A.; Julien, Keith; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The linear theory for rotating compressible convection in a plane layer geometry is presented for the astrophysically relevant case of low Prandtl number gases. When the rotation rate of the system is large, the flow remains geostrophically balanced for all stratification levels investigated and the classical (i.e. incompressible) asymptotic scaling laws for the critical parameters are recovered. For sufficiently small Prandtl numbers, increasing stratification tends to further destabilize the fluid layer, decrease the critical wavenumber and increase the oscillation frequency of the convective instability. In combination, these effects increase the relative magnitude of the time derivative of the density perturbation contained in the conservation of mass equation to non-negligible levels; the resulting convective instabilities occur in the form of compressional quasi-geostrophic oscillations. We find that the anelastic equations, which neglect this term, cannot capture these instabilities and possess spuriously growing eigenmodes in the rapidly rotating, low Prandtl number regime. It is shown that the Mach number for rapidly rotating compressible convection is intrinsically small for all background states, regardless of the departure from adiabaticity. PMID:25792951

  6. Effect on plasma rotation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. P.; Barnes, M.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Parra, F. I.; Bonoli, P. T.; Reinke, M. L.

    2014-02-12

    The injection of LH waves for current drive into a tokamak changes the ion toroidal rotation. In Alcator C-Mod, the direction of the steady state rotation change due to LH waves depends on the plasma current and the density. The change in rotation can be estimated by balancing the external torque of lower hybrid waves with the turbulent radial transport of the momentum. For high plasma current, the turbulent pinch and diffusion of the injected counter-current momentum are sufficient to explain the rotation change. However, for low plasma current, the change in the the intrinsic momentum transport (residual stress) for a non-rotating state is required to explain the co-current rotation change. Accordingly, we investigate the intrinsic momentum transport for the non-rotating state when diamagnetic flow and ExB flow cancel each other. The change in the intrinsic momentum transport due to lower hybrid waves is significant when the plasma current is low, which may explain the rotation reversal for low plasma current. The effect of changed q (safety factor) profile by lower hybrid on the intrinsic momentum transport is estimated by gyrokinetics.

  7. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  8. Long-wave approximation for hybridization modeling of local surface plasmonic resonance in nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ben Q; Liu, Changhong

    2011-01-15

    A hybridization model for the localized surface plasmon resonance of a nanoshell is developed within the framework of long-wave approximation. Compared with the existing hybridization model derived from the hydrodynamic simulation of free electron gas, this approach is much simpler and gives identical results for a concentric nanoshell. Also, with this approach, the limitations associated with the original hybridization model are succinctly stated. Extension of this approach to hybridization modeling of more complicated structures such as multiplayered nanoshells is straightforward.

  9. Approximation of acoustic waves by explicit Newmark's schemes and spectral element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampieri, Elena; Pavarino, Luca F.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical approximation of the acoustic wave equation is presented. The spatial discretization is based on conforming spectral elements, whereas we use finite difference Newmark's explicit integration schemes for the temporal discretization. A rigorous stability analysis is developed for the discretized problem providing an upper bound for the time step [Delta]t. We present several numerical results concerning stability and convergence properties of the proposed numerical methods.

  10. An Approximate Analytical Model of Shock Waves from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Technical Information Service (NTIS). Qualified requestors may obtain additional copies from the Defense Technical Information Center. All others should...apply to the National Technical Information Service. If your address has changed, or .if you wish to be removed from the mailing list, or if the addressee...NUMBERS An Approximate Analvtlial Model of Shock Waves from Contract Underground Nuclear Explosions F19628-88-K-0040

  11. Approximation to cutoffs of higher modes of Rayleigh waves for a layered earth model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    A cutoff defines the long-period termination of a Rayleigh-wave higher mode and, therefore is a key characteristic of higher mode energy relationship to several material properties of the subsurface. Cutoffs have been used to estimate the shear-wave velocity of an underlying half space of a layered earth model. In this study, we describe a method that replaces the multilayer earth model with a single surface layer overlying the half-space model, accomplished by harmonic averaging of velocities and arithmetic averaging of densities. Using numerical comparisons with theoretical models validates the single-layer approximation. Accuracy of this single-layer approximation is best defined by values of the calculated error in the frequency and phase velocity estimate at a cutoff. Our proposed method is intuitively explained using ray theory. Numerical results indicate that a cutoffs frequency is controlled by the averaged elastic properties within the passing depth of Rayleigh waves and the shear-wave velocity of the underlying half space. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  12. Extension of the Temkin-Poet model to L>0 partial waves: The generalized exchange approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, A.; Shertzer, J.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1998-02-01

    The Temkin-Poet (TP) model of electron-hydrogen scattering is here generalized to L>0 partial waves in such a way as to be a clear generalization of the exchange approximation (EA). This generalized exchange approximation (GEA) leads to a pair of coupled partial differential equations (PDE's). Boundary conditions are formulated, and the PDE's are solved by a finite element method program adapted from a previous partial wave calculation of the full problem [Shertzer and Botero, Phys. Rev. A 49, 3673 (1994)]. Calculations are carried out for 1,3P and 1,3D partial waves in the elastic region. Phase shifts are bounded from below, as is rigorously required, by exchange approximate phase shifts. But the GEA can yield resonances: in the elastic region, in addition to the 1S resonance of the TP model, there is a 3P resonance whose position and width are in close proximity to the lowest 3P resonance of the full theory. The GEA distinguishes between singlet and triplet scattering for all L, and it contains inelastic and ionization channels in the appropriate energy regions. It is expected that the GEA will have its greatest utility in the ionization domain, as a nontrivial test of the many recent methods being developed.

  13. Circularly polarized few-optical-cycle solitons in the short-wave-approximation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Leblond, Herve; Triki, Houria; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2011-08-15

    We consider the propagation of few-cycle pulses (FCPs) beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation in media in which the dynamics of constituent atoms is described by a two-level Hamiltonian by taking into account the wave polarization. We consider the short-wave approximation, assuming that the resonance frequency of the two-level atoms is well below the inverse of the characteristic duration of the optical pulse. By using the reductive perturbation method (multiscale analysis), we derive from the Maxwell-Bloch-Heisenberg equations the governing evolution equations for the two polarization components of the electric field in the first order of the perturbation approach. We show that propagation of circularly polarized (CP) few-optical-cycle solitons is described by a system of coupled nonlinear equations, which reduces in the scalar case to the standard sine Gordon equation describing the dynamics of linearly polarized FCPs in the short-wave-approximation regime. By direct numerical simulations, we calculate the lifetime of CP FCPs, and we study the transition to two orthogonally polarized single-humped pulses as a generic route of their instability.

  14. Gravitational-wave dynamics and black-hole dynamics: second quasi-spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2001-12-01

    Gravitational radiation with roughly spherical wavefronts, produced by roughly spherical black holes or other astrophysical objects, is described by an approximation scheme. The first quasi-spherical approximation, describing radiation propagation on a background, is generalized to include additional non-linear effects, due to the radiation itself. The gravitational radiation is locally defined and admits an energy tensor, satisfying all standard local energy conditions and entering the truncated Einstein equations as an effective energy tensor. This second quasi-spherical approximation thereby includes gravitational radiation reaction, such as the back-reaction on the black hole. With respect to a canonical flow of time, the combined energy-momentum of the matter and gravitational radiation is covariantly conserved. The corresponding Noether charge is a local gravitational mass-energy. Energy conservation is formulated as a local first law relating the gradient of the gravitational mass to work and energy-supply terms, including the energy flux of the gravitational radiation. Zeroth, first and second laws of black-hole dynamics are given, involving a dynamic surface gravity. Local gravitational-wave dynamics is described by a non-linear wave equation. In terms of a complex gravitational-radiation potential, the energy tensor has a scalar-field form and the wave equation is an Ernst equation, holding independently at each spherical angle. The strain to be measured by a distant detector is simply defined.

  15. Approximate optimal tracking control for near-surface AUVs with wave disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Su, Hao; Tang, Gongyou

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers the optimal trajectory tracking control problem for near-surface autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in the presence of wave disturbances. An approximate optimal tracking control (AOTC) approach is proposed. Firstly, a six-degrees-of-freedom (six-DOF) AUV model with its body-fixed coordinate system is decoupled and simplified and then a nonlinear control model of AUVs in the vertical plane is given. Also, an exosystem model of wave disturbances is constructed based on Hirom approximation formula. Secondly, the time-parameterized desired trajectory which is tracked by the AUV's system is represented by the exosystem. Then, the coupled two-point boundary value (TPBV) problem of optimal tracking control for AUVs is derived from the theory of quadratic optimal control. By using a recently developed successive approximation approach to construct sequences, the coupled TPBV problem is transformed into a problem of solving two decoupled linear differential sequences of state vectors and adjoint vectors. By iteratively solving the two equation sequences, the AOTC law is obtained, which consists of a nonlinear optimal feedback item, an expected output tracking item, a feedforward disturbances rejection item, and a nonlinear compensatory term. Furthermore, a wave disturbances observer model is designed in order to solve the physically realizable problem. Simulation is carried out by using the Remote Environmental Unit (REMUS) AUV model to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love Wave Energy Ratio based on Array-derived Rotation and Vertical Component Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.; Lin, C. J.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.; Vernon, F.

    2016-12-01

    Using closely located broadband seismographs at Pinon Flat, California (PFO) for one-year long record (2015), we estimated Rayleigh-to-Love wave energy ratios in the secondary microseism (0.1-0.35 Hz) for each season (Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall). We first derived the rotation seismograms from a seismic array; since a vertical-component of rotation consists of almost pure SH (Love-wave) signals, rotation seismograms allow us to estimate Love-wave amplitudes at the surface. Rayleigh wave amplitudes can be estimated from vertical-component seismograms. Knowledge of seismic structure is required to turn these surface amplitude ratios to the Rayleigh-to-Love wave energy ratios. We used three published models (i) SCEC CVM, (ii) tomographic study for the Anza network (Scott et al., 1994), and (iii) receiver function study at PFO (Baker et al., 1998) and compared the results. Derived ratios do not differ very much and fall between 2.0 and 2.5. This ratio means there are 2-2.5 times as much Rayleigh-wave energy than Love-wave energy at PFO. This range seems fairly robust. There is a hint of more Rayleigh waves in summer (about 10 percent) but the size of uncertainty does not allow us to conclude it. In our previous study (Tanimoto et al., 2016), we estimated the Rayleigh-to-Love wave energy ratio at Wettzell, Germany. Our result was that this ratio was about 0.9-1.0, meaning that there was approximately the same amount of Rayleigh-wave energy and Love-wave energy that were passing through Wettzell. Our current result of 2-2.5 at PFO is quite different and suggests that Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratios may differ from location to location. However, such a difference may not be a surprise as there are multiple microseism sources in Europe (e.g., Friedrich et al., 1998; Juretzek and Hazdiioannou, 2016) while the source(s) are spatially limited to the west (the Pacific ocean) in the case of California.

  17. Generation of shear Alfven waves by a rotating magnetic field source: Three-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Karavaev, A. V.; Gumerov, N. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, Xi; Sharma, A. S.; Gekelman, W.; Wang, Y.; Van Compernolle, B.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2011-03-15

    The paper discusses the generation of polarized shear Alfven waves radiated from a rotating magnetic field source created via a phased orthogonal two-loop antenna. A semianalytical three-dimensional cold two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics model was developed and compared with recent experiments in the University of California, Los Angeles large plasma device. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental measurements and the linear shear Alfven wave properties, namely, spatiotemporal wave structure, a dispersion relation with nonzero transverse wave number, the magnitude of the wave dependences on the wave frequency, show good agreement. From the simulations it was found that the energy of the Alfven wave generated by the rotating magnetic field source is distributed between the kinetic energy of ions and electrons and the electromagnetic energy of the wave as: {approx}1/2 is the energy of the electromagnetic field, {approx}1/2 is the kinetic energy of the ion fluid, and {approx}2.5% is the kinetic energy of electron fluid for the experiment. The wave magnetic field power calculated from the experimental data and using a fluid model differ by {approx}1% and is {approx}250 W for the experimental parameters. In both the experiment and the three-dimensional two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics simulations the rotating magnetic field source was found to be very efficient for generating shear Alfven waves.

  18. Tidal waves in 102Pd: a rotating condensate of multiple d bosons.

    PubMed

    Ayangeakaa, A D; Garg, U; Caprio, M A; Carpenter, M P; Ghugre, S S; Janssens, R V F; Kondev, F G; Matta, J T; Mukhopadhyay, S; Patel, D; Seweryniak, D; Sun, J; Zhu, S; Frauendorf, S

    2013-03-08

    Low-lying collective excitations in even-even vibrational and transitional nuclei may be described semiclassically as quadrupole running waves on the surface of the nucleus ("tidal waves"), and the observed vibrational-rotational behavior can be thought of as resulting from a rotating condensate of interacting d bosons. These concepts have been investigated by measuring lifetimes of the levels in the yrast band of the (102)Pd nucleus with the Doppler shift attenuation method. The extracted B(E2) reduced transition probabilities for the yrast band display a monotonic increase with spin, in agreement with the interpretation based on rotation-induced condensation of aligned d bosons.

  19. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. III. Cylindrical approximations for heat waves traveling inwards

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on the heat equation in cylindrical geometry using the symmetry (Neumann) boundary condition at the plasma center. This means that the approximations derived here should be used only to estimate transport coefficients between the plasma center and the off-axis perturbative source. If the effect of cylindrical geometry is small, it is also possible to use semi-infinite domain approximations presented in Part I and Part II of this series. A number of new approximations are derived in this part, Part III, based upon continued fractions of the modified Bessel function of the first kind and the confluent hypergeometric function of the first kind. These approximations together with the approximations based on semi-infinite domains are compared for heat waves traveling towards the center. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of the frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can be used to estimate the transport coefficients over a large parameter range for cases without convection and damping, cases with damping only, and cases with convection and damping. The relative error between the approximation and its underlying model is below 2% for the case, where only diffusivity and damping are considered. If also convectivity is considered, the diffusivity can be estimated well in a large region, but there is also a large region in which no suitable approximation is found. This paper is the third part (Part III) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part II

  20. Shear-horizontal waves in a rotated Y-cut quartz plate with an imperfectly bonded mass layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Du, Jianke; Wang, Ji; Yang, Jiashi

    2011-03-01

    We study shear-horizontal (SH) waves in an unbounded plate of rotated Y-cut quartz carrying a thin mass layer imperfectly or nonrigidly bonded to the surface of the quartz plate. The imperfect interface is described by the socalled shear-lag model that allows the displacement to be discontinuous across the interface. A transcendental frequency equation that determines the dispersion relations of the waves is obtained. Exact and approximate solutions to the frequency equation are presented. The effects of the mass layer and the imperfect interface on the dispersion relations are examined. A quantitative criterion is given which distinguishes whether the combined effect of the mass layer and the imperfect interface raises or lowers the wave frequencies.

  1. Wave propagation in geomaterials in the presence of rotation-induced negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2017-04-01

    Rotational degrees of freedom in geomaterials reflect the ability of constituents to rotate independently. If the constituents are not strictly spherical (or circular in 2D) then their rotation causes the effect of apparent negative stiffness and can be interpreted as negative shear modulus. In order to study the mechanism of stability of geomaterials we use experimental results of a designed inverted pendulum comprising negative stiffness elements. Understanding of wave propagation in geomaterials with apparent negative stiffness has significant importance, especially for interpretation of the results of seismic exploration. In particular this can provide a method for the detection of the pressure of rotational degrees of freedom and insight into the degree of fragmentation. Wave can propagate in such a material if the boundary conditions stabilise the geomaterial. We investigate the values of the negative shear modulus allowing the p- and s-waves propagate. We then numerically model the propagation of initial impulse with the account for the effect of negative stiffness.

  2. Observation of Co and Counter Rotation Produced by Lower Hybrid Waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R. R.; Podpaly, Y.; Lee, J.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-12-23

    Lower hybrid waves launched uni-directionally into tokamak plasmas impart momentum to the electrons. This momentum can be transferred to the ions, leading to substantial counter current rotation. Observations of LH-induced counter rotation have been previously reported [1], and the initial rate of increase has been found to be consistent with the calculated rate of wave momentum injection [2]. However, in recent experiments in Alcator C-Mod it has been found that application of LH waves to relatively low current (I{sub p}{approx}0.4-0.6 MA) plasmas can result in a co-current change of rotation, which implies a different mechanism than that described above. This appears to be linked to the so-called intrinsic rotation commonly observed in Alcator C-Mod and other tokamaks [3]. In addition to the change in direction at low current, some dependence on the magnetic configuration (USL vs. LSN) has been observed.

  3. At what spatio-temporal scales can inertial waves be found in rotating turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Campagne, Antoine; Gallet, Basile; Moisy, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    We present a spatio-temporal analysis of a statistically stationary rotating turbulence experiments aiming to extract a statistical signature of inertial waves and to determine at what scales and frequencies these waves can be detected. This analysis is performed from two-point correlations of temporal Fourier transform of the velocity fields time series obtained from stereoscopic PIV measurements in the rotating frame. From this data, it is possible to quantify the degree of anisotropy of turbulence due to global rotation both as a function of angular frequency ω and spatial scale normal to the rotation axis r⊥. This frequency and scale dependent anisotropy is found compatible with the dispersion relation of inertial waves, provided that a weak non-linearity condition is satisfied in terms of a properly defined Rossby number dependant on the spatio-temporal scale (ω,r⊥).

  4. Modelling and observations of oceanic nonlinear internal wave packets affected by the Earth's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimshaw, Roger; da Silva, Jose C. B.; Magalhaes, Jorge M.

    2017-08-01

    The large-amplitude internal solitary waves commonly observed in the coastal ocean can propagate for long distances for long times, so that it may be necessary to take account of the effects of the Earth's background rotation. In this case an appropriate model wave evolution equation is the Ostrovsky equation, whose typical solutions indicate that internal solitary waves will evolve into envelope wave packets. Unlike the more usual Korteweg-de Vries solutions which are typically rank-ordered wave packets, these are centred with the largest waves in the middle. This qualitative feature, together with certain key quantitative parameters such as the envelope carrier wavenumber and speed, can be sought in oceanic observations. Hence we have examined many SAR images of internal solitary waves with the general aim of finding features indicating that rotational effects have become significant. From these we report in detail on six typical cases of which four give indications of rotational effects. In addition we use a two-layer fluid model to estimate how the rotational parameters depend on the background stratification and topography.

  5. The generation and propagation of internal gravity waves in a rotating fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Chabert Dhieres, G.; Didelle, H.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an extension of a study conducted bu Maxworthy (1979) on internal wave generation by barotropic tidal flow over bottom topography. A short series of experiments was carried out during a limited time period on a large (14-m diameter) rotating table. It was attempted to obtain, in particular, information regarding the plan form of the waves, the exact character of the flow over the obstacle, and the evolution of the waves. The main basin was a dammed section of a long free surface water tunnel. The obstacle was towed back and forth by a wire harness connected to an electronically controlled hydraulic piston, the stroke and period of which could be independently varied. Attention is given to the evolution of the wave crests, the formation of solitary wave groups the evolution of the three-dimensional wave field wave shapes, the wave amplitudes, and particle motion.

  6. Proposal for determining the energy content of gravitational waves by using approximate symmetries of differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Ibrar; Qadir, Asghar; Mahomed, F. M.

    2009-06-15

    Since gravitational wave spacetimes are time-varying vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations, there is no unambiguous means to define their energy content. However, Weber and Wheeler had demonstrated that they do impart energy to test particles. There have been various proposals to define the energy content, but they have not met with great success. Here we propose a definition using 'slightly broken' Noether symmetries. We check whether this definition is physically acceptable. The procedure adopted is to appeal to 'approximate symmetries' as defined in Lie analysis and use them in the limit of the exact symmetry holding. A problem is noted with the use of the proposal for plane-fronted gravitational waves. To attain a better understanding of the implications of this proposal we also use an artificially constructed time-varying nonvacuum metric and evaluate its Weyl and stress-energy tensors so as to obtain the gravitational and matter components separately and compare them with the energy content obtained by our proposal. The procedure is also used for cylindrical gravitational wave solutions. The usefulness of the definition is demonstrated by the fact that it leads to a result on whether gravitational waves suffer self-damping.

  7. Hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities. [Alfven wave propagation in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Cargill, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    1D hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities (RDs) are presented. When the angle between the discontinuity normal and the magnetic field (theta-BN) is 30 deg, the RD broadens into a quasi-steady state of width 60-80 c/omega-i. The hodogram has a characteristic S-shape. When theta-BN = 60 deg, the RD is much narrower (10 c/omega-i). For right handed rotations, the results are similar to theta-BN = 30 deg. For left handed rotations, the RD does not evolve much from its initial conditions and the S-shape in the hodogram is much less visible. The results can be understood in terms of matching a fast mode wavelike structure upstream of the RD with an intermediate mode one downstream.

  8. Wave-number-based assessment of the doubly asymptotic approximation. I. Frequency domain wet surface impedance

    PubMed

    Ginsberg

    2000-04-01

    The doubly asymptotic approximation (DAA) is a canonical relationship for the interaction between surface normal velocity and pressure. Its validity for a slender hemicapped cylinder is examined by formulating a frequency domain version of DAA using the global basis functions employed in the wave-number-based formulation of the surface variational principle [K. Wu and J. H. Ginsberg, ASME J. Vib. Acoust. 120, 392-400 (1998)]. The wet surface impedance matrix, which relates the spectral representation of normal velocity to a corresponding representation of pressure, is obtained according to a second-order version of DAA and according to the surface variational principle. Comparison and interpretation of the results reveals that DAA fails to account for highlights associated with transition from supersonic to subsonic surface waves as the surface wavelength decreases with frequency held constant.

  9. The "JK-only" approximation in density matrix functional and wave function theory.

    PubMed

    Kollmar, Christian

    2004-12-15

    Various energy functionals applying the "JK-only" approximation which leads to two-index two-electron integrals instead of four-index two-electron integrals in the electron-electron interaction term of the electronic energy are presented. Numerical results of multiconfiguration self-consistent field calculations for the best possible "JK-only" wave function are compared to those obtained from the pair excitation multiconfiguration self-consistent (PEMCSCF) method and two versions of density matrix functional theory. One of these is derived making explicit use of some necessary conditions for N representability of the second-order density matrix. It is shown that this method models the energy functional based on the best possible "JK-only" wave function with good accuracy. The calculations also indicate that only a minor fraction of the total correlation energy is incorporated by "JK-only" approaches for larger molecules.

  10. The effect of nonlinear traveling waves on rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui-Correa, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the housing stiffness on nonlinear traveling waves is presented in this work. It was found that the housing controls the synchronization of nonlinear elements and it allows nonlinear waves to travel through the structure. This phenomenon was observed in a gearbox with a soft housing, and the phenomenon was reproduced with a lump-mass dynamic model. The model included a pair of gears, the rolling bearings and the housing. The model considered all the nonlinear effects. Numerical and experimental results were analyzed with a time-frequency method using the Morlet wavelet function. A compound effect was observed when the nonlinear waves travel between the gears and the bearings: the waves increased the dynamic load amplitude and add another periodic load.

  11. A modified equatorial β-plane approximation modelling nonlinear wave-current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David

    2017-09-01

    A modification of the standard geophysical equatorial β-plane model equations, incorporating a gravitational-correction term in the tangent plane approximation, is derived. We present an exact solution satisfying the modified equations, whose form is explicit in the Lagrangian framework, and which represents three-dimensional, nonlinear oceanic wave-current interactions. It is rigorously established, by way of analytical and degree-theoretical considerations, that the solution is dynamically possible, in the sense that the mapping it prescribes from Lagrangian to Eulerian coordinates is a global diffeomorphism.

  12. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from two-dimensional rough surfaces with an impedance approximation.

    PubMed

    Soriano, G; Saillard, M

    2001-01-01

    The sparse-matrix-flat-surface iterative approach has been implemented for perfectly conducting surfaces and modified to enhance convergence stability and speed for very rough surfaces. Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering enhancement using a beam decomposition technique are compared with millimeter-wave laboratory experimental data. Strong but finite conductivity for metals or thin skin depth for dielectrics is simulated by an impedance approximation. This gives rise to a nonhypersingular integral equation derived from the magnetic field integral equation. The effect of finite conductivity for a metal at visible wavelengths is shown.

  13. An approximate waves-bordering algorithm for adaptive finite elements analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi Cecchi, M.; Marcuzzi, F.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper an Approximate Waves-Bordering algorithm (AWB) is presented. It computes the finite elements linear system solution-update after a refinement/unrefinement step. This is done taking into consideration only the equations that correspond to the nodes whose solution is modified above a certain tolerance and it appears to be very efficient. The algorithm considers an increasing set of equations that updates recursively and stops when the norm of the residual has gone under a user-defined threshold.

  14. Distorted-wave Born approximation study of the 11Li(p,t)9Li reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction 11Li(p,t)9Li(gs) at an incident energy of 4 MeV is treated in terms of a simplistic distorted-wave Born approximation transfer. The halo neutrons involved in the reaction are treated as a di-neutron cluster transferred in a simultaneous process. This appears to be a good approximation of the mechanism. The dominant contribution to the reaction comes from the known (1s 1/2)2 structure component of the ground state of 11Li, and the cross section angular distribution seems to be relatively insensitive to the fact that 11 Li has an anomalously large radius due to its Borromean halo properties. Significantly this simple treatment of the reaction is in much better agreement with the experimental angular distribution than a more sophisticated calculation.

  15. Study of Rotating-Wave Electromagnetic Modes for Applications in Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating waves are circularly polarized electromagnetic wave fields that behave like traveling waves but have discrete resonant frequencies of standing waves. In JPL's Communications Ground Systems Section (333), we are making use of this peculiar type of electromagnetic modes to develop a new generation of devices and instruments for direct applications in space exploration. In this article, we present a straightforward analysis about the phase velocity of these wave modes. A derivation is presented for the azimuthal phase velocity of transverse magnetic rotating modes inside cylindrical cavity resonators. Computer simulations and experimental measurements are also presented that corroborate the theory developed. It is shown that the phase velocity of rotating waves inside cavity resonators increases with radial position within the cavity and decreases when employing higher-order operating modes. The exotic features of rotating modes, once better understood, have the potential to enable the implementation of a plethora of new devices that range from amplifiers and frequency multipliers to electron accelerators and ion thrusters.

  16. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  17. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  18. On plasma rotation induced by waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2013-10-15

    The momentum conservation for resonant wave-particle interactions, now proven rigorously and for general settings, is applied to explain in simple terms how tokamak plasma is spun up by the wave momentum perpendicular to the dc magnetic field. The perpendicular momentum is passed through resonant particles to the dc field and, giving rise to the radial electric field, is accumulated as a Poynting flux; the bulk plasma is then accelerated up to the electric drift velocity proportional to that flux, independently of collisions. The presence of this collisionless acceleration mechanism permits varying the ratio of the average kinetic momentum absorbed by the resonant-particle and bulk distributions depending on the orientation of the wave vector. Both toroidal and poloidal forces are calculated, and a fluid model is presented that yields the plasma velocity at equilibrium.

  19. Rotation of weakly collisional plasmas in tokamaks, operated with Alfv{acute e}n waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsypin, V.S.; Elfimov, A.G.; de Azevedo, C.A.; de Assis, A.S.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves on weakly collisional plasma rotation in tokamaks has been studied for the plateau and banana regimes. The quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field have been found. The estimation of these quantities for the Phaedrus-T tokamak [S. Wukitch {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 77}, 294 (1996)] and for the Joint European Torus (JET) [A. Fasoli {ital et} {ital al}., Nucl. Fusion, {bold 36}, 258 (1996)] has been presented. It is shown that the kinetic Alfv{acute e}n waves, which are needed for current drive, change weakly the quasistationary rotation velocities and radial electric field, as found from the experimental data of these tokamaks. In conditions with increased rf power, the plasma rotation and radial electric field can essentially grow up. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ningning; Guo, Huaiming; Zhang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Topological superfluid is an exotic state of quantum matter that possesses a nodeless superfluid gap in the bulk and Andreev edge modes at the boundary of a finite system. Here, we study a multi-orbital superfluid driven by an attractive s-wave interaction in a rotating optical lattice. Interestingly, we find that the rotation induces the inter-orbital hybridization and drives the system into topological orbital superfluid in accordance with intrinsically chiral d-wave pairing characteristics. Thanks to the conservation of spin, the topological orbital superfluid supports four rather than two chiral Andreev edge modes at the boundary of the lattice. Moreover, we find that the intrinsic harmonic confining potential forms a circular spatial barrier which accumulates atoms and supports a mass current under the injection of small angular momentum as an external driving force. This feature provides an experimentally detectable phenomenon to verify the topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice.

  1. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics in a rotating frame: Exotic orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Oza, Anand U.; Harris, Daniel M.; Rosales, Rodolfo R.; Bush, John W. M.; Wind-Willassen, Øistein

    2014-08-15

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of droplets walking on a rotating vibrating fluid bath. The drop's trajectory is described by an integro-differential equation, which is simulated numerically in various parameter regimes. As the forcing acceleration is progressively increased, stable circular orbits give way to wobbling orbits, which are succeeded in turn by instabilities of the orbital center characterized by steady drifting then discrete leaping. In the limit of large vibrational forcing, the walker's trajectory becomes chaotic, but its statistical behavior reflects the influence of the unstable orbital solutions. The study results in a complete regime diagram that summarizes the dependence of the walker's behavior on the system parameters. Our predictions compare favorably to the experimental observations of Harris and Bush [“Droplets walking in a rotating frame: from quantized orbits to multimodal statistics,” J. Fluid Mech. 739, 444–464 (2014)].

  2. Waves and rays in plano-concave laser cavities: I. Geometric modes in the paraxial approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, N.; Romanelli, M.; Lebental, M.; Brunel, M.

    2017-05-01

    Eigenmodes of laser cavities are studied theoretically and experimentally in two companion papers, with the aim of making connections between undulatory and geometric properties of light. In this first paper, we focus on macroscopic open-cavity lasers with localized gain. The model is based on the wave equation in the paraxial approximation; experiments are conducted with a simple diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a variable cavity length. After recalling fundamentals of laser beam optics, we consider plano-concave cavities with on-axis or off-axis pumping, with emphasis put on degenerate cavity lengths, where modes of different order resonate at the same frequency, and combine to form surprising transverse beam profiles. Degeneracy leads to the oscillation of so-called geometric modes whose properties can be understood, to a certain extent, also within a ray optics picture. We first provide a heuristic description of these modes, based on geometric reasoning, and then show more rigorously how to derive them analytically by building wave superpositions, within the framework of paraxial wave optics. The numerical methods, based on the Fox-Li approach, are described in detail. The experimental setup, including the imaging system, is also detailed and relatively simple to reproduce. The aim is to facilitate implementation of both the numerics and of the experiments, and to show that one can have access not only to the common higher-order modes but also to more exotic patterns.

  3. Modeling Alfven and Whistler Waves Generation by Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Karavavev, A.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Gumerov, N.; Joyce, G.; Gigliotti, A.; Gekelman, W.

    2008-11-01

    Recent experiments by Gigliotti et al. 2008 and Karavaev et al. 2008 demonstrated excitation of Alfven and whistler waves, respectively, by Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) created by a phased orthogonal loop antenna. This paper presents a combination of computations along with experiments that emphasize the RMF properties for generating MHD and whistler waves. For RMF rotating frequencies in the whistler wave frequency range, the electrons quickly come to a co-rotation with the RMF, generating a differential azimuthal current. For rotating frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency wave, the electron and ion motion decouple within the ion skin-depth near the antenna and co-rotates with the RMF outside the ion skin depth. In order to understand the RMF and plasma interaction and the resultant radiation in different frequency regimes, we developed a 3D code to simulate experimental configurations. The simulation help us understand the general characteristics of impedance matching, energy coupling and far field radiation pattern from an RMF antenna in plasmas. The dependence of the induced magnetic field on RMF frequency, and plasma parameters, as well as space applications of RMF antennas are discussed. This work was sponsored by ONR MURI Grant 5-28828.

  4. Computational resources to filter gravitational wave data with P-approximant templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2002-08-01

    The prior knowledge of the gravitational waveform from compact binary systems makes matched filtering an attractive detection strategy. This detection method involves the filtering of the detector output with a set of theoretical waveforms or templates. One of the most important factors in this strategy is knowing how many templates are needed in order to reduce the loss of possible signals. In this study, we calculate the number of templates and computational power needed for a one-step search for gravitational waves from inspiralling binary systems. We build on previous works by first expanding the post-Newtonian waveforms to 2.5-PN order and second, for the first time, calculating the number of templates needed when using P-approximant waveforms. The analysis is carried out for the four main first-generation interferometers, LIGO, GEO600, VIRGO and TAMA. As well as template number, we also calculate the computational cost of generating banks of templates for filtering GW data. We carry out the calculations for two initial conditions. In the first case we assume a minimum individual mass of 1 Msolar and in the second, we assume a minimum individual mass of 5 Msolar. We find that, in general, we need more P-approximant templates to carry out a search than if we use standard PN templates. This increase varies according to the order of PN-approximation, but can be as high as a factor of 3 and is explained by the smaller span of the P-approximant templates as we go to higher masses. The promising outcome is that for 2-PN templates, the increase is small and is outweighed by the known robustness of the 2-PN P-approximant templates.

  5. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Verth, G.

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  6. Hamiltonian discontinuous Galerkin FEM for linear, rotating incompressible Euler equations: Inertial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nurijanyan, S.; Vegt, J.J.W. van der; Bokhove, O.

    2013-05-15

    A discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DGFEM) has been developed and tested for the linear, three-dimensional, rotating incompressible Euler equations. These equations admit complicated wave solutions, which poses numerical challenges. These challenges concern: (i) discretisation of a divergence-free velocity field; (ii) discretisation of geostrophic boundary conditions combined with no-normal flow at solid walls; (iii) discretisation of the conserved, Hamiltonian dynamics of the inertial-waves; and, (iv) large-scale computational demands owing to the three-dimensional nature of inertial-wave dynamics and possibly its narrow zones of chaotic attraction. These issues have been resolved, for example: (i) by employing Dirac’s method of constrained Hamiltonian dynamics to our DGFEM for linear, compressible flows, thus enforcing the incompressibility constraints; (ii) by enforcing no-normal flow at solid walls in a weak form and geostrophic tangential flow along the wall; and, (iii) by applying a symplectic time discretisation. We compared our simulations with exact solutions of three-dimensional incompressible flows, in (non) rotating periodic and partly periodic cuboids (Poincaré waves). Additional verifications concerned semi-analytical eigenmode solutions in rotating cuboids with solid walls. Finally, a simulation in a tilted rotating tank, yielding more complicated wave dynamics, demonstrates the potential of our new method.

  7. Liberation of a pinned spiral wave by a rotating electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Peng, Liang; Ma, Jun; Ying, He-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Spiral waves may be pinned to anatomical heterogeneities in the cardiac tissue, which leads to monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by electric pulses in one direction (EP) is a promising method for liberating such waves by using heterogeneities as internal virtual pacing sites. Here, based on the WEH effect, a new mechanism of liberation by means of a rotating electric pulse (REP) is proposed in a generic model of excitable media. Compared with the EP, the REP has the advantage of opening wider time window to liberate pinned spiral. The influences of rotating direction and frequency of the REP, and the radius of the obstacles on this new mechanism are studied. We believe this strategy may improve manipulations with pinned spiral waves in heart experiments.

  8. Influence of gravity waves on the internal rotation and Li abundance of solar-type stars.

    PubMed

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Talon, Suzanne

    2005-09-30

    The Sun's rotation profile and lithium content have been difficult to understand in the context of conventional models of stellar evolution. Classical hydrodynamic models predict that the solar interior must rotate highly differentially, in disagreement with observations. It has recently been shown that internal waves produced by convection in solar-type stars produce an asymmetric, shear layer oscillation, similar to Earth's quasi-biennial oscillation, that leads to efficient angular momentum redistribution from the core to the envelope. We present results of a model that successfully reproduces both the rotation profile and the surface abundance of lithium in solar-type stars of various ages.

  9. Rotation of inertial frames by angular momentum of matter and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, W.; Ledvinka, T.; Lynden-Bell, D.; Bičák, J.

    2017-10-01

    We elucidate the dynamics of a thin spherical material shell with a tangential pressure, using a new approach. This is both simpler than the traditional method of extrinsic curvature junction conditions (which we also employ), and suggests an expression for a ‘gravitational potential energy’ of the shell. Such a shell, if slowly spinning, can rotationally drag the inertial frames within it through a finite angle as it collapses and rebounds from a minimum radius. Rebounding ‘spherical’ and cylindrical pulses of rotating gravitational waves were studied previously. Here we calculate their angular momentum and show that their rotational frame dragging is in agreement with that of the rotating spherical shell and a rotating cylindrical dust shell. This shows that Machian effects occur equally for material and analogous ‘immaterial’ sources.

  10. Mm-Wave Rotational Spectrum of Methyl Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessica; Medvedev, Ivan; Dolson, David

    2014-06-01

    Methyl nitrate (CH3NO3), is a toxic liquid known for it's explosive properties. It is metabolically expressed in trace amounts in exhaled human breath and is a potential candidate for interstellar detection. Previous microwave studies of methyl nitrate have yielded a handful line transitions in its vibrational ground state in the 8-34 GHz range. This paper discusses the high-resolution spectrum of methyl nitrate in 210-270 GHz range, and extends the spectroscopic assignment of its rotational transitions in the ground and first excited vibrational states.

  11. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave.

    PubMed

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-05

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell's law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  12. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-01

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell’s law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  13. Modeling the Slow-Tail of Atmospheric Waves to Approximate the Distance of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cocq, C.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    A lightning strike emits an electromagnetic wave known as an atmospheric or sferic, which propagates through the earth-ionosphere waveguide. Sferics can be recorded by extremely low and very low frequency, ELF and VLF, receiver systems. The recorded signal is composed of two segments, a pulse containing VLF frequencies, followed by a slow-tail, containing the ELF components. The slow-tail is essentially a single cycle wave, which is delayed with respect to the rest of the sferic due to the dispersive nature of the ionosphere. The recorded time- domain slow-tail varies with the lightning strike's current moment, and the waveguide's media characteristics. It is possible to approximate the location of the lightning source with measurements of the sferic. Many methods require measurements from multiple stations, however the goal of this work is to approximate the distance a sferic propagated with a single station. J.R. Wait developed a mode theory where propagating ELF radio are characterized by the first mode. The research reported here uses the first mode equations to model a slow-tail that propagated a certain distance. We include a comparison to measurements on slow-tails observed at widely variable distances from their causative lightning, and analyze the accuracy of our model. Using the inverse of this method along with sferics from known locations, we approximate the form of the current moment at the source and use an average of this waveform to improve our slow-tail model. With an accurate computed slow-tail we can approximate the distance of propagation by fitting the computed waveform to the observed slow-tail. An analysis is given of the effectiveness of this method. As expected, since this method uses data from only one station, the estimation error from this method are larger than those of the traditional multiple station estimation method. However, in most instances our method was accurate to within hundreds of kilometers. With such accuracy, this method

  14. Response to "Comment on `General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-01

    In R. A. Van Gorder, "General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation," Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, "Comment on `General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation' [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]," Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  15. Validity of the Spin-Wave Approximation for the Free Energy of the Heisenberg Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correggi, Michele; Giuliani, Alessandro; Seiringer, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We consider the quantum ferromagnetic Heisenberg model in three dimensions, for all spins S ≥ 1/2. We rigorously prove the validity of the spin-wave approximation for the excitation spectrum, at the level of the first non-trivial contribution to the free energy at low temperatures. Our proof comes with explicit, constructive upper and lower bounds on the error term. It uses in an essential way the bosonic formulation of the model in terms of the Holstein-Primakoff representation. In this language, the model describes interacting bosons with a hard-core on-site repulsion and a nearest-neighbor attraction. This attractive interaction makes the lower bound on the free energy particularly tricky: the key idea there is to prove a differential inequality for the two-particle density, which is thereby shown to be smaller than the probability density of a suitably weighted two-particle random process on the lattice.

  16. Evidence of iridescence in TiO2 nanostructures: An approximation in plane wave expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Heiddy P.; Barrera-Patiño, C. P.; Rey-González, R. R.; Dussan, A.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium dioxide nanotubes, TiO2 NTs, can be obtained by electrochemical anodization of Titanium sheets. After nanotubes are removed by mechanical stress, residual structures or traces on the surface of titanium sheets can be observed. These traces show iridescent effects. In this paper we carry out both experimental and theoretical study of those interesting and novel optical properties. For the experimental analysis we use angle resolved UV-vis spectroscopy while in the theoretical study is evaluated the photonic spectra using numerical simulations into the frequency-domain and the framework of the wave plane approximation. The iridescent effect is a strong property and independent of the sample. This behavior can be important to design new materials or compounds for several applications such as, cosmetic industry, optoelectronic devices, photocatalysis, sensors, among others.

  17. Scroll wave dynamics in a three-dimensional cardiac tissue model: roles of restitution, thickness, and fiber rotation.

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Z; Kil, J; Xie, F; Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N

    2000-01-01

    Scroll wave (vortex) breakup is hypothesized to underlie ventricular fibrillation, the leading cause of sudden cardiac death. We simulated scroll wave behaviors in a three-dimensional cardiac tissue model, using phase I of the Luo-Rudy (LR1) action potential model. The effects of action potential duration (APD) restitution, tissue thickness, filament twist, and fiber rotation were studied. We found that APD restitution is the major determinant of scroll wave behavior and that instabilities arising from APD restitution are the main determinants of scroll wave breakup in this cardiac model. We did not see a "thickness-induced instability" in the LR1 model, but a minimum thickness is required for scroll breakup in the presence of fiber rotation. The major effect of fiber rotation is to maintain twist in a scroll wave, promoting filament bending and thus scroll breakup. In addition, fiber rotation induces curvature in the scroll wave, which weakens conduction and further facilitates wave break. PMID:10827961

  18. Quantum metrology with rotating matter waves in different geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunningham, J. A.; Cooper, J. J.; Hallwood, D. W.

    2012-09-01

    A promising practical application of entanglement is metrology, where quantum states can be used to make measurements beyond the shot noise limit. Here we consider how metrology schemes could be realised using atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped in different potentials. In particular, we show that if a trapped BEC is rotated at just the right frequency, it can undergo a quantum phase transition characterised by large-scale entanglement spreading across the system. This simple process of stirring can generate interesting quantum states such as macroscopic superpositions of all the atoms flowing in opposite directions around a ring-shaped potential. We consider different trapping potentials and show how this leads to different entangled states. In particular, we find that by reducing the dimensionality of the system to one or two dimensions, it is possible to generate entangled states that are remarkably robust to the loss of atoms and so are ideally suited to precision measurement schemes.

  19. Computer algebra and nonlinear iterations for the development of the Periodic Wave Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Napoleon; Price, Richard; Bromley, Benjamin; Beetle, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    The periodic wave approximation, explored in the past few years by different people around the world, has a promising future modeling the gravitational waves obtained by a helical symmetric problem in General Relativity. The existence of a helical Killing vector allows the reduction in the number of degrees of freedom in the problem from 4 to 3. This situation promises to model adequately the slow inspiraling process of two black holes. The numerical solution of this problem involves the implementation of the eigenspectral method developed by Price et al., The motivation on the present is to show the set of computational tools that had been implemented in Maple as an aid in the development of the solution for the full GR problem. To illustrate the utility of such tools, partial results will be shown, involving the solution of one component of the perturbation tensor in a second order post-Minkowski expansion. The results will include a comparison between the solutions obtained through a) a perturbative approach and b) a numerical solver approach (using Newton Raphson). Finally, a review of future work will be given, including future goals and extensions of the present work.

  20. Scattering of twisted electron wave packets by atoms in the Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovets, D. V.; Kotkin, G. L.; Serbo, V. G.; Surzhykov, A.

    2017-03-01

    The potential scattering of electrons carrying nonzero quanta of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is studied in a framework of the generalized Born approximation, developed in our recent paper [D. V. Karlovets, G. L. Kotkin, and V. G. Serbo, Phys. Rev. A 92, 052703 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.052703]. We treat these so-called twisted electrons as spatially localized wave packets. The simple and convenient expressions are derived for a number of scattering events in collision of such a vortex electron with a single potential, located at a given impact parameter with respect to the wave packet's axis. The more realistic scenarios are also considered with either localized (mesoscopic) targets or infinitely wide (macroscopic) ones that consist of randomly distributed atoms. Dependence of the electron-scattering pattern on the size and on the relative position of the target is studied in detail for all three scenarios of the single-potential, mesoscopic, and macroscopic targets made of hydrogen in the ground 1 s state. The results demonstrate that the angular distribution of the outgoing electrons can be very sensitive to the OAM and to kinematic parameters of the focused twisted beams, as well as to composition of the target. Scattering of vortex electrons by atoms can, therefore, serve as a valuable tool for diagnostics of such beams.

  1. Frequency characteristic of a uniformly rotating laser gyroscope with differently amplified counterpropagating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Evgenii A

    2002-02-28

    It is shown that the frequency characteristic of a uniformly rotating laser gyroscope with differently amplified counterpropagating waves is described by the expression containing components that are commuting or noncommuting with respect to the angular velocity. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Rotation induced nonlinear dispersive dust drift waves can be the progenitors of spokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.; Hasnain, H.; Haque, Q.

    2012-03-01

    Rotation induced dispersive dust drift waves are suggested as the possible cause of the formation of spokes in the Saturn's B ring. Using the plasma parameters found in the Saturn's B ring, it has been shown that the theoretically predicted spatio-temporal scalelengths agree well with the satellites and Hubble Space telescope observations of the spokes.

  3. Rotational study of the NH3-CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surin, L. A.; Potapov, A.; Dolgov, A. A.; Tarabukin, I. V.; Panfilov, V. A.; Schlemmer, S.; Kalugina, Y. N.; Faure, A.; van der Avoird, A.

    2015-03-01

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex NH3-CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 112-139 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 0-0, K = 1-1, K = 1-0, and K = 2-1 subbands correlating with the rotationless (jk)NH3 = 00 ground state of free ortho-NH3 and the K = 0-1 and K = 2-1 subbands correlating with the (jk)NH3 = 11 ground state of free para-NH3. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. Some of these transitions are continuations to higher J values of transition series observed previously [C. Xia et al., Mol. Phys. 99, 643 (2001)], the other transitions constitute newly detected subbands. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the ortho-NH3-CO and para-NH3-CO complexes. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of NH3-CO has been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the N atom closest to the CO subunit and binding energy De = 359.21 cm-1. The bound rovibrational levels of the NH3-CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0-6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D0 are 210.43 and 218.66 cm-1 for ortho-NH3-CO and para-NH3-CO, respectively.

  4. Rotational study of the CH4-CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Surin, L A; Tarabukin, I V; Panfilov, V A; Schlemmer, S; Kalugina, Y N; Faure, A; Rist, C; van der Avoird, A

    2015-10-21

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex CH4-CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 110-145 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 2-1 subband correlating with the rotationless jCH4 = 0 ground state and the K = 2-1 and K = 0-1 subbands correlating with the jCH4 = 2 excited state of free methane. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the CH4-CO complex. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of CH4-CO have been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12a] and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta (aVTZ) basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the CH4 face closest to the CO subunit and binding energy De = 177.82 cm(-1). The bound rovibrational levels of the CH4-CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0-6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D0 are 91.32, 94.46, and 104.21 cm(-1) for A (jCH4 = 0), F (jCH4 = 1), and E (jCH4 = 2) nuclear spin modifications of CH4-CO, respectively.

  5. Rotational study of the CH4-CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surin, L. A.; Tarabukin, I. V.; Panfilov, V. A.; Schlemmer, S.; Kalugina, Y. N.; Faure, A.; Rist, C.; van der Avoird, A.

    2015-10-01

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex CH4-CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 110-145 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 2-1 subband correlating with the rotationless jCH4 = 0 ground state and the K = 2-1 and K = 0-1 subbands correlating with the jCH4 = 2 excited state of free methane. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the CH4-CO complex. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of CH4-CO have been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12a] and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta (aVTZ) basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the CH4 face closest to the CO subunit and binding energy De = 177.82 cm-1. The bound rovibrational levels of the CH4-CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0-6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D0 are 91.32, 94.46, and 104.21 cm-1 for A (jCH4 = 0), F (jCH4 = 1), and E (jCH4 = 2) nuclear spin modifications of CH4-CO, respectively.

  6. Rotational study of the NH3-CO complex: millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Surin, L A; Potapov, A; Dolgov, A A; Tarabukin, I V; Panfilov, V A; Schlemmer, S; Kalugina, Y N; Faure, A; van der Avoird, A

    2015-03-21

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex NH3-CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 112-139 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 0-0, K = 1-1, K = 1-0, and K = 2-1 subbands correlating with the rotationless (jk)NH3 = 00 ground state of free ortho-NH3 and the K = 0-1 and K = 2-1 subbands correlating with the (jk)NH3 = 11 ground state of free para-NH3. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. Some of these transitions are continuations to higher J values of transition series observed previously [C. Xia et al., Mol. Phys. 99, 643 (2001)], the other transitions constitute newly detected subbands. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the ortho-NH3-CO and para-NH3-CO complexes. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of NH3-CO has been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the N atom closest to the CO subunit and binding energy De = 359.21 cm(-1). The bound rovibrational levels of the NH3-CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0-6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D0 are 210.43 and 218.66 cm(-1) for ortho-NH3-CO and para-NH3-CO, respectively.

  7. Condensates of p-wave pairs are exact solutions for rotating two-component Bose gases.

    PubMed

    Papenbrock, T; Reimann, S M; Kavoulakis, G M

    2012-02-17

    We derive exact analytical results for the wave functions and energies of harmonically trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with weakly repulsive interactions under rotation. The isospin symmetric wave functions are universal and do not depend on the matrix elements of the two-body interaction. The comparison with the results from numerical diagonalization shows that the ground state and low-lying excitations consist of condensates of p-wave pairs for repulsive contact interactions, Coulomb interactions, and the repulsive interactions between aligned dipoles.

  8. Condensates of p-Wave Pairs Are Exact Solutions for Rotating Two-Component Bose Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, T; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    We derive exact analytical results for the wave functions and energies of harmonically trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with weakly repulsive interactions under rotation. The isospin symmetric wave functions are universal and do not depend on the matrix elements of the two-body interaction. The comparison with the results from numerical diagonalization shows that the ground state and low-lying excitations consist of condensates of p-wave pairs for repulsive contact interactions, Coulomb interactions, and the repulsive interactions between aligned dipoles.

  9. Particle orbits in a force-balanced, wave-driven, rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, I. E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-09-01

    A wave-driven rotating torus is a recently proposed fusion concept where the rotational transform is provided by the E × B drift resulting from a minor radial electric field. This field can be produced, for instance, by the RF-wave-mediated extraction of fusion-born alpha particles. In this paper, we discuss how macroscopic force balance, i.e., balance of the thermal hoop force, can be achieved in such a device. We show that this requires the inclusion of a small plasma current and vertical magnetic field and identify the desirable reactor regime through free energy considerations. We then analyze particle orbits in this desirable regime, identifying velocity-space anisotropies in trapped (banana) orbits, resulting from the cancellation of rotational transforms due to the radial electric and poloidal magnetic fields. The potential neoclassical effects of these orbits on the perpendicular conductivity, current drive, and transport are discussed.

  10. General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-06-15

    In his study of superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Svistunov [“Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)] derived a Hamiltonian equation for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament. Under the local induction approximation (LIA), the Svistunov formulation is equivalent to a nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation. In this paper, we consider a family of rotating vortex filament solutions for the LIA reduction of the Svistunov formulation, which we refer to as the 2D LIA (since it permits a potential formulation in terms of two of the three Cartesian coordinates). This class of solutions holds the well-known Hasimoto-type planar vortex filament [H. Hasimoto, “Motion of a vortex filament and its relation to elastica,” J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31, 293 (1971)] as one reduction and helical solutions as another. More generally, we obtain solutions which are periodic in the space variable. A systematic analytical study of the behavior of such solutions is carried out. In the case where vortex filaments have small deviations from the axis of rotation, closed analytical forms of the filament solutions are given. A variety of numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the wide range of rotating filament behaviors possible. Doing so, we are able to determine a number of vortex filament structures not previously studied. We find that the solution structure progresses from planar to helical, and then to more intricate and complex filament structures, possibly indicating the onset of superfluid turbulence.

  11. Evidence of differential rotation inside Saturn from waves of its rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moutamid, Maryame; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's average interior rotation rate has been estimated based on various analyses of its shape (Anderson and Schubert, 2007; Read et al., 2009; Helled et al., 2015), but we still have no clear information on its exact value and the degree of differential rotation versus depth.However, Hedman et al., (2009), Hedman and Nicholson (2014) and El Moutamid et al., (2016) have identified several structures in the main rings of Saturn which appear to be related to the planet's rotation rate.These structures (waves and perturbed edges) appear to be generated by so-called Tesseral Resonances, which are associated with gravity anomalies that rotate with Saturn's interior, rather than being driven by a satellite. Their locations are given by the usual formula for inner or outer Lindblad resonances.We have searched for additional wave-like signatures in stellar occultation data for the main rings which are related to the rotation period of Saturn and have identified several signatures consistent with other differential rotation in Saturn's interior. Our study of the behavior of the A, B and C rings uses images and occultation data obtained by the Cassini spacecraft over a period of 10 years from 2006 to 2015.

  12. Baroclinic waves and gravity waves in a finite-volume model of the differentially heated rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Fruman, Mark D.; Harlander, Uwe; Vincze, Miklos

    2014-05-01

    The differentially heated rotating annulus is a classical experiment for the investigation of baroclinic flows and can be regarded as a strongly simplified laboratory model of the atmosphere in mid-latitudes. Data measured at the BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg (Harlander et al, 2011) are used to validate a new numerical finite-volume model (cylFloit). The model employs the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM) (Hickel et al, 2006) to parameterize unresolved subgrid-scale turbulence. The validation compares the azimuthal mode numbers of the dominant baroclinic waves and does a principal component analysis of time series of the temperature field observed in the experiment and the model simulation. One part of the laboratory procedure that is commonly neglected in simulations is the annulus spin-up, during which the annulus is accelerated from a state of rest to a desired angular velocity. We investigate whether including the spin-up phase in the simulation improves the agreement with the experiment. In addition we use the model to investigate gravity waves (GWs) in the rotating annulus. These waves play an important role in atmospheric dynamics by transporting momentum over large distances, affecting daily weather as well as the climate. Our focus is on GWs spontaneously emitted by the baroclinic waves. By simulating a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls, we are able to explore a more atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency. Various analyses suggest there is distinct GW activity in these simulations, as well as indications of spontaneous GW emission. Harlander, U., von Larcher, T., Wang, Y., Egbers, C., 2011: PIV- and LDV- measurements of baroclinic wave interactions in a thermally driven rotating annulus. Exp. Fluids, 51(1), 37-49. Hickel, S., Adams, N. A., Domaradzki, J. A., 2006: An adaptive local deconvolution method for implicit LES. J

  13. Numerical calculation of the operation wavelength range of a polarization controller based on rotatable wave plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Su; Sharma, Aditya

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the operation wavelength range of polarization controllers based on rotating wave plates such as paddle-type optical fiber devices. The coverages over arbitrary polarization conversion or arbitrary birefringence compensation are numerically estimated. The results present the acceptable phase retardation range of polarization controllers composed of two quarter-wave plates or a quarter-half-quarter-wave plate combination, and thereby determines the operation wavelength range of a given design. We further prove that a quarter-quarter-half-wave-plate combination is also an arbitrary birefringence compensator as well as a conventional quarter-half-quarter-wave-plate combination, and show that the two configurations have the identical range of acceptable phase retardance within the uncertainty of our numerical method.

  14. On strongly interacting internal waves in a rotating ocean and coupled Ostrovsky equations.

    PubMed

    Alias, A; Grimshaw, R H J; Khusnutdinova, K R

    2013-06-01

    In the weakly nonlinear limit, oceanic internal solitary waves for a single linear long wave mode are described by the KdV equation, extended to the Ostrovsky equation in the presence of background rotation. In this paper we consider the scenario when two different linear long wave modes have nearly coincident phase speeds and show that the appropriate model is a system of two coupled Ostrovsky equations. These are systematically derived for a density-stratified ocean. Some preliminary numerical simulations are reported which show that, in the generic case, initial solitary-like waves are destroyed and replaced by two coupled nonlinear wave packets, being the counterpart of the same phenomenon in the single Ostrovsky equation.

  15. Circular Polarizations of Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Clear Indication of Rapid Rotation.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-04-15

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores just prior to collapse. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that nonaxisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the postbounce cores. It is not surprising, then, that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show, in this Letter, that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of the Galaxy as long as the rotation period of the core is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  16. Square-wave self-modulation in diode lasers with polarization-rotated optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, Athanasios; Erneux, Thomas; Sukow, David W; Burner, Guinevere; McLachlan, Taylor; Miller, John; Amonette, Jake

    2006-07-01

    The square-wave response of edge-emitting diode lasers subject to a delayed polarization-rotated optical feedback is studied in detail. Specifically, the polarization state of the feedback is rotated such that the natural laser mode is coupled into the orthogonal, unsupported mode. Square-wave self-modulated polarization intensities oscillating in antiphase are observed experimentally. We find numerically that these oscillations naturally appear for a broad range of values of parameters, provided that the feedback is sufficiently strong and the differential losses in the normally unsupported polarization mode are small. We then investigate the laser equations analytically and find that the square-wave oscillations are the result of a bifurcation phenomenon.

  17. Square-wave self-modulation in diode lasers with polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Athanasios; Erneux, Thomas; Sukow, David W.; Burner, Guinevere; McLachlan, Taylor; Miller, John; Amonette, Jake

    2006-07-01

    The square-wave response of edge-emitting diode lasers subject to a delayed polarization-rotated optical feedback is studied in detail. Specifically, the polarization state of the feedback is rotated such that the natural laser mode is coupled into the orthogonal, unsupported mode. Square-wave self-modulated polarization intensities oscillating in antiphase are observed experimentally. We find numerically that these oscillations naturally appear for a broad range of values of parameters, provided that the feedback is sufficiently strong and the differential losses in the normally unsupported polarization mode are small. We then investigate the laser equations analytically and find that the square-wave oscillations are the result of a bifurcation phenomenon.

  18. The influence of crustal scattering on translational and rotational motions in regional and teleseismic coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Korn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Monte Carlo solutions to the radiative transfer equations are used to model translational and rotational motion seismogram envelopes in random elastic media with deterministic background structure assuming multiple anisotropic scattering. Observation and modelling of the three additional components of rotational motions can provide independent information about wave propagation in the Earth's structure. Rotational motions around the vertical axis observed in the P-wave coda are of particular interest as they can only be excited by horizontally polarized shear waves and therefore indicate the conversion from P to SH energy by multiple scattering at 3-D heterogeneities. To investigate crustal scattering and attenuation parameters in south-east Germany beneath the Gräfenberg array multicomponent seismogram envelopes of rotational and translational motions are synthesized and compared to seismic data from regional swarm-earthquakes and of deep teleseismic events. In the regional case a nonlinear genetic inversion is used to estimate scattering and attenuation parameters at high frequencies (4-8 Hz). Our preferred model of crustal heterogeneity consists of a medium with random velocity and density fluctuations described by an exponential autocorrelation function with a correlation length of a few hundred metres and fluctuations in the range of 3 per cent. The quality factor for elastic S-waves attenuation Q_i^S is around 700. In a second, step simulations of teleseismic P-wave arrivals using this estimated set of scattering and attenuation parameters are compared to observed seismogram envelopes from deep events. Simulations of teleseismic events with the parameters found from the regional inversion show good agreement with the measured seismogram envelopes. This includes ringlaser observations of vertical rotations in the teleseismic P-wave coda that naturally result from the proposed model of wave scattering. The model also predicts, that the elastic energy recorded

  19. /sup 90/Zr (p,n) and (n,p) distorted-wave impulse approximation cross sections in 2p2h random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Wambach, J.; Droz-dotdz-dot, S.; Schulte, A.; Speth, J.

    1988-03-01

    Within the distorted-wave impulse approximation and an extended random phase approximation theory which includes 1p 1h as well as 2p 2h excitations, we study (p,n) and (n,p) cross sections in /sup 90/Zr at 200 MeV. The inclusion of 2p2h excitations allows us to calculate spreading width effects microscopically without introduction of parameters. Given a fully microscopic description reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is found in the (p,n) channel. In the (n,p) channel at forward angles we find that the compact spin-dipole resonance predicted by 1p1h random-phase approximation calculations is not strongly effected by 2p2h mixing

  20. A new model for algebraic Rossby solitary waves in rotation fluid and its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao-Deng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Gao, Yu-Fang; Yin, Bao-Shu; Feng, Xing-Ru

    2015-09-01

    A generalized Boussinesq equation that includes the dissipation effect is derived to describe a kind of algebraic Rossby solitary waves in a rotating fluid by employing perturbation expansions and stretching transformations of time and space. Using this equation, the conservation laws of algebraic Rossby solitary waves are discussed. It is found that the mass, the momentum, the energy, and the velocity of center of gravity of the algebraic solitary waves are conserved in the propagation process. Finally, the analytical solution of the equation is generated. Based on the analytical solution, the properties of the algebraic solitary waves and the dissipation effect are discussed. The results point out that, similar to classic solitary waves, the dissipation can cause the amplitude and the speed of solitary waves to decrease; however, unlike classic solitary waves, the algebraic solitary waves can split during propagation and the decrease of the detuning parameter can accelerate the occurrence of the solitary waves fission phenomenon. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environment and Disaster Prevention and Mitigation Project, China (Grant No. 2012010), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41205082 and 41476019), the Special Funds for Theoretical Physics of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11447205), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), China.

  1. An approximate global solution of Einstein's equation for a rotating compact source with linear equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchí, J. E.; Gil-Rivero, A.; Molina, A.; Ruiz, E.

    2013-07-01

    We use analytic perturbation theory to present a new approximate metric for a rigidly rotating perfect fluid source with equation of state (EOS) ɛ +(1-n)p=ɛ _0. This EOS includes the interesting cases of strange matter, constant density and the fluid of the Wahlquist metric. It is fully matched to its approximate asymptotically flat exterior using Lichnerowicz junction conditions and it is shown to be a totally general matching using Darmois-Israel conditions and properties of the harmonic coordinates. Then we analyse the Petrov type of the interior metric and show first that, in accordance with previous results, in the case corresponding to Wahlquist's metric it can not be matched to the asymptotically flat exterior. Next, that this kind of interior can only be of Petrov types I, D or (in the static case) O and also that the non-static constant density case can only be of type I. Finally, we check that it can not be a source of Kerr's metric.

  2. Numerical approximation of the Schrödinger equation with the electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhennan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we approximate the semi-classical Schrödinger equation in the presence of electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets approach. By operator splitting, the Hamiltonian is divided into the modified part and the residual part. The modified Hamiltonian, which is the main new idea of this paper, is chosen by the fact that Hagedorn wave packets are localized both in space and momentum so that a crucial correction term is added to the truncated Hamiltonian, and is treated by evolving the parameters associated with the Hagedorn wave packets. The residual part is treated by a Galerkin approximation. We prove that, with the modified Hamiltonian only, the Hagedorn wave packets dynamics give the asymptotic solution with error O(ε{sup 1/2}), where ε is the scaled Planck constant. We also prove that, the Galerkin approximation for the residual Hamiltonian can reduce the approximation error to O(ε{sup k/2}), where k depends on the number of Hagedorn wave packets added to the dynamics. This approach is easy to implement, and can be naturally extended to the multidimensional cases. Unlike the high order Gaussian beam method, in which the non-constant cut-off function is necessary and some extra error is introduced, the Hagedorn wave packets approach gives a practical way to improve accuracy even when ε is not very small.

  3. Uniform asymptotic approximations for transient waves due to an initial disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Per A.; Schäffer, Hemming A.; Fuhrman, David R.; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we first present a semianalytical method for the evolution of linear fully dispersive transient waves generated by an initial surface displacement and propagating over a constant depth. The procedure starts from Fourier and Hankel transforms and involves a combination of the method of stationary phase, the method of uniform asymptotic approximations and various Airy integral formulations. Second, we develop efficient convolution techniques expressed as single and double summations over the source area. These formulations are flexible, extremely fast, and highly accurate even for the dispersive tail of the transient waves. To verify the accuracy of the embedded dispersion properties, we consider test cases with sharp-edged disturbances in 1-D and 2-D. Furthermore, we consider the case of a relatively blunt Gaussian disturbance in 2-D. In all cases, the agreement between the convolution results and simulations with a high-order Boussinesq model is outstanding. Finally, we make an attempt to extend the convolution methods to geophysical tsunami problems taking into account, e.g., uneven bottom effects. Unfortunately, refraction/diffraction effects cannot easily be incorporated, so instead we focus on the incorporation of linear shoaling and its effect on travel time and temporal evolution of the surface elevation. The procedure is tested on data from the 2011 Japan tsunami. Convolution results are likewise compared to model simulations based on the nonlinear shallow water equations and both are compared with field observations from 10 deep water DART buoys. The near-field results are generally satisfactory, while the far-field results leave much to be desired.

  4. Static configurations and nonlinear waves in rotating nonuniform self-gravitating fluids.

    PubMed

    Nekrasov, A K

    2006-02-01

    The equilibrium states and low-frequency waves in rotating nonuniform self-gravitating fluids are studied. The effect of a central object is included. Two-dimensional static configurations accounting for self-gravity, external gravity, and nonuniform rotation are considered for three models connecting the pressure with the mass density: thermodynamic equilibrium, polytropic pressure, and constant mass density. Explicit analytical solutions for equilibrium have been found in some cases. The low-frequency waves arising due to the vertical and horizontal fluid inhomogeneities are considered in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The relationship between the background pressure and mass density is supposed to be arbitrary in the wave analysis. It is shown that the waves considered can be unstable in the cases of polytropic pressure and constant mass density. The additional nonlinear term proportional to the product of the pressure and mass density perturbations, which is usually omitted, is kept in our nonlinear equations. There have been found conditions for this term to be important. Stationary nonlinear wave equations having solutions in the form of coherent vortex structures are obtained in a general form. The importance of involving real static configurations in the consideration of wave perturbations is emphasized.

  5. Modeling Alfven and Whistler Waves Generation by Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, N.; Shao, X.; Karavaev, A.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Joyce, G.; Gigliotti, A.; Gekelman, W.

    2008-12-01

    Recent experiments by Gigliotti et all., 2008 and Karavaev et al., 2008 (two posters in this meeting) demonstrated excitation of shear Alfven wave and whistler wave, respectively, by Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) created by a phased orthogonal loop antenna. This paper presents a combination of computational results along with experiments that emphasize the RMF properties for generating MHD and whistler waves. For RMF rotating frequencies in the whistler wave frequency range, the electrons quickly come to a co- rotation with the RMF, generating a differential azimuthal current. For rotating frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency wave, the electrons and ion motion decouple within the ion skin-depth near the antenna and co-rotates with the RMF outside the ion skin depth, generating a JxB force. In order to understand the RMF and plasma interaction and the resultant radiation in different frequency regimes, we developed a 3D code that simulate the process. The code solves the linearized Maxwell equations coupled to the two-fluid description of the plasma motion in the frequency-domain. The antenna excitation is modeled as a set ofexternal current sources. The magnetized plasma response to the wave excitation at different frequencies,i.e. in the MHD and whistler frequency regime, are described by elements of the dielectric tensor. An iterative sparse matrix-solver is used to solve for the near field antenna-plasma coupling and the far-field wave propagation. The code is able to determine the radiation from antennas with complex geometry. The experimental configurations used in Gigliotti et all., 2008 and Karavaev et al., 2008 were simulated. The simulation results help us understand the general characteristics of impedance matching, energy coupling and far field radiation pattern from an RMF antenna in plasmas. The scaling of the induced magnetic field as a function of the RMF frequency, the plasma parameters and the spatial decay rate of magnetic field, as well

  6. Wave-front propagation of rinsing flows on rotating semiconductor wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostad, John M.; Ylitalo, Andy; Walls, Daniel J.; Mui, David S. L.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-11-01

    The semiconductor manufacturing industry is migrating to a cleaning technology that involves dispersing cleaning solutions onto a rotating wafer, similar to spin-coating. Advantages include a more continuous overall fabrication process, lower particle level, no cross contamination from the back side of a wafer, and less usage of harsh chemicals for a lower environmental impact. Rapid rotation of the wafer during rinsing can be more effective, but centrifugal forces can pull spiral-like ribbons of liquid radially outward from the advancing wave-front where particles can build up, causing higher instances of device failure at these locations. A better understanding of the rinsing flow is essential for reducing yield losses while taking advantage of the benefits of rotation. In the present work, high-speed video and image processing are used to study the dynamics of the advancing wave-front from an impinging jet on a rotating substrate. The flow-rate and rotation-speed are varied for substrates coated with a thin layer of a second liquid that has a different surface tension than the jet liquid. The difference in surface tension of the two fluids gives rise to Marangoni stresses at the interface that have a significant impact on the rinsing process, despite the extremely short time-scales involved.

  7. Rotational Doppler shift for electromagnetic waves carrying orbital angular momentum based on spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Gang

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the rotational Doppler effect for the electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) with a method based on spectrum analysis, which is appropriate for both optics and free-space radio cases. We find that the frequency spectrum received is the convolution of emission spectrum and a discrete spectrum about OAM states, and verify it in the numerical simulations as well. This discovery makes it possible to distinguish the linear and rotational Doppler shift, and is helpful to developments of remote sensing and velocimetry in radar.

  8. Internal wave breather propagation under the influence of the Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipova, Tatiana; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Kurkina, Oxana

    2015-04-01

    The internal wave breather propagation under the influence of the Earth rotation is studied in the frames of the asymptotic model based on the Gardner equation as well as the fully nonlinear Euler equations. It is obtained that the amplitude and shape of short breathers depend on the Earth rotation very weakly but the wide breathers change the amplitude and shape sufficiently. This effect is studied in the model situation adapted to the Baltic Sea hydrological conditions. The rate of the breather amplitude damping upon the even bottom is shown.

  9. Effects of age and pathology on shear wave speed of the human rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Davis, Leah; Labyed, Yassin; Siegal, Daniel S; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-28

    Rotator cuff tears are common and often repaired surgically, but post-operative repair tissue healing, and shoulder function can be unpredictable. Tear chronicity is believed to influence clinical outcomes, but conventional clinical approaches for assessing tear chronicity are subjective. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising technique for assessing soft tissue via estimates of shear wave speed (SWS), but this technique has not been used extensively on the rotator cuff. Specifically, the effects of age and pathology on rotator cuff SWS are not well known. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between SWS and age in healthy, asymptomatic subjects, and to compare measures of SWS between patients with a rotator cuff tear and healthy, asymptomatic subjects. SWE images of the supraspinatus muscle and intramuscular tendon were acquired from 19 asymptomatic subjects and 11 patients with a rotator cuff tear. Images were acquired with the supraspinatus under passive and active (i.e., minimal activation) conditions. Mean SWS was positively associated with age in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon under passive and active conditions (p ≤ 0.049). Compared to asymptomatic subjects, patients had a lower mean SWS in their muscle and tendon under active conditions (p ≤ 0.024), but no differences were detected under passive conditions (p ≥ 0.783). These findings identify the influences of age and pathology on SWS in the rotator cuff. These preliminary findings are an important step toward evaluating the clinical utility of SWE for assessing rotator cuff pathology. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The (p,2p) reaction in finite range relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Mahendra

    The (p,2p) reaction on 40Ca at incident proton energy of 300MeV is examined in the formalism of finite-range relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation (FR-RDWIA). In comparison to conventional t-matrix model of Love-Franey, a new form of nucleon-nucleon t-matrix effective interaction is derived at 300MeV using Reid soft core potentials for isotopic spin one and taking into account the finite-range effects in the p -p interaction at knockout vertex. In comparison to the conventional finite range nonrelativistic and relativistic formalism, the present formalism with a new version of p-p t-matrix is effectively reproducing the shape of cross-section energy distributions for 1d3/2, 1d5/2 and 2s1/2 states for asymmetric angle pair of 30∘-55∘. Discrepancies between the experimental cross-section data and finite range theoretical calculations at Ep = 300MeV are reasonably resolved in the present approach. Without any adjustable parameter of bound state, the obtained spectroscopic factors are in reasonably good agreement with the relativistic and nonrelativistic theoretical predictions by (p,2p), (e,e‧p) and (d,3He) analysis.

  11. Distorted-wave born approximation calculations for turbulence scattering in an upward-refracting atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Kenneth E.; Di, Xiao; Wang, Lintao

    1990-01-01

    Weiner and Keast observed that in an upward-refracting atmosphere, the relative sound pressure level versus range follows a characteristic 'step' function. The observed step function has recently been predicted qualitatively and quantitatively by including the effects of small-scale turbulence in a parabolic equation (PE) calculation. (Gilbert et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 2428-2437 (1990)). The PE results to single-scattering calculations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) are compared. The purpose is to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms that produce the step-function. The PE calculations and DWBA calculations are compared to each other and to the data of Weiner and Keast for upwind propagation (strong upward refraction) and crosswind propagation (weak upward refraction) at frequencies of 424 Hz and 848 Hz. The DWBA calculations, which include only single scattering from turbulence, agree with the PE calculations and with the data in all cases except for upwind propagation at 848 Hz. Consequently, it appears that in all cases except one, the observed step function can be understood in terms of single scattering from an upward-refracted 'skywave' into the refractive shadow zone. For upwind propagation at 848 Hz, the DWBA calculation gives levels in the shadow zone that are much below both the PE and the data.

  12. Square-wave oscillations in edge-emitting diode lasers with polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, A.; Erneux, T.; Sukow, D. W.; Burner, G.; McLachlan, T.; Miller, J.; Amonette, J.

    2006-04-01

    The square-wave response of edge-emitting diode lasers subject to a delayed polarization-rotated optical feedback is studied experimentally and theoretically. Square-wave self-modulated polarization intensities of a period close to twice the delay τ of the feedback gradually appear through a sequence of bifurcations starting with a Hopf bifurcation (Gavrielides et al, Proc. SPIE 6115, to appear, 2006). In Gavrielides et al (submitted, 2006), squarewave solutions were determined analytically from the laser equations in the limit of large τ. A condition on the laser parameters was derived explaining why square-wave oscillations are preferentially observed for suffciently large feedback strength. In this paper, we concentrate on the relaxation oscillations that always appear at each intensity jump between the plateaus of the square-wave. We show analytically that if the feedback strength is progressively decreased, a bifurcation to sustained relaxation oscillations is possible for one of the two plateaus.

  13. Annihilation and creation of rotating waves by a local light pulse in a protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Seiji; Ueda, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    Pattern dynamics plays a fundamental role in biological functions from cell to organ in living systems, and the appearance of rotating waves can lead to pathological situations. Basic dynamics of rotating waves of contraction-relaxation activity under local perturbation is studied in a newly developed protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium. A light pulse is applied by irradiating circularly a quarter of the droplet showing a single rotating wave. The oscillation pattern changes abruptly only when the irradiation is applied at a part of the droplet near the maximal contraction. The abrupt changes are as follows: the rotating wave disappears or is displaced when the irradiation area is very close to the center of the rotating wave, while new rotating waves are created when the irradiation area is far from the center of the rotating wave. These results support the hypothesis that the phase response curve has a discontinuous change (type 0 resetting) from delay to advance around the maximal contraction. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to “vulnerability” in excitable media and biological systems in general.

  14. Small amplitude waves and linear firehose and mirror instabilities in rotating polytropic quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, S.; Prajapati, R. P.; Dolai, B.

    2017-08-01

    The small amplitude quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) waves and linear firehose and mirror instabilities in uniformly rotating dense quantum plasma have been investigated using generalized polytropic pressure laws. The QMHD model and Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) set of equations are used to formulate the basic equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using normal mode analysis which is discussed in parallel, transverse, and oblique wave propagations. The fast, slow, and intermediate QMHD wave modes and linear firehose and mirror instabilities are analyzed for isotropic MHD and CGL quantum fluid plasmas. The firehose instability remains unaffected while the mirror instability is modified by polytropic exponents and quantum diffraction parameter. The graphical illustrations show that quantum corrections have a stabilizing influence on the mirror instability. The presence of uniform rotation stabilizes while quantum corrections destabilize the growth rate of the system. It is also observed that the growth rate stabilizes much faster in parallel wave propagation in comparison to the transverse mode of propagation. The quantum corrections and polytropic exponents also modify the pseudo-MHD and reverse-MHD modes in dense quantum plasma. The phase speed (Friedrichs) diagrams of slow, fast, and intermediate wave modes are illustrated for isotropic MHD and double adiabatic MHD or CGL quantum plasmas, where the significant role of magnetic field and quantum diffraction parameters on the phase speed is observed.

  15. Rotative polarization system of millimetric wave for detecting fiber orientation in CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Urabe, K. )

    1992-02-01

    A new system for nondestructive and contact-free detection of fiber orientation in fiber reinforced composites such as CFRP was devised using 35 GHz millimetric wave. In this system, by rotating the polarization of the wave and compensating it after passing through the sample, changes of anisotropy caused by changes in fiber orientation of unidirectional CFRP or carbon fiber prepreg can be easily and efficiently checked. Scanning detection of fiber direction and of fiber misorientation are also possible with high sensitivity. Results of measurements with successful sensitivity are shown for several kinds of unidirectional samples with artificial fiber misorientations. 5 refs.

  16. Spin Current Generation Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Generated via Spin-Rotation Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, D.; Yoshikawa, T.; Matsuo, M.; Iguchi, R.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.; Nozaki, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate the generation of alternating spin current (SC) via spin-rotation coupling (SRC) using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) in a Cu film. Ferromagnetic resonance caused by injecting SAWs was observed in a Ni-Fe film attached to a Cu film, with the resonance further found to be suppressed through the insertion of a SiO2 film into the interface. The intensity of the resonance depended on the angle between the wave vector of the SAW and the magnetization of the Ni-Fe film. This angular dependence is explicable in terms of the presence of spin transfer torque from a SC generated via SRC.

  17. Rotating matter-wave beam splitters and consequences for atom gyrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Charles

    2007-09-15

    The effect of a rotation on a matter-wave-laser beam splitter is studied and modeled. This modeling is shown to give important nontrivial corrections to the Sagnac phase shift of matter-wave gyrometers when the duration of the laser action cannot be neglected with respect to the propagation time between beam splitters. This result is illustrated on a Mach-Zehnder atom gyrometer (rate gyroscope) with running laser beam splitters. A quasiclassical description of the interferometer arms inside the beam splitters is proposed to interpret the corrected Sagnac phase shift in terms of an effective interferometer area.

  18. A Novel Rotating-Wave X-Ray Source for Analysis of the Martian Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.; Taylor, M.; Liu, Y.; Hodyss, R.; Allwood, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we present analysis and computer simulations for a new accelerator concept that we are proposing for exploration of various planetary surfaces, including the Martian landscape. The rotating-wave accelerator (RWA) uses rotating-wave fields and an external magnetic field to produce acceleration of a low-energy electron beam to high velocities. X-rays are produced by the electrons upon impinging on a suitable target. A linear analysis of the accelerating process is presented as well as computer simulations. These studies show that the RWA can successfully achieve 200-keV X-rays; energy that is ideally suited for X-ray analysis on Mars and other planetary missions. The RWA development will enable a new generation of very compact, power-efficient imaging and analytical instruments capable of producing high-energy X-rays for standoff planetary surface X-ray analysis such as fluorescence and tomography.

  19. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcific and noncalcific tendonitis of the rotator cuff: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harniman, Elaine; Carette, Simon; Kennedy, Carol; Beaton, Dorcas

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for the treatment of calcific and noncalcific tendonitis of the rotator cuff. Conservative treatment for rotator cuff tendonitis includes physiotherapy, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. If symptoms persist with conservative treatment, surgery is often considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been suggested as a treatment alternative for chronic rotator cuff tendonitis, which may decrease the need for surgery. Articles for this review were identified by electronically searching Medline, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and hand-screening references. Two reviewers selected the trials that met the inclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the selected trials. Finally, the strength of scientific evidence was appraised. Evidence was classified as strong, moderate, limited, or conflicting. Sixteen trials met the inclusion criteria. There were only five randomized, controlled trials and all involved chronic (>/=3 months) conditions, three for calcific tendonitis and two for noncalcific tendonitis. For randomized, controlled trials, two (40%) were of high quality, one (33%) for calcific tendonitis and one (50%) for noncalcific tendonitis. The 11 nonrandomized trials included nine that involved calcific tendonitis and two that involved both calcific and noncalcific tendonitis. Common problem areas were sample size, randomization, blinding, treatment provider bias, and outcome measures. There is moderate evidence that high-energy ESWT is effective in treating chronic calcific rotator cuff tendonitis when the shock waves are focused at the calcified deposit. There is moderate evidence that low-energy ESWT is not effective for treating chronic noncalcific rotator cuff tendonitis, although this conclusion is

  20. Spatial-dependent resonance mode and frequency of rotationally periodic structures subjected to standing wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Shiyu

    2017-09-01

    This work examines the distinct resonance vibration of rotationally periodic structures. An analytical model of a sample stepped-plate structure subjected to standing wave excitation is developed by elasticity theory. Spatial-dependent resonance mode and resonance frequency are formulated by perturbation-superposition method. Different from the natural mode and natural frequency, a sinusoidal fluctuation of the resonance frequency is identified between the two split natural frequencies for single standing wave excitation. The resonance mode does not have preferred orientation because it is determined by excitation orientation. The resonance behaviors are different from those near the repeated natural frequencies. The response to a standing wave pair is also calculated and compared with that to the mathematically equivalent traveling wave, where significant difference is identified. The results indicate that purer traveling wave can be created by using a standing wave pair with pre-selected spatial phase and excitation frequency. Reverse traveling direction can be realized by altering excitation frequency. A test rig is designed and fabricated for verification purpose. The experiment validates that the response near the split natural frequencies is in phase with the external standing wave excitation. The resonance frequency varies with the excitation orientation for the split natural frequencies but it remains constant for the repeated natural frequencies. Potential applications of the spatial-dependent resonance mode and frequency are presented.

  1. Nonlocal strain gradient based wave dispersion behavior of smart rotating magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dabbagh, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Main object of the present research is an exact investigation of wave propagation responses of smart rotating magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) graded nanoscale plates. In addition, effective material properties of functionally graded (FG) nanoplate are presumed to be calculated using the power-law formulations. Also, it has been tried to cover both softening and stiffness-hardening behaviors of nanostructures by the means of employing nonlocal strain gradient theory (NSGT). Due to increasing the accuracy of the presented model in predicting shear deformation effects, a refined higher-order plate theory is introduced. In order to cover the most enormous circumstances, maximum amount of load generated by plate’s rotation is considered. Furthermore, utilizing a developed form of Hamilton’s principle, containing magneto-electric effects, the nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG rotating nanoplates are derived. An analytical solution is obtained to solve the governing equations and validity of the solution method is proven by comparing results from present method with those of former attempts. At last, outcomes are plotted in the framework of some figures to show the influences of various parameters such as wave number, nonlocality, length scale parameter, magnetic potential, electric voltage, gradient index and angular velocity on wave frequency, phase velocity and escape frequency of the examined nanoplate.

  2. Bayesian reconstruction of gravitational wave burst signals from simulations of rotating stellar core collapse and bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Roever, Christian; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Christensen, Nelson; Dimmelmeier, Harald; Heng, Ik Siong; Meyer, Renate

    2009-11-15

    Presented in this paper is a technique that we propose for extracting the physical parameters of a rotating stellar core collapse from the observation of the associated gravitational wave signal from the collapse and core bounce. Data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors can be used to provide information on the mass of the progenitor model, precollapse rotation, and the nuclear equation of state. We use waveform libraries provided by the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse models in general relativity, and from them create an orthogonal set of eigenvectors using principal component analysis. Bayesian inference techniques are then used to reconstruct the associated gravitational wave signal that is assumed to be detected by an interferometric detector. Posterior probability distribution functions are derived for the amplitudes of the principal component analysis eigenvectors, and the pulse arrival time. We show how the reconstructed signal and the principal component analysis eigenvector amplitude estimates may provide information on the physical parameters associated with the core collapse event.

  3. Wave propagation reversal for wavy vortices in wide-gap counter-rotating cylindrical Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, S.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a numerical study of wavy supercritical cylindrical Couette flow between counter-rotating cylinders in which the wavy pattern propagates either prograde with the inner cylinder or retrograde opposite the rotation of the inner cylinder. The wave propagation reversals from prograde to retrograde and vice versa occur at distinct values of the inner cylinder Reynolds number when the associated frequency of the wavy instability vanishes. The reversal occurs for both twofold and threefold symmetric wavy vortices. Moreover, the wave propagation reversal only occurs for sufficiently strong counter-rotation. The flow pattern reversal appears to be intrinsic in the system as either periodic boundary conditions or fixed end wall boundary conditions for different system sizes always result in the wave propagation reversal. We present a detailed bifurcation sequence and parameter space diagram with respect to retrograde behavior of wavy flows. The retrograde propagation of the instability occurs when the inner Reynolds number is about two times the outer Reynolds number. The mechanism for the retrograde propagation is associated with the inviscidly unstable region near the inner cylinder and the direction of the global average azimuthal velocity. Flow dynamics, spatio-temporal behavior, global mean angular velocity, and torque of the flow with the wavy pattern are explored.

  4. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  5. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-12-01

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. A simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure for the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert-Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. We also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.

  6. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure for the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.

  7. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    energy cascade is clearly observed consistently with previous measurements. A large amount of data permits us to use higher order statistical tools to investigate directly the resonant interactions. We observe a strong presence of triadic interactions in our system, confirming the foundations of the weak wave turbulence theory. A significant part of these interactions are non-local and enable coupling between capillary and gravity waves. We also emphasize the role of approximate resonances that are made possible by the nonlinear spectral widening. The quasi-resonances increase significantly the number of wave interactions and in particular open the possibility of observing 3-wave coupling among gravity waves although 3-wave exact resonances are prohibited. These effects are being currently investigated in a larger size experiment using a 13m in diameter wave flume. Our observation raise the question of the importance of these approximate resonances of gravity waves in energy transfers both in the theory and in the ocean.

  8. Multiple scattering effects in quasifree scattering from halo nuclei: A test of the distorted-wave impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Fonseca, A. C.

    2008-02-15

    Full Faddeev-type calculations are performed for {sup 11}Be breakup on a proton target at 38.4, 100, and 200 MeV/u incident energies. The convergence of the multiple scattering expansion is investigated. The results are compared with those of other frameworks like distorted-wave impulse approximation that are based on an incomplete and truncated multiple scattering expansion.

  9. Rotating machine fault diagnosis through enhanced stochastic resonance by full-wave signal construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Zhang, Haibin; Kong, Fanrang

    2017-02-01

    This study proposes a full-wave signal construction (FSC) strategy for enhancing rotating machine fault diagnosis by exploiting stochastic resonance (SR). The FSC strategy is utilized to transform a half-wave signal (e.g., an envelope signal) into a full-wave one by conducting a Mirror-Cycle-Add (MCA) operation. The constructed full-wave signal evenly modulates the bistable potential and makes the potential tilt back and forth smoothly. This effect provides the equivalent transition probabilities of particle bounce between the two potential wells. A stable SR output signal with better periodicity, which is beneficial to periodic signal detection, can be obtained. In addition, the MCA operation can improve the input signal-to-noise ratio by enhancing the periodic component while attenuating the noise components. These two advantages make the proposed FSCSR method surpass the traditional SR method in fault signal processing. Performance evaluation is conducted by numerical analysis and experimental verification. The proposed MCA-based FSC strategy has the potential to be a universal signal pre-processing technique. Moreover, the proposed FSCSR method can be used in rotating machine fault diagnosis and other areas related to weak signal detection.

  10. Generation of plasma rotation in a tokamak by ion-cyclotron absorption of fast Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; P. Bonoli

    2000-06-13

    Control of rotation in tokamak plasmas provides a method for suppressing fine-scale turbulent transport by velocity shear and for stabilizing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via a close-fitting conducting shell. The experimental discovery of rotation in a plasma heated by the fast-wave minority ion cyclotron process is important both as a potential control method for a fusion reactor and as a fundamental issue, because rotation arises even though this heating process introduces negligible angular momentum. This paper proposes and evaluates a mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport in a tokamak is governed by a diffusion equation with a no-slip boundary condition at the plasma surface and with a torque-density source that is a function of radius. When the torque density source consists of two separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a non-zero central rotation velocity results, even when the total angular momentum input vanishes. Secondly, the authors show that localized ion-cyclotron heating can generate regions of positive and negative torque density and consequently central plasma rotation.

  11. Educing the emission mechanism of internal gravity waves in the differentially heat rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Joran; Hien, Steffen; Achatz, Ulrich; Borchert, Sebastian; Fruman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the lifecycle of gravity waves is fundamental to a good comprehension of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In this lifecycle, the emission mechanisms may be the most elusive. Indeed, while the emission of gravity waves by orography or convection is well understood, the so-called spontaneous emission is still a quite open topic of investigation [1]. This type of emission usually occur very near jet-front systems in the troposphere. In this abstract, we announce our numerical study of the question. Model systems of the atmosphere which can be easily simulated or built in a laboratory have always been an important part of the study of atmospheric dynamics, alongside global simulations, in situ measurements and theory. In the case of the study of the spontaneous emission of gravity waves near jet-front systems, the differentially heated rotating annulus set up has been proposed and extensively used. It comprises of an annular tank containing water: the inner cylinder is kept at a cold temperature while the outer cylinder is kept at a warm temperature. The whole system is rotating. Provided the values of the control parameters (temperature, rotation rate, gap between the cylinders, height of water) are well chosen, the resulting flow mimics the troposphere at midlatitudes: it has a jet stream, and a baroclinic lifecycle develops on top of it. A very reasonable ratio of Brunt-Väisälä frequency over rotation rate of the system can be obtained, so as to be as close to the atmosphere as possible. Recent experiments as well as earlier numerical simulations in our research group have shown that gravity waves are indeed emitted in this set up, in particular near the jet front system of the baroclinic wave [2]. After a first experimental stage of characterising the emitted wavepacket, we focused our work on testing hypotheses on the gravity wave emission mechanism: we have tested and validated the hypothesis of spontaneous imbalance generated by the flow in

  12. Survey of Coherent Approximately 1 Hz Waves in Mercury's Inner Magnetosphere from MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft of highly coherent waves at frequencies between 0.4 and 5 Hz in Mercury's inner magnetosphere. This survey covers the time period from 24 March to 25 September 2011, or 2.1 Mercury years. These waves typically exhibit banded harmonic structure that drifts in frequency as the spacecraft traverses the magnetic equator. The waves are seen at all magnetic local times, but their observed rate of occurrence is much less on the dayside, at least in part the result of MESSENGER's orbit. On the nightside, on average, wave power is maximum near the equator and decreases with increasing magnetic latitude, consistent with an equatorial source. When the spacecraft traverses the plasma sheet during its equatorial crossings, wave power is a factor of 2 larger than for equatorial crossings that do not cross the plasma sheet. The waves are highly transverse at large magnetic latitudes but are more compressional near the equator. However, at the equator the transverse component of these waves increases relative to the compressional component as the degree of polarization decreases. Also, there is a substantial minority of events that are transverse at all magnetic latitudes, including the equator. A few of these latter events could be interpreted as ion cyclotron waves. In general, the waves tend to be strongly linear and characterized by values of the ellipticity less than 0.3 and wave-normal angles peaked near 90 deg. Their maxima in wave power at the equator coupled with their narrow-band character suggests that these waves might be generated locally in loss cone plasma characterized by high values of the ratio beta of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure. Presumably both electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves can be generated by ion loss cone distributions. If proton beta decreases with increasing magnetic latitude along a field line, then electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves are predicted

  13. Wave generation by fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials with internal rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Xu, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Crack or fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials are sources of waves and is important in both stability and fracture (e.g. hydraulic fracture) monitoring. Many geomaterials consist of particles or other constituents capable of rotating with respect to each other, either due to the absence of the binder phase (fragmented materials) or due to extensive damage of the cement between the constituents inflicted by previous loading. In investigating the wave generated in fracturing it is important to distinguish between the cases when the fracture is instantaneously initiated to its full length or propagates from a smaller initial crack. We show by direct physical experiments and discrete element modelling of 2D arrangements of unbonded disks that under compressive load fractures are initiated instantaneously as a result of the material instability and localisation. Such fractures generate waves as a single impulse impact. When the fractures propagate, they produce a sequence of impulses associated with the propagation steps. This manifests itself as acoustic (microseismic) emission whose temporal pattern contains the information of the fracture geometry, such as fractal dimension of the fracture. The description of this process requires formulating criteria of crack growth capable of taking into account the internal rotations. We developed an analytical solution based on the Cosserat continuum where each point of body has three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. When the Cosserat characteristic lengths are comparable with the grain sizes, the simplified equations of small-scale Cosserat continuum can be used. We established that the order of singularity of the main asymptotic term for moment stress is higher than the order of singularity for conventional stress. Therefore, the mutual rotation of particles and related bending and/or twisting of the bonds between the particles represent an unconventional mechanism of crack propagation.

  14. TSA - A Two Scale Approximation for Wind-Generated Ocean Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    The coastal zone involves significant potential future economic development, e.g., residences, recreation, fisheries, aquaculture , coastal...Quality of Life Development of the coastal zone involves residences, recreation, fisheries, aquaculture , coastal transportation. Ocean waves are...11p. [published] 2. Perrie, W., Guo, L ., Long, Z. and Toulany, B., 2011: Impacts of Climate Change on Autumn North Atlantic Wave Climate. 12th

  15. An Exact Solution for Geophysical Edge Waves in the {β}-Plane Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2015-12-01

    By taking into account the {β}-plane effects, we provide an exact nonlinear solution to the geophysical edge-wave problem within the Lagrangian framework. This solution describes trapped waves propagating eastward or westward along a sloping beach with the shoreline parallel to the Equator.

  16. A high-order time-parallel scheme for solving wave propagation problems via the direct construction of an approximate time-evolution operator

    DOE PAGES

    Haut, T. S.; Babb, T.; Martinsson, P. G.; ...

    2015-06-16

    Our manuscript demonstrates a technique for efficiently solving the classical wave equation, the shallow water equations, and, more generally, equations of the form ∂u/∂t=Lu∂u/∂t=Lu, where LL is a skew-Hermitian differential operator. The idea is to explicitly construct an approximation to the time-evolution operator exp(τL)exp(τL) for a relatively large time-step ττ. Recently developed techniques for approximating oscillatory scalar functions by rational functions, and accelerated algorithms for computing functions of discretized differential operators are exploited. Principal advantages of the proposed method include: stability even for large time-steps, the possibility to parallelize in time over many characteristic wavelengths and large speed-ups over existingmore » methods in situations where simulation over long times are required. Numerical examples involving the 2D rotating shallow water equations and the 2D wave equation in an inhomogenous medium are presented, and the method is compared to the 4th order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method and to the use of Chebyshev polynomials. The new method achieved high accuracy over long-time intervals, and with speeds that are orders of magnitude faster than both RK4 and the use of Chebyshev polynomials.« less

  17. A high-order time-parallel scheme for solving wave propagation problems via the direct construction of an approximate time-evolution operator

    SciTech Connect

    Haut, T. S.; Babb, T.; Martinsson, P. G.; Wingate, B. A.

    2015-06-16

    Our manuscript demonstrates a technique for efficiently solving the classical wave equation, the shallow water equations, and, more generally, equations of the form ∂u/∂t=Lu∂u/∂t=Lu, where LL is a skew-Hermitian differential operator. The idea is to explicitly construct an approximation to the time-evolution operator exp(τL)exp(τL) for a relatively large time-step ττ. Recently developed techniques for approximating oscillatory scalar functions by rational functions, and accelerated algorithms for computing functions of discretized differential operators are exploited. Principal advantages of the proposed method include: stability even for large time-steps, the possibility to parallelize in time over many characteristic wavelengths and large speed-ups over existing methods in situations where simulation over long times are required. Numerical examples involving the 2D rotating shallow water equations and the 2D wave equation in an inhomogenous medium are presented, and the method is compared to the 4th order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method and to the use of Chebyshev polynomials. The new method achieved high accuracy over long-time intervals, and with speeds that are orders of magnitude faster than both RK4 and the use of Chebyshev polynomials.

  18. Modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in a semi-bounded magnetized plasma containing the rotating dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-15

    The dispersion relation for modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in the magnetized dusty plasma containing the rotating dust grains is derived, and the effects of magnetic field configuration on the resonant growth rate are investigated. We present the results that the resonant growth rates of the wave would increase with the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency as well as with the increase of wave number for the case of perpendicular magnetic field configuration when the ion plasma frequency is greater than the dust rotation frequency. For the parallel magnetic field configuration, we find that the instability occurs only for some limited ranges of the wave number and the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The resonant growth rate is found to decrease with the increase of the wave number. The influence of dust rotational frequency on the instability is also discussed.

  19. Multivariate statistical data analysis methods for detecting baroclinic wave interactions in the thermally driven rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Larcher, Thomas; Harlander, Uwe; Alexandrov, Kiril; Wang, Yongtai

    2010-05-01

    Experiments on baroclinic wave instabilities in a rotating cylindrical gap have been long performed, e.g., to unhide regular waves of different zonal wave number, to better understand the transition to the quasi-chaotic regime, and to reveal the underlying dynamical processes of complex wave flows. We present the application of appropriate multivariate data analysis methods on time series data sets acquired by the use of non-intrusive measurement techniques of a quite different nature. While the high accurate Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV ) is used for measurements of the radial velocity component at equidistant azimuthal positions, a high sensitive thermographic camera measures the surface temperature field. The measurements are performed at particular parameter points, where our former studies show that kinds of complex wave patterns occur [1, 2]. Obviously, the temperature data set has much more information content as the velocity data set due to the particular measurement techniques. Both sets of time series data are analyzed by using multivariate statistical techniques. While the LDV data sets are studied by applying the Multi-Channel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M - SSA), the temperature data sets are analyzed by applying the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF ). Our goal is (a) to verify the results yielded with the analysis of the velocity data and (b) to compare the data analysis methods. Therefor, the temperature data are processed in a way to become comparable to the LDV data, i.e. reducing the size of the data set in such a manner that the temperature measurements would imaginary be performed at equidistant azimuthal positions only. This approach initially results in a great loss of information. But applying the M - SSA to the reduced temperature data sets enable us to compare the methods. [1] Th. von Larcher and C. Egbers, Experiments on transitions of baroclinic waves in a differentially heated rotating annulus, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics

  20. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  1. A singular vortex Rossby wave packet within a rapidly rotating vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillol, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the quasi-steady régime attained by a rapidly rotating vortex after a wave packet has interacted with it. We consider singular, nonlinear, helical, and shear asymmetric modes within a linearly stable, columnar, axisymmetric, and dry vortex in the f-plane. The normal modes enter resonance with the vortex at a certain radius rc, where the phase angular speed is equal to the rotation frequency. The related singularity in the modal equation at rc strongly modifies the flow in the 3D helical critical layer, the region where the wave/vortex interaction occurs. This interaction induces a secondary mean flow of higher amplitude than the wave packet and that diffuses at either side of the critical layer inside two spiral diffusion boundary layers. We derive the leading-order equations of the system of nonlinear coupled partial differential equations that govern the slowly evolving amplitudes of the wave packet and induced mean flow a long time after this interaction started. We show that the critical layer imposes its proper scalings and evolution equations; in particular, two slow times are involved, the faster being secular. This system leads to a more complex dynamics with respect to the previous studies on wave packets where this coupling was omitted and where, for instance, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation was derived [D. J. Benney and S. A. Maslowe, "The evolution in space and time of nonlinear waves in parallel shear flows," Stud. Appl. Math. 54, 181 (1975)]. Matched asymptotic expansion method lets appear that the neutral modes are distorted. The main outcome is that a stronger wave/vortex interaction takes place when a wave packet is considered with respect to the case of a single mode. Numerical simulations of the leading-order inviscid Burgers-like equations of the derived system show that the wave packet rapidly breaks and that the vortex, after intensifying in the transition stage, is substantially weakened before the breaking onset. This

  2. Anomalous waves in gas-liquid mixtures near gas critical point in Gardner equation approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasenko, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    The waves in a bubbled incompressible liquid with Van der Waals gas in a bubbles being near critical points is considered in a frame of Gardner equation. It is shown that both coefficients on quadratic and cubic nonlinear terms in Gardner equation change the sign near gas critical point and it results the anomalous waves: negative and limited solitons, kinks, antikinks and breathers. The dynamics and interactions of these waves was studied numerically by high accuracy Fourier methods with periodically boundary conditions. In particular it is revealed that limited solitons always arise from initial distribution with a few identical soliton's pair and stand stable in their form after numerous interactions.

  3. Rotations

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    The rotation, in forestry, is the planned number of years between formation of a crop or stand and its final harvest at a specified stage of maturity (Ford-Robertson 1971). The rotation used for many species is the age of culmination of mean usable volume growth [net mean annual increment (MAI)]. At that age, usable volume divided by age reaches its highest level. That...

  4. Controlled rotation and translation of spherical particles or living cells by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Ianis; Doinikov, Alexander A; Marmottant, Philippe; Rabaud, David; Poulain, Cédric; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-07-11

    We show experimental evidence of the acoustically-assisted micromanipulation of small objects like solid particles or blood cells, combining rotation and translation, using high frequency surface acoustic waves. This was obtained from the leakage in a microfluidic channel of two standing waves arranged perpendicularly in a LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate working at 36.3 MHz. By controlling the phase lag between the emitters, we could, in addition to translation, generate a swirling motion of the emitting surface which, in turn, led to the rapid rotation of spherical polystyrene Janus beads suspended in the channel and of human red and white blood cells up to several rounds per second. We show that these revolution velocities are compatible with a torque caused by the acoustic streaming that develops at the particles surface, like that first described by [F. Busse et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 1981, 69(6), 1634-1638]. This device, based on standard interdigitated transducers (IDTs) adjusted to emit at equal frequencies, opens a way to a large range of applications since it allows the simultaneous control of the translation and rotation of hard objects, as well as the investigation of the response of cells to shear stress.

  5. Monitoring Rotational Components of Seismic Waves with a Ring Laser Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakundi, Jackson; Dunn, Robert

    2015-04-01

    It has been known for decades that seismic waves can introduce rotation in the surface of the Earth. There are historic records of tombstones in Japan being rotated after large earthquakes. Until fairly recently, the primary way to detect ground rotation from earthquakes was with an array of several seismographs. The development of large ring laser interferometers has provided a way for a single instrument to make extremely sensitive measurements of ground motion. In this poster, a diagram of a large ring laser will be presented. For comparison, seismograms recorded with a ring laser and a collocated standard seismograph will be presented. A major thrust of this research is the detection and analysis of seismic responses from directional drilling sites in Arkansas and Oklahoma. There are suggestions that the injection of pressurized water used to fracture gas bearing shale may cause small earthquakes. The Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission ordered the closing of certain waste water disposal wells in North Central Arkansas. Apparently, these wells injected waste water into a previously unknown fault causing it to slip. An attempt is being made to determine if the seismic wave patterns from earthquakes generated near directional drilling sites differ from those generated miles away.

  6. Evolution of massive black hole binaries in rotating galactic nuclei: implications for gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasskazov, Alexander; Merritt, David

    2017-01-01

    The subject of our study is a binary supermassive black hole (BSBH) in the center of a galactic nucleus. We model the evolution of its orbit due to interactions with the stars of the galaxy by means of 3-body scattering experiments. Our model includes a new degree of freedom - the orientation of the BSBH’s orbital plane - which is allowed to change due to interaction with the stars in a rotating nucleus. The binary’s eccentricity also evolves in an orientation-dependent manner. We find that the dynamics are qualitatively different compared with non-rotating nuclei: 1) The BSBH's orbital plane evolves toward alignment with the plane of rotation of the nucleus; 2) The BSBH’s eccentricity decreases for aligned BSBHs and increases for counter-aligned ones.We then apply our model to calculate the effects of stellar environment on the gravitational wave background spectrum produced by BSBHs. Using the results of recent N-body/Monte-Carlo simulations we account for different rates of stellar interaction in spherical, axisymmetric and triaxial galaxies. We also consider the possibility that SBH masses are systematically lower than usually assumed. The net result of the new physical mechanisms included here is a spectrum for the stochastic gravitational wave background that has a significantly lower amplitude than in previous treatments, which could explain the discrepancy that currently exists between the models and the upper limits set by pulsar timing array observations.

  7. Three-dimensional structures of equatorial waves and the resulting super-rotation in the atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Gu, Pin-Gao; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) equatorial trapped waves excited by stellar isolation and the resulting equatorial super-rotating jet in a vertical stratified atmosphere of a tidally locked hot Jupiter are investigated. Taking the hot Jupiter HD 189733b as a fiducial example, we analytically solve linear equations subject to stationary stellar heating with a uniform zonal-mean flow included. We also extract wave information in the final equilibrium state of the atmosphere from our radiative hydrodynamical simulation for HD 189733b. Our analytic wave solutions are able to qualitatively explain the 3D simulation results. Apart from previous wave studies, investigating the vertical structure of waves allows us to explore new wave features such as the wavefronts tilts related to the Rossby-wave resonance as well as dispersive equatorial waves. We also attempt to apply our linear wave analysis to explain some numerical features associated with the equatorial jet development seen in the general circulation model by Showman and Polvani. During the spin-up phase of the equatorial jet, the acceleration of the jet can be in principle boosted by the Rossby-wave resonance. However, we also find that as the jet speed increases, the Rossby-wave structure shifts eastward, while the Kelvin-wave structure remains approximately stationary, leading to the decline of the acceleration rate. Our analytic model of jet evolution implies that there exists only one stable equilibrium state of the atmosphere, possibly implying that the final state of the atmosphere is independent of initial conditions in the linear regime. Limitations of our linear model and future improvements are also discussed.

  8. Forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wooyoung

    The primary objective of this graduate research is to study forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability properties. For axisymmetric flow of a non-uniformly rotating fluid within a long cylindrical tube, an analysis is presented to predict the periodic generation of upstream-advancing vortex solitons by axisymmetric disturbance steadily moving with a transcritical velocity as a forcing agent. The phenomenon is simulated using the forced Korteweg-de Vries (fKdV) equation to model the amplitude function of the Stokes stream function for describing this family of rotating flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid. The numerical results for the weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave motion show that a sequence of well-defined axisymmetrical recirculating eddies is periodically produced and emitted to radiate upstream of the disturbance, soon becoming permanent in the form as a procession of vortex solitons, which we call vortons. Two primary flows, the Rankine vortex and the Burgers vortex, are adopted to exhibit in detail the process of producing the upstream vortons by the critical motion of a slender body moving along the central axis, with the Burgers vortex being found the more effective of the two in the generation of vortons. To investigate the evolution of free or forced waves within a tube of non-uniform radius, a new forced KdV equation is derived which models the variable geometry with variable coefficients. A set of section-mean conservation laws is derived specially for this class of rotational tube flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid, in both differential and integral forms. A new aspect of stability theory is analyzed for possible instabilities of the axisymmetric solitary waves subject to non-axisymmetric disturbances. The present linear analysis based on the model equation involving the bending mode shows that the axisymmetric solitary wave is neutrally stable with respect to small bending mode

  9. On the linear approximation of gravity wave saturation in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Lindzen's model of gravity wave breaking is shown to be inconsistent with the process of convective adjustment and associated turbulent outbreak. The K-theory turbulent diffusion model used by Lindzen implies a spatially uniform turbulent field which is not in agreement with the fact that gravity wave saturation and the associated convection produce turbulence only in restricted zones. The Lindzen model may be corrected to some extent by taking the turbulent Prandtl number for a diffusion acting on the wave itself to be very large. The eddy diffusion coefficients computed by Lindzen then become a factor of 2 larger and eddy transports of heat and constituents by wave fields vanish to first order.

  10. Can plume-induced internal gravity waves regulate the core rotation of subgiant stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.; Marques, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The seismic data provided by the space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler enabled us to probe the internal rotation of thousands of evolved low-mass stars. Subsequently, several studies showed that current stellar evolution codes are unable to reproduce the low core rotation rates observed in these stars. These results indicate that an additional angular momentum transport process is necessary to counteract the spin up due to the core contraction during the post-main sequence evolution. For several candidates, the transport induced by internal gravity waves (IGW) could play a non-negligible role. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of IGW generated by penetrative convection on the internal rotation of low-mass stars from the subgiant branch to the beginning of the red giant branch. Methods: A semi-analytical excitation model was used to estimate the angular momentum wave flux. The characteristic timescale associated with the angular momentum transport by IGW was computed and compared to the contraction timescale throughout the radiative region of stellar models at different evolutionary stages. Results: We show that IGW can efficiently counteract the contraction-driven spin up of the core of subgiant stars if the amplitude of the radial-differential rotation (between the center of the star and the top of the radiative zone) is higher than a threshold value. This threshold depends on the evolutionary stage and is comparable to the differential rotation rates inferred for a sample of subgiant stars observed by the satellite Kepler. Such an agreement can therefore be interpreted as the consequence of a regulation mechanism driven by IGW. This result is obtained under the assumption of a smooth rotation profile in the radiative region and holds true even if a wide range of values is considered for the parameters of the generation model. In contrast, on the red giant branch, we find that IGW remain insufficient, on their own, to explain the observations because

  11. Spontaneous Gravity Wave emission in the differentially-heated rotating-annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Steffen; Rolland, Joran; Borchert, Sebastian; Schoon, Lena; Zülicke, Christoph; Achatz, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    The source mechanism of inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) observed in numerical simulations of the differentially heated rotating annulus experiment is investigated. The focus is on the wave generation from the balanced flow, a process presumably contributing significantly to the atmospheric IGW spectrum. Direct numerical simulations are performed for an atmosphere-like configuration of the experiment and possible regions of IGW activity are characterized by a Hilbert-transform algorithm. Subsequently, the flow is separated into a balanced and unbalanced part, assuming the limit of small Rossby number, and the forcing of IGWs by the internal balanced flow is derived rigorously. Tangent-linear simulations are then used to identify the part of the IGW signal that is rather due to radiation by the internal balanced flow than to boundary-layer instabilities at the side walls. An idealized fluid setup without rigid horizontal boundaries is considered as well, to see the effect of the identified balanced forcing unmaske by boundary-layer effects. The direct simulations show a clear baroclinic wave structure exhibiting a realistic jet-front system superimposed by three distinct wave packets. The subsequent linear analysis indicates that one wave packet is radiated from the internal flow, one affected both by the internal flow and by the inner boundary layer, and a third one is probably caused by boundary layer instabilities. The balanced forcing is found to play a significant role in the generation of unbalanced flow so that it supplements boundary-layer instabilities as key factor in the IGW emission in the differentially heated rotating annulus.

  12. Generation of polarized shear Alfven waves by a rotating magnetic field source

    SciTech Connect

    Gigliotti, A.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.; Karavaev, A.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. Surjalal; Papadopoulos, D.

    2009-09-15

    Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device at the University of California, Los Angeles to study the propagation of field-aligned, polarized kinetic shear Alfven waves radiated from a rotating magnetic field source created via a novel phased orthogonal loop antenna. Both right and left hand circular polarizations are generated at a wide range of frequencies from 0.21{<=}{omega}/{omega}{sub ci}<0.93. Propagation parallel to the background magnetic field near the Alfven velocity is observed along with a small parallel wave magnetic field component implying a shear mode. The peak-to-peak magnitude of the wave magnetic field, 33 cm away from the antenna, is on the order of 0.8% of the background field and drops off in the far field. The full width at half maximum of the wave energy changes little over a distance of 2.5 parallel wavelengths while the exponential decrease in wave energy as a function of distance can be attributed to collisional damping. Evidence of electron heating and ionization is observed during the pulse.

  13. Galactic rotation curve and spiral density wave parameters from 73 masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Based on kinematic data on masers with known trigonometric parallaxes and measurements of the velocities of HI clouds at tangential points in the inner Galaxy, we have refined the parameters of the Allen-Santillan model Galactic potential and constructed the Galactic rotation curve in a wide range of Galactocentric distances, from 0 to 20 kpc. The circular rotation velocity of the Sun for the adopted Galactocentric distance R 0 = 8 kpc is V 0 = 239 ± 16 km s-1. We have obtained the series of residual tangential, Δ V θ , and radial, V R , velocities for 73 masers. Based on these series, we have determined the parameters of the Galactic spiral density wave satisfying the linear Lin-Shu model using the method of periodogram analysis that we proposed previously. The tangential and radial perturbation amplitudes are f θ = 7.0±1.2 km s-1 and f R = 7.8±0.7 km s-1, respectively, the perturbation wave length is λ = 2.3±0.4 kpc, and the pitch angle of the spiral pattern in a two-armed model is i = -5.2° ±0.7°. The phase of the Sun ζ ⊙ in the spiral density wave is -50° ± 15° and -160° ± 15° from the residual tangential and radial velocities, respectively.

  14. First Experimental Evidence of large-scale wave modes in rotating magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.; Fabre, G.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Present day dynamo models simulate thermally-driven convection in fluids differently from liquid metals that exist in planetary cores. In such models, quasi-steady, columnar convection structures drive dynamo action. Here we present the results of an idealized model of core-style convection first by studying rotating convection in liquid gallium and then by including the effect of magnetic fields. In rotating convection in liquid metal, we find that the convection occurs via oscillatory motions occurring throughout the bulk of the fluid. These liquid metal inertial motions are fundamentally different than the quasi-steady modes in present day dynamo models and, further, are unlikely to be efficient at generating quasi-steady planetary magnetic fields. Withthe addition of a magnetic field, the bulk oscillatory convection mode is suppressed and replaced by a previously unobserved flow: a magneto-Coriolis sidewall-attached mode slowly precessing around the rim of the container. This slow wall mode is similar to a rapidly-rotating convection mode found in non-metals. Non-intuitively, then, the effect of the magnetic field is to dampen the inertial aspects of the the liquid metal flow while allowing for large-scale slow modes that can develop in rapidly rotating systems. Overall, our experiments show that the convection driven MC wave modes that can develop in liquid metals are remarkably different from the canonical flows that develop in the fluids used in present day dynamo models.

  15. Contributions to the theory of magnetorotational instability and waves in a rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B. Lominadze, J. G. Churikov, A. P.; Tsypin, V. S.; Erokhin, N. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Konovalov, S. V.; Pashitskii, E. A.; Stepanov, A. V.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2008-01-15

    The one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in an ideal plasma is presented. The theory predicts the possibility of MRI for arbitrary {beta}, where {beta} is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure. The kinetic theory of MRI in a collisionless plasma is developed. It is demonstrated that as in the ideal MHD, MRI can occur in such a plasma for arbitrary {beta}. The mechanism of MRI is discussed; it is shown that the instability appears because of a perturbed parallel electric field. The electrodynamic description of MRI is formulated under the assumption that the dispersion relation is expressed in terms of the permittivity tensor; general properties of this tensor are analyzed. It is shown to be separated into the nonrotational and rotational parts. With this in mind, the first step for incorporation of MRI into the general theory of plasma instabilities is taken. The rotation effects on Alfven waves are considered.

  16. Motion Characteristics Measurement of Rotating Object Using Surface Acoustic Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugizaki, Goro; Takenaka, Tadashi; Sakata, Koichiro; Toda, Kohji

    1993-09-01

    The configuration and characteristics of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line oscillator for use as an accelerometer using a ceramic plate are described. The static strain sensitivity of the delay line oscillator using a Pb(Zr\\cdotTi)O3-based piezoelectric ceramic plate is measured. The SAW accelerometer is a strain-sensitive SAW delay line oscillator, in which the oscillation frequency varies with bending stress imparted to the ceramic plate by four loading pins on a brass block that is subjected to force. The accelerometer is mounted on a rotating disk and its oscillation frequency deviation is measured against the number of rotations and the radial acceleration of the disk. The strain sensitivity in the form of the change of oscillation frequency is satisfactory for accelerometer performance.

  17. Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wordsworth, R. D.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2008-12-01

    We report an analog laboratory study of planetary-scale turbulence and jet formation. A rotating annulus was cooled and heated at its inner and outer walls, respectively, causing baroclinic instability to develop in the fluid inside. At high rotation rates and low temperature differences, the flow became chaotic and ultimately fully turbulent. The inclusion of sloping top and bottom boundaries caused turbulent eddies to behave like planetary waves at large scales, and eddy interaction with the zonal flow then led to the formation of several alternating jets at mid-depth. The jets did not scale with the Rhines length, and spectral analysis of the flow indicated a distinct separation between jets and eddies in wavenumber space, with direct energy transfer occurring nonlocally between them. Our results suggest that the traditional ``turbulent cascade'' picture of zonal jet formation may be an inappropriate one in the geophysically important case of large-scale flows forced by differential solar heating.

  18. Systematics of an ambient-temperature, rapidly-rotating half-wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essinger-Hileman, T.; Kusaka, A.; Appel, J. W.; Gallardo, P.; Irwin, K. D.; Jarosik, N.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2016-07-01

    In these proceedings, we summarize our in-field evaluation of temperature-to-polarization leakage associated with the use of a continuously-rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) on the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment. Using two seasons of data, we demonstrate scalar leakage of ˜ 0.01%. This is consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude better than any previously-reported leakage. We constrain higher-order dipole and quadrupole leakage terms to be < 0.06% (95% confidence). Without any mitigation from scan cross-linking or boresight rotation, this corresponds to an upper limit on systematic errors in the tensor-to-scalar ratio r ;S 0.01. The HWP significantly reduces temperature-to-polarization leakage systematic errors for ABS and shows the promise of fast polarization modulation with HWPs for future experiments. Full details can be found in Ref. 1.

  19. Induced P-wave superfluidity within the full energy- and momentum-dependent Eliashberg approximation in asymmetric dilute Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgac, Aurel; Yoon, Sukjin

    2009-05-15

    We consider a very asymmetric system of fermions with an interaction characterized by a positive scattering length only. The minority atoms pair and form a Bose-Einstein condensate of dimers, while the surplus fermions interact only indirectly through the exchange of Bogoliubov sound modes. This interaction has a finite range, the retardation effects are significant, and the surplus fermions will form a P-wave superfluid. We compute the P-wave pairing gap in the BCS and Eliashberg approximations with only energy-dependence approximations, and demonstrate their inadequacy in comparison with a full treatment of the momentum and energy dependence of the induced interaction. The pairing gap computed with a full momentum and energy dependence is significantly larger in magnitude, and that makes it more likely that this new exotic paired phase could be put in evidence in atomic trap experiments.

  20. Effective three-wave-mixing picture and first Born approximation for femtosecond supercontinua from microstructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesik, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Tartara, L.

    2010-10-15

    The theory of supercontinuum generation in microstructured fibers is based on notions of soliton fission and subsequent dispersive wave radiation. In bulk media, in contrast, the paradigm of effective three-wave mixing (ETWM) proves useful for understanding the supercontinuum spectral properties and revealing the dynamics within the high-intensity core of the collapsing filament. Previously, it has been shown that the bulk theory applies accurately even to so-called glass-membrane fibers in which the guided light is free to diffract in one dimension. In the same spirit, this work extends that result and brings the fiber and bulk supercontinuum approaches closer together. Specifically, we demonstrate that the ETWM paradigm can be modified for fibers, where it provides an accurate analytic description of the supercontinuum component due to dispersive waves.

  1. Magnetic field effect on waves in a centrifuged layer of a rotating conducting viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueva, N. V.; Sandalov, V. M.; Tkach, M. E.; Soldatov, I. N.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers wave processes in a centrifuged layer of an incompressible viscous conducting fluid in an axial magnetic field in the cavity of a rapidly rotating infinite cylinder with insulating walls. Inertial modes (solutions of the linearized boundary-value problem of magnetohydrodynamics) are represented as a superposition of helical fields. Expressions for the vorticity parameters of the helical flows forming the inertial mode at a small Stewart number are given. Dispersion curves of inertial waves are constructed, and the influence of the magnetic field on the flow field is analyzed. The critical frequencies at which the lowest (surface) mode arises are determined. The spatial and temporal stability of the modes are investigated.

  2. Shear flow driven drift waves and the counter-rotating vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the drift waves can become unstable due to the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field. The modified Rayleigh instability condition is obtained which is applicable to both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is proposed that the shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas as well as electron-ion plasmas. A particular form of the shear flow can give rise to counter-rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains. The speed and amplitude of the structures are affected by the presence of positrons in the electron ion plasma. The relevance of this investigation to laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

  3. Magnetogasdynamic Cylindrical Shock Waves in a Rotating Nonideal Gas with Radiation Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Patel, Nanhey

    2015-03-01

    A similarity solution is presented for a cylindrical magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a rotating nonideal gas in the presence of a variable axial magnetic field in the case where the radiation heat flux is of importance. The initial angular velocity of the medium is assumed to vary as some power of the distance from the symmetry axis. The radiation heat flux is evaluated from the equation of motion without explicit use of the radiation transfer equations. It is shown that the gas nonidealness increases the shock strength but decreases the shock velocity. On the other hand, the presence of a magnetic field decreases the shock strength but increases the shock velocity. Moreover, the shock velocity increases with the ratio of specific heats. The total energy of the shock wave increases with time.

  4. Dispersion calculation method based on S-transform and coordinate rotation for Love channel waves with two components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Zhang, Yugui

    2017-08-01

    Dispersion analysis is an important part of in-seam seismic data processing, and the calculation accuracy of the dispersion curve directly influences pickup errors of channel wave travel time. To extract an accurate channel wave dispersion curve from in-seam seismic two-component signals, we proposed a time-frequency analysis method based on single-trace signal processing; in addition, we formulated a dispersion calculation equation, based on S-transform, with a freely adjusted filter window width. To unify the azimuth of seismic wave propagation received by a two-component geophone, the original in-seam seismic data undergoes coordinate rotation. The rotation angle can be calculated based on P-wave characteristics, with high energy in the wave propagation direction and weak energy in the vertical direction. With this angle acquisition, a two-component signal can be converted to horizontal and vertical directions. Because Love channel waves have a particle vibration track perpendicular to the wave propagation direction, the signal in the horizontal and vertical directions is mainly Love channel waves. More accurate dispersion characters of Love channel waves can be extracted after the coordinate rotation of two-component signals.

  5. Uniform approximation of wave functions with improved semiclassical transformation amplitudes and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Edward D.

    2004-09-01

    Semiclassical transformation theory implies an integral representation for stationary-state wave functions {psi}{sub m}(q) in terms of angle-action variables ({theta},J). It is a particular solution of Schroedinger's time-independent equation when terms of order ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2} and higher are omitted, but the preexponential factor A(q,{theta}) in the integrand of this integral representation does not possess the correct dependence on q. The origin of the problem is identified: the standard unitarity condition invoked in semiclassical transformation theory does not fix adequately in A(q,{theta}) a factor which is a function of the action J written in terms of q and {theta}. A prescription for an improved choice of this factor, based on successfully reproducing the leading behavior of wave functions in the vicinity of potential minima, is outlined. Exact evaluation of the modified integral representation via the residue theorem is possible. It yields wave functions which are not, in general, orthogonal. However, closed-form results obtained after Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization bear a striking resemblance to the exact analytical expressions for the stationary-state wave functions of the various potential models considered (namely, a Poeschl-Teller oscillator and the Morse oscillator)

  6. CORONAL FARADAY ROTATION FLUCTUATIONS AND A WAVE/TURBULENCE-DRIVEN MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: scranmer@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-10-20

    Some recent models for coronal heating and the origin of the solar wind postulate that the source of energy and momentum consists of Alfven waves of solar origin dissipating via MHD turbulence. We use one of these models to predict the level of Faraday rotation fluctuations (FRFs) that should be imposed on radio signals passing through the corona. This model has the virtue of specifying the correlation length of the turbulence, knowledge of which is essential for calculating the FRFs; previous comparisons of observed FRFs with models suffered from the fact that the correlation length had to be guessed. We compare the predictions with measurements of FRFs obtained by the Helios radio experiment during occultations in 1975 through 1977, close to solar minimum. We show that only a small fraction of the FRFs are produced by density fluctuations; the bulk of the FRFs must be produced by coronal magnetic field fluctuations. The observed FRFs have periods of hours, suggesting that they are related to Alfven waves which are observed in situ by spacecraft throughout the solar wind; other evidence also suggests that the FRFs are due to coronal Alfven waves. We choose a model field line in an equatorial streamer which has background electron concentrations that match those inferred from the Helios occultation data. The predicted FRFs are found to agree very well with the Helios data. If the FRFs are in fact produced by Alfven waves with the assumed correlation length, our analysis leads us to conclude that wave-turbulence models should continue to be pursued with vigor. But since we cannot prove that the FRFs are produced by Alfven waves, we state the more conservative conclusion, still subject to the correctness of the assumed correlation length, that the corona contains long-period magnetic fluctuations with sufficient energy to heat the corona and drive the solar wind.

  7. Thomas-Fermi Approximation for Coexisting Two Component Bose-Einstein Condensates and Nonexistence of Vortices for Small Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftalion, Amandine; Noris, Benedetta; Sourdis, Christos

    2015-06-01

    We study minimizers of a Gross-Pitaevskii energy describing a two- component Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a radially symmetric harmonic trap and set into rotation. We consider the case of coexistence of the components in the Thomas-Fermi regime, where a small parameter conveys a singular perturbation. The minimizer of the energy without rotation is determined as the positive solution of a system of coupled PDEs, for which we show uniqueness. The limiting problem for has degenerate and irregular behavior at specific radii, where the gradient blows up. By means of a perturbation argument, we obtain precise estimates for the convergence of the minimizer to this limiting profile, as tends to 0. For low rotation, based on these estimates, we can show that the ground states remain real valued and do not have vortices, even in the region of small density.

  8. Breakdown of the ponderomotive approximation as an acceleration mechanism in wave-particle nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, S.; Peter, E.; de Oliveira, G. I.; Rizzato, F. B.

    2017-09-01

    In the present analysis, we study the dynamics of charged particles submitted to the action of slowly modulated electromagnetic carrier waves. While the velocity of the particles remains smaller than the carrier's phase-velocity, their dynamics is well described by a refined ponderomotive approach. The ponderomotive approach has its own validity limits well established, beyond which particles are resonantly trapped by the carrier waves. We show that under adequate conditions, the trapping mechanism places particles at an optimal relative phase with respect to the carrier for maximum acceleration. In addition to the analytical approach involved in the ponderomotive description, we use numerical simulations to validate the corresponding dynamics as well as to explore various features of the resonant trapping and acceleration.

  9. Sixteen-moment approximation for a collisionless space plasma: Waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Dzhalilov, N. S.

    2009-11-15

    A study is carried out of waves and instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless plasma. In a strongly magnetized plasma, the velocity distributions along and across the magnetic field lines are different, which results in anisotropy of the total pressure and gives rise to an anisotropic heat flux. The fluid description of the plasma is based on the 16-moment integral transport equations, which are integral equations obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation. For small incompressible perturbations in a homogeneous plasma, the general dispersion relation implies that there are not only firehose modes, but also three additional modes, and that all four wave modes interact with each other if a heat flux is present. Heat fluxes do not change the properties of conventional firehose modes. The conditions for the onset of instabilities are investigated as functions of the parameters of the problems. Qualitative estimates for conditions typical of the solar corona are presented.

  10. Effect of background rotation on the evolution of 3D internal gravity wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boyu; Akylas, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of background rotation on the 3D propagation of internal gravity wave beams (IGWB) is studied, assuming that variations in the along-beam and transverse directions are of long length scale relative to the beam width. The present study generalizes the asymptotic model of KA (Kataoka & Akylas 2015) who considered the analogous problem in the absence of rotation. It is shown that the role of mean vertical vorticity in the earlier analysis is now taken by the flow mean potential vorticity (MPV). Specifically, 3D variations enable resonant transfer of energy to the flow MPV, resulting in strong nonlinear coupling between a 3D IGWB and its induced mean flow. This coupling mechanism is governed by a system of two nonlinear equations of the same form as those derived in KA. Accordingly, the induced mean flow features a purely inviscid modulational component, as well as a viscous one akin to acoustic streaming; the latter grows linearly with time for a quasi-steady IGWB. On the other hand, owing to background rotation, the induced mean flow in the vicinity of the IGWB is no longer purely horizontal and develops an asymmetric behavior. Supported by NSF.

  11. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate.

    PubMed

    Essinger-Hileman, T; Kusaka, A; Appel, J W; Choi, S K; Crowley, K; Ho, S P; Jarosik, N; Page, L A; Parker, L P; Raghunathan, S; Simon, S M; Staggs, S T; Visnjic, K

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ∼0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be <0.07% (95% confidence), limited by statistical uncertainty in our measurement. Dipole and quadrupole leakage at this level lead to systematic error on r ≲ 0.01 before any mitigation due to scan cross-linking or boresight rotation. The measured scalar leakage and the theoretical level of dipole and quadrupole leakage produce systematic error of r < 0.001 for the ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  12. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essinger-Hileman, T.; Kusaka, A.; Appel, J. W.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K.; Ho, S. P.; Jarosik, N.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ˜0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be <0.07% (95% confidence), limited by statistical uncertainty in our measurement. Dipole and quadrupole leakage at this level lead to systematic error on r ≲ 0.01 before any mitigation due to scan cross-linking or boresight rotation. The measured scalar leakage and the theoretical level of dipole and quadrupole leakage produce systematic error of r < 0.001 for the ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  13. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the stars' rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We present new (3 +1 )-dimensional numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) mergers that take into account the NS spins. We consider different spin configurations, aligned or antialigned to the orbital angular momentum, for equal- and unequal-mass BNSs and for two equations of state. All the simulations employ quasiequilibrium circular initial data in the constant rotational velocity approach, i.e. they are consistent with the Einstein equations and in hydrodynamical equilibrium. We study the NS rotation effect on the energetics, the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated to dynamical mass ejecta. For dimensionless spin magnitudes of χ ˜0.1 we find that both spin-orbit interactions and spin-induced quadrupole deformations affect the late-inspiral merger dynamics. The latter is, however, dominated by finite-size effects. Spin (tidal) effects contribute to GW phase differences up to ˜5 (20) radians accumulated during the last eight orbits to merger. Similarly, after merger the collapse time of the remnant and the GW spectrogram are affected by the NSs rotation. Spin effects in dynamical ejecta are clearly observed in unequal-mass systems in which mass ejection originates from the tidal tail of the companion. Consequently kilonovae and other EM counterparts are affected by spins. We find that spin aligned to the orbital angular momentum leads to brighter EM counterparts than antialigned spin with luminosities up to a factor of 2 higher.

  14. Observation and characterization of the effect of electron cyclotron waves on toroidal rotation in EAST L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Ruiji; Lyu, Bo; Wang, Fudi; Wang, Xiaojie; Xu, Handong; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Yin, Xianghui; Wu, Dajun; Liu, Fukun; Zang, Qing; Liu, Haiqing; Shi, Yuejiang; Mao, Shifeng; Yu, Yi; Wang, Baonian; Ye, Minyou; Shen, Yongcai; EAST Team

    2017-10-01

    The change in the toroidal rotation of plasma caused by electron cyclotron wave (ECW) injection has been observed in EAST. It is found that the response of the rotation is similar for all possible ECW toroidal injection angles. The core toroidal rotation velocity increases in the co-current direction along with a rise in the plasma temperature and stored energy. The profile of the electron temperature, ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity gradually become peaked. The change in toroidal rotation in the core increases with the ECW injection power. Different behavior is observed when the ECWs are injected into low hybrid current drive (LHCD) target plasmas, where the electron temperature and rotation profile become peaked, while the ion temperature profile flattens after ECW injection, suggesting different transport characteristics in energy and momentum.

  15. TSA - a Two Scale Approximation for Wind-generated Ocean Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    aquaculture , coastal transportation. Better forecasts, with longer lead-time, and better accuracy can help reduce potential risk to these economic...developments, due to ocean waves. Quality of Life Development of the coastal zone involves residences, recreation, fisheries, aquaculture , coastal...Babanin, J. F. Filipot, R. Magne, A. Roland, A. van der Westhuysen, P. Queffeulou, J. M. Lefevre, L . Aouf, and F. Collard (2010), Semiempirical

  16. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  17. Separable-spherical-wave approximation: Application to x-ray-absorption fine-structure multiple scattering in ReO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, B.; Ingalls, R.; Rehr, J. J.

    1992-04-01

    Rehr and Albers have shown that the exact x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) propagator may be expanded in a separable matrix form, and that the lowest-order term in the expansion yields XAFS formulas that contain spherical-wave corrections, yet retain the simplicity of the plane-wave approximation. This separable-spherical-wave approximation was used to model the multiple-scattering contributions to the XAFS spectrum of rhenium trioxide. We report a modest improvement over the plane-wave approximation.

  18. Separable wave equations for gravitoelectromagnetic perturbations of rotating charged black strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Alex S.; Morgan, Jaqueline; Kandus, Alejandra; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating charged black strings are exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant and a non-trivial spacetime topology. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence, these black strings are dual to rotating thermal states of a strongly interacting quantum field theory with nonzero chemical potential that lives in a cylinder. The dynamics of linear fluctuations in the dual field theory can be studied from the perturbation equations for classical fields in a black-string spacetime. With this motivation in mind, we develop here a completely gauge and tetrad invariant perturbation approach to deal with the gravitoelectromagnetic fluctuations of rotating charged black strings in the presence of sources. As usual, for any charged black hole, a perturbation in the background electromagnetic field induces a metric perturbation and vice versa. In spite of this coupling and the non-vanishing angular momentum, we show that linearization of equations of the Newman-Penrose formalism leads to four separated second-order complex equations for suitable combinations of the spin coefficients, the Weyl and the Maxwell scalars. Then, we generalize the Chandrasekhar transformation theory by the inclusion of sources and apply it to reduce the perturbation problem to four decoupled inhomogeneous wave equations—a pair for each sector of perturbations. The radial part of such wave equations can be put into Schrödinger-like forms after Fourier transforming them with respect to time. We find that the resulting effective potentials form two pairs of supersymmetric partner potentials and, as a consequence, the fundamental variables of one perturbation sector are related to the variables of the other sector. The relevance of such a symmetry in connection to the AdS/CFT correspondence is discussed, and future applications of the pertubation theory developed here are outlined.

  19. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Sabeti-Aschraf, Manuel; Dorotka, Ronald; Goll, Alexandra; Trieb, Klemens

    2005-09-01

    Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy is an alternative treatment, with limited evidence for effectiveness, for calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Objective localization of the calcium deposit by 3-dimensional, computer-assisted navigation reveals superior clinical and radiographic outcomes compared to localization through patient-to-therapist feedback. Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. A prospective, randomized, single-blind study was carried out on 50 patients. The population was divided into 2 groups of equal numbers (navigation group and feedback group). In all patients, treatment-resistant pain was evident for longer than 6 months. A total of 3 therapy sessions of constant low-energy focused shock wave therapy was administered in weekly intervals in both groups. Local anesthesia was not applied. Radiographs and clinical assessment, including the Constant and Murley shoulder scoring system and the visual analog scale for pain, were performed both before therapy and after 12 weeks. In the navigation group, the calcium deposit was localized using a radiographically guided, 3-dimensional, computer-assisted device. The feedback group was treated after locating the point of maximum tenderness through palpation by the therapist with feedback from the patient. Both groups had significant improvements in the Constant and Murley score and the visual analog scale after 12 weeks. The results from the navigation group were statistically significantly superior to those of the feedback group. In the navigation group, 6 calcium deposits disappeared and 9 altered, compared to 1 disappearance and 12 alterations in the feedback group. No severe complications occurred. Three-dimensional, computer-assisted navigation reveals significantly better results and is therefore recommended when extracorporeal shock wave therapy is used in the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  20. Quantitative assessment of rotator cuff muscle elasticity: Reliability and feasibility of shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Uehara, Kosuke; Okamoto, Seiji; Chen, Shigao; Sperling, John W; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-11-05

    Ultrasound imaging has been used to evaluate various shoulder pathologies, whereas, quantification of the rotator cuff muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography (SWE) has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SWE measurements for the quantification of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle elasticity. Thirty cadaveric shoulders (18 intact and 12 with torn rotator cuff) were used. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated on an established SWE technique for measuring the SSP muscle elasticity. To assess the effect of overlying soft tissues above the SSP muscle, SWE values were measured with the transducer placed on the skin, on the subcutaneous fat after removing the skin, on the trapezius muscle after removing the subcutaneous fat, and directly on the SSP muscle. In addition, SWE measurements on 4 shoulder positions (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction) were compared in those with/without rotator cuff tears. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements were excellent for all regions in SSP muscle. Also, removing the overlying soft tissue showed no significant difference on SWE values measured in the SSP muscle. The SSP muscle with 0° abduction showed large SWE values, whereas, shoulders with large-massive tear showed smaller variation throughout the adduction-abduction positions. SWE is a reliable and feasible tool for quantitatively assessing the SSP muscle elasticity. This study also presented SWE measurements on the SSP muscle under various shoulder abduction positions which might help characterize patterns in accordance to the size of rotator cuff tears.

  1. Chemical Kinetics in the expansion flow field of a rotating detonation-wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. A key step towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release.

  2. Hard magnetic ferrite with a gigantic coercivity and high frequency millimetre wave rotation

    PubMed Central

    Namai, Asuka; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Yamada, Kana; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Goto, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuro; Nakajima, Makoto; Suemoto, Tohru; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic ferrites such as Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 are extensively used in a range of applications because they are inexpensive and chemically stable. Here we show that rhodium-substituted ε-Fe2O3, ε-RhxFe2−xO3 nanomagnets prepared by a nanoscale chemical synthesis using mesoporous silica as a template, exhibit a huge coercive field (Hc) of 27 kOe at room temperature. Furthermore, a crystallographically oriented sample recorded an Hc value of 31 kOe, which is the largest value among metal-oxide-based magnets and is comparable to those of rare-earth magnets. In addition, ε-RhxFe2−xO3 shows high frequency millimetre wave absorption up to 209 GHz. ε-Rh0.14Fe1.86O3 exhibits a rotation of the polarization plane of the propagated millimetre wave at 220 GHz, which is one of the promising carrier frequencies (the window of air) for millimetre wave wireless communications. PMID:22948817

  3. Rotational spectroscopy and three-wave mixing of 4-carvomenthenol: A technical guide to measuring chirality in the microwave regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-07

    We apply chirality sensitive microwave three-wave mixing to 4-carvomenthenol, a molecule previously uncharacterized with rotational spectroscopy. We measure its rotational spectrum in the 2-8.5 GHz range and observe three molecular conformers. We describe our method in detail, from the initial step of spectral acquisition and assignment to the final step of determining absolute configuration and enantiomeric excess. Combining fitted rotational constants with dipole moment components derived from quantum chemical calculations, we identify candidate three-wave mixing cycles which were further tested using a double resonance method. Initial optimization of the three-wave mixing signal is done by varying the duration of the second excitation pulse. With known transition dipole matrix elements, absolute configuration can be directly determined from a single measurement.

  4. 3-D Inverse Teleseismic Scattered Wave Imaging using the Kirchhoff Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Levander, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a 3-D teleseismic imaging technique for scattered elastic wavefields using the Kirchhoff approximation. Kirchhoff migration/inversion have been well developed in exploration seismology within the inverse scattering framework (e.g. Miller et al., 1987; Beylkin and Burridge, 1990) to image subsurface structure that generates secondary wavefields caused by localized heterogeneities. Application of this method in global seismology has been largely limited to 2-D images made with 1-D reference models due to high computational cost and the lack of adequately dense receiver arrays (Bostock, 2002, Poppeliers and Pavlis, 2003; Frederiksen and Revenaugh, 2004; Cao et al., 2010). The deployment of the USArray Transportable and Flexible arrays in the United States and dense array recordings in other countries motivate developing teleseismic scattered wavefield imaging with the Kirchhoff approximation for 3-D velocity models for both scalar and vector wavefields to improve upper mantle imaging. Following Bostock's development of the 2-D problem (2002), we derive the 3-D P-to-S scattering inversion formula by phrasing the inverse problem in terms of the generalized Radon transform (GRT) and singular functions of discontinuity surfaces. In the forward scattering modeling, we extend the method to utilize a 3-D migration velocity model by calculating 3-D finite-difference traveltimes, backprojected from the receivers using an eikonal solver. To demonstrate the relative accuracy of the inversion, we examine several synthetic cases with a variety of discontinuity surfaces (sinuous, dipping, dome- and crater-shaped discontinuity interfaces, point scatterers, etc.). The Kirchhoff GRT imaging can successfully recover the shapes of these structures very well. We compare our Kirchhoff approximation imaging with the Born-approximate results, as well as the common-conversion point (CCP) stacked receiver function imaging for the various synthetic cases, and show a field

  5. Accurate spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic compounds: from the rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one in the millimeter wave region to its infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Calabrese, Camilla; Melandri, Sonia; Blanco, Susana

    2015-01-14

    The rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one, a small oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been recorded and assigned in the 52-74.4 GHz region. The determined small negative value of the inertia defect (-0.3 u Å(2)) has been explained in terms of vibrational-rotational coupling constants calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Vibrational anharmonic analysis together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory approximation was applied both to fluorenone and its reduced form, fluorene, to predict the mid- and near-infrared spectra. The data presented here give precise indication on the fluorenone ground state structure, allow for an accurate spectral characterization in the millimeter wave and infrared regions, and hopefully will facilitate extensive radio astronomical searches with large radio telescopes.

  6. Inertial waves and mean velocity profiles in a rotating pipe and a circular annulus with axial flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yantao; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Wu, Jiezhi; Orlandi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we solve the inviscid inertial wave solutions in a circular pipe or annulus rotating constantly about its axis with moderate angular speed. The solutions are constructed by the so-called helical wave functions. We reveal that the mean velocity profiles must satisfy certain conditions to accommodate the inertial waves at the bulk region away from boundary. These conditions require the axial and azimuthal components of the mean velocity to take the shapes of the zeroth and first order Bessel functions of the first kind, respectively. The theory is then verified by data obtained from direct numerical simulations for both rotating pipe and circular annulus, and excellent agreement is found between theory and numerical results. Large scale vortex clusters are found in the bulk region where the mean velocity profiles match the theoretical predictions. The success of the theory in rotating pipe, circular annulus, and streamwise rotating channel suggests that such inertial waves are quite common in wall bounded flow with background rotation.

  7. Solitons and nonlinear waves along quantum vortex filaments under the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    Very recent experimental work has demonstrated the existence of Kelvin waves along quantized vortex filaments in superfluid helium. The possible configurations and motions of such filaments is of great physical interest, and Svistunov previously obtained a Hamiltonian formulation for the dynamics of quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature limit under the assumption that the vortex filament is essentially aligned along one axis, resulting in a two-dimensional (2D) problem. It is standard to approximate the dynamics of thin filaments by employing the local induction approximation (LIA), and we show that by putting the two-dimensional LIA into correspondence with the first equation in the integrable Wadati-Konno-Ichikawa-Schimizu (WKIS) hierarchy, we immediately obtain solutions to the two-dimensional LIA, such as helix, planar, and self-similar solutions. These solutions are obtained in a rather direct manner from the WKIS equation and then mapped into the 2D-LIA framework. Furthermore, the approach can be coupled to existing inverse scattering transform results from the literature in order to obtain solitary wave solutions including the analog of the Hasimoto one-soliton for the 2D-LIA. One large benefit of the approach is that the correspondence between the 2D-LIA and the WKIS allows us to systematically obtain vortex filament solutions directly in the Cartesian coordinate frame without the need to solve back from curvature and torsion. Implications of the results for the physics of experimentally studied solitary waves, Kelvin waves, and postvortex reconnection events are mentioned.

  8. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  9. Modification of Current Profile, Toroidal Rotation and Pedestal by Lower Hybrid Waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Porkolab, M.; Schmidt, A. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Ko, J.-S.; McDermott, R. M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Scott, S.

    2009-11-26

    Recent results from the lower hybrid current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod are presented. These include i) MSE measurements of broadened LHCD current profiles; ii) development of counter rotation comparable to the rate of injected wave momentum; iii) modification of pedestals and rotation in H-mode; and iv) development of a new FEM-based code that models LH wave propagation from the RF source to absorption in the plasma. An improved antenna concept that will be used in the upcoming C-Mod campaigns is also briefly described.

  10. The propagation of the shock wave from a strong explosion in a plane-parallel stratified medium: the Kompaneets approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olano, C. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Using certain simplifications, Kompaneets derived a partial differential equation that states the local geometrical and kinematical conditions that each surface element of a shock wave, created by a point blast in a stratified gaseous medium, must satisfy. Kompaneets could solve his equation analytically for the case of a wave propagating in an exponentially stratified medium, obtaining the form of the shock front at progressive evolutionary stages. Complete analytical solutions of the Kompaneets equation for shock wave motion in further plane-parallel stratified media were not found, except for radially stratified media. Aims: We aim to analytically solve the Kompaneets equation for the motion of a shock wave in different plane-parallel stratified media that can reflect a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. We were particularly interested in solving the Kompaneets equation for a strong explosion in the interstellar medium of the Galactic disk, in which, due to intense winds and explosions of stars, gigantic gaseous structures known as superbubbles and supershells are formed. Methods: Using the Kompaneets approximation, we derived a pair of equations that we call adapted Kompaneets equations, that govern the propagation of a shock wave in a stratified medium and that permit us to obtain solutions in parametric form. The solutions provided by the system of adapted Kompaneets equations are equivalent to those of the Kompaneets equation. We solved the adapted Kompaneets equations for shock wave propagation in a generic stratified medium by means of a power-series method. Results: Using the series solution for a shock wave in a generic medium, we obtained the series solutions for four specific media whose respective density distributions in the direction perpendicular to the stratification plane are of an exponential, power-law type (one with exponent k=-1 and the other with k =-2) and a quadratic hyperbolic-secant. From these series solutions, we deduced

  11. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves in a steady zonal circulation for a shallow fluid shell on the surface of a rotating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y. Q.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers two-dimensional nonlinear MHD waves of large horizontal spatial scales for a thin magnetofluid layer on the surface of a rotating sphere. The 'shallow fluid' hydrodynamic equations are generalized to include the effects of magnetic fields, and it is shown that the resulting MHD equations can be reduced to a single scalar equation for a stream function involving several free functions. For special choices of these free functions, two kinds of finite-amplitude MHD waves are obtained, propagating in the azimuthal direction relative to the uniformly rotating background atmosphere in the presence of a background zonal magnetic field and a steady differential zonal flow. These two kinds of MHD waves are fundamentally due to the joint effects of the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere and background magnetic field; the first is an inertial wave of the Rossby (1939) and Haurwitz (1940) type, modified by the presence of the background zonal magnetic field, while the second is a magnetic Alfven-like wave which is modified by the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere.

  12. Wave-function frozen-density embedding: Approximate analytical nuclear ground-state gradients.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2016-05-05

    We report the derivation of approximate analytical nuclear ground-state uncoupled frozen density embedding (FDEu) gradients for the resolution of identity (RI) variant of the second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (RICC2) as well as density functional theory (DFT), and an efficient implementation thereof in the KOALA program. In order to guarantee a computationally efficient treatment, those gradient terms are neglected which would require the exchange of orbital information. This approach allows for geometry optimizations of single molecules surrounded by numerous molecules with fixed nuclei at RICC2-in-RICC2, RICC2-in-DFT, and DFT-in-DFT FDE level of theory using a dispersion correction, required due to the DFT-based treatment of the interaction in FDE theory. Accuracy and applicability are assessed by the example of two case studies: (a) the Watson-Crick pair adenine-thymine, for which the optimized structures exhibit a maximum error of about 0.08 Å for our best scheme compared to supermolecular reference calculations, (b) carbon monoxide on a magnesium oxide surface model, for which the error amount up to 0.1 Å for our best scheme. Efficiency is demonstrated by successively including environment molecules and comparing to an optimized conventional supermolecular implementation, showing that the method is able to outperform conventional RICC2 schemes already with a rather small number of environment molecules, gaining significant speed up in computation time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Non-Hermitian wave packet approximation for coupled two-level systems in weak and intense fields.

    PubMed

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Sukharev, Maxim; Charron, Eric

    2016-04-21

    We introduce a non-Hermitian Schrödinger-type approximation of optical Bloch equations for two-level systems. This approximation provides a complete and accurate description of the coherence and decoherence dynamics in both weak and strong laser fields at the cost of losing accuracy in the description of populations. In this approach, it is sufficient to propagate the wave function of the quantum system instead of the density matrix, providing that relaxation and dephasing are taken into account via automatically adjusted time-dependent gain and decay rates. The developed formalism is applied to the problem of scattering and absorption of electromagnetic radiation by a thin layer comprised of interacting two-level emitters.

  14. Expectation values of r{sup q} between Dirac and quasirelativistic wave functions in the quantum-defect approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Owono Owono, L.C.; Kwato Njock, M.G.; Oumarou, B.

    2002-11-01

    A search is conducted for the determination of expectation values of r{sup q} between Dirac and quasirelativistic radial wave functions in the quantum-defect approximation. The phenomenological and supersymmetry-inspired quantum-defect models, which have proven so far to yield accurate results, are used. The recursive structure of formulas derived on the basis of the hypervirial theorem enables us to develop explicit relations for arbitrary values of q. Detailed numerical calculations concerning alkali-metal-like ions of the Li, Na, and Cu isoelectronic sequences confirm the superiority of supersymmetry-based quantum-defect theory over quantum-defect orbital and exact orbital quantum number approximations. It is also shown that relativistic rather than quasirelativistic treatment may be used for consistent inclusion of relativistic effects.

  15. Hysteresis phenomenon in the dynamics of spiral waves rotating around a hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, V.; Bordyugov, G.; Lentz, H.; Engel, H.

    2010-06-01

    Hysteresis in the pinning-depinning transitions of spiral waves rotating around a hole in a circular shaped two-dimensional excitable medium is studied both by use of the continuation software AUTO and by direct numerical integration of the reaction-diffusion equations for the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. In order to clarify the role of different factors in this phenomenon, a kinematical description is applied. It is found that the hysteresis phenomenon computed for the reaction-diffusion model can be reproduced qualitatively only when a nonlinear eikonal equation (i.e. velocity-curvature relationship) is assumed. However, to obtain quantitative agreement, the dispersion relation has to be taken into account.

  16. Reduced local perfusion after shock wave treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Tafuri, Silvio; Forcignanò, Maria; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

    2011-03-01

    A marked neovascularity has been demonstrated in tendinopathies, due to the inflammatory-degenerative process. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on tissue perfusion in the treatment of tendinopathy. An observational clinical study was made of 30 patients undergoing ESWT for tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. A clinical improvement was obtained in 65.6% of patients at 2 and 6 months. This was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the oxygen tissue saturation, measured by oxymetry that was apparent already during treatment, as well as at subsequent follow-up visits. The reduced perfusion achieved with ESWT supports the hypothesis that this treatment can regulate the inflammatory process and offset increased vascularization, restoring physiologic tendon conditions. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectroscopic mode identification of γ Doradus stars: frequencies, modes, rotation and wave leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Karen R.; Brunsden, E.; Davie, M.; Greenwood, A.; Cottrell, P. L.

    The gravity modes present in γ Doradus stars probe the deep stellar interiors and are thus of particular interest in asteroseismology. The MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying frequencies and pulsation modes in many γ Doradus stars using hundreds of precise, high resolution spectroscopic observations obtained with the 1.0 m telescope and HERCULES spectrograph at the Mt John Observatory in New Zealand. In this paper we present a summary of our spectroscopic frequency and mode identifications. Of particular interest from our spectroscopic analyses are: the prevalence of (l, m) = 1, 1 modes in many γ Dor stars; the importance of stellar rotation in the interpretation of the frequency and mode identification; and finally, possible evidence of wave leakage in one of these stars.

  18. Comments on "optimal approximation of uniformly rotated images: relationship between Karhumen-Loeve expansion and discrete cosine transform".

    PubMed

    Park, Rae-Hong

    2002-01-01

    This paper points out the incorrect expressions of Uenohara and Kanade (see ibid., vol.7, p.116-19, 1998), in the context of the representation of the eigenvectors based on the discrete cosine transform (DCT). With the repeated eigenvalues, the eigenvector matrix of the P x P real symmetric circulant matrix can be constructed using the singular value decomposition (SVD), where P denotes the number of uniformly rotated images. Or equivalently it can be formulated in terms of the discrete Hartley transform (DHT). An example with P=4 is presented to show the correctness of our analysis.

  19. Fat2 acts through the WAVE regulatory complex to drive collective cell migration during tissue rotation.

    PubMed

    Squarr, Anna Julia; Brinkmann, Klaus; Chen, Baoyu; Steinbacher, Tim; Ebnet, Klaus; Rosen, Michael K; Bogdan, Sven

    2016-02-29

    Directional cell movements during morphogenesis require the coordinated interplay between membrane receptors and the actin cytoskeleton. The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a conserved actin regulator. Here, we found that the atypical cadherin Fat2 recruits the WRC to basal membranes of tricellular contacts where a new type of planar-polarized whip-like actin protrusion is formed. Loss of either Fat2 function or its interaction with the WRC disrupts tricellular protrusions and results in the formation of nonpolarized filopodia. We provide further evidence for a molecular network in which the receptor tyrosine phosphatase Dlar interacts with the WRC to couple the extracellular matrix, the membrane, and the actin cytoskeleton during egg elongation. Our data uncover a mechanism by which polarity information can be transduced from a membrane receptor to a key actin regulator to control collective follicle cell migration during egg elongation. 4D-live imaging of rotating MCF10A mammary acini further suggests an evolutionary conserved mechanism driving rotational motions in epithelial morphogenesis. © 2016 Squarr et al.

  20. Fat2 acts through the WAVE regulatory complex to drive collective cell migration during tissue rotation

    PubMed Central

    Squarr, Anna Julia; Brinkmann, Klaus; Chen, Baoyu; Steinbacher, Tim; Ebnet, Klaus; Rosen, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Directional cell movements during morphogenesis require the coordinated interplay between membrane receptors and the actin cytoskeleton. The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a conserved actin regulator. Here, we found that the atypical cadherin Fat2 recruits the WRC to basal membranes of tricellular contacts where a new type of planar-polarized whip-like actin protrusion is formed. Loss of either Fat2 function or its interaction with the WRC disrupts tricellular protrusions and results in the formation of nonpolarized filopodia. We provide further evidence for a molecular network in which the receptor tyrosine phosphatase Dlar interacts with the WRC to couple the extracellular matrix, the membrane, and the actin cytoskeleton during egg elongation. Our data uncover a mechanism by which polarity information can be transduced from a membrane receptor to a key actin regulator to control collective follicle cell migration during egg elongation. 4D-live imaging of rotating MCF10A mammary acini further suggests an evolutionary conserved mechanism driving rotational motions in epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:26903538

  1. Quantifying extensibility of rotator cuff muscle with tendon rupture using shear wave elastography: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Hooke, Alexander W; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2017-08-16

    Surgical repair for large rotator cuff tear remains challenging due to tear size, altered muscle mechanical properties, and poor musculotendinous extensibility. Insufficient extensibility might lead to an incomplete reconstruction; moreover, excessive stresses after repair may result in repair failure without healing. Therefore, estimates of extensibility of cuff muscles can help in pre-surgical planning to prevent unexpected scenarios during surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if quantified mechanical properties of the supraspinatus muscle using shear wave elastography (SWE) could be used to predict the extensibility of the musculotendinous unit on cadaveric specimens. Forty-five fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders (25 intact and 20 with rotator cuff tear) were used for the study. Passive stiffness of 4 anatomical regions in the supraspinatus muscle was first measured using SWE. After detaching the distal edge of supraspinatus muscle from other cuff muscles, the detached muscle was axially pulled with the scapula fixed. The correlation between the SWE modulus and the extensibility of the muscle under 30 and 60N loads was assessed. There was a significant negative correlation between SWE measurements and the experimental extensibility. SWE modulus for the anterior-deep region in the supraspinatus muscle showed the strongest correlation with extensibility under 30N (r=0.70, P<0.001) and 60N (r=0.68, P<0.001). Quantitative SWE assessment for the supraspinatus muscle was highly correlated with extensibility of musculotendinous unit on cadaveric shoulders. This technique may be used to predict the extensibility for rotator cuff tears for pre-surgical planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffusely scattered and transmitted elastic waves by random rough solid-solid interfaces using an elastodynamic Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Lowe, Mike; Craster, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Elastic waves scattered by random rough interfaces separating two distinct media play an important role in modeling phonon scattering and impact upon thermal transport models, and are also integral to ultrasonic inspection. We introduce theoretical formulas for the diffuse field of elastic waves scattered by, and transmitted across, random rough solid-solid interfaces using the elastodynamic Kirchhoff approximation. The new formulas are validated by comparison with numerical Monte Carlo simulations, for a wide range of roughness (rms σ ≤λ /3 , correlation length λ0≥ wavelength λ ), demonstrating a significant improvement over the widely used small-perturbation approach, which is valid only for surfaces with small rms values. Physical analysis using the theoretical formulas derived here demonstrates that increasing the rms value leads to a considerable change of the scattering patterns for each mode. The roughness has different effects on the reflection and the transmission, with a strong dependence on the material properties. In the special case of a perfect match of the wave speed of the two solid media, the transmission is the same as the case for a flat interface. We pay particular attention to scattering in the specular direction, often used as an observable quantity, in terms of the roughness parameters, showing a peak at an intermediate value of rms; this rms value coincides with that predicted by the Rayleigh parameter.

  3. The Half Wave Plate Rotator for the BLAST-TNG Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Hananiel; Ashton, Peter; Novak, Giles; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Galitzki, Nicholas; Ade, Peter; Doyle, Simon; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Tucker, Carole E.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) is an experiment designed to map magnetic fields in molecular clouds in order to study their role in the star formation process. The telescope will be launched aboard a high-altitude balloon in December 2016 for a 4-week flight from McMurdo station in Antarctica. BLAST-TNG will measure the polarization of submillimeter thermal emission from magnetically aligned interstellar dust grains, using large format arrays of kinetic inductance detectors operating in three bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns, with sub-arcminute angular resolution. The optical system includes an achromatic Half Wave Plate (HWP), mounted in a Half Wave Plate rotator (HWPr). The HWP and HWPr will operate at 4 K temperature to reduce thermal noise in our measurements, so it was crucial to account for the effects of thermal contraction at low temperature in the HWPr design. It was also equally important for the design to meet torque requirements while minimizing the power from friction and conduction dissipated at the 4 K stage. We also discuss our plan for cold testing the HWPr using a repurposed cryostat with a Silicon Diode thermometer read out by an EDAS-CE Ethernet data acquisition system.

  4. Quantum Hasimoto transformation and nonlinear waves on a superfluid vortex filament under the quantum local induction approximation.

    PubMed

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The Hasimoto transformation between the classical LIA (local induction approximation, a model approximating the motion of a thin vortex filament) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) has proven very useful in the past, since it allows one to construct new solutions to the LIA once a solution to the NLS is known. In the present paper, the quantum form of the LIA (which includes mutual friction effects) is put into correspondence with a type of complex nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation (PDE) with cubic nonlinearity (similar in form to a Ginsburg-Landau equation, with additional nonlinear terms). Transforming the quantum LIA in such a way enables one to obtain quantum vortex filament solutions once solutions to this dispersive PDE are known. From our quantum Hasimoto transformation, we determine the form and behavior of Stokes waves, a standing one-soliton, traveling waves, and similarity solutions under normal and binormal friction effects. The quantum Hasimoto transformation is useful when normal fluid velocity is relatively weak, so for the case where the normal fluid velocity is dominant we resort to other approaches. We exhibit a number of solutions that exist only in the presence of the normal fluid velocity and mutual friction terms (which would therefore not exist in the limit taken to obtain the classical LIA, decaying into line filaments under such a limit), examples of which include normal fluid driven helices, stationary and propagating topological solitons, and a vortex ring whose radius varies inversely with the normal fluid magnitude. We show that, while chaos may not be impossible under the quantum LIA, it should not be expected to arise from traveling waves along quantum vortex filaments under the quantum LIA formulation.

  5. Atmospheric-like rotating annulus experiment: gravity wave emission from baroclinic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodda, Costanza; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale balanced flows can spontaneously radiate meso-scale inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) and are thus in fact unbalanced. While flow-dependent parameterizations for the radiation of IGWs from orographic and convective sources do exist, the situation is less developed for spontaneously emitted IGWs. Observations identify increased IGW activity in the vicinity of jet exit regions. A direct interpretation of those based on geostrophic adjustment might be tempting. However, directly applying this concept to the parameterization of spontaneous imbalance is difficult since the dynamics itself is continuously re-establishing an unbalanced flow which then sheds imbalances by GW radiation. Examining spontaneous IGW emission in the atmosphere and validating parameterization schemes confronts the scientist with particular challenges. Due to its extreme complexity, GW emission will always be embedded in the interaction of a multitude of interdependent processes, many of which are hardly detectable from analysis or campaign data. The benefits of repeated and more detailed measurements, while representing the only source of information about the real atmosphere, are limited by the non-repeatability of an atmospheric situation. The same event never occurs twice. This argues for complementary laboratory experiments, which can provide a more focused dialogue between experiment and theory. Indeed, life cycles are also examined in rotating- annulus laboratory experiments. Thus, these experiments might form a useful empirical benchmark for theoretical and modelling work that is also independent of any sort of subgrid model. In addition, the more direct correspondence between experimental and model data and the data reproducibility makes lab experiments a powerful testbed for parameterizations. Joint laboratory experiment and numerical simulation have been conducted. The comparison between the data obtained from the experiment and the numerical simulations shows a very good

  6. Propagation of exponential shock wave in an axisymmetric rotating non-ideal dusty gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flow behind a strong exponential shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, which has variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocities, is analyzed. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to exponential law. The azimuthal and axial components of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying exponential laws. In the present work, small solid particles are considered as pseudo-fluid with the assumption that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained in the flow-field, and the viscous-stress and heat conduction of the mixture are negligible. Solutions are obtained in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector and compressibility. It is found that the assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, axial component of vorticity vector and compressibility distributions as compared to that of the adiabatic case. To investigate the behavior of the flow variables and the influence on the shock wave propagation by the parameter of non-idealness of the gas overline{b} in the mixture as well as by the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture Kp and by the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas G1 are worked out in detail. It is interesting to note that the shock strength increases with an increase in G1 ; whereas it decreases with an increase in overline{b} . Also, a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  7. Magnetogasdynamic shock wave generated by a moving piston in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of perfect gas with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field, and with or without axisymmetric rotational effects, is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The ambient medium is assumed to have radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The fluid velocities, the initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obey power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. The effects of variation of the initial density and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  8. Rotational study of the CH{sub 4}–CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, L. A.; Tarabukin, I. V.; Panfilov, V. A.; Schlemmer, S.; Kalugina, Y. N.; Faure, A.; Rist, C.; Avoird, A. van der

    2015-10-21

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex CH{sub 4}–CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 110–145 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 2–1 subband correlating with the rotationless j{sub CH4} = 0 ground state and the K = 2–1 and K = 0–1 subbands correlating with the j{sub CH4} = 2 excited state of free methane. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the CH{sub 4}–CO complex. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of CH{sub 4}–CO have been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12a] and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta (aVTZ) basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the CH{sub 4} face closest to the CO subunit and binding energy D{sub e} = 177.82 cm{sup −1}. The bound rovibrational levels of the CH{sub 4}–CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0–6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D{sub 0} are 91.32, 94.46, and 104.21 cm{sup −1} for A (j{sub CH4} = 0), F (j{sub CH4} = 1), and E (j{sub CH4} = 2) nuclear spin modifications of CH{sub 4}–CO, respectively.

  9. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Jinsik

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated. PMID:25383300

  10. The stability of second sound waves in a rotating Darcy-Brinkman porous layer in local thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Elbashir, T. B. A.

    2017-08-01

    The linear and nonlinear stabilities of second sound waves in a rotating porous Darcy-Brinkman layer in local thermal non-equilibrium are studied when the heat flux in the solid obeys the Cattaneo law. The simultaneous action of the Brinkman effect (effective viscosity) and rotation is shown to destabilise the layer, as compared to either of them acting alone, for both stationary and overstable modes. The effective viscosity tends to favour overstable modes while rotation tends to favour stationary convection. Rapid rotation invokes a negative viscosity effect that suppresses the stabilising effect of porosity so that the stability characteristics resemble those of the classical rotating Benard layer. A formal weakly nonlinear analysis yields evolution equations of the Landau-Stuart type governing the slow time development of the amplitudes of the unstable waves. The equilibrium points of the evolution equations are analysed and the overall development of the amplitudes is examined. Both overstable and stationary modes can exhibit supercritical stability; supercritical instability, subcritical instability and stability are not possible. The dependence of the supercritical stability on the relative values of the six dimensionless parameters representing thermal non-equilibrium, rotation, porosity, relaxation time, thermal diffusivities and Brinkman effect is illustrated as regions in regime diagrams in the parameter space. The dependence of the heat transfer and the mean heat flux on the parameters of the problem is also discussed.

  11. Plane wave propagation in a rotating anisotropic medium with voids under the action of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Narottam; Barik, S. P.; Chaudhuri, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, plane wave propagation in a rotating anisotropic material of general nature under the action of a magnetic field of constant magnitude has been investigated. The material is supposed to be porous in nature and contains voids. Following the concept of [Cowin S. C. and Nunziato, J. W. [1983] “Linear elastic materials with voids,” J. Elasticity 13, 125-147.] the governing equations of motion have been written in tensor notation taking account of rotation, magnetic field effect and presence of voids in the medium and the possibility of plane wave propagation has been examined. A number of particular cases have been derived from our general results to match with previously obtained results in this area. Effects of various parameters on the velocity of wave propagation have been presented graphically.

  12. Estimation of the ion toroidal rotation source due to momentum transfer from Lower Hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. P.; Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Parker, R. R.; Catto, P. J.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.

    2011-12-23

    Significant ion toroidal rotation (50km/s) has been measured by X-Ray spectroscopy for impurities in Alcator C-Mod during lower hybrid (LH) RF power injection. We investigate the relation between the computed toroidal momentum input from LH waves and the measured INITIAL change of ion toroidal rotation when the LH power is turned on. The relation may depend on the plasma current and magnetic configuration. Because of the fast build up time of the electron quasilinear plateau (<1 millisecond), the electron distribution function rapidly reaches steady state in which the electrons transfer momentum to the ions. The LH wave momentum input is computed from the self consistent steady state electron distribution function and a bounce-averaged quasilinear diffusion coefficient that are obtained by iterating a full wave code (TORLH) with a Fokker Plank code (CQL3D)

  13. Wave refraction diagrams for the Baltimore Canyon region of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf computed by using three bottom topography approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science wave refraction computer model was applied to the Baltimore Canyon region of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf. Wave refraction diagrams for a wide range of normally expected wave periods and directions were computed by using three bottom topography approximation techniques: quadratic least squares, cubic least squares, and constrained bicubic interpolation. Mathematical or physical interpretation of certain features appearing in the computed diagrams is discussed.

  14. Submillimeter-wave rotational spectra of DNC in highly excited vibrational states observed in an extended negative glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, T.

    2011-05-01

    Rotational transitions of DNC have been observed in the submillimeter-wave region in an extended negative glow discharge in a gas mixture of CD 4 and N 2. The dissociative recombination reaction of DCND + with electrons is thought to be a dominant channel to produce DNC in highly excited vibrational states. The vibrational temperature for the ν3 vibrational mode is found to be about 4000 K, and the rotational lines in levels up to (0 0 8) are observed. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants are determined for these states along with those for the (1 0 0) state. The measurement accuracy is high enough to determine some higher order vibration-rotation interaction constants.

  15. Three-dimensional Kirchhoff-approximate generalized Radon transform imaging using teleseismic P-to-S scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaijian; Levander, Alan

    2013-03-01

    Teleseismic imaging techniques utilizing mode converted/scattered waves are gaining importance due to the deployment of increasingly dense broad-band seismograph arrays. Although common-conversion point (CCP) stacking is widely used to determine structure from Ps or Sp scattered wavefields isolated by receiver function (RF) processing, this method is limited due to its assumption of a layered medium: Dipping events and diffractions are not treated correctly. As an extension of previous 2-D generalized Radon transform (GRT) imaging methods, we present a 3-D Kirchhoff-approximate imaging technique to migrate scattered waves in 3-D. We first derive the 3-D migration formula for P-to-S conversions using the GRT solution to the linear inverse elastic wave scattering problem. Then we illustrate the Kirchhoff method using finite-difference synthetic seismograms from several 3-D models. Next, we apply the method to two portable broad-band array data sets in the western United States to image the Mendocino Triple Junction and the High Lava Plains (HLP) crust and uppermost mantle structures. From the HLP data, we construct the Ps transmission coefficient images with three-component Green's functions. The 1.0 and 0.5 Hz images show a continuous undulating Moho, as well as three negative upper-mantle events at 50-80 km depth. Compared to the CCP images, the Moho is more clearly imaged, particularly near 117.5°W-117.8°W at the western edge of the Owyhee Plateau. The three negative events in the upper mantle correlate well with the top of three low-Vs zones (-3 per cent contour) in the Rayleigh wave tomography model. The migrated Ps RF data from Mendocino clearly image the rapid decrease in depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary from ˜65 km beneath the subducting Gorda Plate to 30-50 km beneath the Coast Ranges slab window. The final image is consistent with, but has higher resolution than the Vs structure determined from joint receiver function/Rayleigh wave

  16. Approximate method for predicting the permanent set in a beam in vacuo and in water subject to a shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiehl, A. L.; Haberman, R. C.; Cowles, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    An approximate method to compute the maximum deformation and permanent set of a beam subjected to shock wave laoding in vacuo and in water was investigated. The method equates the maximum kinetic energy of the beam (and water) to the elastic plastic work done by a static uniform load applied to a beam. Results for the water case indicate that the plastic deformation is controlled by the kinetic energy of the water. The simplified approach can result in significant savings in computer time or it can expediently be used as a check of results from a more rigorous approach. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by various examples of beams with simple support and clamped support boundary conditions.

  17. Performance of a continuously rotating half-wave plate on the POLARBEAR telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Takakura, Satoru; Aguilar, Mario; Akiba, Yoshiki; ...

    2017-05-03

    A continuously rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) is a promising tool to improve the sensitivity to large angular scales in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. With a CRHWP, single detectors can measure three of the Stokes parameters, I, Q and U, thereby avoiding the set of systematic errors that can be introduced by mismatches in the properties of orthogonal detector pairs. We focus on the implementation of CRHWPs in large aperture telescopes (i.e. the primary mirror is larger than the current maximum half-wave plate diameter of ~0.5 m), where the CRHWP can be placed between the primary mirror and focalmore » plane. In this configuration, one needs to address the intensity to polarization (I→P) leakage of the optics, which becomes a source of 1/f noise and also causes differential gain systematics that arise from CMB temperature fluctuations. In this paper, we present the performance of a CRHWP installed in the {\\scshape Polarbear} experiment, which employs a Gregorian telescope with a 2.5 m primary illumination pattern. The CRHWP is placed near the prime focus between the primary and secondary mirrors. We find that the I→P leakage is larger than the expectation from the physical properties of our primary mirror, resulting in a 1/f knee of 100 mHz. The excess leakage could be due to imperfections in the detector system, i.e. detector non-linearity in the responsivity and time-constant. We demonstrate, however, that by subtracting the leakage correlated with the intensity signal, the 1/f noise knee frequency is reduced to 32 mHz (ℓ ~ 39 for our scan strategy), which is very promising to probe the primordial B-mode signal. We also discuss methods for further noise subtraction in future projects where the precise temperature control of instrumental components and the leakage reduction will play a key role.« less

  18. Performance of a continuously rotating half-wave plate on the POLARBEAR telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, Satoru; Aguilar, Mario; Akiba, Yoshiki; Arnold, Kam; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Beckman, Shawn; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Ducout, Anne; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Fujino, Takuro; Galitzki, Nicholas; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Halverson, Nils W.; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Leon, David; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ross, Colin; Siritanasak, Praween; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takatori, Sayuri; Teply, Grant

    2017-05-01

    A continuously rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) is a promising tool to improve the sensitivity to large angular scales in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. With a CRHWP, single detectors can measure three of the Stokes parameters, I, Q and U, thereby avoiding the set of systematic errors that can be introduced by mismatches in the properties of orthogonal detector pairs. We focus on the implementation of CRHWPs in large aperture telescopes (i.e. the primary mirror is larger than the current maximum half-wave plate diameter of ~0.5 m), where the CRHWP can be placed between the primary mirror and focal plane. In this configuration, one needs to address the intensity to polarization (I→P) leakage of the optics, which becomes a source of 1/f noise and also causes differential gain systematics that arise from CMB temperature fluctuations. In this paper, we present the performance of a CRHWP installed in the {\\scshape Polarbear} experiment, which employs a Gregorian telescope with a 2.5 m primary illumination pattern. The CRHWP is placed near the prime focus between the primary and secondary mirrors. We find that the I→P leakage is larger than the expectation from the physical properties of our primary mirror, resulting in a 1/f knee of 100 mHz. The excess leakage could be due to imperfections in the detector system, i.e. detector non-linearity in the responsivity and time-constant. We demonstrate, however, that by subtracting the leakage correlated with the intensity signal, the 1/f noise knee frequency is reduced to 32 mHz (l ~ 39 for our scan strategy), which is very promising to probe the primordial B-mode signal. We also discuss methods for further noise subtraction in future projects where the precise temperature control of instrumental components and the leakage reduction will play a key role.

  19. A Rotating Knife-beam Altimeter for Wide-swath Remote Sensing of Ocean: Wind and Waves

    PubMed Central

    Karaev, V. Yu.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Balandina, G. N.; Meshkov, E. M.; Challenor, P.; Srokosz, Meric; Gommenginger, C.

    2006-01-01

    The use of a nadir altimeter radar with a rotating knife-beam antenna pattern is considered for improved measurements of the sea surface wind and wave parameters over a wide swath. Theoretical calculations suggest the antenna beam rotating about the vertical axis is able to provide wide swath of order 250-350 km. Processing of the signals using time or Doppler sampling techniques results in the division of the antenna footprint into elementary scattering cells of the order of 14×14 km. The theoretical algorithms developed here indicate that the system may be used to retrieve the variance of large-scale slopes, the direction of wave propagation and the wind speed in each cell. The possibility of measuring significant wave height is also analyzed. The combination of linear motion of the radar and the rotation of the knife-beam antenna can be exploited to build up a two-dimensional map of the surface, which enables better understanding of wave processes and to study their structure and temporal dynamics using repeated observations.

  20. Influence of plume-induced internal gravity waves on the rotation profile of low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-quality seismic data due to the space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler provide precious information on the core rotation of thousands of stars from the subgiant to the red giant stages. We know today that current stellar evolution codes need for an additional physical mechanism to extract angular momentum from the core to the envelope of evolved low-mass stars and explain the low observed internal rotation. In this framework, internal gravity waves generated by penetrative convection at the top of the radiative region may play a role. In this work, we investigate whether the transport of angular momentum by plume-induced gravity waves may counteract the accelereration due the the strong contraction of the innermost layers. On the red giant branch, we find that the strong radiative damping near the H-burning shell prevents these waves from slowing down the core, so that another process should operate in these stars. Nevertheless, we show that plume-induced gravity waves are a good candidate to regulate the amplitude of the differential rotation in subgiant stars.

  1. Dispersive SH waves in a cylindrical multiferroic composite with interfacial irregularity: Approximate analysis on coordinate-dependent phase velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Dong; Liu, Shi-Lun; Jin, Ying; Wei, Hong-Xing; Guan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Irregular interfaces may be formed between the neighboring ferromagnetic and ferroelectric layers of multiferroic composites during the hot-pressing process. They undoubtedly affects the mechanical behavior of multiferroic composites and this is a scientific problem deserving studying. In addition, phase velocity will be a function of coordinate if the interface is irregular, and this makes the governing equation so complicated that direct analytical solution is unobtainable. The present article proposes an approximate approach for analyzing SH waves in a cylindrical multiferroic composite with interfacial irregularity. The dispersion equation is analytically derived and numerically solved. After the validity range of the approximate treatment is clarified, parametric studies reveals that interfacial corrugations can give rise to an oscillatory distribution of phase velocity along the propagation direction. Because such oscillation can lead to unstable signal transmission, it should be avoided in engineering. Further discussion suggests three possible ways for suppressing the oscillation of phase velocity. The research results can provide references for optimizing the design, manufacture and application of multiferroic devices.

  2. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in rotator cuff calcific tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mangone, Giuseppe; Veliaj, Altin; Postiglione, Marco; Viliani, Tamara; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Radial Extracorporeal Shock-wave Therapy (RESWT) compared with High Power LASER Therapy (HPLT) for the treatment of patients with Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinosis (RCCT). RCCT is widely diffused, it is painful and invalidating. It is an important public health problem with social and economic implications. The most common therapeutic approach is a physiotherapic one. Both HPLT and RESWT give positive results. There is a debate on which is to be preferred. Therefore there is need to obtain scientific evidence to support either case. An observational study was carried out in the period between October 2008 and September 2009 in our outpatient clinic with 62 patients, divided into 3 groups: group A 36 patients treated only with RESWT, group B 26 patients treated only with HPLT and group C 16 patients with only short term improvement with HPLT retreated with RESWT. Patients were evaluated with Constant-Murley scale before and after treatment (immediately, 1 month and 3 months) for mean constant score, pain and range of movement. Data were examined statistically with SPSS. Criteria for inclusion and exclusion were defined. Patients treated with HPLT have shown good clinical results but have returned to original syndrome 1 month after treatment. RESWT has given improvement after treatment extended in time (3 months) in terms of pain and recover of functionality with a limited number of applications. The evidence collected indicates that RESWT is the method of choice. PMID:22460011

  3. Gravitational Waves from Rotating Neutron Stars and Evaluation of fast Chirp Transform Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    X-ray observations suggest that neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) are rotating with frequencies from 300 - 600 Hz. These spin rates are significantly less than the break-up rates for essentially all realistic neutron star equations of state, suggesting that some process may limit the spin frequencies of accreting neutron stars to this range. If the accretion induced spin up torque is in equilibrium with gravitational radiation losses, these objects could be interesting sources of gravitational waves. I present a brief summary of current measurements of neutron star spins in LMXBs based on the observations of high-Q oscillations during thermonuclear bursts (so called 'burst oscillations'). Further measurements of neutron star spins will be important in exploring the gravitational radiation hypothesis in more detail. To this end I also present a study of fast chirp transform (FCT) techniques as described by Jenet and Prince in the context of searching for the chirping signals observed during X-ray bursts.

  4. Evolution of massive black hole binaries in rotating stellar nuclei: Implications for gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasskazov, Alexander; Merritt, David

    2017-04-01

    We compute the isotropic gravitational wave (GW) background produced by binary supermassive black holes (SBHs) in galactic nuclei. In our model, massive binaries evolve at early times via gravitational-slingshot interaction with nearby stars, and at later times by the emission of GWs. Our expressions for the rate of binary hardening in the "stellar" regime are taken from the recent work of Vasiliev et al., who show that in the nonaxisymmetric galaxies expected to form via mergers, stars are supplied to the center at high enough rates to ensure binary coalescence on Gyr timescales. We also include, for the first time, the extra degrees of freedom associated with evolution of the binary's orbital plane; in rotating nuclei, interaction with stars causes the orientation and the eccentricity of a massive binary to change in tandem, leading in some cases to very high eccentricities (e >0.9 ) before the binary enters the GW-dominated regime. We argue that previous studies have over-estimated the mean ratio of SBH mass to galaxy bulge mass by factors of 2-3. In the frequency regime currently accessible to pulsar timing arrays (PTAs), our assumptions imply a factor 2-3 reduction in the characteristic strain compared with the values computed in most recent studies, removing the tension that currently exists between model predictions and the nondetection of GWs.

  5. Gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars and evaluation of fast chirp transform techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2002-04-01

    X-ray observations suggest that neutron stars in low mass x-ray binaries (LMXB) are rotating with frequencies in the range 300-600 Hz. These spin rates are significantly less than the break-up rates for essentially all realistic neutron star equations of state, suggesting that some process may limit the spin frequencies of accreting neutron stars to this range. If the accretion-induced spin up torque is in equilibrium with gravitational radiation losses, these objects could be interesting sources of gravitational waves. I present a brief summary of current measurements of neutron star spins in LMXBs based on the observations of high-Q oscillations during thermonuclear bursts (so-called 'burst oscillations'). Further measurements of neutron star spins will be important in exploring the gravitational radiation hypothesis in more detail. To this end, I also present a study of fast chirp transform (FCT) techniques as described by Jenet and Prince (Prince T A and Jenet F A 2000 Phys. Rev. D 62 122001) in the context of searching for the chirping signals observed during x-ray bursts.

  6. The millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of CF 3CN in the excited vibrational state v8 = 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, Masoud; Haseli, Aliakbar

    2006-03-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectra of the excited vibrational state v8 = 2 of the symmetric top molecule, CF 3CN, have been recorded for J″ = 16 up to J″ = 32. The analysis indicates that ℓ-resonance has been observed for this molecule around ( k - ℓ) = 25. The ℓ = ±2 and ℓ = 0 series have been assigned and the spectra analyzed to give rotational parameters including B = 2955.46351(49) MHz, Xℓℓ = 8783.6(78) MHz, and qt+(2,2)=3.4673(20) MHz.

  7. A model for the generation of strongly nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic interfacial waves in a rotating ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2015-04-01

    We derive a new two-fluid layer model consisting of a set of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations for studying the generation and evolution of strongly nonlinear weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves in a rotating ocean. The forcing for internal tide generation is due to tide-topography interaction (an oscillating non-flat bottom mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography). The resulting model forms a generalization of the Miyata-Choi-Camassa (MCC) equations, to which we add topography, tidal forcing and Coriolis dispersion due to Earth's rotation. Solitons are generated by disintegration of the first-mode of the internal tide. Because of strong non-linearity, they can attain a table-shaped form. Our moving (accelerating) topography is not an inertial frame and, hence, the transformation to a frame at rest is not simply a Galilean transformation. The effect of this transformation is discussed and is shown to be slight for the parameters under consideration. The set of equations is solved numerically using finite-difference methods. Numerical experiments using these equations are a useful tool for exploring and interpreting the conditions under which full nonlinearity becomes important for soliton generation. In particular, this is the case for table-top solitons when approaching the theoretical maximum amplitude and the appearance of nonlinearities when the two-layer system consists of two layers of equal thickness. At the early stage of the strongly nonlinear disintegration of an internal tide into table-top solitons, we observe that the low mode internal tide splits up into two different groups of rank-ordered solitons: a train of depressions on the leading edge and a train of elevations, after the former packet, with initially smaller amplitudes. Evolving in time, the largest elevations reach the smaller depressions in the train ahead, and three leading solitons at the front attain almost equal amplitudes. The table-top soliton

  8. Global seismic body-wave observations of temporal variations in the Earth's inner core, and implications for its differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Anna M.; Deuss, Arwen

    2011-10-01

    Differential rotation of the Earth's inner core has been predicted in some geodynamo models, and seismic studies over the past 15 yr have resolved rotation rates up to 1° yr-1. Most previous seismic body-wave studies have focussed on South Sandwich Islands events recorded at station COL in Alaska. Here, we present a globally extended study into temporal variations in the inner core over some 25 yr, using PKPbc-PKPdf traveltime residuals. To test for differential rotation of the inner core, displacement of inner-core heterogeneities over time is sought. We introduce a new method of space-flattening to remove the effect of spatial variations on the time variations; this allows for the use of both polar, semi-equatorial and equatorial geometries. First, we reanalyse polar paths from South Sandwich Islands events to stations COL and INK in North America. These stations yield a differential rotation of the inner core at a rate of 0.12-0.38° yr-1 in an eastward direction, in agreement with previous studies. However, station DAWY, which has a very similar path through the inner core as COL, yields at best a westward differential rotation of the inner core. Thus DAWY results are incompatible with the COL/INK inferred rotation. Secondly, earthquakes in the Aleutian Islands region, observed at BOSA and LBTB in southern Africa, exhibit temporal variations that are incompatible with the South Sandwich Islands-COL/INK inferred rotation rate. Thirdly, Kuril Islands events, recorded in South America at station BDF, yield inconclusive results. Finally, our final piece of evidence for the irreconcilability of differential inner-core rotation with global data comes from using earthquakes in the Vanuatu region, recorded at BCAO/BGCA in Central Africa, an equatorial geometry. These residuals resolve a westward inner-core rotation at a rate of 0.14° yr-1, over the same time period that South Sandwich Islands events indicate an eastward rotation. As any rigid-body rotation should

  9. Millimeter wave measurements of the rotational spectra of ClF, BrF, BrCl, ICl, and IBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Robert E.; Clark, William W.

    1980-05-01

    The rotational spectra of all twelve stable isotopic species of ClF, BrF, BrCl, ICl, and IBr were observed and measured in the millimeter wave region by means of a sensitive microwave spectrometer. Transitions were detected over a wide range of frequencies for molecules in both the ground vibrational state and several excited states. The rotational spectrum of each molecule was split by the nuclear quadrupole interaction. Altogether, 250 new lines were measured. These correspond to 136 pure rotational transitions. Values of the Dunham coefficients Y01, Y11, Y21, Y31, Y02, Y12, and Y03 were obtained from a computer analysis of the measured frequencies. From these coefficients a number of equilibrium constants were derived to significantly greater accuracy than in previous work. In particular, the equilibrium distance, re, was found to two or three more significant figures.

  10. On the interaction of stationary crossflow vortices and Tollmien-Schlichting waves in the boundary layer on a rotating disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassom, Andrew P.; Hall, Philip

    1989-01-01

    There are many fluid flows where the onset of transition can be caused by different instability mechanisms which compete among themselves. The interaction is considered of two types of instability mode (at an asymptotically large Reynolds number) which can occur in the flow above a rotating disc. In particular, the interaction is examined between lower branch Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and the upper branch, stationary, inviscid crossflow vortex whose asymptotic structure has been described by Hall (1986). This problem is studied in the context of investigating the effect of the vortex on the stability characteristics of a small TS wave. Essentially, it is found that the primary effect is felt through the modification to the mean flow induced by the presence of the vortex. Initially, the TS wave is taken to be linear in character and it is shown (for the cases of both a linear and a nonlinear stationary vortex) that the vortex can exhibit both stabilizing and destabilizing effects on the TS wave and the nature of this influence is wholly dependent upon the orientation of this latter instability. Further, the problem is examined with a larger TS wave, whose size is chosen so as to ensure that this mode is nonlinear in its own right. An amplitude equation for the evolution of the TS wave is derived which admits solutions corresponding to finite amplitude, stable, traveling waves.

  11. Rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with a finite number of atoms confined in a ring potential: Spontaneous symmetry breaking beyond the mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussou, A.; Smyrnakis, J.; Magiropoulos, M.; Efremidis, Nikolaos K.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on Bose-Einstein condensed atoms which rotate in annular and/or toroidal traps, we study the effect of the finiteness of the atom number N on the states of lowest energy for a fixed expectation value of the angular momentum, under periodic boundary conditions. To attack this problem, we develop a general strategy, considering a linear superposition of the eigenstates of the many-body Hamiltonian, with amplitudes that we extract from the mean-field approximation. This many-body state breaks the symmetry of the Hamiltonian; it has the same energy to leading order in N as the mean-field state and the corresponding eigenstate of the Hamiltonian, however, it has a lower energy to subleading order in N and thus it is energetically favorable.

  12. Effects of rotating nanoparticles on the instability of dust-acoustic waves in a plasma containing superthermal electrons and ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2011-01-01

    Charged particles with sizes ranging from tens of nanometer to tens of micrometer are created in various situations such as DC discharges, rf discharges, laser-driven plasmas, processing plasmas used in device fabrications, as well as in space such as interstellar clouds, solar system, etc. In general, a large number of background electrons could stick onto the nanoparticle surface during the charging processes and as a result a significant depletion of the electron number density can be encountered. If charged non-spherical nanoparticles are created, they can rotate due to the interaction with surrounding plasmas or oscillating electric field. Therefore, a significant modification of the conventional plasma wave dispersion relations might be necessary for the complex plasma that consists of electrons, ions and nanoparticles. In this work, the growing of dust-acoustic wave is investigated in the presence of the nanoparticles in a superthermal plasma. Full spectrums of the growth rate of the dust-acoustic wave is obtained and analyzed to investigate the effect of nanoparticle rotation. The superthermal plasma effect on the growth rate is also analyzed. The growth rate was found to be enhanced by the rotation of nanoparticles, but suppressed by the superthermal plasmas.

  13. Inertia gravity waves in a rotating, differentially heated annulus with an upper free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamampianina, Anthony; Harlander, Uwe; Vincze, Miklos; von Larcher, Thomas; Viazzo, Stephane

    2015-04-01

    Inertia gravity waves (IGWs) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and oceans, and are known to play a fundamental role in a wide variety of processes, among others the induction and modulation of turbulence. Observations and simulations have revealed their spontaneous occurrence simultaneously with the onset of baroclinic instability, recognized to be one of the dominant energetic processes in the large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulations. In spite of intensive research activities these last decades, the generation mechanism and the propagation of IGWs, as well as their interaction with large-scale structures triggering locally chaotic motions, remain poorly understood. A better understanding of these phenomena is therefore mandatory for the development of IGW's parameterization schemes actually required for numerical global weather prediction. A combined laboratory experiment and direct numerical simulations study is proposed for the detailed investigations of instabilities arising within a differentially heated rotating annulus, the baroclinic cavity. The configuration corresponds to an experimental setup used at BTU, Cottbus Senftenberg, Germany [1], characterized by an open upper surface and filled with water (Pr = 7). Infrared thermography and simultaneous kalliroscope visualization in horizontal planes, illuminated by a laser sheet, have been applied to detect the surface signatures of IGWs. These findings confirmed the computations carried out by three different numerical approaches, using either spectral methods, high order compact finite difference scheme (M2P2, Marseille), or the EULAG code (Freie Universitaet Berlin). These small-scale features have been observed in addition to those developing along the inner cold cylinder, previously identified by simulations in a closed cavity, filled with a liquid defined by Pr = 16 [2]. These new IGWs show characteristics similar to the ones obtained by [3] at the exit of the meandering jet between the cyclonic

  14. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  15. On extreme transient events from rotating black holes and their gravitational wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Della Valle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The super-luminous object ASASSN-15lh (SN2015L) is an extreme event with a total energy Erad ≃ 1.1 × 1052 erg in blackbody radiation on par with its kinetic energy Ek in ejecta and a late time plateau in the UV, which defies a nuclear origin. It likely presents a new explosion mechanism for hydrogen-deprived supernovae. With no radio emission and no H-rich environment, we propose to identify Erad with dissipation of a baryon-poor outflow in the optically thick remnant stellar envelope produced by a central engine. By negligible time-scales of light crossing and radiative cooling of the envelope, SN2015L's light curve closely tracks the evolution of this engine. We here model its light curve by the evolution of black hole spin during angular momentum loss in Alvén waves to matter at the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO). The duration is determined by σ = MT/M of the torus mass MT around the black hole of mass M: σ ˜ 10-7 and σ ˜ 10-2 for SN2015L and, respectively, a long GRB. The observed electromagnetic radiation herein represents a minor output of the rotational energy Erot of the black hole, while most is radiated unseen in gravitational radiation. This model explains the high-mass slow-spin binary progenitor of GWB150914, as the remnant of two CC-SNe in an intra-day binary of two massive stars. This model rigorously predicts a change in magnitude Δm ≃ 1.15 in the light curve post-peak, in agreement with the light curve of SN2015L with no fine-tuning.

  16. Rotational study of the NH{sub 3}–CO complex: Millimeter-wave measurements and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, L. A.; Potapov, A.; Schlemmer, S.; Dolgov, A. A.; Tarabukin, I. V.; Panfilov, V. A.; Kalugina, Y. N.; Faure, A.; Avoird, A. van der

    2015-03-21

    The rotational spectrum of the van der Waals complex NH{sub 3}–CO has been measured with the intracavity OROTRON jet spectrometer in the frequency range of 112–139 GHz. Newly observed and assigned transitions belong to the K = 0–0, K = 1–1, K = 1–0, and K = 2–1 subbands correlating with the rotationless (j{sub k}){sub NH3} = 0{sub 0} ground state of free ortho-NH{sub 3} and the K = 0–1 and K = 2–1 subbands correlating with the (j{sub k}){sub NH3} = 1{sub 1} ground state of free para-NH{sub 3}. The (approximate) quantum number K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the intermolecular axis. Some of these transitions are continuations to higher J values of transition series observed previously [C. Xia et al., Mol. Phys. 99, 643 (2001)], the other transitions constitute newly detected subbands. The new data were analyzed together with the known millimeter-wave and microwave transitions in order to determine the molecular parameters of the ortho-NH{sub 3}–CO and para-NH{sub 3}–CO complexes. Accompanying ab initio calculations of the intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of NH{sub 3}–CO has been carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta basis set. The global minimum of the five-dimensional PES corresponds to an approximately T-shaped structure with the N atom closest to the CO subunit and binding energy D{sub e} = 359.21 cm{sup −1}. The bound rovibrational levels of the NH{sub 3}–CO complex were calculated for total angular momentum J = 0–6 on this intermolecular potential surface and compared with the experimental results. The calculated dissociation energies D{sub 0} are 210.43 and 218.66 cm{sup −1} for ortho-NH{sub 3}–CO and para-NH{sub 3}–CO, respectively.

  17. Approximate solution of two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph models arising in mathematical physics using optimal homotopy asymptotic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, S.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the analytical approximate solutions for two-term fractional-order diffusion, wave-diffusion, and telegraph equations. The fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], (1,2), and [1,2], respectively. In this paper, we extended optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) for two-term fractional-order wave-diffusion equations. Highly approximate solution is obtained in series form using this extended method. Approximate solution obtained by OHAM is compared with the exact solution. It is observed that OHAM is a prevailing and convergent method for the solutions of nonlinear-fractional-order time-dependent partial differential problems. The numerical results rendering that the applied method is explicit, effective, and easy to use, for handling more general fractional-order wave diffusion, diffusion, and telegraph problems.

  18. Arbitrary photonic wave plate operations on chip: realizing Hadamard, Pauli-X, and rotation gates for polarisation qubits.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, René; Gräfe, Markus; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Chip-based photonic quantum computing is an emerging technology that promises much speedup over conventional computers at small integration volumes. Particular interest is thereby given to polarisation-encoded photonic qubits, and many protocols have been developed for this encoding. However, arbitrary wave plate operation on chip are not available so far, preventing from the implementation of integrated universal quantum computing algorithms. In our work we close this gap and present Hadamard, Pauli-X, and rotation gates of high fidelity for photonic polarisation qubits on chip by employing a reorientation of the optical axis of birefringent waveguides. The optical axis of the birefringent waveguide is rotated due to the impact of an artificial stress field created by an additional modification close to the waveguide. By adjusting this length of the defect along the waveguide, the retardation between ordinary and extraordinary field components is precisely tunable including half-wave plate and quarter-wave plate operations. Our approach demonstrates the full range control of orientation and strength of the induced birefringence and thus allows arbitrary wave plate operations without affecting the degree of polarisation or introducing additional losses to the waveguides. The implemented gates are tested with classical and quantum light.

  19. Earth's core: Temporal variations using body waves, and implications for fast differential rotation of the inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, A. M.; Deuss, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    Differential rotation of the Earth's inner core has proved to be a seismological enigma over the past fifteen years. Originally predicted in some geodynamo models, body-wave studies have resolved rates of up to 1°/year for this differential rotation. Most previous body-wave studies have focussed on events in the South Sandwich Islands, recorded at station COL in Alaska. Here we expand on previous geometries to achieve a more global coverage of the inner core, using PKPbc-PKPdf travel time residuals to shed light on temporal variations in the core over some 25 years. We test for differential rotation of the inner core by seeking displacement of inner-core heterogeneities over time. In order to remove the effect of ray path dependent spatial variations on time variations, we introduce a new method of space-flattening, applied either in longitude or latitude. This allows for the use of polar, semi-equatorial and equatorial ray geometries. We start by re-analysing polar paths from South Sandwich Island to stations COL and INK in North America, finding that travel time residuals are varying on a 25-year time scale. These results could indicate a possible differential rotation of the inner core in an eastward sense, at a rate of 0.12-0.38°/year. This is in agreement with previous studies. However, station DAWY - to which inner-core ray paths resemble those to COL - yields, at best, a westward rotation of the inner core, incompatible with the COL/INK inferred rotation. We then employ earthquakes in the Aleutian Islands region, observed at BOSA and LBTB in southern Africa. These too exhibit temporal variations in the core-sensitive residuals, but these variations are not reconcilable with the South Sandwich Islands-COL/INK results regarding rotation. Our final piece of evidence for both the presence of temporal variations in core-sensitive ray paths and the incompatibility of these variations with a fast differential rigid-body rotation of the inner core comes from use

  20. Influence of the multipole order of the source on the decay of an inertial wave beam in a rotating fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, Nathanaël; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Moisy, Frédéric; Voisin, Bruno

    2015-06-15

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally the far-field viscous decay of a two-dimensional inertial wave beam emitted by a harmonic line source in a rotating fluid. By identifying the relevant conserved quantities along the wave beam, we show how the beam structure and decay exponent are governed by the multipole order of the source. Two wavemakers are considered experimentally, a pulsating and an oscillating cylinder, aiming to produce a monopole and a dipole source, respectively. The relevant conserved quantity which discriminates between these two sources is the instantaneous flow rate along the wave beam, which is non-zero for the monopole and zero for the dipole. For each source, the beam structure and decay exponent, measured using particle image velocimetry, are in good agreement with the predictions.

  1. EEG slow (approximately 1 Hz) waves are associated with nonstationarity of thalamo-cortical sensory processing in the sleeping human.

    PubMed

    Massimini, Marcello; Rosanova, Mario; Mariotti, Maurizio

    2003-03-01

    Intracellular studies reveal that, during slow wave sleep (SWS), the entire cortical network can swing rhythmically between extremely different microstates, ranging from wakefulness-like network activation to functional disconnection in the space of a few hundred milliseconds. This alternation of states also involves the thalamic neurons and is reflected in the EEG by a slow (<1 Hz) oscillation. These rhythmic changes, occurring in the thalamo-cortical circuits during SWS, may have relevant, phasic effects on the transmission and processing of sensory information. However, brain reactivity to sensory stimuli, during SWS, has traditionally been studied by means of sequential averaging, a procedure that necessarily masks any short-term fluctuation of responsiveness. The aim of this study was to provide a dynamic evaluation of brain reactivity to sensory stimuli in naturally sleeping humans. To this aim, single-trial somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were grouped and averaged as a function of the phase of the ongoing sleep slow (<1 Hz) oscillation. This procedure revealed a dynamic profile of responsiveness, which was conditioned by the phase of the spontaneous sleep EEG. Overall, the amplitude of the evoked potential changed sistematically, increasing and approaching wakefulness levels along the negative slope of the EEG oscillation and decaying below SWS average levels along the positive drift. These marked and fast changes of stimulus-correlated electrical activity involved both short (N20) and long latency (P60 and P100) components of SEPs. In addition, the observed short-term response variability appeared to be centrally generated and specifically related to the evolution of the spontaneous oscillatory pattern. The present findings demonstrate that thalamo-cortical processing of sensory information is not stationary in the very short period (approximately 500 ms) during natural SWS.

  2. Magnetopause surface waves triggered by a rotating IMF with the global MHD SWMF/BAT-S-RUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind driving of magnetopause surface waves is only partly understood. In particular we do not have a picture of the magnetopause surface wave properties and behavior when a magnetic cloud event, which sometimes involves a rotating IMF, impinges on the magnetosphere. Here we investigate the effect of a twisting or rotational IMF under moderate solar wind velocity (about 500 km/s) upon the magnetosphere with the Global MHD BATS-R-US code. Synthetic solar wind data is constructed to simulate the most important features of a magnetic cloud event, but without including shock features. A sinusoidally varying By component accompanied by a cosinusoidally varying Bz component of the IMF is input into the model with magnitude 10-20 nT. The synthetic data is representative of the magnetic cloud event that occurred on October 3-7 2000. We use the results of the simulation to infer the modes, properties, and particularly the phase speed and wavelength of the surface wave structures.

  3. Optical Ramsey spectroscopy in a rotating frame: Sagnac effect in a matter-wave interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Riehle, F.; Kisters, T.; Witte, A.; Helmcke, J. ); Borde, C.J. Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Universite Paris, Villetaneuse, France )

    1991-07-08

    A calcium atomic beam excited in an optical Ramsey geometry was rotated about an axis perpendicular to the plane defined by the laser beams and the atomic beam. A frequency shift of the Ramsey fringes of several kHz has been measured which is proportional to the rotation frequency of the apparatus and to the distance between the laser beams. The results can be interpreted in three equivalent ways as the Sagnac effect in a calcium-atomic-beam interferometer: in the rotating frame of the laser beams either along straight paths or along the curved trajectories of the atoms, or in the inertial atomic frame.

  4. EFFECTS OF ROTATION ON STOCHASTICITY OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES IN THE NONLINEAR PHASE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kotake, Kei; Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-08-01

    By performing three-dimensional (3D) simulations that demonstrate the neutrino-driven core-collapse supernovae aided by the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), we study how the spiral modes of the SASI can impact the properties of the gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To see the effects of rotation in the nonlinear postbounce phase, we give a uniform rotation on the flow advecting from the outer boundary of the iron core, the specific angular momentum of which is assumed to agree with recent stellar evolution models. We compute fifteen 3D models in which the initial angular momentum and the input neutrino luminosities from the protoneutron star are changed in a systematic manner. By performing a ray-tracing analysis, we accurately estimate the GW amplitudes generated by anisotropic neutrino emission. Our results show that the gravitational waveforms from neutrinos in models that include rotation exhibit a common feature; otherwise, they vary much more stochastically in the absence of rotation. The breaking of the stochasticity stems from the excess of the neutrino emission parallel to the spin axis. This is because the compression of matter is more enhanced in the vicinity of the equatorial plane due to the growth of the spiral SASI modes, leading to the formation of the spiral flows circulating around the spin axis with higher temperatures. We point out that recently proposed future space interferometers like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these signals for a Galactic supernova.

  5. PROBING THE ROTATION OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA WITH A CONCURRENT ANALYSIS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Yokozawa, Takaaki; Asano, Mitsuhiro; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Kayano, Tsubasa; Koshio, Yusuke; Suwa, Yudai; Vagins, Mark R.

    2015-10-01

    The next time a core-collapse supernova (SN) explodes in our galaxy, various detectors will be ready and waiting to detect its emissions of gravitational waves (GWs) and neutrinos. Current numerical simulations have successfully introduced multi-dimensional effects to produce exploding SN models, but thus far the explosion mechanism is not well understood. In this paper, we focus on an investigation of progenitor core rotation via comparison of the start time of GW emission and that of the neutronization burst. The GW and neutrino detectors are assumed to be, respectively, the KAGRA detector and a co-located gadolinium-loaded water Cherenkov detector, either EGADS or GADZOOKS!. Our detection simulation studies show that for a nearby SN (0.2 kpc) we can confirm the lack of core rotation close to 100% of the time, and the presence of core rotation about 90% of the time. Using this approach there is also the potential to confirm rotation for considerably more distant Milky Way SN explosions.

  6. Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft attitude control based on the dynamics of slosh wave-induced fluid stress distribution on rotating dewar container of cryogenic propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids, in a full-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant dewar tank imposed by various frequencies of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that fluid stress distribution exerted on the outer and inner walls of rotating dewar are closely related to the characteristics of slosh waves excited on the liquid-vapor interface in the rotating dewar tank. This can provide a set of tool for the spacecraft dynamic control leading toward the control of spacecraft unbalance caused by the uneven fluid stress distribution due to slosh wave excitations.

  7. A cryogenic rotation stage with a large clear aperture for the half-wave plates in the Spider instrument.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Sean; Ade, Peter; Amiri, Mandana; Benton, Steven; Bihary, Richard; Bock, James; Bond, J Richard; Chiang, H Cynthia; Contaldi, Carlo; Crill, Brendan; Dore, Olivier; Elder, Benjamin; Filippini, Jeffrey; Fraisse, Aurelien; Gambrel, Anne; Gandilo, Natalie; Gudmundsson, Jon; Hasselfield, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Holmes, Warren; Hristov, Viktor; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kermish, Zigmund; Lawrie, Craig; MacTavish, Carrie; Mason, Peter; Megerian, Krikor; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Montroy, Thomas; Morford, Tracy; Nagy, Johanna; Netterfield, C Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rahlin, Alexandra S; Reintsema, Carl; Riley, Daniel C; Ruhl, John; Runyan, Marcus; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan; Trangsrud, Amy; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Rebecca; Turner, Anthony; Wen, Shyang; Wiebe, Donald; Young, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the cryogenic half-wave plate rotation mechanisms built for and used in Spider, a polarization-sensitive balloon-borne telescope array that observed the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz and 150 GHz during a stratospheric balloon flight from Antarctica in January 2015. The mechanisms operate at liquid helium temperature in flight. A three-point contact design keeps the mechanical bearings relatively small but allows for a large (305 mm) diameter clear aperture. A worm gear driven by a cryogenic stepper motor allows for precise positioning and prevents undesired rotation when the motors are depowered. A custom-built optical encoder system monitors the bearing angle to an absolute accuracy of ±0.1(∘). The system performed well in Spider during its successful 16 day flight.

  8. A cryogenic rotation stage with a large clear aperture for the half-wave plates in the Spider instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean; Ade, Peter; Amiri, Mandana; Benton, Steven; Bihary, Richard; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Chiang, H. Cynthia; Contaldi, Carlo; Crill, Brendan; Dore, Olivier; Elder, Benjamin; Filippini, Jeffrey; Fraisse, Aurelien; Gambrel, Anne; Gandilo, Natalie; Gudmundsson, Jon; Hasselfield, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Gene; Holmes, Warren; Hristov, Viktor; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kermish, Zigmund; Lawrie, Craig; MacTavish, Carrie; Mason, Peter; Megerian, Krikor; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Montroy, Thomas; Morford, Tracy; Nagy, Johanna; Netterfield, C. Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rahlin, Alexandra S.; Reintsema, Carl; Riley, Daniel C.; Ruhl, John; Runyan, Marcus; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan; Trangsrud, Amy; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Rebecca; Turner, Anthony; Wen, Shyang; Wiebe, Donald; Young, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the cryogenic half-wave plate rotation mechanisms built for and used in Spider, a polarization-sensitive balloon-borne telescope array that observed the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz and 150 GHz during a stratospheric balloon flight from Antarctica in January 2015. The mechanisms operate at liquid helium temperature in flight. A three-point contact design keeps the mechanical bearings relatively small but allows for a large (305 mm) diameter clear aperture. A worm gear driven by a cryogenic stepper motor allows for precise positioning and prevents undesired rotation when the motors are depowered. A custom-built optical encoder system monitors the bearing angle to an absolute accuracy of ±0.1∘. The system performed well in Spider during its successful 16 day flight.

  9. Tidal inertial waves in differentially rotating convective envelopes of low-mass stars. I. Free oscillation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Baruteau, C.; Mathis, S.; Rieutord, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Star-planet tidal interactions may result in the excitation of inertial waves in the convective region of stars. In low-mass stars, their dissipation plays a prominent role in the long-term orbital evolution of short-period planets. Turbulent convection can sustain differential rotation in their envelopes with an equatorial acceleration (as in the Sun) or deceleration, which can modify the propagation properties of the waves. Aims: We explore in this first paper the general propagation properties of free linear inertial waves in a differentially rotating homogeneous fluid inside a spherical shell. We assume that the angular velocity background flow depends on the latitudinal coordinate alone, close to what is expected in the external convective envelope of low-mass stars. Methods: We use an analytical approach in the inviscid case to get the dispersion relation, from which we compute the characteristic trajectories along which energy propagates. This allows us to study the existence of attractor cycles and infer the different families of inertial modes. We also use high-resolution numerical calculations based on a spectral method for the viscous problem. Results: We find that modes that propagate in the whole shell (D modes) behave the same way as with solid-body rotation. However, another family of inertial modes exists (DT modes), which can only propagate in a restricted part of the convective zone. Our study shows that they are less common than D modes and that the characteristic rays and shear layers often focus towards a wedge - or point-like attractor. More importantly, we find that for non-axisymmetric oscillation modes, shear layers may cross a corotation resonance with a local accumulation of kinetic energy. Their damping rate scales very differently from the value we obtain for standard D modes, and we show an example where it is independent of viscosity (Ekman number) in the astrophysical regime in which it is small.

  10. Diffusion approximation with polarization and resonance effects for the modelling of seismic waves in strongly scattering small-scale media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the multiple scattering of seismic waves by a collection of randomly distributed point scatterers. The theory assumes that the energy envelopes are smooth, but does not require perturbations to be small, thereby allowing the modelling of strong, resonant scattering. The correlation tensor of seismic coda waves recorded at a three-component sensor is decomposed into a sum of eigenmodes of the elastodynamic multiple scattering (Bethe-Salpeter) equation. For a general moment tensor excitation, a total number of four modes is necessary to describe the transport of seismic waves polarization. Their spatio-temporal dependence is given in closed analytical form. Two additional modes transporting exclusively shear polarizations may be excited by antisymmetric moment tensor sources only. The general solution converges towards an equipartition mixture of diffusing P and S waves which allows the retrieval of the local Green's function from coda waves. The equipartition time is obtained analytically and the impact of absorption on Green's function reconstruction is discussed. The process of depolarization of multiply scattered waves and the resulting loss of information is illustrated for various seismic sources. It is shown that coda waves may be used to characterize the source mechanism up to lapse times of the order of a few mean free times only. In the case of resonant scatterers, a formula for the diffusivity of seismic waves incorporating the effect of energy entrapment inside the scatterers is obtained. Application of the theory to high-contrast media demonstrates that coda waves are more sensitive to slow rather than fast velocity anomalies by several orders of magnitude. Resonant scattering appears as an attractive physical phenomenon to explain the small values of the diffusion constant of seismic waves reported in volcanic areas.

  11. A search for evidence of the evolution of rotational discontinuities in the solar wind from nonlinear Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Buti, B.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a study designed to confirm the suspected relation between Alfven solitons (steepened Afven waves) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) in the solar wind. The ISEE 3 data were used to search for the predicted correlations between the beta value of plasma, the sense of polarization of the discontinuity, and changes of the magnetic field strength and plasma density across the discontinuity. No statistically significant evidence was found for the evolution of RDs from Alfven solitons. A possibility is suggested that the observations made could have been far from the regions in which the RDs were formed.

  12. Simple and complex square waves in an edge-emitting diode laser with polarization-rotated optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, Athanasios; Sukow, David W; Burner, Guinevere; McLachlan, Taylor; Miller, John; Amonette, Jake

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for an edge-emitting diode laser with delayed optical feedback, where the polarization state of the feedback is rotated such that the natural laser mode is coupled into the orthogonal, unsupported mode. We examine the bifurcation structure and dynamics that give rise to a class of periodic, polarization-modulated solutions, the simplest of which is a square wave solution with a period related to but longer than twice the external cavity roundtrip time. Such solutions typically emerge when the feedback is strong and the differential losses in the normally unsupported polarization mode are small. We also observe more complex waveforms that maintain the same periodicity.

  13. Simple and complex square waves in an edge-emitting diode laser with polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Athanasios; Sukow, David W.; Burner, Guinevere; McLachlan, Taylor; Miller, John; Amonette, Jake

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for an edge-emitting diode laser with delayed optical feedback, where the polarization state of the feedback is rotated such that the natural laser mode is coupled into the orthogonal, unsupported mode. We examine the bifurcation structure and dynamics that give rise to a class of periodic, polarization-modulated solutions, the simplest of which is a square wave solution with a period related to but longer than twice the external cavity roundtrip time. Such solutions typically emerge when the feedback is strong and the differential losses in the normally unsupported polarization mode are small. We also observe more complex waveforms that maintain the same periodicity.

  14. Cylindrical shock waves in rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas with increasing energy under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, P. K.

    2017-08-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas under the action of monochromatic radiation with increasing energy, which has variable azimuthal and axial components of fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. Similarity solutions are obtained as well as the effects of the variation of the radiation parameters, the parameter of non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the piston velocity index are worked out in detail. The total energy of the shock wave is varying and increases with time. It is observed that the radiation parameter and the piston velocity index have opposite behaviour on the flow variables as well as the shock strength.

  15. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  16. Cell movement and shape are non-random and determined by intracellular, oscillatory rotating waves in Dictyostelium amoebae.

    PubMed

    Killich, T; Plath, P J; Hass, E C; Xiang, W; Bultmann, H; Rensing, L; Vicker, M G

    1994-01-01

    We present evidence for a mechanism of eukaryotic cell movement. The pseudopodial dynamics and shape of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae were investigated using computer-supported video microscopy. An examination of the cell periphery by the novel method of serial circular maps revealed explicit, classical wave patterns, which indicate the existence of intrinsic intracellular oscillations. The patterns are generated by the transit of self-organized, super-positioned, harmonic modes of rotating oscillatory waves (ROWS). These waves are probably associated with the dynamics of intracellular actin polymerisation and depolymerisation. A Karhunen-Loève expansion was conducted on one cell during 10 min of locomotion using points each 10 degrees around the cell's boundary. The results show that only 2-3 modes are necessary to describe the most essential features of cell movement and shape. Based on this analysis, a wave model was developed, which accurately simulates the dynamics of cell movement and shape during this time. The model was tested by reconstructing the cell's dynamical form by means of the Karhunen-Loève transform. No difference was detected between this reconstruction and the actual cell outline. Although cell movement and shape have hitherto been viewed as random, our results demonstrate that ROWS determine the spatio-temporal expression of pseudopodia, and consequently govern cell shape and movement, non-randomly.

  17. Approximate solutions to a nonintegrable problem of propagation of elliptically polarised waves in an isotropic gyrotropic nonlinear medium, and periodic analogues of multisoliton complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V A; Petnikova, V M; Potravkin, N N; Shuvalov, V V

    2014-02-28

    Using the linearization method, we obtain approximate solutions to a one-dimensional nonintegrable problem of propagation of elliptically polarised light waves in an isotropic gyrotropic medium with local and nonlocal components of the Kerr nonlinearity and group-velocity dispersion. The consistent evolution of two orthogonal circularly polarised components of the field is described analytically in the case when their phases vary linearly during propagation. The conditions are determined for the excitation of waves with a regular and 'chaotic' change in the polarisation state. The character of the corresponding nonlinear solutions, i.e., periodic analogues of multisoliton complexes, is analysed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Consistent dynamics of the components of an elliptically polarised wave with zero mean amplitudes in a nonlinear isotropic gyrotropic medium in the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V A; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, V V

    2015-01-31

    The adiabatic approximation is used to obtain an analytical solution to a nonintegrable problem of propagation of a plane elliptically polarised light wave with zero mean amplitudes of orthogonal circularly polarised field components through an isotropic gyrotropic medium with local and nonlocal components of Kerr nonlinearity and second-order group velocity dispersion. We describe the aperiodic evolution of bound (attributable to the medium nonlinearity) paired states, which are responsible for the propagation of two orthogonal polarisation components – cnoidal waves with significantly different periods. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. The Millimeter-Wave Spectrum of Methacrolein. Torsion-Rotation Effects in the Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Last year we reported the analysis of the rotational spectrum of s-trans conformer of methacrolein CH2=C(CH3)CHO in the ground vibrational state. In this talk we report the study of its low lying excited vibrational states. The study is based on room-temperature absorption spectra of methacrolein recorded in the frequency range 150 - 465 GHz using the spectrometer in Lille. The new results include assignment of the first excited torsional state (131 cm-1), and the joint analysis of the vt = 0 and vt = 1 states, that allowed us to improve the model in the frame of Rho-Axis-Method (RAM) Hamiltonian and to remove some strong correlations between parameters. Also we assigned the first excited vibrational state of the skeletal torsion mode (170 cm-1). The inverse sequence of A and E tunneling substates as well as anomalous A-E splittings observed for the rotational lines of vsk = 1 state clearly indicate a coupling between methyl torsion and skeletal torsion. However we were able to fit within experimental accuracy the rotational lines of vsk = 1 state using the RAM Hamiltonian. Because of the inversion of the A and E tunneling substates the rotational lines of the vsk = 1 states were assumed to belong to a virtual first excited torsional state. Finally, we assigned several low-Ka rotational transitions of the excited vibrational states above 200 cm-1 but their analysis is complicated by different rotation-vibration interactions. In particular there is an evidence of the Fermi-type resonance between the second excited torsional state and the first excited state of the in-plane skeletal bending mode (265 cm-1). Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. Zakharenko O. et al., 69th ISMS, 2014, TI01

  20. Gravitational wave production by Hawking radiation from rotating primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Kinney, William H.; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze in detail a rarely discussed question of gravity wave production from evaporating primordial black holes. These black holes emit gravitons which are, at classical level, registered as gravity waves. We use the latest constraints on their abundance, and calculate the power emitted in gravitons at the time of their evaporation. We then solve the coupled system of equations that gives us the evolution of the frequency and amplitude of gravity waves during the expansion of the universe. The spectrum of gravitational waves that can be detected today depends on multiple factors: fraction of the total energy density which was occupied by primordial black holes, the epoch in which they were formed, and quantities like their mass and angular momentum. We conclude that very small primordial black holes which evaporate before the big-bang nucleosynthesis emit gravitons whose spectral energy fraction today can be as large as 10-7.5. On the other hand, those which are massive enough so that they still exist now can yield a signal as high as 10-6.5. However, typical frequencies of the gravity waves from primordial black holes are still too high to be observed with the current and near future gravity wave observations.

  1. Differential cross sections and product rotational polarization in A + BC reactions using wave packet methods: H+ + D2 and Li + HF examples.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, A; Roncero, O; González-Lezana, T; Rodríguez-López, A; Aguado, A; Sanz-Sanz, C; Gómez-Carrasco, S

    2009-12-31

    The state-to-state differential cross sections for some atom + diatom reactions have been calculated using a new wave packet code, MAD-WAVE3, which is described in some detail and uses either reactant or product Jacobi coordinates along the propagation. In order to show the accuracy and efficiency of the coordinate transformation required when using reactant Jacobi coordinates, as recently proposed [ J. Chem. Phys. 2006 , 125 , 054102 ], the method is first applied to the H + D(2) reaction as a benchmark, for which exact time-independent calculations are also performed. It is found that the use of reactant coordinates yields accurate results, with a computational effort slightly lower than that when using product coordinates. The H(+) + D(2) reaction, with the same masses but a much deeper insertion well, is also studied and exhibits a completely different mechanism, a complex-forming one which can be treated by statistical methods. Due to the longer range of the potential, product Jacobi coordinates are more efficient in this case. Differential cross sections for individual final rotational states of the products are obtained based on exact dynamical calculations for some selected total angular momenta, combined with the random phase approximation to save the high computational time required to calculate all partial waves with very long propagations. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with available exact time-independent calculations. Finally, the method is applied to the Li + HF system for which reactant coordinates are very well suited, and quantum differential cross sections are not available. The results are compared with recent quasiclassical simulations and experimental results [J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 244304]. Furthermore, the polarization of the product angular momenta is also analyzed as a function of the scattering angle.

  2. Hall effects on the Walén relation in rotational discontinuities and Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B. H.; Lee, L. C.

    2000-08-01

    For Alfvénic fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) the perturbed transverse velocity Vt and magnetic field Bt can be related by the Walén relation, Vt = ±Bt/(μ0ρ)1/2 ≡;±VAt, where ρ is the plasma density, VAt is the transverse Alfvén velocity, and the plus (minus) sign is for antiparallel (parallel) propagation. However, observations of Vt and Bt for Alfvén waves and rotational discontinuities in the solar wind and at the magnetopause showed an obvious deviation from the relation. In this paper, modifications of the Walén relation for linear and nonlinear Alfvén waves and rotational discontinuities (RDs) are examined in the Hall-MHD formulation. Let Vit (≈ Vt) be the transverse ion velocity and Vet be the transverse electron velocity. It is found that Vit = ±Bt(z)/(μ0ρ1)1/2 = ±(ρ(z)/ρ1)1/2 VAt(z) and Vet = ±(ρ1/μ0)1/2Bt(z)/ρ(z) = ±(ρ1/ρ(z))1/2 VAt(z)for RDs in Hall-MHD, where ρ1 is the upstream plasma density. The ion and electron Walén ratios are defined as Ai = Vit/VAt and Ae = Vet/VAt, respectively. It is found in Hall-MHD that ?, AiAe = 1 and Ai < 1 (Ai > 1) for Alfvén waves and RDs with right-hand (left-hand) polarization. The Hall dispersive effect may modify the ion Walén ratio by ΔAi≈±0.14 for the magnetopause RDs and by ΔAi≈±0.07 for the interplanetary RDs.

  3. LINEAR INVERSION OF TRANSMITTED ACOUSTIC WAVE FIELDS FOR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODULUS AND DENSITY PERTURBATIONS USING A BORN-TYPE APPROXIMATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauber, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    A Born approximation is used to linearize the relationship, in the horizontal-wavenumber and frequency domains, between lateral perturbations of modulus and density in a layered half-space and the acoustic wave field observed at the surface when a plane wave is incident from below. The resulting equations can be used to perform a linear inversion of observed acoustic wave fields to obtain lateral perturbations in modulus and density. Since modulus and density effects are separated, gravity observations can be included in the inversion procedure without any assumptions about the relationship between density and acoustic velocity. Tests with synthetic data sets reveal that the inversion method gives useful results when the spatial scales of the inhomogeneities are smaller than several acoustic wavelengths. Refs.

  4. Effects of high- and low-energy radial shock waves therapy combined with physiotherapy in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiangzheng; Li, Zhongli; Liu, Zhengsheng; Shi, Teng; Xue, Chao

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high- and low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy patients. Data from rotator cuff tendinopathy patients received high- or low-energy radial shock waves combined with physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone were collected. The Constant and Murley score and visual analog scale score were collected to assess the effectiveness of treatment in three groups at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. In total, 94 patients were involved for our retrospective study. All groups showed remarkable improvement in the visual analog scale and Constant and Murley score compared to baseline at 24 weeks. The high-energy radial shock waves group had more marked improvement in the Constant and Murley score compared to the physiotherapy group at 4 and 8 weeks and at 4 weeks when compared with low-energy group. Furthermore, high-energy radial shock waves group had superior results on the visual analog scale at 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared to low-energy and physiotherapy groups. This retrospective study supported the usage of high-energy radial shock waves as a supplementary therapy over physiotherapy alone for rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving the symptoms rapidly and maintaining symptoms at a satisfactory level for 24 weeks. Implications for Rehabilitation High-energy radial shock waves can be a supplemental therapy to physiotherapy for rotator cuff tendinopathy. We recommend the usage of high-energy radial shock waves during the first 5 weeks, at an interval of 7 days, of physiotherapy treatment. High-energy radial shock waves treatment combined with physiotherapy can benefit rotator cuff tendinopathy by relieving symptoms rapidly and maintain these improvements at a satisfactory level for quite a long time.

  5. Wave propagation analysis of smart rotating porous heterogeneous piezo-electric nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dabbagh, Ali

    2017-04-01

    The present work is mainly focused on studying the influences of angular velocity on the wave propagation responses of functionally graded (FG) piezo-electric nanobeams. Moreover, the effects of porosity are also regarded in the wave propagation analysis of size-dependent FG beams. The distribution of electro-mechanical properties of a piezo-electric beam are precisely described employing power-law formulation. The nonlocal elasticity theory is utilized to account for the influences of small scale. Herein, a classical beam theory is expounded to derive the nonlocal governing equations of the nanobeam. Once the governing equations are completely derived, an analytical solution method is applied to obtain the dispersion relations of propagating waves. A comparison of this model with previous studies is then made to show the validity of the obtained results. Finally, the influences of various variants, such as wave number, nonlocal parameter, gradient index, electric voltage, volume fraction of porosity and angular velocity, are studied in detail to show how these parameters can affect the wave frequency, phase velocity and escape frequency of FG smart rotary porous nanobeams.

  6. Review of rigorous coupled-wave analysis and of homogeneous effective medium approximations for high spatial-frequency surface-relief gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glytsis, Elias N.; Brundrett, David L.; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis as applied to the diffraction of electro-magnetic waves by gratings is presented. The analysis is valid for any polarization, angle of incidence, and conical diffraction. Cascaded and/or multiplexed gratings as well as material anisotropy can be incorporated under the same formalism. Small period rectangular groove gratings can also be modeled using approximately equivalent uniaxial homogeneous layers (effective media). The ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of these layers depend on the gratings filling factor, the refractive indices of the substrate and superstrate, and the ratio of the freespace wavelength to grating period. Comparisons of the homogeneous effective medium approximations with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis are presented. Antireflection designs (single-layer or multilayer) using the effective medium models are presented and compared. These ultra-short period antireflection gratings can also be used to produce soft x-rays. Comparisons of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis with experimental results on soft x-ray generation by gratings are also included.

  7. Three-component Gross-Pitaevskii equations in the spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate: Spin-rotation symmetry, matter-wave solutions, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zichao; Yan, Zhenya

    2017-03-01

    We report new matter-wave solutions of the one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate system by combining global spin-rotation states and similarity transformation. Dynamical behaviors of non-stationary global spin-rotation states derived from the SU(2) spin-rotation symmetry are discussed, which exhibit temporal periodicity. We derive generalized bright-dark mixed solitons and new rogue wave solutions and reveal the relations between Euler angles in spin-rotation symmetry and parameters in ferromagnetic and polar solitons. In the modulated spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate system, new solutions are derived and graphically illustrated for different types of modulations. Moreover, numerical simulations are performed to investigate the stability of some obtained solutions for chosen parameters.

  8. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  9. Gravitational waves from rotating and precessing rigid bodies. 2: General solutions and computationally useful formulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.

    1979-01-01

    The classical mechanics results for free precession which are needed in order to calculate the weak field, slow-motion, quadrupole-moment gravitational waves are reviewed. Within that formalism, algorithms are given for computing the exact gravitational power radiated and waveforms produced by arbitrary rigid-body freely-precessing sources. The dominant terms are presented in series expansions of the waveforms for the case of an almost spherical object precessing with a small wobble angle. These series expansions, which retain the precise frequency dependence of the waves, may be useful for gravitational astronomers when freely-precessing sources begin to be observed.

  10. Monostatic radar cross-section spectra of a rotating-fan array, with tilted plate metal blades, in the PO/PTD approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.-L.; Bor, S.-S.

    1992-12-01

    The monostatic radar cross-section spectra of a rotating-fan array, with tilted blades, are investigated. The high-frequency theoretical treatment of a slowly rotating and electrically large scatterer is based on the quasi-stationary method with the physical optics/physical theory of diffraction (PO/PTD) technique. Only the theta-theta polarization case is considered here, although the psi-psi polarization case can be treated in the same way. The solution is applicable to any observation angles, and, except for the condition of the same rotational velocity, each fan need not have the same number of blades and dimensions or the same spacing. An example, a linear array with two synchronously rotating fans, each with three identical tilted blades, is presented. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results is acceptable.

  11. Modified method of simplest equation: Powerful tool for obtaining exact and approximate traveling-wave solutions of nonlinear PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the class of equations ∑i,j=0mAij(u){∂iu}/{∂ti}∂+∑k,l=0nBkl(u){∂ku}/{∂xk}∂=C(u) where Aij( u), Bkl( u) and C( u) are functions of u( x, t) as follows: (i) Aij, Bkl and C are polynomials of u; or (ii) Aij, Bkl and C can be reduced to polynomials of u by means of Taylor series for small values of u. For these two cases the above-mentioned class of equations consists of nonlinear PDEs with polynomial nonlinearities. We show that the modified method of simplest equation is powerful tool for obtaining exact traveling-wave solution of this class of equations. The balance equations for the sub-class of traveling-wave solutions of the investigated class of equations are obtained. We illustrate the method by obtaining exact traveling-wave solutions (i) of the Swift-Hohenberg equation and (ii) of the generalized Rayleigh equation for the cases when the extended tanh-equation or the equations of Bernoulli and Riccati are used as simplest equations.

  12. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1994-07-01

    Our ARM goal is to help improve both longwave and shortwave models used in GCM's by providing improved radiometric shortwave data. The inference of cloud cover and optical properties of clouds is another goal of this research effort. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling shortwave, including direct and diffuse irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling longwave, upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave, and aerosol optical depth that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data as a model test data set for ARM researchers. The major objective of our program has been to develop two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR). The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) contains six filtered, narrow-passband detectors, and one unfiltered silicon detector that serves as a surrogate total shortwave sensor. The rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) contains a 256-channel diode array that spans the wavelengths 350-1050 nm with resolution varying between 0.6 nm and 8 nm. With some of the instrument development complete we are devoting more effort to analysis of the MFRSR data. Progress was made on several fronts this year, resulting in conference papers and submissions to refereed journals. Data from the ASRC roof has been used to develop corrections of the MFRSR shortwave sensor. SGP data has been used to develop and validate a retrieval technique for total column water vapor. Total column ozone has been estimated using MFRSR data, but validation at the SGP was not possible for lack of a suitable ozone column standard. Some progress has been made on cloud cover detection, but it is not yet implemented as a routine classification and reporting procedure.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Microwave and Millimeter Wave Radiation from Hollow, Rotating, Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    detection bands (X, Ku, K (a) produced by a rotating electron beam in a cylindrical drif t tube. 9- 600 (a a)400- ~200. 28 32 36 f (GHz) 600 (b) ~400...are plotted in an radii Rj,Ro, as shown in Fig. 2. o- k , diagram. At the interaction points indicated ( k -f ,a-) The stability of the system is examined...by linearizingw-kqs diaram Atd t5h. i ercto porbit indicaton ( k -naw -) and ( k ,’ ,w), we have "resopant interaction". If these are Eqs. (4) and (5

  14. A solar dynamo surface wave at the interface between convection and nonuniform rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    A simple dynamo surface wave is presented to illustrate the basic principles of a dynamo operating in the thin layer of shear and suppressed eddy diffusion beneath the cyclonic convection in the convection zone of the sun. It is shown that the restriction of the shear delta(Omega)/delta(r) to a region below the convective zone provides the basic mode with a greatly reduced turbulent diffusion coefficient in the region of strong azimuthal field. The dynamo takes on the character of a surface wave tied to the lower surface z = 0 of the convective zone. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting a fibril state for the principal flux bundles beneath the surface of the sun, with fundamental implications for the solar dynamo.

  15. Dynamics of spiral waves rotating around an obstacle and the existence of a minimal obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Li, Teng-Chao; Qu, Shixian; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Pinning of vortices by obstacles plays an important role in various systems. In the heart, anatomical reentry is created when a vortex, also known as the spiral wave, is pinned to an anatomical obstacle, leading to a class of physiologically very important arrhythmias. Previous analyses of its dynamics and instability provide fine estimates in some special circumstances, such as large obstacles or weak excitabilities. Here, to expand theoretical analyses to all circumstances, we propose a general theory whose results quantitatively agree with direct numerical simulations. In particular, when obstacles are small and pinned spiral waves are destabilized, an accurate explanation of the instability in two-dimensional media is provided by the usage of a mapping rule and dimension reduction. The implications of our results are to better understand the mechanism of arrhythmia and thus improve its early prevention.

  16. Imaging of rotational wave-function in photodissociation of rovibrationally excited HCl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygoryeva, K.; Rakovský, J.; Votava, O.; Fárník, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a visualization of quantum mechanical phenomena with the velocity map imaging (VMI) technique, combining vibrationally mediated photodissociation (VMP) of a simple diatomic HCl with the VMI of its H-photofragments. Free HCl molecules were excited by a pump infrared (IR) laser pulse to particular rotational J levels of the v = 2 vibrational state, and subsequently a probe ultraviolet laser photodissociated the molecule at a fixed wavelength of 243.07 nm where also the H-fragments were ionized. The molecule was aligned by the IR excitation with respect to the IR laser polarization, and this alignment was reflected in the angular distribution of the H-photofragments. In particular, the highest degree of molecular alignment was achieved for the J =1 ←0 transition, which exclusively led to the population of a single rotational state with M = 0. The obtained images were analyzed for further details of the VMP dynamics, and different J states were studied as well. Additionally, we investigated the dynamic evolution of the excited states by changing the pump-probe laser pulse delay; the corresponding images reflected dephasing due to a coupling between the molecular angular momentum and nuclear spin. Our measurements confirmed previous observation using the time-of-flight technique by Sofikitis et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 144307 (2007)]. We observed a partial recovery of the originally excited state after 60 ns in agreement with the previous observation.

  17. A model for the selective amplification of spatially coherent waves in a centrifugal compressor on the verge of rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    A simple model for the stability zones of a low speed centrifugal compressor is developed, with the goal of understanding the driving mechanism for the changes in stalling behavior predicted for, and observed in, the Purdue Low Speed Centrifugal Research Compressor Facility. To this end, earlier analyses of rotating stall suppression in centrifugal compressors are presented in a reduced form that preserves the essential parameters of the model that affect the stalling behavior of the compressor. The model is then used to illuminate the relationship between compressor geometry, expected mode shape, and regions of amplification for weak waves which are indicative of the susceptibility of the system to rotating stall. The results demonstrate that increasing the stagger angle of the diffuser vanes, and consequently the diffusion path length, results in the compressor moving towards a condition where higher-order spatial modes are excited during stall initiation. Similarly, flow acceleration in the diffuser section caused by an increase in the number of diffuser vanes also results in the excitation of higher modes.

  18. Polarization rotation of light propagating through a medium with efficient four-wave mixing and cross-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sushree S.; Bhowmick, Arup; Mohapatra, Ashok K.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the rotation of an elliptically polarized light propagating through thermal rubidium vapor with efficient four-wave mixing (FWM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM). These nonlinear processes are enhanced by Zeeman coherence within the degenerate sub-levels of the two-level atomic system. The elliptically polarized light with small ellipticity is considered as the superposition of a strong-linearly-polarized pump beam and a weak-orthogonal-polarized probe beam. The interference of the probe and the newly generated light field due to degenerate FWM and their gain in the medium due to a large XPM induced by the pump beam leads to the rotation of the elliptical polarized light. A theoretical analysis of the probe propagation through the nonlinear medium was used to explain the experimental observation and the fitting of the experimental data gives the estimates of the third-order non-linear susceptibilities associated with FWM and XPM. Our study can provide useful parameters for the generation of efficient squeezed vacuum states and squeezed polarization states of light. Furthermore our study finds application in controlling the diffraction of a linearly-polarized light beam traversing the medium.

  19. Method for extracting forward acoustic wave components from rotating microphone measurements in the inlets of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicon, D. E.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a procedure for enhancing the use of the basic rotating microphone system so as to determine the forward propagating mode components of the acoustic field in the inlet duct at the microphone plane in order to predict more accurate far-field radiation patterns. In addition, a modification was developed to obtain, from the same microphone readings, the forward acoustic modes generated at the fan face, which is generally some distance downstream of the microphone plane. Both these procedures employ computer-simulated calibrations of sound propagation in the inlet duct, based upon the current radiation code. These enhancement procedures were applied to previously obtained rotating microphone data for the 17-inch ADP fan. The forward mode components at the microphone plane were obtained and were used to compute corresponding far-field directivities. The second main task of the program involved finding the forward wave modes generated at the fan face in terms of the same total radial mode structure measured at the microphone plane. To obtain satisfactory results with the ADP geometry it was necessary to limit consideration to the propagating modes. Sensitivity studies were also conducted to establish guidelines for use in other fan configurations.

  20. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. PART I. ANELASTIC APPROXIMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2012-09-10

    Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here, we study the properties of gravity waves in stably stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve energy in stably stratified atmospheres, instead conserving pseudo-energies that depend on the stratification, and we demonstrate this numerically. One anelastic equation set does conserve energy in all atmospheres and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number anelastic codes to this set of equations.

  1. The effect of an infinite plane-wave approximation on calculations for second-harmonic generation in a one-dimensional nonlinear crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Li-Ming

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, the second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a one-dimensional nonlinear crystal that is embedded in air is investigated. Previously, the identical configuration was studied in Li Z. Y. et al., Phys. Rev. B, 60 (1999) 10644, without the use of the slowly varying amplitude approximation (SVAA), but by adopting the infinite plane-wave approximation (PWA), despite the fact that this approximation is not quite applicable to such a system. We calculate the SHG conversion efficiency without a PWA, and compare the results with those from the quoted reference. The investigation reveals that conversion efficiencies of SHG as calculated by the two methods appear to exhibit significant differences, and that the SHG may be modulated by the field of a fundamental wave (FW). The ratio between SHG conversion efficiencies as produced by the two methods shows a periodic variation, and this oscillatory behavior is fully consistent with the variation in transmittance of the FW. Quasi-phase matching (QPM) is also studied, and we find that the location of the peak for SHG conversion efficiency deviates from Δd=0, which differs from the conventional QPM results.

  2. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Q. D.; Budny, R. V.

    2015-03-01

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (Ti,e) and toroidal velocity (Vϕ) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition.

  3. Optimal staggered-grid finite-difference schemes by combining Taylor-series expansion and sampling approximation for wave equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongyong; Yang, Lei; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2016-12-01

    High-order staggered-grid finite-difference (SFD) schemes have been universally used to improve the accuracy of wave equation modeling. However, the high-order SFD coefficients on spatial derivatives are usually determined by the Taylor-series expansion (TE) method, which just leads to great accuracy at small wavenumbers for wave equation modeling. Some conventional optimization methods can achieve high accuracy at large wavenumbers, but they hardly guarantee the small numerical dispersion error at small wavenumbers. In this paper, we develop new optimal explicit SFD (ESFD) and implicit SFD (ISFD) schemes for wave equation modeling. We first derive the optimal ESFD and ISFD coefficients for the first-order spatial derivatives by applying the combination of the TE and the sampling approximation to the dispersion relation, and then analyze their numerical accuracy. Finally, we perform elastic wave modeling with the ESFD and ISFD schemes based on the TE method and the optimal method, respectively. When the appropriate number and interval for the sampling points are chosen, these optimal schemes have extremely high accuracy at small wavenumbers, and can also guarantee small numerical dispersion error at large wavenumbers. Numerical accuracy analyses and modeling results demonstrate the optimal ESFD and ISFD schemes can efficiently suppress the numerical dispersion and significantly improve the modeling accuracy compared to the TE-based ESFD and ISFD schemes.

  4. Radar Cross-Sectional Spectra of Rotating Multiple Skew-Plated Metal Fan Blades by Physical Optics/Physical Theory of Diffraction, Equivalent Currents Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, Sheau-Shong; Yang, Tai-Lin; Yang, Shui-Yuan

    1992-05-01

    The monostatic radar cross-sectional spectra of rotating multiple skew-plated metal fan blades are investigated. The theoretical treatment of such a slowly rotating and electrically large scatterer is based on the quasi-stationary method together with physical optics/physical theory of diffraction (PO/PTD) equivalent current techniques. Only the θθ polarization case is considered here, but the \\psi\\psi polarization case can be treated in the same way. This solution is applicable to any observation angle, and is represented by such a general form as one which enables us to treat a similar scatterer with multiple blades and with different skew angles. Three rotating skew-plated blades are taken as an example, and the agreements between the theoretical and experimental results are satisfactory.

  5. Boundary-layer variations due to orographic-wave breaking in the presence of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisogono, B.; Enger, L.

    2004-10-01

    A mesoscale numerical model is used to study the atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) response to nonlinear orographic forcing with Coriolis effect, f, over a mountain with length (the cross-wind component) comparable to the Rossby radius of deformation, LR. The orographic-wave breaking occurring for Froude number Fr < 1, affected by f > 0, intensifies on the northern flank for westerly flows, as also found in other recent studies. A cumulative effect occurs as the Coriolis force lifts the northern ABL top and generates a stronger low-level jet (LLJ) than on the southern side. A differential layering also appears, since the specific humidity is higher in the lower southern ABL than in the related northern ABL, and vice versa. By contrast, there are higher values of the turbulent kinetic energy and humidity in the upper northern ABL. The breaking of flow symmetry around the orography due to f changes both the vertical vorticity and horizontal divergence field, (, D), it modulates eddies and turbulence leading to the differential layering of the ABL. The stronger northern LLJ and its weaker southern counterpart, both meandering, together with the asymmetric wave breaking, induce strong lee-side fluctuations of the (zeta, D) field in the presence of f. The enhanced (zeta, D) production due to wave breaking over the distance apLR, the primary atmosphere-orography resonance occurs mainly in the vertical, while the 'f-enhancement' occurs in the horizontal plane. In this way, the initial mesoscale forcing may extend its effects over the synoptic scale.

  6. Chemical Analysis of Exhaled Human Breath Using High Resolution Mm-Wave Rotational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianle; Branco, Daniela; Thomas, Jessica; Medvedev, Ivan; Dolson, David; Nam, Hyun-Joo; O, Kenneth

    2014-06-01

    High resolution rotational spectroscopy enables chemical sensors that are both sensitive and highly specific, which is well suited for analysis of expired human breath. We have previously reported on detection of breath ethanol, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde using THz sensors. This paper will outline our present efforts in this area, with specific focus on our ongoing quest to correlate levels of blood glucose with concentrations of a few breath chemicals known to be affected by elevated blood sugar levels. Prospects, challenges and future plans will be outlined and discussed. Fosnight, A.M., B.L. Moran, and I.R. Medvedev, Chemical analysis of exhaled human breath using a terahertz spectroscopic approach. Applied Physics Letters, 2013. 103(13): p. 133703-5.

  7. Mean Trajectory Gaussian Wave Packet Approach to Rotationally Inelastic Molecule-Surface Diffraction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    the wave function (11.3) in the time dependent Schrodinger equation and operate from the left with 8 2Tr IT Jd6b ! de sine Y(,o.This leads to 0 0 c...8217 orientation, and agress well with recent close coupling calculations. A connection is also made with the recent semiclassical trajectory work of DD I FORMN...orientation, and agress well with recent close coupling calculations. A connection is also made with the recent semiclassical trajectory work of DePristo. The

  8. Rotation Rate Sensing via Magnetostatic Surface Wave Propagation on a Thick Yig Ring.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-03

    Magnetostatic Waves Along Curved Ferrite Surfaces."I IEES Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, 2674:252-256 (Ari 16, Von Aulock, W.*H * Handbook of... Microwave Ferrite Materi- als. Academic Pre;ssInc.,New York, 𔃻-9-5- - P4 I ADSGO 372 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AF9 OH SCHOO--e F/G 20.3...tunable microwave oscilla- tors (Ref 8) and variable delay lines (Ref 1) operating within the microwave frequency spectrum. A further ex- tension of this

  9. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    PubMed

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength.

  10. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  11. Applications of finite element and wave envelope element approximations to turbofan engine noise radiation including flight effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrett, A. V.; Eversman, W.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation from turbofan engine inlets in flow has not lent itself fully to analysis by numerical means because of the large domains and high frequencies involved. The current work has extended the use of finite elements and wave envelope elements, elements which simulate decay and wavelike behaviour in their interpolation functions, from the no-flow case in which they have been proven, to cases incorporating mean flow. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, the acoustics problem has been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of acoustic velocity potential, thus minimizing computer solution storage requirements. The results obtained from the numerical procedures agree well with known analytical solutions, static experimental jet engines inflow data, and also with flight test results.

  12. Applications of finite element and wave envelope element approximations to turbofan engine noise radiation including flight effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrett, A. V.; Eversman, W.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation from turbofan engine inlets in flow has not lent itself fully to analysis by numerical means because of the large domains and high frequencies involved. The current work has extended the use of finite elements and wave envelope elements, elements which simulate decay and wavelike behaviour in their interpolation functions, from the no-flow case in which they have been proven, to cases incorporating mean flow. By employing an irrotational mean flow assumption, the acoustics problem has been posed in an axisymmetric formulation in terms of acoustic velocity potential, thus minimizing computer solution storage requirements. The results obtained from the numerical procedures agree well with known analytical solutions, static experimental jet engines inflow data, and also with flight test results.

  13. A Lagrangian approach to the weakly nonlinear interaction of Kelvin waves and a symmetry-breaking bifurcation of a rotating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Mie, Youichi

    2015-02-01

    We develop a general framework of using the Lagrangian variables for calculating the energy of waves on a steady Euler flow and the mean flow induced by their nonlinear interaction. With the mean flow at hand we can determine, without ambiguity, all the coefficients of the amplitude equations to third order in amplitude for a rotating flow subject to a steady perturbation breaking the circular symmetry of the streamlines. Moreover, a resonant triad of waves is identified which brings in the secondary instability of the Moore-Saffman-Tsai-Widnall instability, and with the aid of the energetic viewpoint, resonant amplification of the waves without bound is numerically confirmed.

  14. Wave spectra of a strongly coupled magnetized one-component plasma: quasilocalized charge approximation versus harmonic lattice theory and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ott, T; Baiko, D A; Kählert, H; Bonitz, M

    2013-04-01

    Two different approaches to the calculation of the wave spectra of magnetized strongly coupled liquid one-component plasmas are analzyed: the semianalytical quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA) and the angle-averaged harmonic lattice (AAHL) theory. Both theories are benchmarked against the numerical evidence obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that not too far from the melting transition (Γ≳100), the AAHL theory is superior to the QLCA, while further away from the transition, the QLCA performs comparably to or better than the AAHL theory.

  15. On the arbitrary l-wave solutions of the deformed hyperbolic manning-rosen potential including an improved approximation to the orbital centrifugal term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chun-Long; Zhang, Min-Cang

    2017-01-01

    The arbitrary l-wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation for the deformed hyperbolic Manning-Rosen potential is investigated analytically by using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method, the centrifugal term is treated with an improved Greene and Aldrich's approximation scheme. The wavefunctions depend on the deformation parameter q, which is expressed in terms of the Jocobi polynomial or the hypergeometric function. The bound state energy is obtained, and the discrete spectrum is shown to be independent of the deformation parameter q.

  16. Beyond Clausius-Mossotti - Wave propagation on a polarizable point lattice and the discrete dipole approximation. [electromagnetic scattering and absorption by interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    We derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating on a lattice of polarizable points. From this dispersion relation we obtain a prescription for choosing dipole polarizabilities so that an infinite lattice with finite lattice spacing will mimic a continuum with dielectric constant. The discrete dipole approximation is used to calculate scattering and absorption by a finite target by replacing the target with an array of point dipoles. We compare different prescriptions for determining the dipole polarizabilities. We show that the most accurate results are obtained when the lattice dispersion relation is used to set the polarizabilities.

  17. Millimeter-wave rotational spectrum and molecular constants of diatomic gallium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. P. R.; Schütze-Pahlmann, H.-U.; Hoeft, J.

    1980-03-01

    The gas-phase molecular spectrum of Gal has been detected in the millimeter wavelength region. The molecules are produced by vapourising a mixture of gallium and lead iodide into an evaculated cell. Analysis of the observed rotational transitions yields the following molecular parameters for 69Ga 127I: Y01 = 1706.89645(83) MHz, Y11 = -5.68714(53) MHz, Y21 = 6.329(43) kHz, Y02 = -0.472713(60) kHz, Y12 = 0.472(38) Hz, ω e = 216.38 cm -1, ω exe= 0.471 cm -1, and for 71Ga 127I: y 01 = 1675.72004(71) MHz, Y11 = -5.53277(57) MHz, Y21 = 5.995(34) kHz, Y02 = -0.455700(51) kHz, y12 = 0.522(40) Hz, ω e = 214.37 cm -1, and ω exe = 0.458 cm -1. The equilibrium internuclear distance obtained for Gal is re = 2.574667(12) Å.

  18. Approximate scheme by the coupled-wave theory to efficiently analyze the influences of moiré phenomena in liquid-crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Ho, I-Lin; Wang, Tsang-Chi; Chang, Yia-Chung; Li, Wang-Yang

    2012-08-20

    This work studies an approximate scheme by coupled-wave theory to analyze quickly the large-scale moiré phenomena as seen in common liquid-crystal devices. The moiré phenomena are considered to be caused by two periodic structures (with lattice vectors γ[combininb arrow](1) and γ[combininb arrow](2) and show an interference pattern spanning over a length γ(m)=|γ[combininb arrow](1)|·|γ[combininb arrow](2)|/|γ[combininb arrow](1)-γ[combininb arrow](2)| (with γ[combininb arrow](1)=/~γ[combininb arrow](2)). With the coupled-wave theory, the complete analysis of the moiré optics includes at least 2γ(m)/λ (λ: wavelength in vacuum) Fourier components and presents an ineffective computation. This work applies a cos(τ) type approximation for the openings of unpatterned liquid-crystal pixels, and considers the first-order coupling between the Fourier components of pixels and other (periodic) optical structures. We hence arrive at an effective evaluation, including 4τ|γ[combininb arrow](1)|/λ (or 4τ|γ[combininb arrow](2)|/λ) Fourier components, and are able to go back to a complete analysis when considering higher-order couplings at an appropriate τ integer value.

  19. Black hole triple dynamics: a breakdown of the orbit average approximation and implications for gravitational wave detections

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Murray, Norman; Mikkola, Seppo

    2014-01-20

    Coalescing black hole (BH) binaries forming in the dense core of globular clusters (GCs) are expected to be one of the brightest sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation for the next generation of ground-based laser interferometers. Favorable conditions for a merger are initiated by the Kozai resonance in which the gravitational interaction with a third distant object, typically another BH, induces quasi-periodic variations of the inner BH binary eccentricity. In this article we perform high precision three-body simulations of the long-term evolution of hierarchical BH triples and investigate the conditions that lead to the merging of the BH binary and the way it might become an observable source of GW radiation. We find that the secular orbit average treatment, which was adopted in previous works, does not reliably describe the dynamics of these systems if the binary is orbited by the outer BH on a highly inclined orbit at a moderate distance. We show that 50% of coalescing BH binaries driven by the Kozai mechanism in GCs will have eccentricities larger than 0.1, with 10% of them being extremely eccentric, (1 – e) ≲ 10{sup –4}, when they first chirp in the frequency band of ground-based laser interferometers. This implies that a large fraction of such GW sources could be missed if conventional quasi-circular templates are used for analysis of GW detector data. The efficient detection of all coalescing BH binaries in GCs will therefore require template banks of eccentric inspiral waveforms for matched-filtering and dedicated search strategies.

  20. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  1. Analytical and numerical studies of approximate phase velocity matching based nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves for the detection of evenly distributed microstructural changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, X.; Tse, P. W.; Xu, G. H.; Tao, T. F.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-04-01

    Most previous studies on nonlinear Lamb waves are conducted using mode pairs that satisfying strict phase velocity matching and non-zero power flux criteria. However, there are some limitations in existence. First, strict phase velocity matching is not existed in the whole frequency bandwidth; Second, excited center frequency is not always exactly equal to the true phase-velocity-matching frequency; Third, mode pairs are isolated and quite limited in number; Fourth, exciting a single desired primary mode is extremely difficult in practice and the received signal is quite difficult to process and interpret. And few attention has been paid to solving these shortcomings. In this paper, nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves at low-frequency range satisfying approximate phase velocity matching is proposed for the purpose of overcoming these limitations. In analytical studies, the secondary amplitudes with the propagation distance considering the fundamental frequency, the maximum cumulative propagation distance (MCPD) with the fundamental frequency and the maximum linear cumulative propagation distance (MLCPD) using linear regression analysis are investigated. Based on analytical results, approximate phase velocity matching is quantitatively characterized as the relative phase velocity deviation less than a threshold value of 1%. Numerical studies are also conducted using tone burst as the excitation signal. The influences of center frequency and frequency bandwidth on the secondary amplitudes and MCPD are investigated. S1-S2 mode with the fundamental frequency at 1.8 MHz, the primary S0 mode at the center frequencies of 100 and 200 kHz are used respectively to calculate the ratios of nonlinear parameter of Al 6061-T6 to Al 7075-T651. The close agreement of the computed ratios to the actual value verifies the effectiveness of nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves satisfying approximate phase velocity matching for characterizing the material nonlinearity. Moreover, the ratios derived from

  2. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Q. D.; Budny, R. V.

    2015-03-15

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (T{sub i,e}) and toroidal velocity (V{sub ϕ}) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition.

  3. Effects of reagent rotational excitation on the H + CHD{sub 3} → H{sub 2} + CD{sub 3} reaction: A seven dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-10-14

    Seven-dimensional time-dependent wave packet calculations have been carried out for the title reaction to obtain reaction probabilities and cross sections for CHD{sub 3} in J{sub 0} = 1, 2 rotationally excited initial states with k{sub 0} = 0 − J{sub 0} (the projection of CHD{sub 3} rotational angular momentum on its C{sub 3} axis). Under the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, the initial states with the projection of the total angular momentum on the body fixed axis (K{sub 0}) equal to k{sub 0} are found to be much more reactive, indicating strong dependence of reactivity on the orientation of the reagent CHD{sub 3} with respect to the relative velocity between the reagents H and CHD{sub 3}. However, at the coupled-channel (CC) level this dependence becomes much weak although in general the K{sub 0} specified cross sections for the K{sub 0} = k{sub 0} initial states remain primary to the overall cross sections, implying the Coriolis coupling is important to the dynamics of the reaction. The calculated CS and CC integral cross sections obtained after K{sub 0} averaging for the J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states with all different k{sub 0} are essentially identical to the corresponding CS and CC results for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state, meaning that the initial rotational excitation of CHD{sub 3} up to J{sub 0} = 2, regardless of its initial k{sub 0}, does not have any effect on the total cross sections for the title reaction, and the errors introduced by the CS approximation on integral cross sections for the rotationally excited J{sub 0} = 1, 2 initial states are the same as those for the J{sub 0} = 0 initial state.

  4. Similarity solution for a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which has a variable azimuthally fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant, the heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  5. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotating dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2010-04-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which is rotating about the axis of symmetry, is investigated. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a piston (an inner expanding surface) and the dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  6. Rotational elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  7. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  8. Design and development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating achromatic half-wave plate for CMB polarization modulation on the POLARBEAR-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Charles A.; Beckman, Shawn; Chinone, Yuji; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Hazumi, Masashi; Keating, Brian; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Matsuda, Frederick; Plambeck, Richard; Suzuki, Aritoki; Takakura, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    We describe the development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating half-wave plate (HWP) for study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization by the POLARBEAR-2 (PB2) experiment. Rapid polarization modulation suppresses 1/f noise due to unpolarized atmospheric turbulence and improves sensitivity to degree-angular-scale CMB fluctuations where the inflationary gravitational wave signal is thought to exist. A HWP modulator rotates the input polarization signal and therefore allows a single polarimeter to measure both linear polarization states, eliminating systematic errors associated with differencing of orthogonal detectors. PB2 projects a 365-mm-diameter focal plane of 7,588 dichroic, 95/150 GHz transition-edge-sensor bolometers onto a 4-degree field of view that scans the sky at 1 degree per second. We find that a 500-mm-diameter ambient-temperature sapphire achromatic HWP rotating at 2 Hz is a suitable polarization modulator for PB2. We present the design considerations for the PB2 HWP, the construction of the HWP optical stack and rotation mechanism, and the performance of the fully-assembled HWP instrument. We conclude with a discussion of HWP polarization modulation for future Simons Array receivers.

  9. Modulation of the shape and speed of a chemical wave in an unstirred Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction by a rotating magnet.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hideyuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe whether a rotating magnetic field (RMF) could change the anomalous chemical wave propagation induced by a moderate-intensity gradient static magnetic field (SMF) in an unstirred Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. The application of the SMF (maximum magnetic flux density = 0.22 T, maximum magnetic flux density gradient = 25.5 T/m, and peak magnetic force product (flux density × gradient) = 4 T(2) /m) accelerated the propagation velocity in a two-dimensional pattern. Characteristic anomalous patterns of the wavefront shape were generated and the patterns were dependent on the SMF distribution. The deformation and increase in the propagation velocity were diminished by the application of an RMF at a rotation rate of 1 rpm for a few minutes. Numerical simulation by means of the time-averaged value of the magnetic flux density gradient or the MF gradient force over one rotation partially supported the experimental observations. These considerations suggest that RMF exposure modulates the chemical wave propagation and that the degree of modulation could be, at least in part, dependent on the time-averaged MF distribution over one rotation. Bioelectromagnetics 34:220-230, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Triggering collapse of the presolar dense cloud core and injecting short-lived radioisotopes with a shock wave. III. Rotating three-dimensional cloud cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-06-10

    A key test of the supernova triggering and injection hypothesis for the origin of the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes is to reproduce the inferred initial abundances of these isotopes. We present here the most detailed models to date of the shock wave triggering and injection process, where shock waves with varied properties strike fully three-dimensional, rotating, dense cloud cores. The models are calculated with the FLASH adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Three different outcomes can result: triggered collapse leading to fragmentation into a multiple protostar system; triggered collapse leading to a single protostar embedded in a protostellar disk; or failure to undergo dynamic collapse. Shock wave material is injected into the collapsing clouds through Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, resulting in initially inhomogeneous distributions in the protostars and protostellar disks. Cloud rotation about an axis aligned with the shock propagation direction does not increase the injection efficiency appreciably, as the shock parameters were chosen to be optimal for injection even in the absence of rotation. For a shock wave from a core-collapse supernova, the dilution factors for supernova material are in the range of ∼10{sup –4} to ∼3 × 10{sup –4}, in agreement with recent laboratory estimates of the required amount of dilution for {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al. We conclude that a type II supernova remains as a promising candidate for synthesizing the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes shortly before their injection into the presolar cloud core by the supernova's remnant shock wave.

  11. Detection and Interpretation of Collisional Transfer and Rotational Anisotropy Fingerprints in Resonant Four-Wave Mixing Spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzov, A.; Radi, P.; Maksyutenko, P.; Kozlov, D.

    2013-06-01

    Coherent responses produced by resonant four-wave mixing (RFWM) in a weakly absorbing medium carry valuable information on the intrinsic properties and dynamics of the quantum states involved. Here, two aspects of RFWM applications are highlighted. First, the Two-Color (TC) version of RFWM was found to be a unique spectroscopic tool to directly trace collisional state-to-state transfer in isotropic gaseous media, both in the frequency% and time domains. Second, the RFWM techniques appeared to be very useful for studies of the rotational anisotropy. Here we report new experimental one-color RFWM spectra of the OH radicals produced by laser photolysis of H_{2}O_{2} at 266 nm. Polarization dependence and Doppler line structure of the spectra show clear evidence of the pronounced anisotropy of angular momentum (j) and velocity (% v) distributions as well as on the j-v correlation. The obtained results directly point to the pronounced OH helicity (i.e. j% ∥ v) which yet remained beyound the reach of purely optical means. For all mentioned cases, the line-shape theory is an optimal tool to derive compact expressions for the RFWM signals. The work was supported by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy, the Swiss National Science Foundation (200020_124542/1), and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grants 11-02-01296 and 11-03-00448. P. P. Radi, H.-M. Frey, B. Mischler, A. P. Tzannis, P. Beaud, and T. Gerber, Chem. Phys. Lett. 265, 271 (1997). X. Chen and T. B. Settersten, Appl. Opt. 46, 3911 (2007). T. A. W. Wasserman, P. H. Vaccaro, and B. R. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6314 (1997). A.P. Kouzov and P.P. Radi, Phys. Rev. A 63, 010701 (2000).

  12. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  13. Oscillations of rapidly rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2008-09-15

    Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of rapidly rotating relativistic stars are studied using the Cowling approximation. The oscillation spectra have been estimated by Fourier transforming the evolution equations describing the perturbations. This is the first study of its kind and provides information on the effect of fast rotation on the oscillation spectra while it offers the possibility of studying the complete problem by including space-time perturbations. Our study includes both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations and provides limits for the onset of the secular bar mode rotational instability. We also present approximate formulas for the dependence of the oscillation spectrum from rotation. The results suggest that it is possible to extract the relativistic star's parameters from the observed gravitational wave spectrum.

  14. A numerical approach for approximating the historical morphology of wave-dominated coasts—A case study of the Pomeranian Bight, southern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junjie; Zhang, Wenyan; Harff, Jan; Schneider, Ralf; Dudzinska-Nowak, Joanna; Terefenko, Pawel; Giza, Andrzej; Furmanczyk, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    Comparison between historical maps from the 1900s, 1980s and a modern map from the 2000s of the Pomeranian Bight at the southern Baltic Sea indicates that a major part of the coastline has been suffering continuous erosion. This also holds for a major part of other coasts on a global scale. Quantifying coastal geomorphological changes on a decadal-to-centennial temporal scale thus needs to be intensified for coastal protection activities and integrated coastal zone management. This study applies an estimation of sediment mass balance including the investigation of sediment source-to-sink transport. In the case of absent historical survey data, a numerical approach, namely the Dynamic Equilibrium Shore Model (DESM), is developed to approximate the historical morphology and to estimate sediment budget of wave-dominated coasts based on the information of historical coastline configuration derived from maps, a high-resolution modern Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and relative sea-level change. The basic concept of the model is a dynamic equilibrium of the coastal cross-shore profiles adapting to sediment mass balancing of a semi-enclosed coastal area, in which the unknown parameters of the cross-shore profile shapes are calculated by numerical iterations. The model is applied at the Pomeranian Bight, in order to validate its capability in reflecting the pattern of bed level change and estimating sediment mass volume. Two tests of the model are conducted in approximating historical DEMs in 1980s and ca. 1900. The changes of approximated DEMs from past to present are then respectively compared with the ones derived from a nautical sea chart in 1980s, and the ones produced by a complex morphodynamic model that uses the approximated DEM at ca. 1900 as a starting point to hindcast the coastal morphological evolution of the research area. The deposition/erosion patterns along the coastline are consistent in both comparisons. The pre-conditions and limitations of the model are

  15. Development of a Single Station 6C-Approach for Array Analysis and Microzonation: Using Vertical Rotation Rate to Estimate Love-Wave Disperion Curves and Direction Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, J. M.; Wietek, A.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.

    2014-12-01

    Microzonation, i.e. the estimation of (shear) wave velocity profiles of the upper few 100m in dense 2D surface grids is one of the key methods to understand the variation in seismic hazard caused by ground shaking events. In this presentation we introduce a novel method for estimating the Love-wave phase velocity dispersion by using ambient noise recordings. We use the vertical component of rotational motions inherently present in ambient noise and the well established relation to simultaneous recordings of transverse acceleration. In this relation the frequency dependent phase velocity of a plane SH (or Love)-type wave acts as a proportionality factor between the anti-correlated amplitudes of both measures. In a first step we used synthetic data sets with increasing complexity to evaluate the proposed technique and the developed algorithm to extract the direction and amplitude of the incoming ambient noise wavefield measured at a single site. Since reliable weak rotational motion sensors are not yet readily available, we apply array derived rotation measurements in order to test our method. We next use the technique to analyze different real data sets of ambient noise measurements as well as seismic recordings at active volcanoes and compare these results with findings of the Spatial AutoCorrelation technique which was applied to the same data set. We demonstrate that the newly developed technique shows comparable results to more classical, strictly array based methods. Furthermore, we show that as soon as portable weak motion rotational motion sensors are available, a single 6C-station approach will be feasible, not only for microzonation but also for general array applications, with performance comparable to more classical techniques. An important advantage, especially in urban environments, is that with this approach, the number of seismic stations needed is drastically reduced.

  16. Self-similar solution of cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic unsteady flow behind a strong cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas, which has a variable azimuthal fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity. The experimental studies and astrophysical observations show that the outer atmosphere of the planets rotates due to rotation of the planets. Macroscopic motion with supersonic speed occurs in an interplanetary atmosphere and shock waves are generated. Thus rotation of planets or stars significantly affect the process taking place in their outer layers, therefore question connected with the explosions in rotating gas atmospheres are of definite astrophysical interest. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The shock Mach number is not infinite, but has a finite value. The azimuthal and axial component of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws, and the density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. Effects of the variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  17. Self-similar Solution of a Cylindrical Shock Wave under the Action of Monochromatic Radiation in a Rotational Axisymmetric Dusty Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Sahu, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    A self-similar flow behind a cylindrical shock wave is studied under the action of monochromatic radiation in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas. The dusty gas is taken to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas, and solid particles are continuously distributed in the mixture. The similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of the variation of the radiation parameter, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the index for the time dependent energy law are investigated. It is observed that an increase in the radiation parameter has decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas the shock strength increases with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas or the index for the time dependent energy law. Also, it is found that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables except the density and the azimuthal component of fluid velocity. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  18. Triplet pair amplitude in a trapped s -wave superfluid Fermi gas with broken spin rotation symmetry. II. Three-dimensional continuum case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inotani, Daisuke; Hanai, Ryo; Ohashi, Yoji

    2016-10-01

    We extend our recent work [Y. Endo et al., Phys. Rev. A 92, 023610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.023610 for a parity-mixing effect in a model of two-dimensional lattice fermions to a realistic three-dimensional ultracold Fermi gas. Including effects of broken local spatial inversion symmetry by a trap potential within the framework of the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory at T =0 , we point out that an odd-parity p -wave Cooper-pair amplitude is expected to have already been realized in previous experiments on an (even-parity) s -wave superfluid Fermi gas with spin imbalance. This indicates that when one suddenly changes the s -wave pairing interaction to an appropriate p -wave one by using a Feshbach technique in this case, a nonvanishing p -wave superfluid order parameter is immediately obtained, which is given by the product of the p -wave interaction and the p -wave pair amplitude that has already been induced in the spin-imbalanced s -wave superfluid Fermi gas. Thus, by definition, the system is in the p -wave superfluid state, at least just after this manipulation. Since the achievement of a p -wave superfluid state is one of the most exciting challenges in cold Fermi gas physics, our results may provide an alternative approach to this unconventional pairing state. In addition, since the parity-mixing effect cannot be explained as far as one deals with a trap potential in the local density approximation (LDA), it is considered as a crucial example which requires us to go beyond the LDA.

  19. Millimeter Wave Spectra of the Internal Rotation Excited States of (o)H_2-H_2O and (o)H_2-D_2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Iwasaki, Y.; Giesen, T.; Tanaka, K.

    2013-06-01

    H_2-H_2O is a weakly bound complex and it has a various states according to the internal rotation for both H_2 and H_2O moieties. In our previous study, we have reported the pure rotational transitions of the (o)H_2 complex in the ground H_2O rotational state, 0_{00}(Σ), for both H_2-H_2O and H_2-D_2O, where (o)H_2 (j_{ H2} =1) is rotating perpendicular to the intermolecular axis to give the projection of j_{ H2} to the axis k_{ H2} to be zero (i.e. Σ state). In the present study, we have observed the rotational transitions for the 0_{00} (Π) states in the millimeter-wave region up to 220 GHz, where the (o)H_2 is rotating around the intermolecular axis to give the projection k_{ H2} to be one (i.e. Π state). The center of mass bond lengths derived from the observed rotational constants for 0_{00} (Π) are longer by 5 % than those for 0_{00} (Σ), while force constants for the intermolecular stretching for 0_{00} (Π) derived from centrifugal distortion constants are smaller by 23 % than those for 0_{00} (Σ), suggesting the Π and Σ substates have quite different structures. The recent theoretical calculation indicates that for 0_{00}(Σ), (o)H_2 is bound to the oxygen site of H_2O, while for the 0_{00} (Π) state, (o)H_2 to the hydrogen site of H_2O, and the 0_{00}(Σ) state is by 14 cm^{-1} more stable than the 0_{00} (Π) state. Observed molecular constants for 0_{00}(Σ) and (Π) are consistent with the structures given by the theoretical calculation. We also observed the rotational spectrum in the 1_{01} (Σ) and (Π) states, where Σ and Π correspond to the rotation of H_2O perpendicular and parallel to the intermolecular axis and (o)H_2 is calculated to be bound to the oxygen site of H_2O. The energy difference between the 1_{01} (Σ) and (Π) states will be discussed due to the Criolis interaction between these substates. C. J. Whitham, K. Tanaka, and K. Harada, The 56th OSU Symposium, RD08 (2001). Ad. van der Avoid and D. J. Nesbit, J. Chem. Phys

  20. Vibrational and rotational transitions in low-energy electron-diatomic-molecule collisions. I - Close-coupling theory in the moving body-fixed frame. II - Hybrid theory and close-coupling theory: An /l subscript z-prime/-conserving close-coupling approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. H.; Poe, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed vibrational-rotational (V-R) close-coupling formulation of electron-diatomic-molecule scattering is developed in which the target molecular axis is chosen to be the z-axis and the resulting coupled differential equation is solved in the moving body-fixed frame throughout the entire interaction region. The coupled differential equation and asymptotic boundary conditions in the body-fixed frame are given for each parity, and procedures are outlined for evaluating V-R transition cross sections on the basis of the body-fixed transition and reactance matrix elements. Conditions are discussed for obtaining identical results from the space-fixed and body-fixed formulations in the case where a finite truncated basis set is used. The hybrid theory of Chandra and Temkin (1976) is then reformulated, relevant expressions and formulas for the simultaneous V-R transitions of the hybrid theory are obtained in the same forms as those of the V-R close-coupling theory, and distorted-wave Born-approximation expressions for the cross sections of the hybrid theory are presented. A close-coupling approximation that conserves the internuclear axis component of the incident electronic angular momentum (l subscript z-prime) is derived from the V-R close-coupling formulation in the moving body-fixed frame.

  1. Vibrational and rotational transitions in low-energy electron-diatomic-molecule collisions. I - Close-coupling theory in the moving body-fixed frame. II - Hybrid theory and close-coupling theory: An /l subscript z-prime/-conserving close-coupling approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. H.; Poe, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed vibrational-rotational (V-R) close-coupling formulation of electron-diatomic-molecule scattering is developed in which the target molecular axis is chosen to be the z-axis and the resulting coupled differential equation is solved in the moving body-fixed frame throughout the entire interaction region. The coupled differential equation and asymptotic boundary conditions in the body-fixed frame are given for each parity, and procedures are outlined for evaluating V-R transition cross sections on the basis of the body-fixed transition and reactance matrix elements. Conditions are discussed for obtaining identical results from the space-fixed and body-fixed formulations in the case where a finite truncated basis set is used. The hybrid theory of Chandra and Temkin (1976) is then reformulated, relevant expressions and formulas for the simultaneous V-R transitions of the hybrid theory are obtained in the same forms as those of the V-R close-coupling theory, and distorted-wave Born-approximation expressions for the cross sections of the hybrid theory are presented. A close-coupling approximation that conserves the internuclear axis component of the incident electronic angular momentum (l subscript z-prime) is derived from the V-R close-coupling formulation in the moving body-fixed frame.

  2. Square-wave switching in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with polarization-rotated optical feedback: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukow, David W.; Gilfillan, Taylor; Pope, Brenton; Torre, Maria S.; Gavrielides, Athanasios; Masoller, Cristina

    2012-09-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with polarization-rotated (PR) optical feedback, such that the natural lasing polarization of a VCSEL is rotated by 90 deg and then is reinjected into the laser. We observe noisy, square-wave-like polarization switchings with periodicity slightly longer than twice the delay time, which degrade to (or alternate with) bursts of irregular oscillations. We present results of simulations that are in good agreement with the observations. The simulations demonstrate that close to threshold the regular switching is very sensitive to noise, while well above threshold is less affected by the noise strength. The frequency splitting between the two polarizations plays a key role in the switching regularity, and we identify wide parameter regions where deterministic and robust switching can be observed.

  3. Finite difference modeling of ultrasonic propagation (coda waves) in digital porous cores with un-split convolutional PML and rotated staggered grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Luxin; Wei, Wei; Guan, Xizhu

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in heterogeneous porous cores under laboratory studies is an extremely complex process involved with strong scattering by microscale heterogeneous structures. The resulting coda waves, as an index to measure scattering attenuation, are recorded as continuous waveforms in the tail portion of wavetrains. Because of the contamination of reflections from the side ends and reverberations between the sample surfaces, it is difficult to extract pure coda waves from ultrasonic measurements for the estimation of the P- and S-coda attenuation quality factors. Comparisons of numerical and experimental ultrasonic wave propagation in heterogeneous porous cores can give important insight into understanding the effect of boundary reflections on the P- and S-codas in the laboratory experiment. It challenges numerical modeling techniques by three major issues: the creation of a digital core model to map heterogeneous rock properties in detail, the perfect simulation with a controllable and accurate absorbing boundary, and overcoming the numerical dispersions resulting from high-frequency propagation and strong heterogeneity in material. A rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method of Biot's poroelastic equations is presented with an unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary to simulate poroelastic wave propagation in isotropic and fluid-saturated porous media. The contamination of boundary reflections on coda waves is controlled by the CPML absorbing coefficients for the comparison between numerical and experimental ultrasonic waveforms. Numerical examples with a digital porous core demonstrate that the boundary reflections contaminate coda waves seriously, causing much larger coda quality factors and thus underestimating scattering attenuation.

  4. The discrete dipole approximation with surface interaction for evanescent wave-based characterization of nanostructures on a surface with validation against experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Mitchell R.

    Nanotechnology has become so widely used it can be found in every aspect of life, from cell-phones and computers, to cars, and even athletic socks. As it permeates so many markets, the need for supplemental technologies has also increased. One such needed technology is in the area of nanoscale characterization. Current imaging methods are advanced; however, they do not have the capabilities to characterize the size, shape, composition, and arrangement of nanostructures and nanoparticles in a real-time, unobtrusive manner. The Polarized-Surface-Wave-Scattering system (PSWSS) is a method being researched at the University of Utah that can provide such characterization, although in order for the PSWSS to function accurately through inversion techniques, a predictive forward model must be developed and validated. This work explores the discrete dipole approximation with surface interaction (DDA-SI), an open source MATLAB toolbox, as a predictive model to calculate electromagnetic scattering by objects on a surface illuminated by an evanescent wave generated by total internal reflection (TIR). Far-field scattering predictions via DDA-SI are validated against scaled microwave experimental results for two objects on a surface: a sphere with a diameter of lambda/1.92 and a cube with a side length of lambda/1.785, where lambda refers to the wavelength. A good agreement between experiments and simulations is observed, especially when modified Fresnel reflection coefficients are employed by DDA-SI. Programs to calculate the amplitude scattering matrix and Mueller matrix elements have been also been created. Additionally, the sensitivity of four Mueller matrix elements (M11, M12, M21, and M22) to the particle size, material (gold and silver), shape (sphere and cube), and interparticle spacing, is analyzed. It is found that these four elements are sensitive to changes in shape and interparticle spacing, whereas prove insufficient to difference in material and sizes smaller than

  5. An investigation of a wave-amplitude vacillation using a light-speckle velocity measuring technique. [in thermally driven rotating annular flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A novel form of streak photography based on a light-speckle technique has been used to investigate wave-amplitude vacillation in a thermally driven rotating cylindrical annulus of fluid. The technique is evaluated and found to be an excellent way to measure a 2-dimensional field of velocity without introducing probes into the fluid. The results are compared with previous work with the exception that the kinetic energy is significantly higher. The relation between eddy and mean motion, momentum transport, and period of the vacillation cycle appear similar in the two studies.

  6. Generation of FCC-compliant and background-free millimeter-wave ultrawideband signal based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Sun, Wen Hui; Liu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-05-05

    We propose a novel approach to generating millimeter-wave (MMW) ultrawideband (UWB) signal based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The MMW UWB signal is background-free by eliminating the baseband frequency components using an optical filter. The proposed scheme is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The generated MMW UWB signal centered at 25.5 GHz has a 10-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz from 22 to 29 GHz, which fully satisfies the spectral mask regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

  7. Communication: Creation of molecular vibrational motions via the rotation-vibration coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels E.

    2015-06-14

    Building on recent advances in the rotational excitation of molecules, we show how the effect of rotation-vibration coupling can be switched on in a controlled manner and how this coupling unfolds in real time after a pure rotational excitation. We present the first examination of the vibrational motions which can be induced via the rotation-vibration coupling after a pulsed rotational excitation. A time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation for the HF molecule shows how a slow (compared to the vibrational period) rotational excitation leads to a smooth increase in the average bond length whereas a fast rotational excitation leads to a non-stationary vibrational motion. As a result, under field-free postpulse conditions, either a stretched stationary bond or a vibrating bond can be created due to the coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The latter corresponds to a laser-induced breakdown of the adiabatic approximation for rotation-vibration coupling.

  8. Alterations of the Danger Zone after Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using WaveOne with Reverse Rotation or Reciprocation Movements

    PubMed Central

    Shantiaee, Yazdan; Dianat, Omid; Paymanpour, Payam; Nahvi, Golnaz; Ketabi, Mohammad Ali; Kolahi Ahari, Golbarg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the changes that occur in the danger zone (DZ) after preparation of curved mesiobuccal (MB) canals of mandibular first molars with WaveOne instruments in two different movements [reciprocation (RCP) and counter-clockwise rotation (CCWR)] by means of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: MB canals of 30 mandibular molars were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15); WaveOne/RCP and WaveOne/CCWR. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were assessed for changes in the dentin thickness in DZ (2 and 4 mm below the highest point of the root furcation) in both groups. Data was analyzed using the repeated measures ANOVA test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two experimental groups in terms of remaining dentin thickness at 2 and 4 mm levels below the highest point of the furcation (P>0.05). Conclusion: The efficacy of WaveOne instrument on changes of the dentin thickness in the DZ was not affected by different file movements. PMID:26213536

  9. An improved rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method with fourth-order temporal accuracy for elastic-wave modeling in anisotropic media

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Kai; Huang, Lianjie

    2017-08-31

    The rotated staggered-grid (RSG) finite-difference method is a powerful tool for elastic-wave modeling in 2D anisotropic media where the symmetry axes of anisotropy are not aligned with the coordinate axes. We develop an improved RSG scheme with fourth-order temporal accuracy to reduce the numerical dispersion associated with prolonged wave propagation or a large temporal step size. The high-order temporal accuracy is achieved by including high-order temporal derivatives, which can be converted to high-order spatial derivatives to reduce computational cost. Dispersion analysis and numerical tests show that our method exhibits very low temporal dispersion even with a large temporal step sizemore » for elastic-wave modeling in complex anisotropic media. Using the same temporal step size, our method is more accurate than the conventional RSG scheme. In conclusion, our improved RSG scheme is therefore suitable for prolonged modeling of elastic-wave propagation in 2D anisotropic media.« less

  10. Finite elements modelling of scattering problems for flexural waves in thin plates: Application to elliptic invisibility cloaks, rotators and the mirage effect

    SciTech Connect

    Farhat, M.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.

    2011-03-20

    We propose a finite elements algorithm to solve a fourth order partial differential equation governing the propagation of time-harmonic bending waves in thin elastic plates. Specially designed perfectly matched layers are implemented to deal with the infinite extent of the plates. These are deduced from a geometric transform in the biharmonic equation. To numerically illustrate the power of elastodynamic transformations, we analyze the elastic response of an elliptic invisibility cloak surrounding a clamped obstacle in the presence of a cylindrical excitation i.e. a concentrated point force. Elliptic cloaking for flexural waves involves a density and an orthotropic Young's modulus which depend on the radial and azimuthal positions, as deduced from a coordinates transformation for circular cloaks in the spirit of Pendry et al. [Science 312, 1780 (2006)], but with a further stretch of a coordinate axis. We find that a wave radiated by a concentrated point force located a couple of wavelengths away from the cloak is almost unperturbed in magnitude and in phase. However, when the point force lies within the coating, it seems to radiate from a shifted location. Finally, we emphasize the versatility of transformation elastodynamics with the design of an elliptic cloak which rotates the wavevector of a flexural wave within its core.

  11. Exact Steady Azimuthal Internal Waves in the f-Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Chu

    2017-03-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of the nonlinear governing equations with Coriolis and centripetal terms in the f-plane approximation for internal geophysical trapped waves with a uniform current near the equator. This solution describes in the Lagrangian framework azimuthal equatorial internal waves propagating westward in a stratified rotational fluid.

  12. Development and Applications of Magnetooptical Measurement System Equipped with a Rotational Resonant Cavity in the Millimeter-Wave Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Motoi; Koyama, Keiichi; Ohta, Hitoshi; Oshima, Yugo; Motokawa, Mitsuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kouichi; Ikemoto, Isao

    2005-07-01

    A rotational resonant cavity equipped with a millimeter vector network analyzer (MVNA) and a 14 T solenoid type superconducting magnet has been developed. The available frequency range is about 50-100 GHz. The temperature can decrease to 1.5 K. The cavity can rotate within the precision of one degree. As an example of the application of the new resonant cavity, we have performed detailed magnetooptical measurements of an organic conductor to estimate the Fermi surface topology. The Fermi surface of the quasi-one-dimensional conductor (DMET)2I3 is discussed.

  13. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  14. f- and r-modes of slowly rotating stars: New results in the linear treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirenti, C.; Skákala, J.; Yoshida, S.

    2014-09-01

    Newly born neutron stars can present differential rotation, even if later it should be suppressed by viscosity or a sufficiently strong magnetic field. In this early stage of its life, a neutron star is expected to have a strong emission of gravitational waves, which could be influenced by the differential rotation. We present here a new formalism for modelling differentially rotating neutron stars, working on the slow rotation approximation and assuming a small degree of differential rotation. After we establish our equilibrium model, we explore the influence of the differential rotation on the f and r-modes of oscillation of the neutron star in the Cowling approximation, and we also analyze an effect of the differential rotation on the emission of gravitational radiation from the f-modes. Based on results presented in Chirenti, C., Skákala, J., & Yoshida, S. 2013, Phys. Rev.D, 87, 044043.

  15. Fast and local non-linear evolution of steep wave-groups on deep water: A comparison of approximate models to fully non-linear simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, T. A. A.; Taylor, P. H.

    2016-01-15

    The non-linear Schrödinger equation and its higher order extensions are routinely used for analysis of extreme ocean waves. This paper compares the evolution of individual wave-packets modelled using non-linear Schrödinger type equations with packets modelled using fully non-linear potential flow models. The modified non-linear Schrödinger Equation accurately models the relatively large scale non-linear changes to the shape of wave-groups, with a dramatic contraction of the group along the mean propagation direction and a corresponding extension of the width of the wave-crests. In addition, as extreme wave form, there is a local non-linear contraction of the wave-group around the crest which leads to a localised broadening of the wave spectrum which the bandwidth limited non-linear Schrödinger Equations struggle to capture. This limitation occurs for waves of moderate steepness and a narrow underlying spectrum.

  16. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  17. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  18. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Klimachkov, D. A. Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-15

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  19. Magnetogasdynamics shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind a magnetogasdynamics cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric non ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat fluxes in presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assume to be varying and obeying power laws. In order to find the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is taken to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the presence of radiation and conduction, the non-idealness of the gas and the magnetic field on the shock propagation and the flow behind the shock are investigated.

  20. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525